Fishing Kayak recommendation

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Topic Author
TheOscarGuy
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TheOscarGuy » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:23 am

I am in market for a fishing kayak. I am just starting out looking at various options. Here is some more information on the application:
1. I am looking for a tandem kayak, I plan to fish with my kid (11 yrs. old).
2. I am not experienced kayaker; anything that is easy to use for beginners would be preferable.
3. I know there are options for kayaks -- sit in vs sit on kayaks. Is anyone better than the other with respect to fishing? I am guessing fishing kayaks need to be stable more than anything else, but have read that fishing is better with sit on top kayaks?
4. We will mostly be fishing in lakes. We are looking to reach more areas as right now its just shoreline fishing which is very restrictive.
5. We have a large SUV that can carry the kayak on top. We would also need some roof rack to carry it.
6. I love fishing as a hobby, so I would prefer a safe, but not too over the top expensive kayak. I am guessing I would need to spend close to $2000 for a kayak, and that is our budget.
7. I don't know if its a concern, but something that is easy to put on / get off the roof would be preferable. I know this is also a function of roof rack that holds the kayak.

Any help would be appreciated!

goshenBogle
Posts: 126
Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2011 6:12 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by goshenBogle » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:32 am

I would recommend SeaEagle inflatable kayaks. Take a look at 385fta FastTrack which is designed for fishing. You can get this for around $1000. I have a 385 and I love it. Easy to inflate - takes 10 minutes with a foot pump. No roof rack needed. Folds & fits in my SUV trunk.

David
Retired and loving it!!!!

harvestbook
Posts: 706
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2017 7:12 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by harvestbook » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:36 am

If he or she is 11, I would be thinking of getting two--it's hard to fish when you are piled up on one another and he will get older fast and probably want some independence. That also allows you to expand your fishing zone while still being "together." You should of course both wear life vests so it's still relatively safe, especially on a lake where the chance of tipping is low. I just use a regular sit-in kayak modified with two pole holders, on rivers, lakes, and intracoastal waters (would not use that in open sea). I think I spent $250 or so for a good used one from a local rafting company.
Last edited by harvestbook on Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
I'm not smart enough to know, and I can't afford to guess.

barnaclebob
Posts: 3969
Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:54 am

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by barnaclebob » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:37 am

What type of lake fishing will you be doing? Trolling for trout, casting while you drift along, moving around casting for bass? Catch and release or trying to fill your freezer with crappie?

My wife and I fish and crab the Puget sound from some nicer recreational sit in kayaks because thats what we had available. We were complete beginners and have no problems with stability (these kayaks are fairly wide). Pretty much any tandem sit on kayak can be modified for decent fishing by adding rod holdesr and will be easy to use. I'd recommend getting a longer one just so there is more room to move your rod around. As another poster suggested, I would consider getting an 11 year old their own kayak for small water fishing.

Most of the nicer fishing kayaks use foot drives because that's faster and leaves your hands free to fish. The tandem foot power kayaks look to be $2500+. Sit on kayaks are probably preferred for fishing due to the extra width and stability. Some of them are stable enough to stand on.

I'd avoid an inflatable fishing by myself let alone with a kid, too paranoid of getting a hook into the boat. They are slow too.

Finally buy it off craigslist.

sailaway
Posts: 780
Joined: Fri May 12, 2017 1:11 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by sailaway » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:51 am

I can not recommend the Hobie mirage drive enough. The kayaks are stable, being able to pedal extends your distance for most people and fishers tend to love the ability to move and use hands at the same time. I accidentally wave at other kayakers, which is kind of cruel, though.

There are a couple of other brands that have come up with pedalling systems, which would bring the cost down, but I haven't seen a tandem. Not that I have been looking.

mak1277
Posts: 1179
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:26 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by mak1277 » Fri Mar 15, 2019 11:15 am

I don't own one and have never used one, but have heard good things about Jackson kayaks. They have a wide range of fishing kayaks, many of which are under (some well under) $2k.

ThankYouJack
Posts: 3028
Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2014 7:27 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by ThankYouJack » Fri Mar 15, 2019 11:52 am

+1 on getting two separate kayaks. Or for fisting with two, you could also get a canoe and a small motor if you want to cover more ground and have more space for gear.

I have a tandem kayak and it quite heavy and takes all my strength to get on top of my SUV. It was actually given to me for free because it was too heavy for my friend to lift on top of his car. So that's something to keep in mind.

Topic Author
TheOscarGuy
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TheOscarGuy » Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:02 pm

sailaway wrote:
Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:51 am
I can not recommend the Hobie mirage drive enough. The kayaks are stable, being able to pedal extends your distance for most people and fishers tend to love the ability to move and use hands at the same time. I accidentally wave at other kayakers, which is kind of cruel, though.

There are a couple of other brands that have come up with pedalling systems, which would bring the cost down, but I haven't seen a tandem. Not that I have been looking.
I checked their literature online. I must say they are very nice kayaks. It does make sense to have hands free, as I plan to be fishing hopefully most of the time. They prices are a bit steep (I see everything in >3K or so range at local dealer) though.
barnaclebob wrote: What type of lake fishing will you be doing? Trolling for trout, casting while you drift along, moving around casting for bass? Catch and release or trying to fill your freezer with crappie?

My wife and I fish and crab the Puget sound from some nicer recreational sit in kayaks because thats what we had available. We were complete beginners and have no problems with stability (these kayaks are fairly wide). Pretty much any tandem sit on kayak can be modified for decent fishing by adding rod holdesr and will be easy to use. I'd recommend getting a longer one just so there is more room to move your rod around. As another poster suggested, I would consider getting an 11 year old their own kayak for small water fishing.

Most of the nicer fishing kayaks use foot drives because that's faster and leaves your hands free to fish. The tandem foot power kayaks look to be $2500+. Sit on kayaks are probably preferred for fishing due to the extra width and stability. Some of them are stable enough to stand on.

I'd avoid an inflatable fishing by myself let alone with a kid, too paranoid of getting a hook into the boat. They are slow too.

