Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

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djpeteski
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by djpeteski » Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:21 am

4nursebee wrote:
Sun Feb 24, 2019 1:38 pm
Still no lessons but some progress.
I've been able to go 8 lengths breast stroke with no break.
4 lengths freestyle without a break.
Kickboard has helped improve my freestyle kick some.
40 lengths swum regularly several days a week, though not hooked on this.
Today I am going to work on breast stroke kicks more.
Still fun.
I feel like i am going through this with you.

For me, I started working through the Total Immersion book. I have found it very helpful, but you also need the video. I am getting much better, but did not have a good swim this AM. Friday's swim was excellent though.

Norsky19
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by Norsky19 » Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:33 am

Here's a thought, Swimming really well is efficient. Therefore, to burn the calories and get the workout you are looking for, it will require a lot more laps to get the job done. If you are a competent swimmer and somewhat inefficient with your strokes, you will swim less and burn more calories! I think becoming a very good swimmer is good for saving your life if you fall out of a boat and need to reach an island before you drown. :wink: Being a bad swimmer but good enough to not drown in a pool means you will have great workouts just swimming a few laps! :sharebeer

Cycle
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by Cycle » Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:34 am

just watch some youtube videos and practice what you see.

i don't have a gym membership, so i just swim the open water course our city runs during the summer, each lap is 1/2 a mile.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

runner540
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by runner540 » Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:40 am

Norsky19 wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:33 am
Here's a thought, Swimming really well is efficient. Therefore, to burn the calories and get the workout you are looking for, it will require a lot more laps to get the job done. If you are a competent swimmer and somewhat inefficient with your strokes, you will swim less and burn more calories! I think becoming a very good swimmer is good for saving your life if you fall out of a boat and need to reach an island before you drown. :wink: Being a bad swimmer but good enough to not drown in a pool means you will have great workouts just swimming a few laps! :sharebeer
I hope this is a joke...

carol-brennan
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by carol-brennan » Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:45 am

I have not been able to bring myself to swim in public pools since I learned how much urine there is in a typical pool.

https://www.theguardian.com/science/201 ... -the-truth

"Ahead of the London 2012 Olympics, the US swimmer, Ryan Lochte, said: “I think there’s just something about getting into chlorine water that you just automatically go,” and his team-mate, Michael Phelps, agreed it was acceptable behaviour. “I think everybody pees in the pool,” he said. “Chlorine kills it, so it’s not bad.”

However, while urine is sterile, compounds in urine, including urea, ammonia, and creatinine have been found to react with disinfectants to form byproducts known as DBPs that can lead to eye and respiratory irritation. Long-term exposure to the compounds has been linked to asthma in professional swimmers and pool workers."

Norsky19
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by Norsky19 » Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:48 am

runner540 wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:40 am
Norsky19 wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:33 am
Here's a thought, Swimming really well is efficient. Therefore, to burn the calories and get the workout you are looking for, it will require a lot more laps to get the job done. If you are a competent swimmer and somewhat inefficient with your strokes, you will swim less and burn more calories! I think becoming a very good swimmer is good for saving your life if you fall out of a boat and need to reach an island before you drown. :wink: Being a bad swimmer but good enough to not drown in a pool means you will have great workouts just swimming a few laps! :sharebeer
I hope this is a joke...
A joke and factually correct. 8-)

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Youngblood
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by Youngblood » Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:05 am

I never needed to lose weight and never liked swimming except when having fun as a kid. Swimming laps in a pool for me is exceedingly boring.

I guess years ago, when I read the short article below, I haven’t even been in the pool at the local gym except for a couple of times.

SWIMMING IS NOT GOOD FOR WEIGHT LOSS

If you want to lose weight, lower cholesterol, or help to control diabetes, swimming is better than nothing, but not that much better (1).

A recent report from the University of Colorado shows that obese people who start a supervised swimming program do not lower their fasting blood sugar, insulin, total cholesterol, good HDL cholesterol and bad LDL cholesterol levels. They also did not lose weight or redistribute their body fat (2).

