Making loose leaf tea

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ThankYouJack
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Making loose leaf tea

Post by ThankYouJack » Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:46 am

How do you make loose leaf tea? I'm thinking about getting a french press but wondering what others prefer.

Edit for more info: Ideally I'd like something that makes ~3 cups and I'd prefer to let it steep overnight so I can just heat it up in the morning to have first thing
Last edited by ThankYouJack on Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:12 am, edited 2 times in total.

goaties
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Re: Buying and making loose leaf tea

Post by goaties » Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:54 am

I've been using loose leaf tea for centuries (ok, I'm not that old, but some days feel like it). I buy it by the pound, now that I know what I like. It's far cheaper that way. I get it from Amazon. Davidson"s is my favorite brand. Their cranberry orange herbal is spectacular. I also like their decaf Earl Grey. No Earl Grey approaches Twinings for flavor, but Davidson's is pretty good.

I brew in a teapot. That way, I can make many cups at once. I let tea of any kind steep for at least half an hour to release all the flavor. That's especially important for herbal tea. I use an old-fashioned strainer which was my mother's. I imagine you can buy those anywhere (they look like a tiny metal basket on a handle). I'm not sure about a french press. Never tried it. Compressing the tea leaves might release some bitterness which steeping does not.

tenkuky
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Re: Buying and making loose leaf tea

Post by tenkuky » Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:58 am

Depends what style you like. In the past, I've loved getting tea bags and loose leaf from here when I was experimenting.
https://www.republicoftea.com/

Have used tea balls/infusers to prepare in regular pot of boiling water.

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c.coyle
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Re: Buying and making loose leaf tea

Post by c.coyle » Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:00 am

ThankYouJack wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:46 am
I'd like to try out some different loose leaf teas. Any recommendations for buying a variety to start to pin point which types I like best?

Also, how do you make it? I'm thinking about getting a french press
I buy loose tea online, primarily from Arbor Teas and Nicholas Coffee (I have no connection to either). It's hard to find decent loose tea in a small town.

I'm primarily a cup-at-a-time drinker, so I use a spoon-sized infuser. A pot with a multi-cup infuser when I want more. I haven't tried a french press.

The important thing, in my experience is fresh water brought to a full, rolling boil for black teas, and just short of a boil for most greens.

A good Darjeeling is my everyday cup. I also keep some green on hand.
VTSAX - 40%, VTIAX - 10%, VBTLX - 50%

MJS
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by MJS » Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:15 am

Upton Tea has sampler kits. For robust tea, try the British Blend; for a more elegant trial, try Oolong or Darjeeling; for the most delicate, try Green.

Using a french press to brew tea is like using a hammer to drive a screw: not recommended. Get a teapot.

KlangFool
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by KlangFool » Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:21 am

OP,

https://www.uptontea.com/

1) Upton tea is a direct tea importer. They have 200+ varieties of teas. They could be beat in term of price, quality, and varieties.

2) I use Glass French Press or Glass Tea Pot to brew my tea. For loose leaf tea, you need plenty of space for the tea leaves to be fully expanded. So, please avoid any small infuser or tea ball.

KlangFool

KlangFool
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by KlangFool » Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:26 am

MJS wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:15 am
Upton Tea has sampler kits. For robust tea, try the British Blend; for a more elegant trial, try Oolong or Darjeeling; for the most delicate, try Green.

Using a french press to brew tea is like using a hammer to drive a screw: not recommended. Get a teapot.
MJS,

I disagreed. It depends on the spaces for the tea leaves after it had been pressed. Some teapots are badly designed with small infuser. It leaves insufficient space for the tea leaves to be fully expanded. Upton tea has a very nice teapot that does not have this problem.

<<for the most delicate, try Green.>>

The most delicate tea is the white tea.

KlangFool

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jabberwockOG
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by jabberwockOG » Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:45 am

I use a simple 1 quart Pyrex measuring cup and a small hand held fine mesh strainer to pour the tea from measuring cup to drinking cup. I drink a lot of loose leaf tea, mostly aged pu'erh style tea.

Steeping overnight is a bad idea. It is not a good idea to over steep/brew tea as most tea will release a lot of bitter tannic notes when over-steeped. Better to steep the tea for a minute for first cup and then steep for additional minutes for each additional cup.