Finally buy it off craigslist.
We have mostly fished for bass and crappie. I think we will continue doing that. Never fished for trout. Yeah, I need to look at these foot drive kayaks as well, I am just worried that it is going to get costly quickly. I will check craigslist as well, thanks!

barnaclebob
Posts: 3969
Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:54 am

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by barnaclebob » Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:21 pm

TheOscarGuy wrote:
Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:02 pm
We have mostly fished for bass and crappie. I think we will continue doing that. Never fished for trout. Yeah, I need to look at these foot drive kayaks as well, I am just worried that it is going to get costly quickly. I will check craigslist as well, thanks!
Yeah Hobie kayaks aren't cheap and probably overkill for small/medium lake fishing. They are capable of full offshore fishing.

For bass and crappie fishing you should be able to find some basic beater sit ons. Bolt a rod holder or two and a box/milk crate behind the seat for your tackle box and you should be good to go. You should be able to get on the water for well under a grand if you don't go for the fancy stuff.

MI_bogle
Posts: 440
Joined: Mon Aug 01, 2016 3:56 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by MI_bogle » Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:35 pm

TheOscarGuy wrote:
Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:23 am
I am in market for a fishing kayak. I am just starting out looking at various options. Here is some more information on the application:
1. I am looking for a tandem kayak, I plan to fish with my kid (11 yrs. old).
Tandem kayaks can be good...but they are bigger, heavier, and your kid will quickly grow and may want to have their own at some point. Something to consider
2. I am not experienced kayaker; anything that is easy to use for beginners would be preferable.
All kayaks are pretty easy to use, much easier than canoes. If you are bass/crappie fishing, a canoe would be cheaper, lighter, and easier to put on your car (IMO)
3. I know there are options for kayaks -- sit in vs sit on kayaks. Is anyone better than the other with respect to fishing? I am guessing fishing kayaks need to be stable more than anything else, but have read that fishing is better with sit on top kayaks?

Sit on top all day long. They are safer (you can self-rescue if you tip over, because the boat doesn't fill with water) and they are typically more comfy and easier to fish out of, although there are some sit-ins made specifically for fishing now
4. We will mostly be fishing in lakes. We are looking to reach more areas as right now its just shoreline fishing which is very restrictive.
5. We have a large SUV that can carry the kayak on top. We would also need some roof rack to carry it.
some larger kayaks are much easier to carry on a trailer. but my opinion is that if you are getting a trailer for a 3K+ kayak, you might as well spend 2K for a used 12 or 14 foot jon boat with a 10 HP motor and a trailer!
6. I love fishing as a hobby, so I would prefer a safe, but not too over the top expensive kayak. I am guessing I would need to spend close to $2000 for a kayak, and that is our budget.
most fishing kayaks, especially tandems, are going to be pretty pricey
7. I don't know if its a concern, but something that is easy to put on / get off the roof would be preferable. I know this is also a function of roof rack that holds the kayak.

Tandem fishing kayaks are pretty heavy and might be tough to fit on top of the car with your 11 year old. I have a Jackson Cuda 12 (single person boat) and it's harder to put on top of a car than either of my canoes.
Any help would be appreciated!

Given that you are newbies and are fishing small waters for bass and crappie, I would consider getting 2 single person kayaks on the lower end of the spectrum in terms of cost/quality. They'll be a big upgrade over shore fishing, allow independence for your kid if they desire it

Might I suggest a Sun Dolphin (review here https://kayakingfisherman.com/sun-dolph ... op-review/)

It's cheap and lightweight. Easier to put on top of an SUV and the 11 year old could even carry it to the water themselves. 2 of these kayaks, 2 paddles, 2 good lifejackets (WEAR THEM 100% OF THE TIME!) and you are on the water fishing for 750-900 bucks depending how spendy you get on the paddles and PFDs

Topic Author
TheOscarGuy
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TheOscarGuy » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:09 pm

MI_bogle wrote:
Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:35 pm
I am in market for a fishing kayak. I am just starting out looking at various options. Here is some more information on the application:
1. I am looking for a tandem kayak, I plan to fish with my kid (11 yrs. old).
Tandem kayaks can be good...but they are bigger, heavier, and your kid will quickly grow and may want to have their own at some point. Something to consider
2. I am not experienced kayaker; anything that is easy to use for beginners would be preferable.
All kayaks are pretty easy to use, much easier than canoes. If you are bass/crappie fishing, a canoe would be cheaper, lighter, and easier to put on your car (IMO)
3. I know there are options for kayaks -- sit in vs sit on kayaks. Is anyone better than the other with respect to fishing? I am guessing fishing kayaks need to be stable more than anything else, but have read that fishing is better with sit on top kayaks?

Sit on top all day long. They are safer (you can self-rescue if you tip over, because the boat doesn't fill with water) and they are typically more comfy and easier to fish out of, although there are some sit-ins made specifically for fishing now
4. We will mostly be fishing in lakes. We are looking to reach more areas as right now its just shoreline fishing which is very restrictive.
5. We have a large SUV that can carry the kayak on top. We would also need some roof rack to carry it.
some larger kayaks are much easier to carry on a trailer. but my opinion is that if you are getting a trailer for a 3K+ kayak, you might as well spend 2K for a used 12 or 14 foot jon boat with a 10 HP motor and a trailer!
6. I love fishing as a hobby, so I would prefer a safe, but not too over the top expensive kayak. I am guessing I would need to spend close to $2000 for a kayak, and that is our budget.
most fishing kayaks, especially tandems, are going to be pretty pricey
7. I don't know if its a concern, but something that is easy to put on / get off the roof would be preferable. I know this is also a function of roof rack that holds the kayak.

Tandem fishing kayaks are pretty heavy and might be tough to fit on top of the car with your 11 year old. I have a Jackson Cuda 12 (single person boat) and it's harder to put on top of a car than either of my canoes.
Any help would be appreciated!