These results are different from people who start land-based sports such as running, aerobic dancing, racquetball and cycling. When you exercise on land, your body is surrounded by air which insulates you, causing your body to retain heat and your body temperature to rise for up to 18 hours after you finish exercising. Increased body temperature speeds up your metabolism and helps you to lose weight and lower cholesterol. On the other hand, when you swim, your body is surrounded by water which is an excellent conductor of heat away from your body, preventing your body temperature from rising. If you want to lose weight by swimming, the best way is to do it is by using a swimming machine on dry land.

I'm Dr. Gabe Mirkin on Fitness.
"I made my money by selling too soon." | Bernard M. Baruch

alfaspider
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by alfaspider » Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:17 am

Youngblood wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:05 am
I never needed to lose weight and never liked swimming except when having fun as a kid. Swimming laps in a pool for me is exceedingly boring.

I guess years ago, when I read the short article below, I haven’t even been in the pool at the local gym except for a couple of times.

SWIMMING IS NOT GOOD FOR WEIGHT LOSS

If you want to lose weight, lower cholesterol, or help to control diabetes, swimming is better than nothing, but not that much better (1).

A recent report from the University of Colorado shows that obese people who start a supervised swimming program do not lower their fasting blood sugar, insulin, total cholesterol, good HDL cholesterol and bad LDL cholesterol levels. They also did not lose weight or redistribute their body fat (2).

These results are different from people who start land-based sports such as running, aerobic dancing, racquetball and cycling. When you exercise on land, your body is surrounded by air which insulates you, causing your body to retain heat and your body temperature to rise for up to 18 hours after you finish exercising. Increased body temperature speeds up your metabolism and helps you to lose weight and lower cholesterol. On the other hand, when you swim, your body is surrounded by water which is an excellent conductor of heat away from your body, preventing your body temperature from rising. If you want to lose weight by swimming, the best way is to do it is by using a swimming machine on dry land.

I'm Dr. Gabe Mirkin on Fitness.
The only thing that causes weight loss is a calorie deficit. Exercise can help you run a calorie deficit by increasing your burn rate, allowing you to eat a more "normal" feeling quantity of food while still maintaining a deficit. But it can also stimulate your appetite, so it's a double-edged sword.

I'm quite skeptical of the explanation that water's heat conductivity has anything to do with reduced weight loss in swimmers. Swimming may burn fewer calories than if it took place in air, but it's still burning calories relative to sitting around. Perhaps it is more appetite stimulative than other aerobic endeavors. As for cholesterol and such, it's far too difficult to draw conclusions if the study was not strictly diet controlled. Perhaps the people who started swimming decided they could binge on french fries after burning all those calories in the pool. The article does not mention what constitutes a "supervised swimming program" or who the participants were. Were they fit 20 year-olds in a strenuous athletic training regimen or obese 70 year olds doing mild water aerobics?

stoptothink
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by stoptothink » Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:24 am

alfaspider wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:17 am
Youngblood wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:05 am
I never needed to lose weight and never liked swimming except when having fun as a kid. Swimming laps in a pool for me is exceedingly boring.

I guess years ago, when I read the short article below, I haven’t even been in the pool at the local gym except for a couple of times.

SWIMMING IS NOT GOOD FOR WEIGHT LOSS

If you want to lose weight, lower cholesterol, or help to control diabetes, swimming is better than nothing, but not that much better (1).

A recent report from the University of Colorado shows that obese people who start a supervised swimming program do not lower their fasting blood sugar, insulin, total cholesterol, good HDL cholesterol and bad LDL cholesterol levels. They also did not lose weight or redistribute their body fat (2).

These results are different from people who start land-based sports such as running, aerobic dancing, racquetball and cycling. When you exercise on land, your body is surrounded by air which insulates you, causing your body to retain heat and your body temperature to rise for up to 18 hours after you finish exercising. Increased body temperature speeds up your metabolism and helps you to lose weight and lower cholesterol. On the other hand, when you swim, your body is surrounded by water which is an excellent conductor of heat away from your body, preventing your body temperature from rising. If you want to lose weight by swimming, the best way is to do it is by using a swimming machine on dry land.

I'm Dr. Gabe Mirkin on Fitness.
The only thing that causes weight loss is a calorie deficit. Exercise can help you run a calorie deficit by increasing your burn rate, allowing you to eat a more "normal" feeling quantity of food while still maintaining a deficit. But it can also stimulate your appetite, so it's a double-edged sword.