High quality loose teas can take 3-5 steeps easily. Each successive steep produces/emphasizes slightly different flavor notes and can be relatively interesting note if you pay attention. Many high end Asian teas are steeped in several small increments (gungfu style) for as little as 15-20 seconds for first steep.

goaties
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by goaties » Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:40 am

jabberwockOG wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:45 am
I use a simple 1 quart Pyrex measuring cup and a small hand held fine mesh strainer to pour the tea from measuring cup to drinking cup. I drink a lot of loose leaf tea, mostly aged pu'erh style tea.

Steeping overnight is a bad idea. It is not a good idea to over steep/brew tea as most tea will release a lot of bitter tannic notes when over-steeped. Better to steep the tea for a minute for first cup and then steep for additional minutes for each additional cup.

High quality loose teas can take 3-5 steeps easily. Each successive steep produces/emphasizes slightly different flavor notes and can be relatively interesting note if you pay attention. Many high end Asian teas are steeped in several small increments (gungfu style) for as little as 15-20 seconds for first steep.
Tea aficionados will probably fight over this, but I find there is no such thing as over-steeping. Some people's taste buds must be more sensitive/cultured than mine. Herbal teas are always better (to me!) when steeped overnight. The OP will find out what works best for them.

I also agree that tea needs to be steeped in a large container where the leaves can float freely. I've tried tea balls and infusers and they result in weak-tasting tea. Yes, it's messier to clean up a pot or Pyrex with tea leaves everywhere, but worth it.

smackboy1
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by smackboy1 » Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:57 am

ThankYouJack wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:46 am
How do you make loose leaf tea? I'm thinking about getting a french press but wondering what others prefer.

Edit for more info: Ideally I'd like something that makes ~3 cups and I'd prefer to let it steep overnight so I can just heat it up in the morning to have first thing
I've used a French press, traditional tea pot, Bodum tea press, Finum filter basket, teabag, cup and a spoon etc.. Equipment doesn't really matter as long as the tea leaves can steep and bloom in hot water and there is a way to stop the extraction by removing or isolating the leaves. It can be as simple as just decanting the tea to another vessel.

Tea leaves contain thousands of chemicals. One is tannin, which in too large quantities leads to astringency and bitterness. It's the same compound that gives grape skins or unripe persimmons their mouth puckering dry biting taste. So the trick is to use hot water to extract just the right amount of good flavor from the tea leaves and stop extracting before too many bad flavors ruin the brew. Depending on the tea, it's typically around 1-5 min with 180-199F water. If I want stronger flavor, I use more tea leaves instead of longer extraction time. I have cold brewed tea for 12 hours in room temperature water. Personally I've found the result similar to cold brew coffee, kind of a weak indistinct brew without the bite and bitterness I enjoy in good tea.

This guy is bit annoying, but his facts are right:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZttG1g6O7vo

The one thing he doesn't do that I always do, especially with a thin walled French press, is to preheat all the vessels with hot water to reduce heat loss.
Disclaimer: nothing written here should be taken as legal advice, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

tenkuky
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by tenkuky » Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:58 am

jabberwockOG wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:45 am
I use a simple 1 quart Pyrex measuring cup and a small hand held fine mesh strainer to pour the tea from measuring cup to drinking cup. I drink a lot of loose leaf tea, mostly aged pu'erh style tea.

Steeping overnight is a bad idea. It is not a good idea to over steep/brew tea as most tea will release a lot of bitter tannic notes when over-steeped. Better to steep the tea for a minute for first cup and then steep for additional minutes for each additional cup.

High quality loose teas can take 3-5 steeps easily. Each successive steep produces/emphasizes slightly different flavor notes and can be relatively interesting note if you pay attention. Many high end Asian teas are steeped in several small increments (gungfu style) for as little as 15-20 seconds for first steep.
Pu'erh rules! :beer Where do you get it here?
I got a few small bricks back from Beijing in the past, and a friend got me more later but sadly, it's all gone :(

KlangFool
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by KlangFool » Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:59 am

goaties wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:40 am
jabberwockOG wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:45 am
I use a simple 1 quart Pyrex measuring cup and a small hand held fine mesh strainer to pour the tea from measuring cup to drinking cup. I drink a lot of loose leaf tea, mostly aged pu'erh style tea.