Given that you are newbies and are fishing small waters for bass and crappie, I would consider getting 2 single person kayaks on the lower end of the spectrum in terms of cost/quality. They'll be a big upgrade over shore fishing, allow independence for your kid if they desire it

Might I suggest a Sun Dolphin (review here https://kayakingfisherman.com/sun-dolph ... op-review/)

It's cheap and lightweight. Easier to put on top of an SUV and the 11 year old could even carry it to the water themselves. 2 of these kayaks, 2 paddles, 2 good lifejackets (WEAR THEM 100% OF THE TIME!) and you are on the water fishing for 750-900 bucks depending how spendy you get on the paddles and PFDs


Thank you for suggestions, especially the bit about tandem kayak being heavy. Yes, I guess it makes more sense to just let him have his own kayak. The foot pedal kayaks would definitely be helpful, I just am not sure I want to spend over 3 grand on those. Local craigslist is listing them at around 2K, so they still aren't that cheap.

Winnie
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2019 9:25 am

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by Winnie » Fri Mar 15, 2019 3:55 pm

You can investigate kayaks and equipment at paddling.net. They also have reviews. You might want to consider renting a couple of times to check out different brands. You might consider regular recreation boats vs fishing specific boats. Also, you will need to consider in your pricing the cost of PFDs, paddles, racks and/or trailers, and all the other accoutrements you will want.

vested1
Posts: 1833
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 4:20 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by vested1 » Fri Mar 15, 2019 3:55 pm

harvestbook wrote:
Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:36 am
If he or she is 11, I would be thinking of getting two--it's hard to fish when you are piled up on one another and he will get older fast and probably want some independence. That also allows you to expand your fishing zone while still being "together." You should of course both wear life vests so it's still relatively safe, especially on a lake where the chance of tipping is low. I just use a regular sit-in kayak modified with two pole holders, on rivers, lakes, and intracoastal waters (would not use that in open sea). I think I spent $250 or so for a good used one from a local rafting company.
+1

Two kayaks gives you a lot more flexibility for fishing. 11 year olds tend to get tangled a lot and assisting them from another kayak is much easier. Having a separate kayak for the 11 year old will also give them confidence. It also much more difficult to fish alone from a tandem kayak, so flexibility of use is more limited.

My wife and I have our own single kayaks and carry portable radios so we can stay in contact without shouting or if we decide to fish on our own. I mounted Scottie rod holders for hands free trolling and upgraded the seats. Fishing kayaks usually have a space between your legs with built in bungees that can secure your fishing tackle in one or two see through plastic boxes. There are also cup holders in various kayaks that will hold bottles of bait if that's your preference. We just paddle all day pulling a fly or a lure.

There's nothing like catching a trout on a kayak because you're sitting at water level when you're pulling them in, and when they get close they see you and freak out. I would buy a couple of fish friendly hand nets, especially if you do catch and release, like we do. It's also great to share the lake with osprey and bald eagles who will reluctantly put up with you invading their fishing grounds.

I have a 15' Ocean Kayak Prowler sit on top with no rudder and my wife has a 16' Wilderness Systems Tarpon 160i sit on top with a rudder. Each weighs about 60 pounds and both are carried on top of the camper shell. We only fish fresh water lakes. Fishing from a sit on top is far easier than from a sit inside. Your $2,000 budget would easily cover the costs of two of this quality level of kayaks. I would have an additional budget for good composite paddles and flotation vests that inflate if the wearer falls out and gets submerged. The life vests that inflate are much less restrictive and allow for a better range of motion. A good waterproof hat that blocks the sun down to your shoulders is a vital addition.

The longer the kayak the better it is for control in the wind and rougher seas. The shorter the kayak the better the maneuverability in tight spaces and a shorter turning radius. We prefer the longer kayaks for fishing because the shorter ones are more susceptible to spinning and being pushed by the wind.

User avatar
nativenewenglander
Posts: 151
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2017 6:05 am

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by nativenewenglander » Fri Mar 15, 2019 5:57 pm

My wife and I fish in a 15 foot canoe and have for 20 years. There are many brands made of kevlar or carbon fiber that are light and stable too. They are within your budget as well. I live in NH and this is one manufacturer here. https://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/boa/d ... 29547.html

3feetpete
Posts: 391
Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2014 7:30 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by 3feetpete » Fri Mar 15, 2019 7:03 pm

I agree with the comments about getting two instead of a tandem. The tandems are very heavy and you will be hooking each other by accident. Also lots of times the fish will go under the boat to the other side and you have to be able to pass the tip of the rod past the bow of the kayak. Most of the serious fishermen around me are going to the Hobies with their peddle drive. They are very fast and leave the hands free. But they are very expensive and I doubt you would be interested in that. I don't have any experience with the inflatables but I would expect they would tend to flex in the water which would make them rather hard to move along. The idea of not having to put on the roof is attractive though.

Most fishermen go with sit on top models. I go on the Chesapeake bay and I have a 13' Ocean Kayak Trident 13 which is totally set up for fishing including rod holders and even has a special spot for my fish finder. For lake fishing I would recommend a 10-12 foot sit on top kayak in order to save weight and cost. I like Ocean Kayaks and Wilderness. But really I think any that you can get a good price on would fill the bill.

For a rack I recommed Thule. You can go on their website and select one that fits your car. Get the one with the square cross bars. Get the longer cross bar and you can fit two kayaks side by side upside down on it. Get the outrigger option and loading the kayak becomes a one man job because you only have to handle half of the kayak at a time.

psy1
Posts: 100
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2019 1:40 am

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by psy1 » Fri Mar 15, 2019 7:10 pm

I suggest two used sit on top kayaks and a beater used canoe. Start cheap until you know what you want and know that your child will maintain interest. If you get just a tandem kayak, you won't be able to fish by yourself.

Sit in kayaks are a pain for fishing. They are uncomfortable for sitting long periods. They are better for cold weather though. Sit on tops potentially allow standing. They are much easier to enter and exit. They are better for swimming on hot days. They are better for gear hauling. You can strap on a small cooler for lunch. They are less tippy. You get the idea.

The canoe is nice for two people. You can get more gear in there, potentially even camp and fish. Also, good to develop paddling skills at a young age.