I'm quite skeptical of the explanation that water's heat conductivity has anything to do with reduced weight loss in swimmers. Swimming may burn fewer calories than if it took place in air, but it's still burning calories relative to sitting around. Perhaps it is more appetite stimulative than other aerobic endeavors. As for cholesterol and such, it's far too difficult to draw conclusions if the study was not strictly diet controlled. Perhaps the people who started swimming decided they could binge on french fries after burning all those calories in the pool. The article does not mention what constitutes a "supervised swimming program" or who the participants were. Were they fit 20 year-olds in a strenuous athletic training regimen or obese 70 year olds doing mild water aerobics?
"A recent report"...I doubt that got through peer-review. So many uncontrolled factors in that study design. It doesn't make any sense.

Hikes_With_Dogs
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by Hikes_With_Dogs » Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:26 am

Re: diet


As a triathlete, I swim, bike, and run regularly.

NOTHING makes me as hungry as swimming. I am hungrier after swimming 30 minutes than I am after running 2 hrs. I trust my body to know when it's calorie depleted and when it's expended a lot of energy. I always thought it was extra expended effort keeping my core body temperature up as well as the cardio.

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4nursebee
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by 4nursebee » Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:59 am

I'm never going to swim with Lochte, Phelps, and one BH poster.
I've lost almost 20# in two months from limiting carbs (we use carbs/sugars for energy, not calories) and exercising, principally through swimming.
I am not hungry after exercising. I am exhausted.
I enjoy watching videos so far and try to work on something different each time I swim. Likely why I have not looked for coaching.
15W feet limit fins, thus far have not seen any. However, I have been able to really see improvement without.

Today I was able to swim four lengths with freestyle kicking alone using a board. I've done that amount before but had to take breaks by standing up 1-2 times each length. Speed better but still hard work.
4nursebee

runner540
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by runner540 » Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:10 pm

Hikes_With_Dogs wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:26 am
Re: diet


As a triathlete, I swim, bike, and run regularly.

NOTHING makes me as hungry as swimming. I am hungrier after swimming 30 minutes than I am after running 2 hrs. I trust my body to know when it's calorie depleted and when it's expended a lot of energy. I always thought it was extra expended effort keeping my core body temperature up as well as the cardio.

+1
This thread is so entertaining. So far people have said that swimming (efficiently) doesn't burn many calories, and that breathing with a snorkel is just as good for fitness as without. There are several groups of swimmers and all are on thia thread: people who swam/swim competitively (flip turns, side breathing, all 4 strokes), triathletes, and dabblers.

jminv
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by jminv » Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:13 pm

4nursebee wrote:
Sun Feb 24, 2019 1:38 pm
Still no lessons but some progress.
I've been able to go 8 lengths breast stroke with no break.
4 lengths freestyle without a break.
Kickboard has helped improve my freestyle kick some.
40 lengths swum regularly several days a week, though not hooked on this.
Today I am going to work on breast stroke kicks more.
Still fun.
I would recommend a few lessons and/or having someone taping your stroke method and comparing it against how it 'should' be done. It is very easy to get into a bad technique and harder to get out of it. Having a good technique will also make swimming much more enjoyable, allow you to move more quickly, and address breathing issues, which can create anxiety/panic for new swimmers. If you don't do lessons, do try the comparison method.

I was a competitive swimmer, started when I was very young. I spent a significant portion of my life up to university in the pool. Swimming is great exercise, especially when you push yourself very hard for an extended duration. What I don't like about swimming is how boring it became for me. I was in the pool twice a day for 3+ hours total a day. It's the water and your thoughts, which in moderation is enjoyable. As an adult, I don't like to swim for more than 20 minutes for this reason, though, and push myself very hard in those 20 minutes. It's good to combine swimming as part of a broader workout routine. The worst part about swimming, though, is how quickly you lose your touch for the water. It's crazy how much you lose in just a week of not swimming.

You didn't mention backstroke, but you should try it if you haven't already. I was best at butterfly followed by backstroke. At a slower pace, backstroke can be relaxing and a nice change of routine.

