Button Down Shirts / Travel Pants / Light Jacket? Other Tips from experienced Boglehead world travelers?

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Capricorn51
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by Capricorn51 » Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:52 am

I've been very happy with Clothing Arts
https://www.clothingarts.com

Not "cheap", but durable. I have both the cargo and dress styles. Cargo is very comfy on planes, and dress style can very well be worn under a blazer. Lots of pockets with zippered compartments.

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Sandtrap
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by Sandtrap » Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:54 am

TN_Boy wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:38 am
Sandtrap wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:17 pm
Due to health, I have not travelled in several years.
Recently upgraded my passport, TSA Precheck, Travel ID, etc. ("newbie" ready to ride/fly).

Now packing for an upcoming trip, I've found that my assortment of travel pants have "shrunk" in storage. (that must be it) :shock:
Thus, I am on the hunt for new travel clothes.

Previously, nothing but Columbia long sleeve shirts, pants, and shorts.
Now needs a redo.

Slacks (casual, lightweight)
No iron, wrinkle free, minimum cotton (bulk and weight), elastic waist would help.
1 pair dress, 2 pairs casual?
*Really like the Columbia Men's "Global Adventurer" slacks but discontinued.

Long sleeve shirts (casual), wrinkle free, no cotton?
1 semi dress, 2 casual?

I only travel with a single carry-on so less bulk and weight is important.

Suggestions?

Retired newbie traveller.
mahalo,
j :D
Sandtrap,

Glad you are able to travel more again!

In addition to some of the brands mentioned, I like Railriders stuff -- they have excellent lightweight cargo pants (nylon) plus some nylon hiking pants I really like. Also their shirts. Drawback -- generally not available in retail stores, have to order (so mild guessing on sizes).

On an editorial note, some of the other responses were "don't look like an American tourist!" This viewpoint, frankly, leaves me laughing hard enough to injure myself. Unless you are wearing what the locals wear (in Paris, will you go for dark slim fit clothes?), look like the locals (how would you avoid looking like an American in Japan?), and speak the local language fluently with no accent, you will be identifiable as an American tourist from about 100 yards away. This is not a problem unless you are traveling in an area hostile to US citizens.

Even in Europe this is true. I mean, you are walking around in a European city, perhaps with a camera, possibly asking people for directions/suggestions/help .... trust me, they will know you are not from around there. Why this bothers some people bemuses me.

You want to travel light, so that will impact what clothes you can take; obviously all you can do is optimize for the expected weather and the amount of baggage you want to deal with.
Thanks for the help and taking the time to write all that.
The "Railrider's" clothes look like quality stuff.
https://www.railriders.com
The styles look a bit more forgiving for "senior" "shapes". (like the styles here).

Thanks for the "kudos" to travel.
Need to get in active time before my "expiration date". :D
mahalo
jim
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user5027
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by user5027 » Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:12 am

I have always tried to wear cotton clothes when flying. I have heard that polyester will melt in high heat and stick to your skin. Think of burning jet fuel. Just trying to give myself a chance as slim as it may be. :shock:

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by TheOscarGuy » Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:20 am

J295 wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 5:46 pm
Eddie Bauer Travex
Meets all your requirements.

Note: some of the credit cards offer reward miles and also include a statement credit for global entry application fee. I can't recall off the top of my head which cards had this feature, but I know some did and we took advantage of it. Should be easy to find on google.
Ditto!
I got 3 shorts by Travex/EB, and they are amazing while traveling. They pack really small, don't need ironing, and are really good for summer/hot climates. I haven't tried shirts from same line, but for that I have UA shirts.
I know cap one venture gives me credit for global entry/TSA pre, and I thought of applying for it as I will be traveling soon. However, I am concerned the application will take too long, if at all they process it, due to govt. shutdown.

mrb09
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by mrb09 » Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:59 am

TN_Boy wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:38 am
Sandtrap wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:17 pm
Due to health, I have not travelled in several years.
Recently upgraded my passport, TSA Precheck, Travel ID, etc. ("newbie" ready to ride/fly).

Now packing for an upcoming trip, I've found that my assortment of travel pants have "shrunk" in storage. (that must be it) :shock:
Thus, I am on the hunt for new travel clothes.

In addition to some of the brands mentioned, I like Railriders stuff -- they have excellent lightweight cargo pants (nylon) plus some nylon hiking pants I really like. Also their shirts. Drawback -- generally not available in retail stores, have to order (so mild guessing on sizes).
+1 on Railriders. I wear their pants, a mix of synthetic shirts, and Duluth Trading Company underwear. Then I pack some woolite travel packets and a travel clothes line.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by The Wizard » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:06 pm

user5027 wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:12 am
I have always tried to wear cotton clothes when flying. I have heard that polyester will melt in high heat and stick to your skin. Think of burning jet fuel. Just trying to give myself a chance as slim as it may be. :shock:
You should be wearing WOOL then.
Or asbestos, but it's hard to find asbestos suits anymore...
Attempted new signature...

AlphaLess
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by AlphaLess » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:31 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:46 am
AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:58 am
I recommend Lululemon ABC pants.

You can wear them for everything:
- go out to a nice dinner,
- hiking,
- biking.
Thanks.
Went to the "Lululemon" website:
https://shop.lululemon.com
Very very nice stuff.
Pricey

Where can I buy a body shape like the one in the clothing catalogs? :shock: :(
In the local gym, with 3-4 exercise per week :)
"A Republic, if you can keep it". Benjamin Franklin. 1787. | Party affiliation: Vanguard. Religion: low-cost investing.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by rjbraun » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:35 pm

We tend to buy quick-dry attire from places like REI. Admittedly, our clothing probably has more of an "outdoor / adventure" look, as some others have alluded to. Sometimes that's fine, but I suppose now that I'm aware of it perhaps we will try for more neutral looking stuff going forward. Agree that merino wool works well for travel.

I actually learned of Rohan Designs from another Bogleheads post. Kind of surprised no one has suggested them. I haven't had occasion to buy more travel clothing since learning of Rohan, but I figured I would check them out, at some point, in the future.

https://www.rohandesigns.com

Chase Sapphire Reserve will give $100 credit for Global Entry. We took advantage of this, and I still have the card (SO canceled his membership after the first year, we figured we could manage with just mine). After $300 travel credit, the annual fee works out the $150. For now, we think it's worth the cost. I like the trip protection coverage, and also have enough remaining Chase Ultimate Reward points to justify holding on to the card, at least for the time being.

https://creditcards.chase.com/rewards-c ... re-reserve

Not sure if Lyft works outside the US, but I keep both the Uber and Lyft apps on my phone. There have been times when either the Uber app wasn't working for me or no cars were free, and I was thankful to have the Lyft app installed on my phone, as it enabled me to call a car.

Happy travels!

rjbraun
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by rjbraun » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:44 pm

AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:31 pm
Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:46 am
AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:58 am
I recommend Lululemon ABC pants.

You can wear them for everything:
- go out to a nice dinner,
- hiking,
- biking.
Thanks.
Went to the "Lululemon" website:
https://shop.lululemon.com
Very very nice stuff.
Pricey

Where can I buy a body shape like the one in the clothing catalogs? :shock: :(
In the local gym, with 3-4 exercise per week :)
Uh, not always. I exercise 3-4 per week at my local gym. I even bought "lulus" thinking that it was just a matter of getting the right cut / styling, in order to achieve "the look". :(

Even if I don't look like the models in the pictures, I do like my lulus. They can be a bit finicky to care for, though, at least in the case of the leggings. I need to be careful to avoid having anything like a gym bag rub against the seams, lest the stitching gets "fuzzy". At least, Lululemon customer service seems very good about returns / exchanges, fwiw.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by EddyB » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:53 pm

quantAndHold wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 4:44 pm

You don't need NEXUS unless you're planning on driving back and forth across the Canadian border a lot. If you're planning on driving across the Mexican border, you need SENTRI.
NEXUS is also good for customs at the major Canadian airports, gets you expedited security at Canadian airports, and includes all the Global Entry benefits. It's also cheaper, at $50 for five years rather than $100. But you need a Canadian interview in addition to the US interview.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by hoops777 » Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:09 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 10:47 pm
radiowave wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 7:19 pm
Sandtrap, a few additional tips (those above are excellent), been travelling international almost 3 decades now.