The Hobie's are great. I have a Native Titan with pedal drive. But they are also hogs that are difficult/impossible to car-top, over your budget, and no tandems.

malabargold
Posts: 582
Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2014 8:16 am

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by malabargold » Fri Mar 15, 2019 7:47 pm

For lakes think about a Wenonah Kevlar
square stern Bluegill canoe

About 25lbs, nice wide beam and the square stern
can take a trolling motor

vested1
Posts: 1833
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 4:20 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by vested1 » Sat Mar 16, 2019 8:07 am

Thumbs up on the canoe as well. We have a 16' Old Town Camper that weighs about 60 pounds. I've lowered the cane seats by changing out the dowels that attach the seats to the rails to add stability, and added kevlar with resin on the bottom of the bow and stern to protect the bottom when beaching. That canoe will carry 800 pounds, whereas kayaks have much less weight capacity. Canoes are more susceptible to being pushed around by the wind than kayaks however, and are far less stable.

For a serious fisherman, a kayak is a better choice than a canoe IMHO, although a canoe will allow you to face each other and interact while fishing.

Buford T Justice
Posts: 30
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2014 5:33 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by Buford T Justice » Sat Mar 16, 2019 8:44 am

2 kayaks and take plenty of day rentals until you feel comfortable with your purchase.

TBillT
Posts: 799
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2011 1:43 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TBillT » Sat Mar 16, 2019 11:06 am

I have a Wilderness Systems Tarpon 100 which Tarpon is a quintessential fishing kayak, for freshwater anyways. Fits in my minivan with all the seats down, so I do not usually mess with roof tie downs and weight is manageble at about 50-60 lbs.

But you need a longer 12 to 14-ft kayak if you want to go distances, because L/D ratio impacts boat ease of paddling.

I do not use my 17-ft Grumman canoe much anymore, because I would need a helper.

oldmotos
Posts: 56
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:37 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by oldmotos » Sat Mar 16, 2019 4:48 pm

I fish with my grandson on a Hydrobike Angler which is a water bicycle on 10' plastic pontoons, hydrobikes.com. Extremely stabile and easy to get on and off. I am also an investor in the company so a little biased.

chw
Posts: 712
Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 4:22 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by chw » Sat Mar 16, 2019 5:06 pm

Agree with others about skipping the tandem kayak for fishing. If you prefer to be in the same craft, perhaps consider a canoe. Fishing for 2 works better in a canoe, as easier to manuver your body for casting.

If you do look into fishing kayaks, I recommend Ocean kayaks sit on top style. Very stable, lighter than the Hobie, and easier to set up and go than the Hobie.

heyyou
Posts: 3572
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 4:58 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by heyyou » Sun Mar 17, 2019 2:37 am

Watch what others are using where you fish, and ask for their opinions. Always buy used, expecting a learning curve to find what does suit you better. Your first personal craft will likely not be your last one. Your kid will soon have less time for fishing, due to organized activities, while his increasing weight will change what type and size of personal boat fits.

Topic Author
TheOscarGuy
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TheOscarGuy » Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:10 am

chw wrote:
Sat Mar 16, 2019 5:06 pm
Agree with others about skipping the tandem kayak for fishing. If you prefer to be in the same craft, perhaps consider a canoe. Fishing for 2 works better in a canoe, as easier to manuver your body for casting.

If you do look into fishing kayaks, I recommend Ocean kayaks sit on top style. Very stable, lighter than the Hobie, and easier to set up and go than the Hobie.
Thank you. I am not sure if ocean kayaks are drive or not. I am thinking additional weight may not be an issue, as I have decided to get some sort of lift assist system to get it up on the roof of my vehicle. But I am definitely now sold on foot drive kayaks.

Topic Author
TheOscarGuy
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TheOscarGuy » Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:15 am

heyyou wrote:
Sun Mar 17, 2019 2:37 am
Watch what others are using where you fish, and ask for their opinions. Always buy used, expecting a learning curve to find what does suit you better. Your first personal craft will likely not be your last one. Your kid will soon have less time for fishing, due to organized activities, while his increasing weight will change what type and size of personal boat fits.
Thanks. Yes, I think that is a good suggestion. I am pretty much sold on having two kayaks as opposed to one, and also buying used and not new. We also plan to rent a bit prior to deciding which one we like best, rather than dropping too much money without first trying the kayak.

Topic Author
TheOscarGuy
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TheOscarGuy » Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:22 am

Buford T Justice wrote:
Sat Mar 16, 2019 8:44 am
2 kayaks and take plenty of day rentals until you feel comfortable with your purchase.
Yes, that is what we have in mind as well! Thanks.

nick evets
Posts: 248
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2017 5:40 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by nick evets » Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:35 am

I have 3 (down from 4) Hobie Mirage drive boats; for the coastal marshes and waters I fish they're a necessity when trying to position against wind and tide. One is an Oasis tandem and it works well with my wife and guests, and 'magically' dramatically increases their catching since I can position them, but two avid fishermen are going to want their own kayak.

Hobie's are expensive, and expensive even used/demo, no doubt. Hobie Inc. also annoyed me with various model year changes that make swapping drives, and seats between boats impossible, which annoys me, but IMO for a foot drive kayak, I wouldn't buy anything else.

That said, if you're fishing somewhat protected ponds and lakes, any good sit-on-top boat should be hugely enjoyable -- you should be able to find two decent used kayaks and paddles for ~$1500. Get the longest kayak you can reasonably handle -- tracking can be miserable in shorter boats. I'd also recommend a rudder system.

And, as another data point, my buddy used to drive around with his kayaks in the back of his SUV's with the rear seats down and the tail-gate up. No roof-rack needed, and when he went to a longer boat (Hobie Adventure), he used a bed extender. (I use one too, with my pickup truck: similar to https://www.amazon.com/Boonedox-T-Bone- ... B075NRMV49). I'm not necessarily advocating this method of transport, and would always keep my windows open, but for < 30 minutes on rural roads, worked fine for him. <shrug>

Topic Author
TheOscarGuy
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TheOscarGuy » Mon Mar 18, 2019 6:57 am

nick evets wrote:
Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:35 am
I have 3 (down from 4) Hobie Mirage drive boats; for the coastal marshes and waters I fish they're a necessity when trying to position against wind and tide. One is an Oasis tandem and it works well with my wife and guests, and 'magically' dramatically increases their catching since I can position them, but two avid fishermen are going to want their own kayak.