SrGrumpy
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by SrGrumpy » Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:39 pm

jminv wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:13 pm
What I don't like about swimming is how boring it became for me.
Ha! I definitely count down the last 10 minutes of my workout: "Are we there yet?" There's no rule against taking a break, yakking with someone in the next lane, floating on the back for a bit and gazing at the birds overhead. And then resuming.
4nursebee wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:59 am
Today I was able to swim four lengths with freestyle kicking alone using a board. I've done that amount before but had to take breaks by standing up 1-2 times each length. Speed better but still hard work.
How long is the length? I'd shoot myself if I was doing that drill in a 50-meter pool. Kicking is definitely hard work for little overall contribution to the stroke.

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4nursebee
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by 4nursebee » Tue Feb 26, 2019 1:25 pm

SrGrumpy wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:39 pm
jminv wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:13 pm
What I don't like about swimming is how boring it became for me.
Ha! I definitely count down the last 10 minutes of my workout: "Are we there yet?" There's no rule against taking a break, yakking with someone in the next lane, floating on the back for a bit and gazing at the birds overhead. And then resuming.
4nursebee wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:59 am
Today I was able to swim four lengths with freestyle kicking alone using a board. I've done that amount before but had to take breaks by standing up 1-2 times each length. Speed better but still hard work.
How long is the length? I'd shoot myself if I was doing that drill in a 50-meter pool. Kicking is definitely hard work for little overall contribution to the stroke.

I do not know how long the pool is but 72 lengths is one mile, 36 laps is one mile.
I do back stroke sometimes, not many laps. It is on my list to build laps when the pool is calm (I get a lot of water in when inhaling)
4nursebee

SrGrumpy
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by SrGrumpy » Tue Feb 26, 2019 1:35 pm

4nursebee wrote:
Tue Feb 26, 2019 1:25 pm
I do not know how long the pool is but 72 lengths is one mile, 36 laps is one mile.
I do back stroke sometimes, not many laps. It is on my list to build laps when the pool is calm (I get a lot of water in when inhaling)
Sounds like 25 yards or so each way. That's a good length. If you get bored, you can change it up by doing kicking slowly for one length and then fast for the next one - all sorts of fun patterns at your disposal. A length could also begin quickly, then you slow down, then finish fast.

Grateful1
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by Grateful1 » Tue Feb 26, 2019 11:53 pm

From personal experience as a later in life learned to swim swimmer, I would strongly recommend the Total Immersion Swimming videos. The Total Immersion course teaches proper technique in an easy to accomplish series of mini-steps. And technique is everything in swimming. The video course will start you off right with a stroke that keeps you arm motion in "the scapular plane" and thus avoids shoulder injury.

I began as a non-swimmer at age 65 and after 2 years now have swum a cumulative 425 miles. Currently I swim a mile at a time, 4 times per week and am having a heck of good time doing it.
No one is more surprised by this than me. I got hooked on the continuous improvement aspect of technique. Luckily I have a nearby indoor public pool. Now for me a day without swimming is like a day without sunshine. It is NOT about power or working hard.It is about balance & streamlined body position to minimize drag. Learning to keep your head low in the water is vital as otherwise your legs sink increasing frontal drag. Breathing becomes easy with body rotation rather than head lift. You can always rotate to air and the air is free so take all you want as they say. But the bigger hurdle is learning to exhale fully and avoiding breath holding which is very tiring. Who would lift weights at the gym while holding there breath? Same with this exercise. Using a swim snorkel at first may speed your initial progress. Goggles are essential. Once you begin to swim significant periods of time it is helpful to us a skin moisturized after your post swimming session shower to avoid dry itchy skin. Don't be intimidated by other lap swimmers. Just inquire about the local lane etiquette and join in. Everyone started at the beginning at one time. If you stick with it your progress will be rapid and in 4 months you won't believe how well you can swim. Once again I highly recommend the Total Immersion course. I can often recognize TI swimmers in the lap lanes. They tend to have good body position keep their head low, rotate to breath, have a high elbow lead recovery, a full stroke with body rotation that takes advantage of gravity and core muscles for power. They look long and streamlined, and seem to glide down the pool rotating side to side, with rhythm and grace.
For a beginner I would recommend the " Effortless Endurance Self-Coaching Course" from Total Immersion.

