Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

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TLC1957
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Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by TLC1957 » Sun Dec 09, 2018 8:45 am

Do not forget to water your Christmas tree! According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), more than 200 home fires each year start with a Christmas tree. In this video, NIST fire researchers demonstrate what could happen if a fire starts in a watered Christmas tree vs. a dry Christmas tree.

I hope you find this video helpful please share with your friends and neighbors.


https://www.nist.gov/video/christmas-tr ... s-dry-tree

runner3081
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by runner3081 » Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:10 am

Thanks for sharing. I was curious to see the actual odds of this happening

Assuming the numbers on the internet are correct, the chances of a tree fire are extremely low.

.001108%

95 million Christmas trees in the US
81% are fake
Leaving 18,050,000 real trees

200 fires per year.

With that said, you have a better chance of a tree fire than being struck by lightning :)

We don't do a real tree, too much work.

euroswiss
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by euroswiss » Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:30 am

Good advice! This always brings up memories from my childhood days (I’m not THAT old... :wink: ): we not only failed to water our tree but we actually used probably a total of 20 LIVE CANDLES (yes, candles clipped to the tree branches)!!!!! Alas, we bought the tree on Dec 23 and took it back down before New Year because, of course, it dropped needles like crazy by then. Still, in retrospect, amazing that we never burned down our house....

SimonJester
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by SimonJester » Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:26 am

I think changes in modern Christmas tree lighting had made this issue even rarer. I remember as a kid those Christmas tree lights would burn you quick if you touched them. Now many people are using LED lights that produce next to no heat. I have many drier wood products in my house that have lights on them and I do not worry about them catching fire.

Water your tree because you want it to last...
"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin

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unclescrooge
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by unclescrooge » Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:11 am

runner3081 wrote:
Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:10 am
Thanks for sharing. I was curious to see the actual odds of this happening

Assuming the numbers on the internet are correct, the chances of a tree fire are extremely low.

.001108%

95 million Christmas trees in the US
81% are fake
Leaving 18,050,000 real trees

200 fires per year.

With that said, you have a better chance of a tree fire than being struck by lightning :)

We don't do a real tree, too much work.
Do you have the stats on electrical fires started by fake trees?

runner3081
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by runner3081 » Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:26 am

unclescrooge wrote:
Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:11 am
runner3081 wrote:
Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:10 am
Thanks for sharing. I was curious to see the actual odds of this happening

Assuming the numbers on the internet are correct, the chances of a tree fire are extremely low.

.001108%

95 million Christmas trees in the US
81% are fake
Leaving 18,050,000 real trees

200 fires per year.

With that said, you have a better chance of a tree fire than being struck by lightning :)

We don't do a real tree, too much work.
Do you have the stats on electrical fires started by fake trees?
No. Interesting thought though.

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nisiprius
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by nisiprius » Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:32 am

I am bitterly disappointed. Here I was all set to enjoy a spirited discussion between people arguing that it is safer to water them and people arguing it is safer to let them dry out.

One can only imagine what it was like in the days when people put candles on trees.
In 'The Fir Tree,' Hans Christian Andersen wrote:At last the candles were lit, and then what a glistening blaze of light the tree presented! It trembled so with joy in all its branches, that one of the candles fell among the green leaves and burnt some of them. “Help! help!” exclaimed the young ladies, but there was no danger, for they quickly extinguished the fire.
What fun and merriment, putting out Christmas tree fires! But perhaps trees were not left unattended with lighted candles on them.
Last edited by nisiprius on Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

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Fletch
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by Fletch » Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:44 am

Christmas tree water recipie, all ingredients approximate volume depending on size of container:

1 quart water
1 cup vinegar
1/2 cup sugar
1 copper penny

Have used this for years and a real tree lasts a long time. Be sure to cut off the bottom two inches of the trunk immediately prior to submerging in the water mixture or the resin will prevent the water uptake.
“Meaningless! Meaningless!” says the Teacher. Whoever loves money never has enough; whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with their income. This too is meaningless.

quantAndHold
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by quantAndHold » Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:19 pm

There was some book I read as a kid where the servants had to stand watch over the tree with buckets of sand and water when the candles were lit. I can’t remember he book, but the mental image of a footman standing by the Christmas tree holding a bucket of sand has stuck with me.