Footwear, key is to find sturdy, durable shoes, leather only if possible, and wear with two pair of socks, a light inner liner then a compatable merino wool hiking pair. REI is a great source of footwear for world travelers.

Wallet pouch: I spent plenty of $ on special travel pants, multiple zippers, etc. My best option has been to use an internal wallet pouch that connects through belt loops and flips inside. You can get these at any luggage/travel store in a mall. It's cheap and very effective. I use mine all the time and know my wallet is safe. I have a second I used for my iPhone.

Belts: speaking of which, you may want to get a sturdy belt with in internal zipper. I have a nice black and brown pair and keep abt $100 plus copy of my passport in there. Also have a "throw away" wallet I keep in an outside pocket with just a small amount of cash. I was pick pocketed in the Madrid metro station a ways back and glad they got the throw away and not the main wallet.

Pants: My most comfortable pants are the REI brand nylon hiking pants. They are a bit casual for dinner and such but great for walking around. They are light, very comfortable, zipper bottom legs so you can make them shorts, and they dry quickly.

Water: be sure to have a thermos or other water collection to keep while you are travelling around - you never know when you might pass a store to buy water. I wouldn't drink public water from a fountain, etc. outside the US or Canada.

Hat: something light and easy to use to keep the sun off your eyes and head. But don't look like an American tourist :)

Small backpack: I also travel internationally as carry-on only. I have my trusty old Travel-Pro I bough in 1991 (stapled, duct taped, etc.) but it works and fits in the overhead bin. I have a second travel backpack that fits under the seat. That's my daypack when in town, when travelling, I keep a change of clothes and basic necessities if I should ever get separated from my Travel-Pro (actually happened coming out of New Zealand to Hawaii and of course it didn't make the connecting flight, glad we had enough to tie us over until the next day). For the backpack, I have found a Targa at Best Buy or someplace that fit well and had two outside places to keep water.

That's all I can think of off the top of my head. I fly mostly United (our preferred carrier at work) and find that if I get one of the last rows, actually the very last row, I get in Zone 3 and if I get in line early I never have a problem getting an overhead bin. I have noticed lately that zone 4 and 5 for United have been running out of space which would require a gate tag. I like to get out of the airport as soon as possible.

Happy travels.
Thanks so much for taking the time to post all that.
Will look into all of it.

Fanny pack in lieu of a Wallet Pouch???
Not sure what a Wallet Pouch is?

mahalo,
j :D
I got tired of all this so I purchased a tiny trifold wallet made out of the material they make parachutes from.It holds about 12 cards and plenty of cash,weighs nothing and fits in the small zippered pockets on the front of my pants or jacket.Extremely happy with it and now use it as my regular wallet.It is almost the same size as a credit card.
K.I.S.S........so easy to say so difficult to do.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by AlphaLess » Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:31 pm

rjbraun wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:44 pm
In the local gym, with 3-4 exercise per week :)
Uh, not always. I exercise 3-4 per week at my local gym. I even bought "lulus" thinking that it was just a matter of getting the right cut / styling, in order to achieve "the look". :(
What does 'not always' refer to?

OP did not ask about a look.
He asked about a body type. One would assume that body type is independent of the clothes you wear.
"A Republic, if you can keep it". Benjamin Franklin. 1787. | Party affiliation: Vanguard. Religion: low-cost investing.

AlphaLess
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by AlphaLess » Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:32 pm

hoops777 wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:09 pm
I got tired of all this so I purchased a tiny trifold wallet made out of the material they make parachutes from.It holds about 12 cards and plenty of cash,weighs nothing and fits in the small zippered pockets on the front of my pants or jacket.Extremely happy with it and now use it as my regular wallet.It is almost the same size as a credit card.
What's the name of the wallet and company making it?
Thanks
"A Republic, if you can keep it". Benjamin Franklin. 1787. | Party affiliation: Vanguard. Religion: low-cost investing.

rjbraun
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by rjbraun » Mon Jan 21, 2019 7:53 pm

AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:31 pm
rjbraun wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:44 pm
In the local gym, with 3-4 exercise per week :)
Uh, not always. I exercise 3-4 per week at my local gym. I even bought "lulus" thinking that it was just a matter of getting the right cut / styling, in order to achieve "the look". :(
What does 'not always' refer to?

OP did not ask about a look.
He asked about a body type. One would assume that body type is independent of the clothes you wear.
Guess I misunderstood. Sorry! :confused

AlphaLess
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by AlphaLess » Mon Jan 21, 2019 8:02 pm

rjbraun wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 7:53 pm
AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:31 pm
rjbraun wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:44 pm
In the local gym, with 3-4 exercise per week :)
Uh, not always. I exercise 3-4 per week at my local gym. I even bought "lulus" thinking that it was just a matter of getting the right cut / styling, in order to achieve "the look". :(
What does 'not always' refer to?

OP did not ask about a look.
He asked about a body type. One would assume that body type is independent of the clothes you wear.
Guess I misunderstood. Sorry! :confused
No worries, and nothing to be sorry about.

I was simply trying to understand what your comment was about. That's why I asked: what does 'not always' refer to in your post?
"A Republic, if you can keep it". Benjamin Franklin. 1787. | Party affiliation: Vanguard. Religion: low-cost investing.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by rjbraun » Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:13 pm

AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 8:02 pm
rjbraun wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 7:53 pm
AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:31 pm
rjbraun wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:44 pm
In the local gym, with 3-4 exercise per week :)
Uh, not always. I exercise 3-4 per week at my local gym. I even bought "lulus" thinking that it was just a matter of getting the right cut / styling, in order to achieve "the look". :(
What does 'not always' refer to?

OP did not ask about a look.
He asked about a body type. One would assume that body type is independent of the clothes you wear.
Guess I misunderstood. Sorry! :confused
No worries, and nothing to be sorry about.

I was simply trying to understand what your comment was about. That's why I asked: what does 'not always' refer to in your post?
OP seemed to ask how to get body shape (of the models) shown on the lululemon website. I figured the operating assumption was that the models were viewed favorably. I thought you were suggesting in your reply that by exercising several times a week at the gym one could attain a favorable, or attractive, body shape.

My "not always" comment simply meant that while I exercise several times a week at the gym, I (not surprisingly) still don't look anything like the models in the catalog :annoyed

As my understanding is that lululemon's steep price tag reflects, at least in part, their efforts to design clothes that enhance the wearer's appearance (or "look"), that was the basis for remarking that despite regular exercise and pricey workout clothes, I still don't come close to looking like their models. :P
Not sure if that helps to clarify things, but here's to OP finding the right travel attire! :sharebeer

reisner
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by reisner » Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:27 pm

For a single reliable pair of shoes, probably leather: Danner makes some great ones, expensive but often on sale.

AlphaLess
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by AlphaLess » Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:53 pm

rjbraun wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:13 pm
AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 8:02 pm
rjbraun wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 7:53 pm
AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:31 pm
rjbraun wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:44 pm

Uh, not always. I exercise 3-4 per week at my local gym. I even bought "lulus" thinking that it was just a matter of getting the right cut / styling, in order to achieve "the look". :(
What does 'not always' refer to?