Hobie's are expensive, and expensive even used/demo, no doubt. Hobie Inc. also annoyed me with various model year changes that make swapping drives, and seats between boats impossible, which annoys me, but IMO for a foot drive kayak, I wouldn't buy anything else.

That said, if you're fishing somewhat protected ponds and lakes, any good sit-on-top boat should be hugely enjoyable -- you should be able to find two decent used kayaks and paddles for ~$1500. Get the longest kayak you can reasonably handle -- tracking can be miserable in shorter boats. I'd also recommend a rudder system.

And, as another data point, my buddy used to drive around with his kayaks in the back of his SUV's with the rear seats down and the tail-gate up. No roof-rack needed, and when he went to a longer boat (Hobie Adventure), he used a bed extender. (I use one too, with my pickup truck: similar to https://www.amazon.com/Boonedox-T-Bone- ... B075NRMV49). I'm not necessarily advocating this method of transport, and would always keep my windows open, but for < 30 minutes on rural roads, worked fine for him. <shrug>
I have been looking at Hobies and they are I must say really nice. I am leaning towards outback for myself, and either a sport or a compass for my kid. I am concerned about having two kayaks side by side on two sets of hullavator pros might be too much if both are heavy and 34", so it is likely that sport is better option there. None of this though can happen immediately, as I need to wait till I can get them used which takes time and patience (and I am prepared to wait). I also want to make sure we use these a lot over summer (renting), so we really are comfortable with them.
I am sure my 2K budget is out of window, even used!

Creditcardguy
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri May 25, 2018 7:23 am

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by Creditcardguy » Mon Mar 18, 2019 7:26 am

I’ve fished in the tandem Hobie Mirage and it was great. The gears are made for saltwater as well. Layout is good for fishing. But they’re expensive. For fun, I just checked craigslist and there is one for $1600 in Madison, MS, about half price I think. They’re all used once they hit the water, check craigslist.

nick evets
Posts: 248
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2017 5:40 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by nick evets » Mon Mar 18, 2019 9:20 am

TheOscarGuy wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 6:57 am
[I am leaning towards outback for myself, and either a sport or a compass for my kid.
I would *not* get the Sport -- it's too short, too slow and more of a recreational water toy-thing than a serious fishing kayak. The Outback is great, however, and probably my all-around favorite boat in their fleet: it's slower than the Revo's but very stable. I can even stand up in mine, if it's not too rough. It's also drier, since it tends to float on top of the chop than slice through, like the other hull designs.

IMO, I'd try to find a used Outback (for yourself) and get your son any decent used SOT boat ~14'. As he gets older he can use your Outback if you're not fishing, while you look for another used one.

I still think you could stack the boats on top of each other and slide them right into the back of your SUV and leave the gate up.

Topic Author
TheOscarGuy
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TheOscarGuy » Mon Mar 18, 2019 9:50 am

nick evets wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 9:20 am
TheOscarGuy wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 6:57 am
[I am leaning towards outback for myself, and either a sport or a compass for my kid.
I would *not* get the Sport -- it's too short, too slow and more of a recreational water toy-thing than a serious fishing kayak. The Outback is great, however, and probably my all-around favorite boat in their fleet: it's slower than the Revo's but very stable. I can even stand up in mine, if it's not too rough. It's also drier, since it tends to float on top of the chop than slice through, like the other hull designs.

IMO, I'd try to find a used Outback (for yourself) and get your son any decent used SOT boat ~14'. As he gets older he can use your Outback if you're not fishing, while you look for another used one.

I still think you could stack the boats on top of each other and slide them right into the back of your SUV and leave the gate up.
I never thought of keeping it inside (maybe one may go in) the SUV. that might work, I have to see if I have enough space to keep back hatch open and slide it in there (or keep the door open). Thanks for that.

The only reason why I am considering those alternatives (or maybe revo 11) is the two kayak weight and width combo. Thule says that max. cross bars it has for my SUV are 60", and I am guessing total side by side width of two outbacks (68") may be too much. I know hullavator stands out a bit, but after watching some youtube videos, I am not convinced I can get them there side by side. Add to that, I am also concerned about the total weight of kayaks and two sets of hullavators on my vehicle.

The way I see it, outback can be on hullavator, while the other can be on its side (J bar). And since I have to lug it on a tall SUV it better be something I can manage by myself! I hope to also take these kayaks on longer trips, so keeping them inside the SUV may work for close by trips, but not for longer trips I am afraid.

I am actively looking on CL. Maybe due to it being almost spring but either folks are asking too much, or they are trying to sell me a whole lot of accessories that I don't necessarily need along with the kayak. But I am going to be patient and keep looking :happy

bhsince87
Posts: 2579
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 1:08 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by bhsince87 » Mon Mar 18, 2019 11:45 am

Book marking for future personal use.

Thanks!
"If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace." Samuel Adams

open_circuit
Posts: 276
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2017 9:20 am

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by open_circuit » Mon Mar 18, 2019 11:53 am

Going to throw out a completely different opinion than most here -- small, inexpensive, light, and easy to store. Intex makes some inflatable kayaks that can be purchased for ~$75. Look up the Intex Explorer K2. These can accommodate one or two persons, and are extremely portable. If you just want a kayak for occasional use, it may serve your needs quite well. We own two, but do not fish out of them.

If you are going to use the kayak frequently, get something that is not inflatable and save yourself the setup and tear down time. If you plan to use it a couple times each year, consider an inflatable (either a cheap one like the Intex or a nice one like the SeaEagle).

Topic Author
TheOscarGuy
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TheOscarGuy » Mon Mar 18, 2019 12:02 pm

open_circuit wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 11:53 am
Going to throw out a completely different opinion than most here -- small, inexpensive, light, and easy to store. Intex makes some inflatable kayaks that can be purchased for ~$75. Look up the Intex Explorer K2. These can accommodate one or two persons, and are extremely portable. If you just want a kayak for occasional use, it may serve your needs quite well. We own two, but do not fish out of them.