Steeping overnight is a bad idea. It is not a good idea to over steep/brew tea as most tea will release a lot of bitter tannic notes when over-steeped. Better to steep the tea for a minute for first cup and then steep for additional minutes for each additional cup.

High quality loose teas can take 3-5 steeps easily. Each successive steep produces/emphasizes slightly different flavor notes and can be relatively interesting note if you pay attention. Many high end Asian teas are steeped in several small increments (gungfu style) for as little as 15-20 seconds for first steep.
Tea aficionados will probably fight over this, but I find there is no such thing as over-steeping. Some people's taste buds must be more sensitive/cultured than mine. Herbal teas are always better (to me!) when steeped overnight. The OP will find out what works best for them.

I also agree that tea needs to be steeped in a large container where the leaves can float freely. I've tried tea balls and infusers and they result in weak-tasting tea. Yes, it's messier to clean up a pot or Pyrex with tea leaves everywhere, but worth it.
goaties,

Some herbal tea has no tea leaves at all.

KlangFool

tenkuky
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by tenkuky » Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:03 am

KlangFool wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:26 am

The most delicate tea is the white tea.

KlangFool
Klang: where can I get white tea? I have tried it before and it is so subtle and pleasing. Loose leaf better than bags?

KlangFool
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by KlangFool » Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:05 am

tenkuky wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:03 am
KlangFool wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:26 am

The most delicate tea is the white tea.

KlangFool
Klang: where can I get white tea? I have tried it before and it is so subtle and pleasing. Loose leaf better than bags?
tenkuky,

1) Upton Tea

<<Loose leaf better than bags?>>

2) Yes. And, loose leaf is cheaper than tea bag if you buy your tea from Upton Tea.

https://www.uptontea.com/chinese-white- ... /p/V00387/

3) I like this one from Upton Tea.

https://www.tazo.com/us/en/products/whi ... white.html

4) This one is good too even though it is in a tea bag.

KlangFool
Last edited by KlangFool on Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:12 am, edited 1 time in total.

bhsince87
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by bhsince87 » Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:07 am

tenkuky wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:58 am
jabberwockOG wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:45 am
I use a simple 1 quart Pyrex measuring cup and a small hand held fine mesh strainer to pour the tea from measuring cup to drinking cup. I drink a lot of loose leaf tea, mostly aged pu'erh style tea.

Steeping overnight is a bad idea. It is not a good idea to over steep/brew tea as most tea will release a lot of bitter tannic notes when over-steeped. Better to steep the tea for a minute for first cup and then steep for additional minutes for each additional cup.

High quality loose teas can take 3-5 steeps easily. Each successive steep produces/emphasizes slightly different flavor notes and can be relatively interesting note if you pay attention. Many high end Asian teas are steeped in several small increments (gungfu style) for as little as 15-20 seconds for first steep.
Pu'erh rules! :beer Where do you get it here?
I got a few small bricks back from Beijing in the past, and a friend got me more later but sadly, it's all gone :(
I buy a lot from a company called Yunnan Sourcing.

The choices can be overwhelming, so plan to do some experimentation!
Retirement: When you reach a point where you have enough. Or when you've had enough.

KlangFool
Posts: 10436
Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 12:35 pm

Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by KlangFool » Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:09 am

smackboy1 wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:57 am
ThankYouJack wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:46 am
How do you make loose leaf tea? I'm thinking about getting a french press but wondering what others prefer.

Edit for more info: Ideally I'd like something that makes ~3 cups and I'd prefer to let it steep overnight so I can just heat it up in the morning to have first thing
I've used a French press, traditional tea pot, Bodum tea press, Finum filter basket, teabag, cup and a spoon etc.. Equipment doesn't really matter as long as the tea leaves can steep and bloom in hot water and there is a way to stop the extraction by removing or isolating the leaves. It can be as simple as just decanting the tea to another vessel.

Tea leaves contain thousands of chemicals. One is tannin, which in too large quantities leads to astringency and bitterness. It's the same compound that gives grape skins or unripe persimmons their mouth puckering dry biting taste. So the trick is to use hot water to extract just the right amount of good flavor from the tea leaves and stop extracting before too many bad flavors ruin the brew. Depending on the tea, it's typically around 1-5 min with 180-199F water. If I want stronger flavor, I use more tea leaves instead of longer extraction time. I have cold brewed tea for 12 hours in room temperature water. Personally I've found the result similar to cold brew coffee, kind of a weak indistinct brew without the bite and bitterness I enjoy in good tea.

