Did you really have something to retire to?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Fri Sep 21, 2018 12:52 pm

I do still use the alarm clock, although I now allow some "snoozes" as needed. I know from experience that I need that to keep to something like a regular schedule. Otherwise I'll start staying up and getting up later each day.
This week's fortune cookie: "Your financial life will be secure and beneficial." So I got that going for me, which is nice.

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jazman12
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by jazman12 » Fri Sep 21, 2018 1:09 pm

kacang wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 10:18 am
flyingaway wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 9:06 am
After reading the responses, I feel that, maybe, a concrete plan of retirement plan is more important for early retirees. For some people who have to retire because of ages, too much money, other obligations, not so much.
Not really. I think it depends on each person's comfort level. Do you feel that you need a plan?

I will be an early retiree soon. At one point I thought I needed a "concrete plan" to retire to, as you put it. But that didn't sit well with me, I've had enough of 5-year plans & corporate goals in my career. After some introspection, I've come to a happy conclusion that just knowing what my non-negotiable priorities are in retirement and going with the flow on everything else, is what I wanted. My priorities are simple, eg. spend more time with loved ones, health. No need to prescribe actionables, timelines, etc. I'll decide on those later, after I finish my coffee, if I feel like it. :happy
[/quote
Well said...what happened to the term "Life happens while making other plans ..... or something along those lines..
Act soon... time is running out

bhsince87
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by bhsince87 » Fri Sep 21, 2018 1:13 pm

flyingaway, IIRC, you and I are in very similar situations, both deciding when to make the leap.

I had the chance to retire at age 50 with one year pay and "COBRA till medicare" essentially. We were at about 25-30X annual expenses, so that was a factor. But I ultimately decided not to take that deal because I had read the advice about "retiring to something", and I didn't know what that might be at the time.

3 years later, I'm kicking myself for not taking that deal! The COBRA for life deal is no longer an option. :(

On the plus side, we're now at 50-60X annual expenses, and I have done a TON of researching and soul searching with the wife about what we want retired life to look like.

We only have a rough outline, but I am now of the mind that this is perfectly fine.

as I've looked back on life, the only times I've ever been bored are in classrooms, waiting rooms, and meetings at work. Smartphones have fixed the waiting room problem, I plan to stay out of class rooms for the most part, and meetings will be a ting of the past!

But the major takeaway is that I know how to keep myself entertained and interested in stuff. So I expect zero issues with that.

Another interesting tidbit I've discovered is that every single hobby I've focused on over the last 20 years or so, is one where I could possibly turn it into a money making opportunity if need be. I think this was intentional, but maybe it was sunconcsuly driven.

But now that we're in a situation where we will probably never need to earn another $ actively ever again, I'm rethinking my hobbies.

We might set up a business for each of us for tax purposes (DW already has a successful ebay business). But for the first year or so, i am going to focus entirely on things that don't make money. There will be lots of reading, cooking, and probably fishing and bird watching/photography. I'll probably volunteer at some of the local historical societies.

But who knows? To my mind, worrying about creating a plan and then sticking with it just adds a bunch of stress for stresses sake.
Retirement: When you reach a point where you have enough. Or when you've had enough.

flyingaway
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by flyingaway » Fri Sep 21, 2018 2:42 pm

TN_Boy wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 12:35 pm
I don't know about having something very concrete to "retire to" but I sure have a long list of possible activities -- pure leisure, learning, volunteering etc. And the usual culprits, like getting in better shape.

One related point I saw in a "get ready for retirement book" is to ensure you have *some* structure in your days. The way I view this suggestion is you maybe plan on getting together with friends for lunch one day in a week, go to the gym two mornings, maybe play golf or tennis on Thursday afternoon, etc. And get up at a regular time, have coffee and read the newspaper, or whatever. This can still leave you with quite a bit of unstructured time.

I think the idea of getting up every day with nothing planned is daunting. Sure some days that IS a good, even great plan. But not every day. I do believe most of us do better with a certain amount of structure.
Not fully retired yet. I actually like to be unstructured on my non-work days. If I had to have a detailed plan for every day, I would not retire.
I am looking for some sort of grand plan, not a detailed daily plan.