msk
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by msk » Wed Feb 27, 2019 4:23 am

Just for a contrarian view. I used to swim 500 yards daily in a solar heated outdoor pool. Frankly, I find most talk about technique somewhat strange. The whole point of swimming is exercise. Excellent technique implies the least exercise and exhaustion :shock: Poor technique and you really work hard at it. Anyway a couple of years back I had open heart surgery, at age 72, despite the swimming. Valve issues; one repair, one replacement with a bio prosthesis, plus one bypass. I had nil symptoms, perhaps because of the swimming? Surgery was recommended because a routine check indicated a murmur. Mr Google said my median life expectancy was 2 years, then I wasted half a year thinking about it... After the surgery I became somewhat confused. I am on some medication to slow down my heart beats. Is that not the opposite of vigorous exercise? Amongst a dozen of my buddies, only one died of heart issues; a couple of years after being fitted with a pacemaker/defibrillator. Died at age 78. Seems these days we all undergo heart surgery/stents sooner or later. After that we seem to do well until weird diseases crop up. None of my buddies exercise :annoyed Then I noted that my buddies of similar age (70 to 80+) are dying of stuff other than heart issues. Everyone seems to end up with some disease that none of us have ever heard of (e.g. idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, refracting anaemia, supranuclear progressive Parkinson, etc.). So, all you youngsters under 70: keep swimming, vigorously, and get that heart repaired quickly (like most of my buddies). After the repairs I have chosen to just relax, until some weird disease I have never heard of strikes :annoyed

runner540
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by runner540 » Wed Feb 27, 2019 7:36 am

msk wrote:
Wed Feb 27, 2019 4:23 am
Just for a contrarian view. I used to swim 500 yards daily in a solar heated outdoor pool. Frankly, I find most talk about technique somewhat strange. The whole point of swimming is exercise. Excellent technique implies the least exercise and exhaustion :shock: Poor technique and you really work hard at it.
Um what? Are the Olympic swimmers in really bad shape because they're too good at swimming?? Good technique prevents injury and lets you go faster - and you will get a great workout if you are focused on swimming more and faster.
Are you saying since you had health issues, swimming is useless?

stoptothink
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by stoptothink » Wed Feb 27, 2019 9:52 am

msk wrote:
Wed Feb 27, 2019 4:23 am
Just for a contrarian view. I used to swim 500 yards daily in a solar heated outdoor pool. Frankly, I find most talk about technique somewhat strange. The whole point of swimming is exercise. Excellent technique implies the least exercise and exhaustion :shock: Poor technique and you really work hard at it. Anyway a couple of years back I had open heart surgery, at age 72, despite the swimming. Valve issues; one repair, one replacement with a bio prosthesis, plus one bypass. I had nil symptoms, perhaps because of the swimming? Surgery was recommended because a routine check indicated a murmur. Mr Google said my median life expectancy was 2 years, then I wasted half a year thinking about it... After the surgery I became somewhat confused. I am on some medication to slow down my heart beats. Is that not the opposite of vigorous exercise? Amongst a dozen of my buddies, only one died of heart issues; a couple of years after being fitted with a pacemaker/defibrillator. Died at age 78. Seems these days we all undergo heart surgery/stents sooner or later. After that we seem to do well until weird diseases crop up. None of my buddies exercise :annoyed Then I noted that my buddies of similar age (70 to 80+) are dying of stuff other than heart issues. Everyone seems to end up with some disease that none of us have ever heard of (e.g. idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, refracting anaemia, supranuclear progressive Parkinson, etc.). So, all you youngsters under 70: keep swimming, vigorously, and get that heart repaired quickly (like most of my buddies). After the repairs I have chosen to just relax, until some weird disease I have never heard of strikes :annoyed
:oops: Good technique does not preclude you from getting a good workout, it simply means you go faster at the same level of intensity. I remember a similar sentiment in a thread about rowing: it is not the modality, it is your intensity. If you aren't "getting a good workout", push yourself harder. PERIOD. Some absolutely bizarre ideas about exercise in this thread.