This guy is bit annoying, but his facts are right:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZttG1g6O7vo

The one thing he doesn't do that I always do, especially with a thin walled French press, is to preheat all the vessels with hot water to reduce heat loss.
smackboy1,

He is wrong about using hot water to brew green tea. And, there are proper temperature and brewing time to brew each type of tea. Upton Tea provides the specific instruction for each tea that they sell. The tea labels provide the specific instruction.

KlangFool

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TeamArgo
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by TeamArgo » Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:16 am

In the late 1950's my British grandmother used her "Brown Betty" crock teapot to make her tea. The teapot had a strainer that fit into the opening and extended down into the water. She added black tea to the strainer, poured in boiling water, steeped it for 5 minutes, and served the most wonderful tea at 6 in the morning when only she and I were awake.
I have searched high and low for a teapot with such a strainer without luck, until finding one just recently at a Le Creuset store in an outlet mall. Almost a dead ringer, and I can now make that wonderful tea myself, at a more respectable 8:30 in the morning.
"A man hears what he wants to hear, and disregards the rest" -Paul Simon (The Boxer, 1970)

ThankYouJack
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by ThankYouJack » Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:23 pm

Thanks all. Great info and the youtube video answered most of my questions.

I already have a teapot so just picked up a 2 1/2" ball infuser. Was only a couple bucks so I figure it'll be worth it getting started. If I really get into it, I may look for something that covers more surface area.

I also picked up 4 2 oz bags of some tea. I'm not sure how many servings is typical for an oz, but it was about $2-3 per ounce so not too bad.

So I'll probably try this:

1. Bring water to just under a boil
2. Use 1 teaspoon (3-5 grams) of tea per serving
3. Steep for 1-2 minutes (I may do longer if that doesn't seem strong enough)

Simple enough

WhiteMaxima
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by WhiteMaxima » Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:32 pm

Using tea pot, boiling water and let it sit cool down a bit . For green tea , I would pour 85 degC, for dark tea, I would do 95degC.

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triceratop
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by triceratop » Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:38 pm

KlangFool wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:26 am
MJS wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:15 am
Upton Tea has sampler kits. For robust tea, try the British Blend; for a more elegant trial, try Oolong or Darjeeling; for the most delicate, try Green.

Using a french press to brew tea is like using a hammer to drive a screw: not recommended. Get a teapot.
MJS,

I disagreed. It depends on the spaces for the tea leaves after it had been pressed. Some teapots are badly designed with small infuser. It leaves insufficient space for the tea leaves to be fully expanded. Upton tea has a very nice teapot that does not have this problem.

<<for the most delicate, try Green.>>

The most delicate tea is the white tea.

KlangFool
Whether the infuser is too small or not is a different question from whether you are pressing the water from the leaves. The fact is, if you are at all breaking the leaves by pressing to remove the water and stop the steeping process, you are ruining the tea because it releases flavors which make the tea bitter. So, yes, it is like using a hammer to drive a screw.
"To play the stock market is to play musical chairs under the chord progression of a bid-ask spread."

ThankYouJack
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by ThankYouJack » Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:42 pm

triceratop wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:38 pm
KlangFool wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:26 am
MJS wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:15 am
Upton Tea has sampler kits. For robust tea, try the British Blend; for a more elegant trial, try Oolong or Darjeeling; for the most delicate, try Green.

Using a french press to brew tea is like using a hammer to drive a screw: not recommended. Get a teapot.
MJS,

I disagreed. It depends on the spaces for the tea leaves after it had been pressed. Some teapots are badly designed with small infuser. It leaves insufficient space for the tea leaves to be fully expanded. Upton tea has a very nice teapot that does not have this problem.

<<for the most delicate, try Green.>>

The most delicate tea is the white tea.