OP did not ask about a look.
He asked about a body type. One would assume that body type is independent of the clothes you wear.
Guess I misunderstood. Sorry! :confused
No worries, and nothing to be sorry about.

I was simply trying to understand what your comment was about. That's why I asked: what does 'not always' refer to in your post?
OP seemed to ask how to get body shape (of the models) shown on the lululemon website. I figured the operating assumption was that the models were viewed favorably. I thought you were suggesting in your reply that by exercising several times a week at the gym one could attain a favorable, or attractive, body shape.

My "not always" comment simply meant that while I exercise several times a week at the gym, I (not surprisingly) still don't look anything like the models in the catalog :annoyed

As my understanding is that lululemon's steep price tag reflects, at least in part, their efforts to design clothes that enhance the wearer's appearance (or "look"), that was the basis for remarking that despite regular exercise and pricey workout clothes, I still don't come close to looking like their models. :P
Not sure if that helps to clarify things, but here's to OP finding the right travel attire! :sharebeer
Ok, understood, thanks for the explanation.

This is strictly my opinion:
- lulumelon (and other companies) pick models to make their clothing look good,
- having a good figure, and fitting / looking good in lululemon are probably not as closely correlated as one might think.

Certain designers fit my body type very well. Others make me look like a stick, and yet others make me look like I am swimming in their clothing.

My comment was simply that if you want to look good, exercise is a pre-requisite. But if you want to look good in lululemon, that is a different story.
"A Republic, if you can keep it". Benjamin Franklin. 1787. | Party affiliation: Vanguard. Religion: low-cost investing.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by Sic Vis Pacem » Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:08 pm

I'll add a vote for prAna. I wore the prAna Stretch Zion for about 80% of my hike on the Inca trail and they were amazing. Added a pair of the Zioneer pants when I went to Greece as I understood the local custom in certain areas frowned on shorts. These two pairs have become my go to for travel and are by far the most versatile pants in my closet.

hoops777
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by hoops777 » Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:31 am

AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:32 pm
hoops777 wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:09 pm
I got tired of all this so I purchased a tiny trifold wallet made out of the material they make parachutes from.It holds about 12 cards and plenty of cash,weighs nothing and fits in the small zippered pockets on the front of my pants or jacket.Extremely happy with it and now use it as my regular wallet.It is almost the same size as a credit card.
What's the name of the wallet and company making it?
Thanks
It is called light fold and I bought it on Amazon.
K.I.S.S........so easy to say so difficult to do.

hoops777
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by hoops777 » Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:36 am

hoops777 wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:31 am
AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:32 pm
hoops777 wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:09 pm
I got tired of all this so I purchased a tiny trifold wallet made out of the material they make parachutes from.It holds about 12 cards and plenty of cash,weighs nothing and fits in the small zippered pockets on the front of my pants or jacket.Extremely happy with it and now use it as my regular wallet.It is almost the same size as a credit card.
What's the name of the wallet and company making it?
Thanks
It is called Light Fold men’s ultra slim nylon wallet with RFID. I bought it on Amazon for 12.95.
K.I.S.S........so easy to say so difficult to do.

david_that_guy
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by david_that_guy » Tue Jan 22, 2019 8:46 am

I do think it's good advice to try not to look like an American tourist. Why? Because in popular tourist areas you will attract pickpockets and scam artists like flies to you know what. You're not trying to fool the locals, you're just trying not to stand out. What makes someone an obvious American tourist? They dress very casually, much more casually than the locals. Shorts, a t-shirt with logos, a baseball cap or trucker cap. They're also big and loud, speaking much louder than the locals. You can't help it if you're big, but you don't have to be loud. Some Americans walk like they own the sidewalk. I think this is not so much an American characteristic; it's more the behavior of people who are not used to crowded cities. Just don't walk around like there's nobody else there.

In major European cities adult men don't wear shorts (admittedly young men are often more casual) unless they're running or playing sports. If they wear jeans, the jeans are slim, dark, and not worn. Again, some young men are more casual and now wear distressed jeans, but I'm assuming most of the people on this forum are over 30. Some young men wear salmon or red jeans but older men don't. In Paris and Rome, people are dressed up more than in smaller cities, but you don't have to dress like a fashion model to not stand out.

Another thing that makes American tourists stand out is immediately speaking English to everybody as if everybody is expected to speak English. At least learn how to say "hello", "goodbye", "thank you," and "do you speak English?" in the local language. It's polite and will get you better treatment even if they immediately know that you're American. There are a million YouTube videos on basic phrases to help you be understandable. You don't need a good accent, just good enough.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by Peculiar_Investor » Tue Jan 22, 2019 9:11 am

Sic Vis Pacem wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:08 pm
I'll add a vote for prAna. I wore the prAna Stretch Zion for about 80% of my hike on the Inca trail and they were amazing. Added a pair of the Zioneer pants when I went to Greece as I understood the local custom in certain areas frowned on shorts. These two pairs have become my go to for travel and are by far the most versatile pants in my closet.
My favorite pants for travel and adventure had been The North Face Paramount Trail Convertible but North Face has made some design and construction changes that I didn't like, think cheaper materials and subtle sizing changes. I went in search of alternatives. Many hours of in-store and online research and I found a previous years version of Best Hiking Pants of 2019 | Switchback Travel, which covered a wide gamut of choices. Unfortunately for me as a Canadian, not all the choices are available here.

At a local outdoor oriented gear store I tried the Stretch Zion Convertible Pant | prAna. After an adventure trip from Morocco and another trip to Tuscany, plus many local hours dog walking, I can say these are without a doubt my new favorites. They are very comfortable, breathe well to keep me cool in the summer, yet still keep me warm during wintertime dog walks.
Normal people… believe that if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain’t broke, it doesn’t have enough features yet. – Scott Adams

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by Sandtrap » Tue Jan 22, 2019 9:29 am

AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:53 pm
rjbraun wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:13 pm
AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 8:02 pm
rjbraun wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 7:53 pm
AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:31 pm


What does 'not always' refer to?

OP did not ask about a look.
He asked about a body type. One would assume that body type is independent of the clothes you wear.
Guess I misunderstood. Sorry! :confused
No worries, and nothing to be sorry about.

I was simply trying to understand what your comment was about. That's why I asked: what does 'not always' refer to in your post?
OP seemed to ask how to get body shape (of the models) shown on the lululemon website. I figured the operating assumption was that the models were viewed favorably. I thought you were suggesting in your reply that by exercising several times a week at the gym one could attain a favorable, or attractive, body shape.

My "not always" comment simply meant that while I exercise several times a week at the gym, I (not surprisingly) still don't look anything like the models in the catalog :annoyed

As my understanding is that lululemon's steep price tag reflects, at least in part, their efforts to design clothes that enhance the wearer's appearance (or "look"), that was the basis for remarking that despite regular exercise and pricey workout clothes, I still don't come close to looking like their models. :P
Not sure if that helps to clarify things, but here's to OP finding the right travel attire! :sharebeer
Ok, understood, thanks for the explanation.

This is strictly my opinion:
- lulumelon (and other companies) pick models to make their clothing look good,
- having a good figure, and fitting / looking good in lululemon are probably not as closely correlated as one might think.

Certain designers fit my body type very well. Others make me look like a stick, and yet others make me look like I am swimming in their clothing.