If you are going to use the kayak frequently, get something that is not inflatable and save yourself the setup and tear down time. If you plan to use it a couple times each year, consider an inflatable (either a cheap one like the Intex or a nice one like the SeaEagle).
We fish a lot during summer. Inflatable might be just too much hassle. Plus with a kid I would be concerned about leaks due to hooks etc. Too much that can go wrong, in my mind.

Creditcardguy
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri May 25, 2018 7:23 am

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by Creditcardguy » Mon Mar 18, 2019 12:18 pm

I actually have the Explorer K2 at the condo in Fort Walton Beach. Use in the Gulf and the bays. It’s stable, fairly rugged, the pump that comes with it is excellent, and we have a great time in it. Even the paddles are decent. Deflates easily for storage and transport. Just in case anyone wants to try one out for under $100...

wolf359
Posts: 1881
Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2015 8:47 am

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by wolf359 » Mon Mar 18, 2019 12:28 pm

If you're a beginner, and not sure what to get, then rent. Develop a preference between the different options before you buy.

I fished a lot with my kids before they turned 12. After 12, they developed interests in organized sports.

Have you actually fished in a tandem fishing kayak with your kids? Does it work well? With my kids, I couldn't assist them if required, because we couldn't move around (or turn around) if the fish were big, or a pole needed to be untangled. In that case, a canoe worked better.

My older child didn't need/want assistance, but also preferred to be in a separate kayak.

Each personality is different. Try before you buy.

Also check out the pedal kayaks. They're hands-free and some have a more stable platform (you can stand up on some models!) The drawback is the weight.

Buy used. Keep your costs down, especially if the kids might not stay with it.

nick evets
Posts: 248
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2017 5:40 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by nick evets » Mon Mar 18, 2019 12:31 pm

TheOscarGuy wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 9:50 am

I never thought of keeping it inside (maybe one may go in) the SUV. that might work, I have to see if I have enough space to keep back hatch open and slide it in there (or keep the door open). Thanks for that.

The only reason why I am considering those alternatives (or maybe revo 11) is the two kayak weight and width combo.
I had and sold the Revo11. Of mine, it was my least favorite -- just TOO small, as I'm 6'2" -- but otherwise was a nice boat and had some advantages in terms of size and weight; I think that would make a nice second option if you're determined to get two peddle yaks. It's far more a fishing kayak than the 'Sport' though.

For transport, any chance you can move laterally to a pickup truck? With the tailgate down, I carry my OB and (used to) Revo11 just fine w/out needing the hitch extender T-bar, and can load/unload a boat in a literally under 1 min, by myself. Of all the options, I'd put a truck as #1, with a trailer as second best (unless you have > 2 kayaks) and roof system as a very distance 3rd choice.

researcher
Posts: 1166
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2015 7:05 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by researcher » Mon Mar 18, 2019 12:31 pm

TheOscarGuy wrote:
Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:15 am
I am pretty much sold on having two kayaks as opposed to one, and also buying used and not new.
I'm curious why you are sold on having two kayaks versus a single canoe.
Given what you've described...father and 11 yr old son fishing on lakes for bass/crappie...a canoe would be far superior.

I'm picturing your 11 yr old son doing all of this by himself...
- Propelling/maneuvering the kayak + maintaining position in a good fishing spot + casting lures + landing/unhooking fish+ changing/retying lures. Then try doing all of this when there is a decent wind/breeze.
- It may get tiresome fairly quickly for an 11 yr old, possibly taking the fun out of fishing.

Contrast this with a canoe...
- He can learn how to paddle/maneuver a canoe, but then also focus on fishing: You can paddle & maintain position while he is trying to 'catch the big one', help him land/unhook the fish, help him with lures, deal with the wind, ect.
- He has a much greater range of movement in a canoe, making it easier to fish/cast/ect.
- There is a single tackle box and cooler readily accessible to both of you, and more room to put your rods/paddles/gear/ect.
- Most importantly, you are always within a few feet from him: To talk, teach, learn, help out, encourage.

The primary point of this experience is to have fun and bond with your son. At this age, I think that is done better in a canoe. Plus, if you ever had another kid or want to take someone else along (wife, cousin, friend), you can do that in a canoe.

JRA
Posts: 191
Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2007 3:29 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by JRA » Mon Mar 18, 2019 2:56 pm

I would not recommend a tandem for fishing. I have a 12' Native Ultima (a fast and maneuverable hybrid) and a 12' Jackson Coosa (a sit-on-top). Either one is excellent for class I and II water and inshore fishing. There are lots of good choices for fishing kayaks, but I would strongly recommend that you get one that is designed for fishing (you can still use it as a general recreational kayak) and that you don't get a low end model. You will soon regret not getting a better performing kayak and will probably want to trade up (but probably at a significant loss). It is always a good idea to "try before you buy." A lot of dealers have "paddle days" where you can try out a number of different kayaks. the pedal drive models are nice but better suited for flat water. Personally, I think a kayak is generally not the best fishing platform even if you get one that is stable enough on which to stand. A better option might be to hire a fishing guide who uses kayaks and decide if you really like fishing out of them. I much prefer a small jon or skiff to a kayak.

Topic Author
TheOscarGuy
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TheOscarGuy » Mon Mar 18, 2019 3:32 pm

researcher wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 12:31 pm
TheOscarGuy wrote:
Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:15 am
I am pretty much sold on having two kayaks as opposed to one, and also buying used and not new.
I'm curious why you are sold on having two kayaks versus a single canoe.
Given what you've described...father and 11 yr old son fishing on lakes for bass/crappie...a canoe would be far superior.

I'm picturing your 11 yr old son doing all of this by himself...
- Propelling/maneuvering the kayak + maintaining position in a good fishing spot + casting lures + landing/unhooking fish+ changing/retying lures. Then try doing all of this when there is a decent wind/breeze.
- It may get tiresome fairly quickly for an 11 yr old, possibly taking the fun out of fishing.