Rondo
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by Rondo » Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:26 pm

Fletch wrote:
Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:44 am
Christmas tree water recipie, all ingredients approximate volume depending on size of container:

1 quart water
1 cup vinegar
1/2 cup sugar
1 copper penny

Have used this for years and a real tree lasts a long time. Be sure to cut off the bottom two inches of the trunk immediately prior to submerging in the water mixture or the resin will prevent the water uptake.
I love these crazy recipes. I’ve found that plain old tap water works just great.

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tennisplyr
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by tennisplyr » Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:35 pm

Yes, I keep reminding my daughter to water her tree!
Those who move forward with a happy spirit will find that things always work out.

Starfish
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by Starfish » Sun Dec 09, 2018 8:06 pm

I did not any idea that watering the tree is a thing. I have never heard about it.

quantAndHold
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by quantAndHold » Sun Dec 09, 2018 8:18 pm

Starfish wrote:
Sun Dec 09, 2018 8:06 pm
I did not any idea that watering the tree is a thing. I have never heard about it.
https://ento.psu.edu/extension/christma ... stmas-tree
Maintaining a high moisture level in the tree is the single most important factor in reducing needle loss and keeping the tree fresh. This is accomplished primarily through the use of water-holding stands and maintaining the water level in the stand above the base of the tree.

criticalmass
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by criticalmass » Mon Dec 10, 2018 12:22 am

TLC1957 wrote:
Sun Dec 09, 2018 8:45 am
Do not forget to water your Christmas tree! According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), more than 200 home fires each year start with a Christmas tree. In this video, NIST fire researchers demonstrate what could happen if a fire starts in a watered Christmas tree vs. a dry Christmas tree.

I hope you find this video helpful please share with your friends and neighbors.


https://www.nist.gov/video/christmas-tr ... s-dry-tree
Heck, in Austria there was a tree in the house with lit candles. Never burned down the house of course, but don't recommend this with cats.

SimonJester
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by SimonJester » Mon Dec 10, 2018 9:06 am

Rondo wrote:
Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:26 pm
Fletch wrote:
Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:44 am
Christmas tree water recipie, all ingredients approximate volume depending on size of container:

1 quart water
1 cup vinegar
1/2 cup sugar
1 copper penny

Have used this for years and a real tree lasts a long time. Be sure to cut off the bottom two inches of the trunk immediately prior to submerging in the water mixture or the resin will prevent the water uptake.
I love these crazy recipes. I’ve found that plain old tap water works just great.
Mythbusters tested a whole bunch of these are found that plain tap water was the bast. Everything either did nothing more then water or made it worse...
"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin

Kuna_Papa_Wengi
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by Kuna_Papa_Wengi » Mon Dec 10, 2018 9:52 am

I always cut a slice off the bottom when I first get the tree home. It seems to soak up water better after that. The tree uses a surprising amount of water in the first few days. It also seems that if I ever let the water run out, the tree doesn't soak it up well after I refill it. So I try to never let it run out.

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GoldStar
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by GoldStar » Mon Dec 10, 2018 11:34 am

I thought watering live trees was common sense in this day and age. Kind of like not smoking in bed, wearing a seatbelt in a car, etc.

Starfish
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by Starfish » Mon Dec 10, 2018 12:42 pm

It depends how long you plan to keep the tree for.
When I throw away my Christmas tree, after 2-3 weeks, is still green.

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TLC1957
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Re: Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

Post by TLC1957 » Mon Dec 10, 2018 1:43 pm

How many go out and cut your tree from a tree Christmas tree farm vs buying one that was cut 6-8 weeks ago and was transported to your local big box store? It will make a big difference on how fresh it is and how long before it starts dropping pine needles. For about 10 years we would buy a live tree with a root ball and bring it into the house for a week or so. We would then plant the tree on our property and watch it grow. Took a little preplaning to dig the hole before the ground froze, usually in October, fill it with leaves and grass clippings, cover it with plywood until needed a few days after Christmas. It was fun to plant the trees when the kids were born and see how much they grew compared to the tree. Something we missed after living in the same home for 28 years and raising our kids and moving away when we retired to be closer to our children.

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