My comment was simply that if you want to look good, exercise is a pre-requisite. But if you want to look good in lululemon, that is a different story.
OP: just kidding.
It's tough to look like the models in the clothing catalogues when this happens: :shock:
(poor allocation)
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by Sandtrap » Tue Jan 22, 2019 9:33 am

david_that_guy wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 8:46 am
I do think it's good advice to try not to look like an American tourist. Why? Because in popular tourist areas you will attract pickpockets and scam artists like flies to you know what. You're not trying to fool the locals, you're just trying not to stand out. What makes someone an obvious American tourist? They dress very casually, much more casually than the locals. Shorts, a t-shirt with logos, a baseball cap or trucker cap. They're also big and loud, speaking much louder than the locals. You can't help it if you're big, but you don't have to be loud. Some Americans walk like they own the sidewalk. I think this is not so much an American characteristic; it's more the behavior of people who are not used to crowded cities. Just don't walk around like there's nobody else there.

In major European cities adult men don't wear shorts (admittedly young men are often more casual) unless they're running or playing sports. If they wear jeans, the jeans are slim, dark, and not worn. Again, some young men are more casual and now wear distressed jeans, but I'm assuming most of the people on this forum are over 30. Some young men wear salmon or red jeans but older men don't. In Paris and Rome, people are dressed up more than in smaller cities, but you don't have to dress like a fashion model to not stand out.

Another thing that makes American tourists stand out is immediately speaking English to everybody as if everybody is expected to speak English. At least learn how to say "hello", "goodbye", "thank you," and "do you speak English?" in the local language. It's polite and will get you better treatment even if they immediately know that you're American. There are a million YouTube videos on basic phrases to help you be understandable. You don't need a good accent, just good enough.
Good points. Well said.
Thanks for taking the time.
(red jeans? :shock: )
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by Sandtrap » Tue Jan 22, 2019 9:35 am

hoops777 wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:36 am
hoops777 wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:31 am
AlphaLess wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:32 pm
hoops777 wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 6:09 pm
I got tired of all this so I purchased a tiny trifold wallet made out of the material they make parachutes from.It holds about 12 cards and plenty of cash,weighs nothing and fits in the small zippered pockets on the front of my pants or jacket.Extremely happy with it and now use it as my regular wallet.It is almost the same size as a credit card.
What's the name of the wallet and company making it?
Thanks
It is called Light Fold men’s ultra slim nylon wallet with RFID. I bought it on Amazon for 12.95.
Great Tip!!!!
Here is a link to the wallet.
https://www.amazon.com/Ultra-Nylon-Trif ... B0725JX6DP
thanks!
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by TN_Boy » Tue Jan 22, 2019 10:17 am

david_that_guy wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 8:46 am
I do think it's good advice to try not to look like an American tourist. Why? Because in popular tourist areas you will attract pickpockets and scam artists like flies to you know what. You're not trying to fool the locals, you're just trying not to stand out. What makes someone an obvious American tourist? They dress very casually, much more casually than the locals. Shorts, a t-shirt with logos, a baseball cap or trucker cap. They're also big and loud, speaking much louder than the locals. You can't help it if you're big, but you don't have to be loud. Some Americans walk like they own the sidewalk. I think this is not so much an American characteristic; it's more the behavior of people who are not used to crowded cities. Just don't walk around like there's nobody else there.

In major European cities adult men don't wear shorts (admittedly young men are often more casual) unless they're running or playing sports. If they wear jeans, the jeans are slim, dark, and not worn. Again, some young men are more casual and now wear distressed jeans, but I'm assuming most of the people on this forum are over 30. Some young men wear salmon or red jeans but older men don't. In Paris and Rome, people are dressed up more than in smaller cities, but you don't have to dress like a fashion model to not stand out.

Another thing that makes American tourists stand out is immediately speaking English to everybody as if everybody is expected to speak English. At least learn how to say "hello", "goodbye", "thank you," and "do you speak English?" in the local language. It's polite and will get you better treatment even if they immediately know that you're American. There are a million YouTube videos on basic phrases to help you be understandable. You don't need a good accent, just good enough.
I disagree with much of the above. Well, not acting like a jerk is good advice, but it's good advice in the US also. Your first paragraph simply stereotypes all American tourists as loud and obnoxious, compared to all those well-mannered non-US people.

Clothing ... I'll wear shorts if it is hot and I will have company in most places. The spouse and I will wear travel pants most of the time (with among other thing much more secure pockets than jeans). We don't wear "loud" t-shirts or hats. I'll wear running shoes if I'm walking miles on concrete, because otherwise my feet and knees will hurt. Comfortable travel gear.

I agree if you want to eat in a nicer restaurant, you should be aware of clothing norms for that class of restaurant (though in tourist areas they are used to casual clothing). But it's pretty hard to travel light if you take travel stuff like we've been discussing, plus nice leather shoes, plus sportcoat .... I'd have check a large bag. If you are traveling light, you are .... traveling light. Compromises have to be made.

Important point: locals are usually not walking around six miles a day exploring a city. They are going to work, going shopping etc. So they are dressing for a different problem than a tourist trying to cover a lot of ground in a day.

I'm also frequently carrying a camera, which is obviously going to tag me as a tourist, but well, I want to get some pictures.

We never found it very helpful to try and speak a phrase in the native language. A polite smile and mild demeanor asking a question goes a long way. I don't *assume* they will be able to speak English, though it is very common in many tourist areas of the world.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by david_that_guy » Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:02 am

TN_Boy wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 10:17 am


I disagree with much of the above. Well, not acting like a jerk is good advice, but it's good advice in the US also. Your first paragraph simply stereotypes all American tourists as loud and obnoxious, compared to all those well-mannered non-US people.

Clothing ... I'll wear shorts if it is hot and I will have company in most places. The spouse and I will wear travel pants most of the time (with among other thing much more secure pockets than jeans). We don't wear "loud" t-shirts or hats. I'll wear running shoes if I'm walking miles on concrete, because otherwise my feet and knees will hurt. Comfortable travel gear.

I agree if you want to eat in a nicer restaurant, you should be aware of clothing norms for that class of restaurant (though in tourist areas they are used to casual clothing). But it's pretty hard to travel light if you take travel stuff like we've been discussing, plus nice leather shoes, plus sportcoat .... I'd have check a large bag. If you are traveling light, you are .... traveling light. Compromises have to be made.

Important point: locals are usually not walking around six miles a day exploring a city. They are going to work, going shopping etc. So they are dressing for a different problem than a tourist trying to cover a lot of ground in a day.

I'm also frequently carrying a camera, which is obviously going to tag me as a tourist, but well, I want to get some pictures.

We never found it very helpful to try and speak a phrase in the native language. A polite smile and mild demeanor asking a question goes a long way. I don't *assume* they will be able to speak English, though it is very common in many tourist areas of the world.
All I can say is that I disagree with your disagreement :happy I don't think ALL American tourists dress like I described, but you will see thousands of them in Europe. And you will see them surrounded by scam artists and people trying to sell them crap.

There are comfortable shoes that allow you to walk many miles that don't look like an ad for Nike. I've walked 10 miles a day in Skechers that look like dress shoes. Personally, I find leather shoes too heavy and hot for long days (except when hiking).

I wear dark travel pants and in warmer weather a polo shirt. I've never been too hot, but I don't go to Europe in July and August because it's too expensive and too crowded.

My wife and I travel with international sized carry ons only, and have done that for 3+ week trips. You can travel light without dressing like an obvious tourist. The key is to pack for a few days and then wash your clothes. I use a combination of quick rinse in the sink and laundromats. There are laundromats everywhere. If you don't want to deal with a laundromat, some dry cleaning shops will wash and dry your clothes for a reasonable fee. On my last trip a couple of the AirBnb's had washing machines, so I used them. One host volunteered to do our laundry!