SrGrumpy
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by SrGrumpy » Wed Feb 27, 2019 12:07 pm

msk wrote:
Wed Feb 27, 2019 4:23 am
Poor technique and you really work hard at it.
... and then you wonder why you got that rotator cuff injury. A beautiful stroke is a sight to behold - "rhythm and grace," as @grateful1 stated four posts upthread.

msk
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by msk » Thu Feb 28, 2019 1:56 am

My post was a bit tongue-in-cheek. I swim quite well, DW does not. She hates swimming because just a 50 yards totally exhausts her. Never did figure out the breathing bit. Just from personal observations (I meet around a dozen childhood buddies aged 70+ weekly) I do believe that exercise is hugely important for, say, up to age 70. My buddies include semi pro soccer players (i.e. in excellent shape most of their lives), but beyond 70 it does seem that nature just intrudes rudely to kill you off. Funnily enough, there does not seem to be any exercise/nonexercise pattern as to who needs cardiac repairs by 70+. I must admit that surviving heart attacks/repairs seems quite common amongst my dozen buddies (6 out of 12 already!), a major, quiet advance over the past few decades. My Mom is a great believer in lifelong exercise (currently 91) but even she needed an aortic valve replacement (by catheter) at age 87 following a lifetime of that valve leaking post rheumatic fever in childhood. Kids, keep exercising :beer Umm. Less beer...

Carol88888
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by Carol88888 » Thu Feb 28, 2019 2:02 am

I was really helped by a swimming course I took through Total Immersion Swimming. You can also check out the books and videos. A very relaxed freestyle stroke is taught that when done properly looks beautiful and reduces the sense of effort. Check out some of the free video clips on internet.

SrGrumpy
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by SrGrumpy » Sun Aug 04, 2019 11:09 pm

Resurrecting an old thread.

OP -- summer's in full swing. How's the swimming going?

crystalbank
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by crystalbank » Mon Aug 05, 2019 10:05 pm

Started swimming atleast 2x-3x per week starting this year and recently joined an Advanced Swimming Lessons group. The training was immensely helpful especially for strokes other than freestyle. Like OP, I too found swimming at a consistent pace very relaxing and zen like. Eventually I wanna join a Master Swim group, but they can get very intense.

I wasn't trying to lose a lot of weight, but swimming slightly helped. If anyone out there wants to burn a lot of calories, I suggest the 'Butterfly' stroke. Very intense and burns a lot of calories compared to all other strokes.

My only complaint is the pools around here in LA are crowded! I always have to share the lane with multiple people and there are so many kids in the pool anytime of the year.

fru-gal
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by fru-gal » Tue Aug 06, 2019 8:55 am

There seems to be a lot of overthinking going on here. Stick to the crawl, breathe when you're comfortable, relax, avoid the breast stroke, which is an invention of the devil.

Sophia1884
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Re: Swimming, do you? Advice sought.

Post by Sophia1884 » Tue Aug 06, 2019 10:02 am

Therapist Investor wrote:
Wed Jan 16, 2019 8:58 am
I swam competitively in high school, was a part time swim coach in college, and then gave it up for most of my 20s. I recently returned to the sport. There is so much technique to learn that you really need a coach regardless of when you are learning. It's easier to learn as a child, but you can definitely learn to swim as an adult if you are patient and work hard. There are multiple drills for each stroke that help you get the basics down. I recommend you look for a master's swim team in your area...one that advertises itself as being for swimmers at all levels. If you join a master's swim team, they should be able to provide the coaching that will help you pick up each stroke.

I recently joined a master's swim team and have loved the fact that it provides a new group of people, extra motivation on those early mornings, and someone telling you what to do in the water. If you swim alone, you have to be really self-motivated, something that I just do not possess when it comes to exercise.

Best of luck!

I learned in my mid 20s and very highly recommend working with an swim coach, one-on-one (make sure they have plenty of experience with adults. Triathlon coaches are great here too) for maybe 3-5 lessons. You won't become a master but that's how long it took me to become comfortable with the strokes/breathing + Youtube videos of how it all looked underwater. For practice I joined a local masters teams and in the beginning wasn't able to keep up with even the kiddos of the local swim team that practiced with the masters team. 3 months in...keeping up with the kiddos. 6 months...getting an amazing workout. 1 yr...pegged as a swimmer for my developed back muscles and asked for advice for adult swimmers. Life comes 'round full circle :D

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