KlangFool
Whether the infuser is too small or not is a different question from whether you are pressing the water from the leaves. The fact is, if you are at all breaking the leaves by pressing to remove the water and stop the steeping process, you are ruining the tea because it releases flavors which make the tea bitter. So, yes, it is like using a hammer to drive a screw.
What about using a french press but not pressing down? https://youtu.be/ZttG1g6O7vo?t=37

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triceratop
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by triceratop » Tue Oct 23, 2018 1:10 pm

ThankYouJack wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:42 pm
triceratop wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:38 pm
KlangFool wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:26 am
MJS wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:15 am
Upton Tea has sampler kits. For robust tea, try the British Blend; for a more elegant trial, try Oolong or Darjeeling; for the most delicate, try Green.

Using a french press to brew tea is like using a hammer to drive a screw: not recommended. Get a teapot.
MJS,

I disagreed. It depends on the spaces for the tea leaves after it had been pressed. Some teapots are badly designed with small infuser. It leaves insufficient space for the tea leaves to be fully expanded. Upton tea has a very nice teapot that does not have this problem.

<<for the most delicate, try Green.>>

The most delicate tea is the white tea.

KlangFool
Whether the infuser is too small or not is a different question from whether you are pressing the water from the leaves. The fact is, if you are at all breaking the leaves by pressing to remove the water and stop the steeping process, you are ruining the tea because it releases flavors which make the tea bitter. So, yes, it is like using a hammer to drive a screw.
What about using a french press but not pressing down? https://youtu.be/ZttG1g6O7vo?t=37
Sure, as long as you don't use the operationally-defining feature of the French Press to brew tea, it is fine to use a French Press to brew tea.

You could use a pyrex with a strainer too. Is that a french press? I don't know, maybe.
"To play the stock market is to play musical chairs under the chord progression of a bid-ask spread."

KlangFool
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by KlangFool » Tue Oct 23, 2018 1:14 pm

triceratop wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:38 pm
KlangFool wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:26 am
MJS wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:15 am
Upton Tea has sampler kits. For robust tea, try the British Blend; for a more elegant trial, try Oolong or Darjeeling; for the most delicate, try Green.

Using a french press to brew tea is like using a hammer to drive a screw: not recommended. Get a teapot.
MJS,

I disagreed. It depends on the spaces for the tea leaves after it had been pressed. Some teapots are badly designed with small infuser. It leaves insufficient space for the tea leaves to be fully expanded. Upton tea has a very nice teapot that does not have this problem.

<<for the most delicate, try Green.>>

The most delicate tea is the white tea.

KlangFool
Whether the infuser is too small or not is a different question from whether you are pressing the water from the leaves. The fact is, if you are at all breaking the leaves by pressing to remove the water and stop the steeping process, you are ruining the tea because it releases flavors which make the tea bitter. So, yes, it is like using a hammer to drive a screw.
triceratop,

I use a big 6 cup French Press to make 2 cups of tea. So, I do not break the tea leaves when I press.

KlangFool

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dm200
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by dm200 » Tue Oct 23, 2018 1:16 pm

My paternal grandmother was part of our household in the 1950's and 1960's - of Irish descent. She always made loose tea - in a teapot with boiling water. She did not like tea bags at all.

KlangFool
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by KlangFool » Tue Oct 23, 2018 1:17 pm

ThankYouJack wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:42 pm
triceratop wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 12:38 pm
KlangFool wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:26 am
MJS wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:15 am
Upton Tea has sampler kits. For robust tea, try the British Blend; for a more elegant trial, try Oolong or Darjeeling; for the most delicate, try Green.

Using a french press to brew tea is like using a hammer to drive a screw: not recommended. Get a teapot.
MJS,

I disagreed. It depends on the spaces for the tea leaves after it had been pressed. Some teapots are badly designed with small infuser. It leaves insufficient space for the tea leaves to be fully expanded. Upton tea has a very nice teapot that does not have this problem.

<<for the most delicate, try Green.>>

The most delicate tea is the white tea.

KlangFool
Whether the infuser is too small or not is a different question from whether you are pressing the water from the leaves. The fact is, if you are at all breaking the leaves by pressing to remove the water and stop the steeping process, you are ruining the tea because it releases flavors which make the tea bitter. So, yes, it is like using a hammer to drive a screw.
What about using a french press but not pressing down? https://youtu.be/ZttG1g6O7vo?t=37
ThankYouJack,

You could do that too. Or, you could use a large 6 cups or 8 cups French press and press slowly. Then, it won't matter.