As for the language issue, I've almost always gotten a big smile and friendly service when I try to use the local language. I've had people compliment me for trying to speak the language. Maybe I would have gotten good service anyway, but I think it's polite to try. In smaller cities and outside the big tourist areas, not everybody speaks English. Since I make a point of visiting outside the main tourist areas, I've found it very helpful to know basic phrases. Even if it's your first trip I'd advise getting outside the tourist areas for part of the time. It's both fun and educational.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by TN_Boy » Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:27 am

david_that_guy wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:02 am
TN_Boy wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 10:17 am


I disagree with much of the above. Well, not acting like a jerk is good advice, but it's good advice in the US also. Your first paragraph simply stereotypes all American tourists as loud and obnoxious, compared to all those well-mannered non-US people.

Clothing ... I'll wear shorts if it is hot and I will have company in most places. The spouse and I will wear travel pants most of the time (with among other thing much more secure pockets than jeans). We don't wear "loud" t-shirts or hats. I'll wear running shoes if I'm walking miles on concrete, because otherwise my feet and knees will hurt. Comfortable travel gear.

I agree if you want to eat in a nicer restaurant, you should be aware of clothing norms for that class of restaurant (though in tourist areas they are used to casual clothing). But it's pretty hard to travel light if you take travel stuff like we've been discussing, plus nice leather shoes, plus sportcoat .... I'd have check a large bag. If you are traveling light, you are .... traveling light. Compromises have to be made.

Important point: locals are usually not walking around six miles a day exploring a city. They are going to work, going shopping etc. So they are dressing for a different problem than a tourist trying to cover a lot of ground in a day.

I'm also frequently carrying a camera, which is obviously going to tag me as a tourist, but well, I want to get some pictures.

We never found it very helpful to try and speak a phrase in the native language. A polite smile and mild demeanor asking a question goes a long way. I don't *assume* they will be able to speak English, though it is very common in many tourist areas of the world.
All I can say is that I disagree with your disagreement :happy I don't think ALL American tourists dress like I described, but you will see thousands of them in Europe. And you will see them surrounded by scam artists and people trying to sell them crap.

There are comfortable shoes that allow you to walk many miles that don't look like an ad for Nike. I've walked 10 miles a day in Skechers that look like dress shoes. Personally, I find leather shoes too heavy and hot for long days (except when hiking).

I wear dark travel pants and in warmer weather a polo shirt. I've never been too hot, but I don't go to Europe in July and August because it's too expensive and too crowded.

My wife and I travel with international sized carry ons only, and have done that for 3+ week trips. You can travel light without dressing like an obvious tourist. The key is to pack for a few days and then wash your clothes. I use a combination of quick rinse in the sink and laundromats. There are laundromats everywhere. If you don't want to deal with a laundromat, some dry cleaning shops will wash and dry your clothes for a reasonable fee. On my last trip a couple of the AirBnb's had washing machines, so I used them. One host volunteered to do our laundry!

As for the language issue, I've almost always gotten a big smile and friendly service when I try to use the local language. I've had people compliment me for trying to speak the language. Maybe I would have gotten good service anyway, but I think it's polite to try. In smaller cities and outside the big tourist areas, not everybody speaks English. Since I make a point of visiting outside the main tourist areas, I've found it very helpful to know basic phrases. Even if it's your first trip I'd advise getting outside the tourist areas for part of the time. It's both fun and educational.
We definitely have disagreement on the details :-) For example, I pretty much have to wear running shoes.... period. Sketchers aren't going to cut it (though, I like their golf shoes).

I'll note again on the clothing, the tourist is often dressing for a different of activities than the locals.

There are thousands (if not more) American tourists in Europe. The US is the third most populous country in the world, with a much higher per-capita income than the two in front of us. Not surprising there are a lot of us out there. Some will be jerks and targets of scams. Others will not. I try not to stereotype American tourists in Europe, or for that matter, Asian tourists in the US.

I have yet to be surrounded by scam artists, but as I noted, the camera is going to blow any semblance of not being a tourist. I take precautions on how the camera is handled, and how valuables are secured.

For clothes, some countries have laundry shops (not just dry cleaning) that will take your clothes, wash them for a fee and return them to you in a large bag. Very handy, and a lot better than spending time in a laundromat; just drop-off and pickup.

If they don't speak English, everybody is smiling and pointing quickly anyway. We managed to survive that also. The right attitude and behavior will make things work for you.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by SagaciousTraveler » Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:32 am

Mack Weldon: www.mackweldon.com

Sorry if this is a repeat, didn't cycle through all the replies.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by david_that_guy » Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:41 am

TN_Boy wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:27 am
david_that_guy wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:02 am
TN_Boy wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 10:17 am


I disagree with much of the above. Well, not acting like a jerk is good advice, but it's good advice in the US also. Your first paragraph simply stereotypes all American tourists as loud and obnoxious, compared to all those well-mannered non-US people.

Clothing ... I'll wear shorts if it is hot and I will have company in most places. The spouse and I will wear travel pants most of the time (with among other thing much more secure pockets than jeans). We don't wear "loud" t-shirts or hats. I'll wear running shoes if I'm walking miles on concrete, because otherwise my feet and knees will hurt. Comfortable travel gear.

I agree if you want to eat in a nicer restaurant, you should be aware of clothing norms for that class of restaurant (though in tourist areas they are used to casual clothing). But it's pretty hard to travel light if you take travel stuff like we've been discussing, plus nice leather shoes, plus sportcoat .... I'd have check a large bag. If you are traveling light, you are .... traveling light. Compromises have to be made.

Important point: locals are usually not walking around six miles a day exploring a city. They are going to work, going shopping etc. So they are dressing for a different problem than a tourist trying to cover a lot of ground in a day.

I'm also frequently carrying a camera, which is obviously going to tag me as a tourist, but well, I want to get some pictures.

We never found it very helpful to try and speak a phrase in the native language. A polite smile and mild demeanor asking a question goes a long way. I don't *assume* they will be able to speak English, though it is very common in many tourist areas of the world.
All I can say is that I disagree with your disagreement :happy I don't think ALL American tourists dress like I described, but you will see thousands of them in Europe. And you will see them surrounded by scam artists and people trying to sell them crap.

There are comfortable shoes that allow you to walk many miles that don't look like an ad for Nike. I've walked 10 miles a day in Skechers that look like dress shoes. Personally, I find leather shoes too heavy and hot for long days (except when hiking).

I wear dark travel pants and in warmer weather a polo shirt. I've never been too hot, but I don't go to Europe in July and August because it's too expensive and too crowded.

My wife and I travel with international sized carry ons only, and have done that for 3+ week trips. You can travel light without dressing like an obvious tourist. The key is to pack for a few days and then wash your clothes. I use a combination of quick rinse in the sink and laundromats. There are laundromats everywhere. If you don't want to deal with a laundromat, some dry cleaning shops will wash and dry your clothes for a reasonable fee. On my last trip a couple of the AirBnb's had washing machines, so I used them. One host volunteered to do our laundry!

As for the language issue, I've almost always gotten a big smile and friendly service when I try to use the local language. I've had people compliment me for trying to speak the language. Maybe I would have gotten good service anyway, but I think it's polite to try. In smaller cities and outside the big tourist areas, not everybody speaks English. Since I make a point of visiting outside the main tourist areas, I've found it very helpful to know basic phrases. Even if it's your first trip I'd advise getting outside the tourist areas for part of the time. It's both fun and educational.
We definitely have disagreement on the details :-) For example, I pretty much have to wear running shoes.... period. Sketchers aren't going to cut it (though, I like their golf shoes).

I'll note again on the clothing, the tourist is often dressing for a different of activities than the locals.

