Any one have a Rotimatic?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Post Reply
User avatar
capitalG
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2014 8:02 pm

Any one have a Rotimatic?

Post by capitalG » Thu Oct 18, 2018 10:33 pm

Got lured into a "Rotimatic" pop up store at the mall recently and am now obsessed with the machine - basically bread maker that makes piping hot flatbread out of flour, water, and oil (a la Chevy's "La Maquina"). I was ready to pull the trigger thinking it was ~$300 or so but I was shocked to learn the going rate is $1000! I must be missing something, they can't be selling that many of them at that price. Does any one on the board have a Rotimatic, and if so, how do you like it? Was it worth the $1000 you paid for it?

Dottie57
Posts: 4644
Joined: Thu May 19, 2016 5:43 pm

Re: Any one have a Rotimatic?

Post by Dottie57 » Thu Oct 18, 2018 10:51 pm

What kind f flat bread did it make? Naan, pita? Or simply a tortilla, if no yeast is used.

Personally, I think making it the old fashioned way is better.

onourway
Posts: 1289
Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:39 pm

Re: Any one have a Rotimatic?

Post by onourway » Thu Oct 18, 2018 11:01 pm

I presume it makes a 'roti paratha' (a layered flatbread with plenty of oil - my favorite of the flatbreads).

I also presume it, like all bread machines, takes out the 'work' at the expense of quality. I've never seen an automatic bread maker that makes anything better than you can make with the simplest of hands-off recipes.

frugaltigris
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Sep 01, 2017 8:44 am

Re: Any one have a Rotimatic?

Post by frugaltigris » Thu Oct 18, 2018 11:54 pm

I eat rotis almost everyday, cooked by my DW to perfection. I can make my own, though not as good as my DW. We don't use rotimatic. My brother's family uses it and the rotis which turn out are no where in comparison to hand made ones. Difference of gold and dust. Rotis are not soft, machine is cluncky and very noisy, many issues. There are various complaints of this machine giving up after a year or two. It should not cost more than $150.

Why does it sell for $1000? Mostly it is bought by people who do not know how to make rotis from west or southern parts of India. Unfortunately they do not know the difference between the real roti and the rotimatic roti.

my advise; don't waste your money. making rotis is an art you can perfect for free in a week.

User avatar
capitalG
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2014 8:02 pm

Re: Any one have a Rotimatic?

Post by capitalG » Fri Oct 19, 2018 11:19 pm

@Dottie57 and @onourway, the rotis the machine makes are like a tortilla that puffs up, definitely not oily.

@frugaltigris, I did look up roti making on Youtube and it looks like a very long process! I don't think I would have the time to make them, thus the interest in the rotimatic.

I guess I will just keep an eye on the site to see if they have a sale for Black Friday - I cannot justify spending $1000 on a bread machine!

Yooper
Posts: 331
Joined: Fri May 21, 2010 7:25 am
Location: Nothern Michigan

Re: Any one have a Rotimatic?

Post by Yooper » Sat Oct 20, 2018 8:01 am

capitalG wrote:
Fri Oct 19, 2018 11:19 pm
@Dottie57 and @onourway, the rotis the machine makes are like a tortilla that puffs up, definitely not oily.

@frugaltigris, I did look up roti making on Youtube and it looks like a very long process! I don't think I would have the time to make them, thus the interest in the rotimatic.

I guess I will just keep an eye on the site to see if they have a sale for Black Friday - I cannot justify spending $1000 on a bread machine!
For me the "hardest" part is the resting time of the dough (and of course trying to roll out a relatively round roti), but supposedly this has something to do with the texture of the dough. Some sort of molecular magic occurs during the resting time (grin). If you're in a rush I guess you could bypass that part. Roti is like like coffee, everyone has their own preference - I like mine lightly browned, my wife likes hers not brown at all. I've got zero ethnic background in me (other than the Finn/German/Irish/English everyone up here seems to have) so I'm not making any claims that this is a genuine recipe, but it's what I came up with after multiple failed attempts. They cook FAST, so once you get them frying don't get distracted.

• 1 Cup flour
• 1 Teaspoon baking powder
• Dash of salt
• 1/2 cup warm water
• Butter

Mix flour, baking powder and salt in a bowl.

Pour the water in slowly, not all at one time. Mix until wet and finish on the counter. Knead 5 minutes or so, until soft and somewhat sticky.

Cover with plastic wrap and let rest 20-30 minutes.

Divide dough in half. Roll out on floured surface, flipping when needed (you don't want to add too much flour to it) repeatedly. When approximately 9 to 10 inches wide (double the thickness of a pie crust or about 1/8 inch thick), spread thin layer of butter or Crisco. Then lightly flour surface (this produces the layers in the roti).

Cut from center to one side, and then roll up in a cone shape. Flatten top of cone down (almost into a ball) and cover. Let rest 20 minutes.

Heat cast iron pan on medium/high.

Roll out each roti to 9-10 inches (about 1/8 inch thick).

Lightly oil pan with cooking oil (I use a paper towel and cup of oil to dab it in) and place roti on top.

Checking the bottom, turn when beginning to brown. Slightly oil cooked portion when turned.

Once bottom is slightly brown remove from pan. Put into a plastic container with top on, shake shake shake. This breaks it up. Fold in half or in quarter. Cover with a cloth or paper towel.

If you have to store the roti, store with a slightly damp paper towel wrapped around each, this will keep it moist and pliable.

Post Reply