Contrast this with a canoe...
- He can learn how to paddle/maneuver a canoe, but then also focus on fishing: You can paddle & maintain position while he is trying to 'catch the big one', help him land/unhook the fish, help him with lures, deal with the wind, ect.
- He has a much greater range of movement in a canoe, making it easier to fish/cast/ect.
- There is a single tackle box and cooler readily accessible to both of you, and more room to put your rods/paddles/gear/ect.
- Most importantly, you are always within a few feet from him: To talk, teach, learn, help out, encourage.

The primary point of this experience is to have fun and bond with your son. At this age, I think that is done better in a canoe. Plus, if you ever had another kid or want to take someone else along (wife, cousin, friend), you can do that in a canoe.
So I started out with that idea, (fishing together, not canoe) but got the feedback that (a) these tandem kayaks are a bit unwieldy, heavier, (b) more difficult to manage if I am on my own (c) once he grows a bit he will want his own. I must confess I did not consider canoe at all. My reasons: they are really big (not necessarily heavy, although they do get up there in terms of weight), difficult to car top which is a requirement for me (d) self-rescue seems easier with a sit on kayak than canoe.

researcher
Posts: 1166
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2015 7:05 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by researcher » Mon Mar 18, 2019 3:52 pm

TheOscarGuy wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 3:32 pm
I must confess I did not consider canoe at all. My reasons: they are really big (not necessarily heavy, although they do get up there in terms of weight), difficult to car top which is a requirement for me (d) self-rescue seems easier with a sit on kayak than canoe.
I started regularly fishing with my dad at about 7-8 years old. I've fished in many different types of watercraft (including all that you are considering). For an 11 year old kid, I would absolutely prefer a canoe over separate kayaks. In fact, as a grown man, I'd still prefer to fish with my dad from a canoe (which we still do). Everything about the canoe experience is better for me than 2 separate kayaks.

You mention that you have a "large SUV", so I assume you would be able to carry a canoe. They also make hitch extenders like this...
https://www.homedepot.com/p/TriCam-350- ... /204317805

nick evets
Posts: 248
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2017 5:40 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by nick evets » Mon Mar 18, 2019 6:48 pm

researcher wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 3:52 pm
Everything about the canoe experience is better for me than 2 separate kayaks.

You mention that you have a "large SUV", so I assume you would be able to carry a canoe. They also make hitch extenders like this...
https://www.homedepot.com/p/TriCam-350- ... /204317805
IME, SOT kayaks are much more comfortable and efficient fishing platforms than a canoe, and the foot-peddle Hobie's even more so. The problem with a canoe is that light, cheap ones are very unstable and uncomfortable. Large, heavy canoes are much less tippy, of course, but still kinda uncomfortable if you're trying to fish a shoreline and really susceptible to wind, and a handful for a single person to maneuver, and load, and carry.

I've also plowed through chop in my kayaks I wouldn't dream of taking a canoe into. It's all personal preference -- a canoe can certainly work as well. I just have been fishing Hobie's since 2010, and *prefer* using them quite often to my center-console fishing boat. There's something very intimate about fishing in a kayak, not to mention the fun of a 'Nantucket Sleigh Ride' when a mature red drum gets annoyed at being hooked! :)

But OP should find out for himself, I agree.

il0kin
Posts: 260
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2018 8:19 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by il0kin » Mon Mar 18, 2019 9:55 pm

Bass Pro/Cabelas Ascend 10T are rock solid and well reviewed. You definitely want a sit on top kayak for angling, 100%

But...

A 1448 Jon boat with a 9.9 or 15 HP motor is going to be much more pleasant to fish from together, with more room for both of you. If you have the room to store it, you can easily get set up for around $2000. This will also allow you to safely fish when the water is colder with less concerns about a rollover in the kayaks (not if, when -- ask me how I know :D )

forgeblast
Posts: 319
Joined: Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:45 am
Location: PA
Contact:

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by forgeblast » Tue Mar 19, 2019 6:38 am

TheOscarGuy wrote:
Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:23 am
I am in market for a fishing kayak. I am just starting out looking at various options. Here is some more information on the application:
1. I am looking for a tandem kayak, I plan to fish with my kid (11 yrs. old).
2. I am not experienced kayaker; anything that is easy to use for beginners would be preferable.
3. I know there are options for kayaks -- sit in vs sit on kayaks. Is anyone better than the other with respect to fishing? I am guessing fishing kayaks need to be stable more than anything else, but have read that fishing is better with sit on top kayaks?
4. We will mostly be fishing in lakes. We are looking to reach more areas as right now its just shoreline fishing which is very restrictive.
5. We have a large SUV that can carry the kayak on top. We would also need some roof rack to carry it.
6. I love fishing as a hobby, so I would prefer a safe, but not too over the top expensive kayak. I am guessing I would need to spend close to $2000 for a kayak, and that is our budget.
7. I don't know if its a concern, but something that is easy to put on / get off the roof would be preferable. I know this is also a function of roof rack that holds the kayak.

Any help would be appreciated!
I fish a lot with my kiddo, when we go fishing we take our canoe. We have a wenoaha Kingfisher in royalex. The kevlar ones are a lot lighter (My next one will be kevlar), but this one is still easily movable byjust me. I find the stability and ability to put our fishing poles down, or bring a fish into the boat has saved me getting hooked a bunch of times. I think she was 6 when we started fishing out of the canoe and is 10 now.
We have kayaks too, we love to go out and go around in them even though i put fishing rod holders in them, its not the same sense of balance/control that we have in the canoe, so we do not fish out of them.
A tandem kayak I found can be a bear to turn. If your fishing out of them look at the different anchor systems available. The first time we went in our canoe the wind blew us all over because I forgot one at home.
$2000, will get you a lot of canoe/kayak. Dicks sporting goods has sales in the spring on entry level kayaks....the canoes if your looking at them are a bit heavy, search craigs list, or https://www.kayaktrader.com/ I used them to get my canoe. Also facebook marketplace.
Thule is the rack I see a lot of people use.
If you can, see if a state park will let you rent a kayak or canoe for a day, go out fish from them both, see what works.