There are thousands (if not more) American tourists in Europe. The US is the third most populous country in the world, with a much higher per-capita income than the two in front of us. Not surprising there are a lot of us out there. Some will be jerks and targets of scams. Others will not. I try not to stereotype American tourists in Europe, or for that matter, Asian tourists in the US.

I have yet to be surrounded by scam artists, but as I noted, the camera is going to blow any semblance of not being a tourist. I take precautions on how the camera is handled, and how valuables are secured.

For clothes, some countries have laundry shops (not just dry cleaning) that will take your clothes, wash them for a fee and return them to you in a large bag. Very handy, and a lot better than spending time in a laundromat; just drop-off and pickup.

If they don't speak English, everybody is smiling and pointing quickly anyway. We managed to survive that also. The right attitude and behavior will make things work for you.
We agree on laundry! :D

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by TSR » Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:48 am

Freefun wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 11:23 pm
Another vote for Prana Zion pants. Love them.
Yet another vote for these, but I would also add that Prana's Brion pant is better from a "not looking like a tourist" perspective. They look just like slacks or like nice jeans, depending on the color you get, and they are strong and stretchy and easy to clean like the Zion pants. The Brions don't have utility pockets, but I think that makes you look less like a tourist. They are in a "slim cut," which OP has suggested may not apply to him (no offense intended if I misunderstood!), but they do stretch so might still be good depending on sizing.

Good luck and happy traveling!

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by hoops777 » Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:55 am

david_that_guy wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:02 am
TN_Boy wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 10:17 am


I disagree with much of the above. Well, not acting like a jerk is good advice, but it's good advice in the US also. Your first paragraph simply stereotypes all American tourists as loud and obnoxious, compared to all those well-mannered non-US people.

Clothing ... I'll wear shorts if it is hot and I will have company in most places. The spouse and I will wear travel pants most of the time (with among other thing much more secure pockets than jeans). We don't wear "loud" t-shirts or hats. I'll wear running shoes if I'm walking miles on concrete, because otherwise my feet and knees will hurt. Comfortable travel gear.

I agree if you want to eat in a nicer restaurant, you should be aware of clothing norms for that class of restaurant (though in tourist areas they are used to casual clothing). But it's pretty hard to travel light if you take travel stuff like we've been discussing, plus nice leather shoes, plus sportcoat .... I'd have check a large bag. If you are traveling light, you are .... traveling light. Compromises have to be made.

Important point: locals are usually not walking around six miles a day exploring a city. They are going to work, going shopping etc. So they are dressing for a different problem than a tourist trying to cover a lot of ground in a day.

I'm also frequently carrying a camera, which is obviously going to tag me as a tourist, but well, I want to get some pictures.

We never found it very helpful to try and speak a phrase in the native language. A polite smile and mild demeanor asking a question goes a long way. I don't *assume* they will be able to speak English, though it is very common in many tourist areas of the world.
All I can say is that I disagree with your disagreement :happy I don't think ALL American tourists dress like I described, but you will see thousands of them in Europe. And you will see them surrounded by scam artists and people trying to sell them crap.

There are comfortable shoes that allow you to walk many miles that don't look like an ad for Nike. I've walked 10 miles a day in Skechers that look like dress shoes. Personally, I find leather shoes too heavy and hot for long days (except when hiking).

I wear dark travel pants and in warmer weather a polo shirt. I've never been too hot, but I don't go to Europe in July and August because it's too expensive and too crowded.

My wife and I travel with international sized carry ons only, and have done that for 3+ week trips. You can travel light without dressing like an obvious tourist. The key is to pack for a few days and then wash your clothes. I use a combination of quick rinse in the sink and laundromats. There are laundromats everywhere. If you don't want to deal with a laundromat, some dry cleaning shops will wash and dry your clothes for a reasonable fee. On my last trip a couple of the AirBnb's had washing machines, so I used them. One host volunteered to do our laundry!

As for the language issue, I've almost always gotten a big smile and friendly service when I try to use the local language. I've had people compliment me for trying to speak the language. Maybe I would have gotten good service anyway, but I think it's polite to try. In smaller cities and outside the big tourist areas, not everybody speaks English. Since I make a point of visiting outside the main tourist areas, I've found it very helpful to know basic phrases. Even if it's your first trip I'd advise getting outside the tourist areas for part of the time. It's both fun and educational.
I would say you are over thinking it a bit with all due respect and the last I heard Nike was very big internationally.
K.I.S.S........so easy to say so difficult to do.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by autolycus » Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:14 pm

The notion of trying to blend in better to avoid being the target of scammers is funny. I guarantee you there is not much an American can do to avoid standing out. It's just simple fact. We don't have access to the same brands of clothing that many Europeans wear. Our clothes are cut differently, etc. And there's the other massive problem: When we're tourists, we tend to be in areas that are frequented by tourists rather than locals.

If you want to avoid being the target of scams, you need to behave like someone who is diligent and aware of their situation. You can do that just as easily while wearing shorts and tennis shoes as you can while wearing a spray-on Italian suit.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by david_that_guy » Tue Jan 22, 2019 2:30 pm

autolycus wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:14 pm
The notion of trying to blend in better to avoid being the target of scammers is funny. I guarantee you there is not much an American can do to avoid standing out. It's just simple fact. We don't have access to the same brands of clothing that many Europeans wear. Our clothes are cut differently, etc. And there's the other massive problem: When we're tourists, we tend to be in areas that are frequented by tourists rather than locals.

If you want to avoid being the target of scams, you need to behave like someone who is diligent and aware of their situation. You can do that just as easily while wearing shorts and tennis shoes as you can while wearing a spray-on Italian suit.
Scammers, like wolves, attack the weakest members of the herd. I've often walked through busy tourist areas without being bothered. Maybe it's because I appear diligent and aware or maybe it's because I don't stand out. Or maybe it's both. A lot of European men wear Levis and still don't look like Americans.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by SrGrumpy » Tue Jan 22, 2019 2:43 pm

TSR wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:48 am
Freefun wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 11:23 pm
Another vote for Prana Zion pants. Love them.
Yet another vote for these, but I would also add that Prana's Brion pant is better from a "not looking like a tourist" perspective.
Yes (kinda), in addition to the Prana Zion (NON convertible), I use the Prana Bronson daily around town. The pockets are very deep. They are similarly non-tourist.

Memo to fellow Prana Zion users: Would you believe I got pickpocketed from the cargo pocket, while walking? It was in Bogota, and I walk fast, but this guy was a genius with the zipper. Fortunately I chased after him, grabbed him by the neck and he tossed the wallet aside. So our pants aren't completely impregnable.

BTW, the "American tourist" trope is overdone. Tourism is completely globalized. You are more likely to meet Brazilians and Koreans and Russians at a lot of places, and it's just not possible to "blend in" all the time no matter how much we might fantasize about it. Fashionwise, I am sure we could all do with a bit of a makeover, but it's not the 1950s anymore. BTW (2): Read up about the British family terrorizing New Zealand right now.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... rport.html

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/brit ... -fsz9fmt60

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by praxis » Tue Jan 22, 2019 3:08 pm

If your clothes have "shrunk" in storage, and you'd like to upgrade your Columbia travel clothes, I recommend you consider Sportif tropical weight blend pants if you want light weight, no wrinkle, traditional cut (not real tight legs). The model on this link https://www.sportif.com/sportif-s-calcu ... nos-482162 comes in pleated or flat front and in many colors. The fabric is slightly stretchy and the pants are very well built.

I have this weight fabric in shorts and slacks in light tan and navy and I find them to be versatile for travel. This company makes a slightly heavier weight stretchy fabric in most styles also, in case some of your travels take you to cooler climes. Bon voyage!