KlangFool

fposte
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by fposte » Tue Oct 23, 2018 1:47 pm

I'm not seeing the advantage of a French press over a teapot, either straining the tea as you pour into the cup or using a teapot with a built-in spout strainer. If you're only making one to two cups at a time, I highly recommend the Adagio Ingenuitea. Either way, the goal is, as one fragrantly translated Amazon description says, "The tea leaves can jumping in a teapot enough, so make delicious tea." With infusers, the tea leaves can't jumping enough. Let 'em jump and then strain 'em.

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jabberwockOG
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by jabberwockOG » Tue Oct 23, 2018 2:33 pm

bhsince87 wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:07 am
tenkuky wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:58 am
jabberwockOG wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:45 am
I use a simple 1 quart Pyrex measuring cup and a small hand held fine mesh strainer to pour the tea from measuring cup to drinking cup. I drink a lot of loose leaf tea, mostly aged pu'erh style tea.

Steeping overnight is a bad idea. It is not a good idea to over steep/brew tea as most tea will release a lot of bitter tannic notes when over-steeped. Better to steep the tea for a minute for first cup and then steep for additional minutes for each additional cup.

High quality loose teas can take 3-5 steeps easily. Each successive steep produces/emphasizes slightly different flavor notes and can be relatively interesting note if you pay attention. Many high end Asian teas are steeped in several small increments (gungfu style) for as little as 15-20 seconds for first steep.
Pu'erh rules! :beer Where do you get it here?
I got a few small bricks back from Beijing in the past, and a friend got me more later but sadly, it's all gone :(
I buy a lot from a company called Yunnan Sourcing.

The choices can be overwhelming, so plan to do some experimentation!

I buy most of my tea direct from China from high quality provider - White2tea. Also have an excellent source in the USA - Whispering Pines Tea Company.

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dm200
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by dm200 » Tue Oct 23, 2018 2:42 pm

dm200 wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 1:16 pm
My paternal grandmother was part of our household in the 1950's and 1960's - of Irish descent. She always made loose tea - in a teapot with boiling water. She did not like tea bags at all.
Long time ago -- but I think she just left the tea leaves in the pot - and the tea was usually fully consumed in a short time.

Castanea_d.
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Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by Castanea_d. » Tue Oct 23, 2018 3:12 pm

I use an old Japanese tea pot which holds about four cups of water. I don't strain it off into another container; I just drink all of this in the morning as I work, and consider it one of life's most gentle and good delights, and I enjoy the shift of flavors between the first cup and the last. My teas come from the local Asian grocery; they have a large selection and I enjoy trying different varieties, generally green or sometimes oolong. I keep a few tea bags around for when I want a quick cup of tea, but the loose-leaf teas are less expensive, better, and more variety. I totally agree about the importance of allowing enough room for the leaves to expand, thus leaving them loose in the pot.

p14175
Posts: 332
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:33 am
Location: Now in southeast Arizona

Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by p14175 » Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:12 pm

I have a cheap infuser for holding the tea and a 24 oz. Stanley Classic Vacuum Insulated Food Jar for steeping.
My favorite tea is Lapsang Souchong loose tea. It smells like a campfire, but is really smooth.

4nwestsaylng
Posts: 305
Joined: Thu Jun 15, 2017 2:03 am

Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by 4nwestsaylng » Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:22 pm

I like an electric tea kettle since you can have it in your home office. Preheat teapot, I use a brown betty English one, then add loose tea and then water at a rolling boil. I steep it for five minutes, then pour through a hand strainer into a preheated mug, or a china cup (they are thin, don't need to be preheated. Brits add milk first, then the tea, Canadians add milk after the tea.

Great tea online is from Murchies of Victoria, Canada, at murchies.com

kenoryan
Posts: 165
Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2017 7:11 pm

Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by kenoryan » Tue Oct 23, 2018 9:48 pm

Loose Tata tea into a saucepan of boiling whole milk. Then add brown sugar, ginger and cardamom. Chai!

ThankYouJack
Posts: 2247
Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2014 7:27 pm

Re: Making loose leaf tea

Post by ThankYouJack » Wed Oct 24, 2018 11:52 am

My spouse and I tried our first tea (Cinnamon spice) and it was outstanding! Huge difference than the typical bag tea that we usually have

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