User avatar
lthenderson
Posts: 4375
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 12:43 pm
Location: Iowa

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by lthenderson » Tue Mar 19, 2019 7:52 am

nick evets wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 6:48 pm
The problem with a canoe is that light, cheap ones are very unstable and uncomfortable. Large, heavy canoes are much less tippy, of course, but still kinda uncomfortable if you're trying to fish a shoreline and really susceptible to wind, and a handful for a single person to maneuver, and load, and carry.
Like all boats, there are different ones for different purposes. They make canoes that are specifically for fishing flat water. They have defined keels on the bottom which specifically make them much less tippy and they generally have much less above water line than say a whitewater canoe which will be the opposite on both points.

I have both a kayak and a canoe and I much prefer to take the canoe out fishing and I find it more comfortable than my kayak, especially with my seat with a backrest installed. I like having the options to switch my legs positions rather than having them stuck out in front of me at all times. Plus as someone mentioned above, they have a lot more storage capability and allow me to access all my gear easily. My canoe is kevlar which has a price premium but it weighs less than most cheap kayaks on the market these days.

User avatar
lthenderson
Posts: 4375
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 12:43 pm
Location: Iowa

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by lthenderson » Tue Mar 19, 2019 7:55 am

TheOscarGuy wrote:
Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:23 am
Any help would be appreciated!
Many boating places will allow you to take them for a spin. Personally I would try a canoe as well which I find much more preferable than trying to fish from a kayak especially on lakes, and most especially if you are launching from a dock versus shore. This can be the case on well developed lakes.

researcher
Posts: 1166
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2015 7:05 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by researcher » Tue Mar 19, 2019 8:19 am

nick evets wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 6:48 pm
IME, SOT kayaks are much more comfortable and efficient fishing platforms than a canoe, and the foot-peddle Hobie's even more so.

The problem with a canoe is that light, cheap ones are very unstable and uncomfortable. Large, heavy canoes are much less tippy, of course, but still kinda uncomfortable if you're trying to fish a shoreline and really susceptible to wind, and a handful for a single person to maneuver, and load, and carry.

There's something very intimate about fishing in a kayak...
I don't necessarily disagree that a SOT kayak is more efficient for a solo adult fisherman.
However, the OP is asking about the best craft for a father and 11 year old son.

Sticking an 11 year old in his own kayak to fend for himself is not the experience the OP is looking for.
A canoe is a far better father/son fishing platform.

Also, the OP has a $2000 budget. He can absolutely get a stable, comfortable, comparatively light canoe for that price.

Topic Author
TheOscarGuy
Posts: 938
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by TheOscarGuy » Tue Mar 19, 2019 10:41 am

lthenderson wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 7:55 am
TheOscarGuy wrote:
Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:23 am
Any help would be appreciated!
Many boating places will allow you to take them for a spin. Personally I would try a canoe as well which I find much more preferable than trying to fish from a kayak especially on lakes, and most especially if you are launching from a dock versus shore. This can be the case on well developed lakes.
Thats exactly what I plan to do. Once some of these dealers start allowing rentals (on water bodies next to the store) I plan to try out Hobie kayaks. I will also try canoe then!

researcher
Posts: 1166
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2015 7:05 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by researcher » Tue Mar 19, 2019 11:17 am

TheOscarGuy wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 10:41 am
Thats exactly what I plan to do. Once some of these dealers start allowing rentals (on water bodies next to the store) I plan to try out Hobie kayaks. I will also try canoe then!
Are these dealer trials you mention just a "test drive" or are they comprehensive rentals by the hour/half day/full day?

You don't need to rely on dealers to test out the kayak vs. canoe decision.
There are likely countless bodies of water around you that rent both kayaks and canoes.
I would pick two weekends back to back for you and your son to go fishing.
- The first weekend, do a half/full day kayak rental, and fish in it as if you owned it (bringing all of your gear along)
- The second weekend, do the same thing in a canoe, then decide which you like better.

When it comes to purchasing, I would highly recommend purchasing used from Craigslist/Facebook/ect versus new from a dealer. You'll pay a faction of the price of buying new with little/no downside.

vested1
Posts: 1833
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 4:20 pm

Re: Fishing Kayak recommendation

Post by vested1 » Tue Mar 19, 2019 1:03 pm

researcher wrote:
Tue Mar 19, 2019 8:19 am
nick evets wrote:
Mon Mar 18, 2019 6:48 pm
IME, SOT kayaks are much more comfortable and efficient fishing platforms than a canoe, and the foot-peddle Hobie's even more so.

The problem with a canoe is that light, cheap ones are very unstable and uncomfortable. Large, heavy canoes are much less tippy, of course, but still kinda uncomfortable if you're trying to fish a shoreline and really susceptible to wind, and a handful for a single person to maneuver, and load, and carry.

There's something very intimate about fishing in a kayak...
I don't necessarily disagree that a SOT kayak is more efficient for a solo adult fisherman.
However, the OP is asking about the best craft for a father and 11 year old son.

Sticking an 11 year old in his own kayak to fend for himself is not the experience the OP is looking for.
A canoe is a far better father/son fishing platform.

Also, the OP has a $2000 budget. He can absolutely get a stable, comfortable, comparatively light canoe for that price.
Just my own observation about fishing from a canoe vs a kayak. We've owned and fished from canoes for over 45 years, the first being fiberglass and wood, weighing 120 lbs. We've owned and fished from kayaks for about 20 years and much prefer that to fishing from a canoe, mainly due to the effect of wind. You can defeat the wind by dropping an anchor, but that will cause the canoe to spin unless the anchor is dropped from the extreme bow or stern. Any change in wind direction will cause an anchored canoe to spin, regardless. Paddling against the wind in a canoe will be a challenge, especially if the other occupant is an 11 year old. Anyone who has ever been on the far end of the lake in a canoe when the wind comes up and has to paddle against it to get back will testify to the added time and effort as compared to a kayak in the same conditions.

I agree that bringing a child fishing is best done from a canoe IF the child is younger than about 8 years old, but once they can paddle independently they will function better using a kayak to fish. We still love our current canoe and wouldn't part with it, but for the pure mechanics of fishing, a kayak is the way to go.

Post Reply