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by autolycus » Tue Jan 22, 2019 4:19 pm

And of course I forgot to post my own clothing brand recommendations:

Kuhl has not been mentioned. They have a pretty wide variety of styles and colors in both cotton-blend or full synthetic. I actually prefer their cotton blends for the most part, but I do have a pair of softshell pants that are great in cooler weather, especially cool and wet weather.

I second (third?) the recommendation for Outlier. No security features on their pants. They're just really good pants, if one of their styles fits you well. I love the Futureworks pants. It's a great fabric that works easily in 3 seasons. Lots of people love their main jean-style pants (blanking on the name), but the fit wasn't good for me.

I have a couple pairs of the Bluffworks slacks. I really like them, but would not ever want to wear them on a vacation. They are definitely styled for an American business environment. I also find the material to not be as stretchy as others and to be a little clingy when I get sweaty. Outlier's materials are definitely better in both respects.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by jayjayc » Tue Jan 22, 2019 8:24 pm

There's been some good discussion on the appearance of American tourists. My take is to dress similarly to what you wear back home. Be comfortable in your style. The only difference is to pick out clothes that are conducive for travel...mainly they repel stink, dry quickly, and don't wrinkle easily. There's a whole new industry out for travel wear that's stylish. Many of these brands have already been mentioned earlier: Outlier, Bluffworks, Prana.

I used to live in San Francisco where surprisingly the #1 industry is tourism (not tech). I couldn't fathom why so many American tourists dressed like they were going camping in the wilderness. You can dress normally and still survive in a foreign city.

I typically wear jeans, sneakers and a casual button down shirt. I traveled to Paris and visited a highly exclusive jewelry store on behalf of a close friend (VAT discount!). It was one of those stores that had a camera at the front entrance and the customer had to be allowed to enter the store. I fully expected to be treated like riff raff, but they gave me the full treatment. I was pleasantly surprised.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by Norsky19 » Wed Jan 23, 2019 6:00 am

Sandtrap wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:17 pm
Due to health, I have not travelled in several years.
Recently upgraded my passport, TSA Precheck, Travel ID, etc. ("newbie" ready to ride/fly).

Now packing for an upcoming trip, I've found that my assortment of travel pants have "shrunk" in storage. (that must be it) :shock:
Thus, I am on the hunt for new travel clothes.

Previously, nothing but Columbia long sleeve shirts, pants, and shorts.
Now needs a redo.

Slacks (casual, lightweight)
No iron, wrinkle free, minimum cotton (bulk and weight), elastic waist would help.
1 pair dress, 2 pairs casual?
*Really like the Columbia Men's "Global Adventurer" slacks but discontinued.

Long sleeve shirts (casual), wrinkle free, no cotton?
1 semi dress, 2 casual?

I only travel with a single carry-on so less bulk and weight is important.

Suggestions?

Retired newbie traveller.
mahalo,
j :D
Prana Stretch Zion. Amazing for just about everything.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by ZumZabo » Wed Jan 23, 2019 7:45 am

TN_Boy wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:38 am
Sandtrap wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:17 pm
Due to health, I have not travelled in several years.
Recently upgraded my passport, TSA Precheck, Travel ID, etc. ("newbie" ready to ride/fly).

Now packing for an upcoming trip, I've found that my assortment of travel pants have "shrunk" in storage. (that must be it) :shock:
Thus, I am on the hunt for new travel clothes.

Previously, nothing but Columbia long sleeve shirts, pants, and shorts.
Now needs a redo.

Slacks (casual, lightweight)
No iron, wrinkle free, minimum cotton (bulk and weight), elastic waist would help.
1 pair dress, 2 pairs casual?
*Really like the Columbia Men's "Global Adventurer" slacks but discontinued.

Long sleeve shirts (casual), wrinkle free, no cotton?
1 semi dress, 2 casual?

I only travel with a single carry-on so less bulk and weight is important.

Suggestions?

Retired newbie traveller.
mahalo,
j :D
Sandtrap,

Glad you are able to travel more again!

In addition to some of the brands mentioned, I like Railriders stuff -- they have excellent lightweight cargo pants (nylon) plus some nylon hiking pants I really like. Also their shirts. Drawback -- generally not available in retail stores, have to order (so mild guessing on sizes).

On an editorial note, some of the other responses were "don't look like an American tourist!" This viewpoint, frankly, leaves me laughing hard enough to injure myself. Unless you are wearing what the locals wear (in Paris, will you go for dark slim fit clothes?), look like the locals (how would you avoid looking like an American in Japan?), and speak the local language fluently with no accent, you will be identifiable as an American tourist from about 100 yards away. This is not a problem unless you are traveling in an area hostile to US citizens.

Even in Europe this is true. I mean, you are walking around in a European city, perhaps with a camera, possibly asking people for directions/suggestions/help .... trust me, they will know you are not from around there. Why this bothers some people bemuses me.

You want to travel light, so that will impact what clothes you can take; obviously all you can do is optimize for the expected weather and the amount of baggage you want to deal with.
100% agree. My wife and I travel to Europe at least once per year for the last 35 years and we both keep a small wardrobe there that we bought there. Just carry on with items people there ask us to bring. I can’t remember the last time we checked a bag. We are identified as Americans instantly. It is sually a conversation starter for them to tell us about their visits to the US and have had countless pleasant exchanges. It has never been a problem. We are not fooling anyone. Conversly, it is really easy to pick out a tourist in the US. They don’t feel the need to pretend they are Americans or apologize for being Italian, French, Brazilian etc...

I do, however, have some light weight microfiber slacks that I bought from Sam’s Club years ago that work really well for nicer occasions (dinner, visiting someone’s home) etc. Lightweight, never wrinkle, dry in no time, creases and pleats sharp for years. I am guilty of “dorking out” with convertible pants when hiking. Can be cooler in the morning and warmer later while also going uphill in the mountains. Nice to turn them into shorts just like the locals and other European tourists do. We definitely do not use them in town but if one is living out of a backpack for a long period of time, they are used all the time and save space.

OP didn’t ask about shirts but I have purchased some shirts from Joseph A Banks that are a blend and no iron. Really nice Oxford shirt with button down collar. I’ve put them in a carry on taken them out a day or two later and they look like they just came from the cleaners. I used them for work for years and seriously never had to iron one. Really good if traveling in the city.
What made me think I could start clean slated? The hardest to learn was the least complicated: Emily Saliers / And if I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know: Kerry Livgren

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by elcadarj » Wed Jan 23, 2019 7:57 am

+1 on Jos. Bank worth a look. They have a new Traveler Tech line in both traditional and trim fits. Can be worn with a sport coat, travel khakis or jeans.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by THY4373 » Wed Jan 23, 2019 8:16 am

I am a fan or Rohan. I have several sets of their slacks (I forget which design) that dry in hours even when hand washed. I also have a number of their shirts both synthetic and merino wool. All the stuff is high quality and dries overnight which is important to me because I travel hand baggage only (one 30L backpack). Rohan can be pricey but I only buy when they have one of their two annual sales that makes it more affordable. I have some the Costco UBTech pants both for myself and my son. They are good for the price and honestly are probably just fine for many folks. The only real complaints I have is that one their security pockets are not as well thought out as Rohan (this may be personal preference but that is my view) and they certainly don't dry as fast as Rohan (again depends on how you are doing laundry if at all while travelling).

For socks I like DarnTough merino wool. I use Ex-Officio for regular underwear and Woolly merino wool long johns for layering when I am travelling someplace colder.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by UpperNwGuy » Wed Jan 23, 2019 8:26 am

Interesting that nobody here likes cotton slacks. I travel fairly often and, since retiring, only take cotton slacks on trips. I have wool slacks at home, but they never go into the suitcase. And I don't own any slacks made from synthetics. Dockers work well for me. I get them in the darker colors.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by ZumZabo » Wed Jan 23, 2019 8:27 am

elcadarj wrote:
Wed Jan 23, 2019 7:57 am
+1 on Jos. Bank worth a look. They have a new Traveler Tech line in both traditional and trim fits. Can be worn with a sport coat, travel khakis or jeans.
Thank you for that. I wasn’t aware of the new Traveler Tech line. I will check it out. Haven’t been in the store for a long time because the product is so high quality and durable I haven’t needed to.
What made me think I could start clean slated? The hardest to learn was the least complicated: Emily Saliers / And if I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know: Kerry Livgren

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by Sandtrap » Wed Jan 23, 2019 9:12 am

Norsky19 wrote:
Wed Jan 23, 2019 6:00 am
Sandtrap wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:17 pm
Due to health, I have not travelled in several years.
Recently upgraded my passport, TSA Precheck, Travel ID, etc. ("newbie" ready to ride/fly).

Now packing for an upcoming trip, I've found that my assortment of travel pants have "shrunk" in storage. (that must be it) :shock:
Thus, I am on the hunt for new travel clothes.

Previously, nothing but Columbia long sleeve shirts, pants, and shorts.
Now needs a redo.

Slacks (casual, lightweight)
No iron, wrinkle free, minimum cotton (bulk and weight), elastic waist would help.
1 pair dress, 2 pairs casual?
*Really like the Columbia Men's "Global Adventurer" slacks but discontinued.

Long sleeve shirts (casual), wrinkle free, no cotton?
1 semi dress, 2 casual?

I only travel with a single carry-on so less bulk and weight is important.

Suggestions?

Retired newbie traveller.
mahalo,
j :D
Prana Stretch Zion. Amazing for just about everything.
Thanks for the tip! :D
I ordered a pair to try.
Hope it ifts :shock:

mahalo
j :D
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by forgeblast » Wed Jan 23, 2019 9:19 am

J295 wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 5:46 pm
Eddie Bauer Travex
Meets all your requirements.

These are great Pants!! my favorite are the
https://www.eddiebauer.com/product/mens ... ype=&size=
They move, stretch are very comfortable and are just my go to pants.

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by Sandtrap » Wed Jan 23, 2019 9:20 am

ZumZabo wrote:
Wed Jan 23, 2019 7:45 am
TN_Boy wrote:
Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:38 am
Sandtrap wrote:
Sun Jan 20, 2019 12:17 pm
Due to health, I have not travelled in several years.
Recently upgraded my passport, TSA Precheck, Travel ID, etc. ("newbie" ready to ride/fly).

Now packing for an upcoming trip, I've found that my assortment of travel pants have "shrunk" in storage. (that must be it) :shock:
Thus, I am on the hunt for new travel clothes.

Previously, nothing but Columbia long sleeve shirts, pants, and shorts.
Now needs a redo.

Slacks (casual, lightweight)
No iron, wrinkle free, minimum cotton (bulk and weight), elastic waist would help.
1 pair dress, 2 pairs casual?
*Really like the Columbia Men's "Global Adventurer" slacks but discontinued.

Long sleeve shirts (casual), wrinkle free, no cotton?
1 semi dress, 2 casual?

I only travel with a single carry-on so less bulk and weight is important.

Suggestions?

Retired newbie traveller.
mahalo,
j :D
Sandtrap,

Glad you are able to travel more again!

In addition to some of the brands mentioned, I like Railriders stuff -- they have excellent lightweight cargo pants (nylon) plus some nylon hiking pants I really like. Also their shirts. Drawback -- generally not available in retail stores, have to order (so mild guessing on sizes).

On an editorial note, some of the other responses were "don't look like an American tourist!" This viewpoint, frankly, leaves me laughing hard enough to injure myself. Unless you are wearing what the locals wear (in Paris, will you go for dark slim fit clothes?), look like the locals (how would you avoid looking like an American in Japan?), and speak the local language fluently with no accent, you will be identifiable as an American tourist from about 100 yards away. This is not a problem unless you are traveling in an area hostile to US citizens.

Even in Europe this is true. I mean, you are walking around in a European city, perhaps with a camera, possibly asking people for directions/suggestions/help .... trust me, they will know you are not from around there. Why this bothers some people bemuses me.

You want to travel light, so that will impact what clothes you can take; obviously all you can do is optimize for the expected weather and the amount of baggage you want to deal with.
100% agree. My wife and I travel to Europe at least once per year for the last 35 years and we both keep a small wardrobe there that we bought there. Just carry on with items people there ask us to bring. I can’t remember the last time we checked a bag. We are identified as Americans instantly. It is sually a conversation starter for them to tell us about their visits to the US and have had countless pleasant exchanges. It has never been a problem. We are not fooling anyone. Conversly, it is really easy to pick out a tourist in the US. They don’t feel the need to pretend they are Americans or apologize for being Italian, French, Brazilian etc...

I do, however, have some light weight microfiber slacks that I bought from Sam’s Club years ago that work really well for nicer occasions (dinner, visiting someone’s home) etc. Lightweight, never wrinkle, dry in no time, creases and pleats sharp for years. I am guilty of “dorking out” with convertible pants when hiking. Can be cooler in the morning and warmer later while also going uphill in the mountains. Nice to turn them into shorts just like the locals and other European tourists do. We definitely do not use them in town but if one is living out of a backpack for a long period of time, they are used all the time and save space.

OP didn’t ask about shirts but I have purchased some shirts from Joseph A Banks that are a blend and no iron. Really nice Oxford shirt with button down collar. I’ve put them in a carry on taken them out a day or two later and they look like they just came from the cleaners. I used them for work for years and seriously never had to iron one. Really good if traveling in the city.
Curious.
How did you keep a wardrobe "there"?
Did you have a second residence?
thanks.
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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by ZumZabo » Wed Jan 23, 2019 9:25 am

david_that_guy wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 8:46 am
Americans walk like they own the sidewalk. I think this is not so much an American characteristic; it's more the behavior of people who are not used to crowded cities. Just don't walk around like there's nobody else there.
Have you ever been walking in the afternoon on a Sunday in an urban European city with a group of locals on a stroll walking toward you? Their expectation is that you dive into traffic so they don’t have to give up some of sidewalk and stop walking four wide long enough to pass. There are rude Americans in Europe there are rude Europeans in the US there are rude Americans in the US and there are rude Europeans in Europe or Asia or South America. You just don’t see the polite respectful Americans there because they are not making a scene and they are possibly communicating in the local language. We encounter Americans in Europe all the time and often they don’t know we are Americans. I see Europeans, Asians, South Americans in the US with jeans or shorts and running shoes wearing sport jerseys of their favorite football team. It never occurs to me that they are being ugly foreigners or being disrespectful of our culture. They are just travelers exploring our country. We are a lot mores similar than we different.
There are trade offs when traveling. It isn’t perfect but it is worth it to see other cultures in a world that is becoming more homogenized. I’ll take the trade offs to experience the culture, architecture, topography and cuisine of other places. If you are kind, polite and curious you will be fine in any culture you choose to explore.
What made me think I could start clean slated? The hardest to learn was the least complicated: Emily Saliers / And if I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know: Kerry Livgren

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Re: Men's No-Cotton Travel Pants Suggestions? Other Tips from experienced world travellers?

Post by Sandtrap » Wed Jan 23, 2019 9:25 am

Has anyone tried the "Pick Pocket Proof" Pants from "Clothing Arts"???
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