The Wizard
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by The Wizard » Fri Sep 21, 2018 3:36 pm

wabbajack wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 10:26 am
The Wizard wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 11:11 am
In my first year, starting March 2013, I managed to be away 13 weeks, compared to maybe five while I was working.
I would think that 5 weeks of traveling during your working years would eventually add up to seeing just about the whole world by the time you retire. That's certainly my goal at least.
Otherwise, pretty fascinating to see what retired people get up to.
I did manage to get 49 of 50 states prior to retirement.
But very little foreign travel outside of North America and the Caribbean.
And some Caribbean dive destinations multiple times...
Attempted new signature...

Gardner's Son
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by Gardner's Son » Fri Sep 21, 2018 4:12 pm

I retired as an educator to run a publishing company. Moving from that to help manage a non-profit. Just trying to stay one step ahead...

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tennisplyr
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by tennisplyr » Fri Sep 21, 2018 6:46 pm

I retired "from" something I disliked 'work' which is overrated. Love my freedom, free time, tennis, outdoor activities, etc, etc. More to follow....no pressure.
Those who move forward with a happy spirit will find that things always work out.

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GerryL
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by GerryL » Fri Sep 21, 2018 6:55 pm

Earl Lemongrab wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 12:52 pm
I do still use the alarm clock, although I now allow some "snoozes" as needed. I know from experience that I need that to keep to something like a regular schedule. Otherwise I'll start staying up and getting up later each day.
Funny. The only time I use an alarm is when I’m “on vacation” or have a morning volunteer gig. If I’m traveling I don’t want to waste daylight snoozing in 🛏 in Paris, for example. And yeah, at home it’s late to bed and late to rise 🙂.

AlwaysaQ
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by AlwaysaQ » Fri Sep 21, 2018 9:47 pm

I often find it fun to stay up until 3 or 4 AM reading or watching something recorded on the DVR. Those were things I could rarely do while working.

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Fri Sep 21, 2018 11:18 pm

AlwaysaQ wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 9:47 pm
I often find it fun to stay up until 3 or 4 AM reading or watching something recorded on the DVR. Those were things I could rarely do while working.
I did that too often when I was working. Now, there's not as much reason to stay up late because there's always tomorrow to pick it up.
This week's fortune cookie: "Your financial life will be secure and beneficial." So I got that going for me, which is nice.

smectym
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by smectym » Fri Sep 21, 2018 11:31 pm

Something generally pops up. After a career in law I’m volunteer teaching Latin and AP English at a private high school...but had no idea that was on the cards when I left the firm.

Agree with the general tenor of comment above that retirement is its own good.

But if you’re anxious about “having something to do,” retirement gives you the freedom to decide how now to deploy your skills and talents. Those are always in demand somewhere: and if you’re financially independent and don’t absolutely require a competitive salary, not surprisingly demand for your services will soar.

For others, not “having something to do” is the ultimate pleasure. And that’s true too.

Smectym

flyingaway
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by flyingaway » Sat Sep 22, 2018 8:43 am

Earl Lemongrab wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 11:18 pm
AlwaysaQ wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 9:47 pm
I often find it fun to stay up until 3 or 4 AM reading or watching something recorded on the DVR. Those were things I could rarely do while working.
I did that too often when I was working. Now, there's not as much reason to stay up late because there's always tomorrow to pick it up.
If I watch some TV program or play some computer games until morning, I will feel very uncomfortable for two days, getting my daily life upside down. But I did those things regularly with friends when I was in my 20s.

flyingaway
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by flyingaway » Sat Sep 22, 2018 8:45 am

smectym wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 11:31 pm
Something generally pops up. After a career in law I’m volunteer teaching Latin and AP English at a private high school...but had no idea that was on the cards when I left the firm.

Agree with the general tenor of comment above that retirement is its own good.

But if you’re anxious about “having something to do,” retirement gives you the freedom to decide how now to deploy your skills and talents. Those are always in demand somewhere: and if you’re financially independent and don’t absolutely require a competitive salary, not surprisingly demand for your services will soar.

For others, not “having something to do” is the ultimate pleasure. And that’s true too.

Smectym
My intention is to leave this job and never get another job. So I want to retire to something that is not a job.

flyingaway
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by flyingaway » Sat Sep 22, 2018 8:47 am

tennisplyr wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 6:46 pm
I retired "from" something I disliked 'work' which is overrated. Love my freedom, free time, tennis, outdoor activities, etc, etc. More to follow....no pressure.
If I have my finance part done, I really do not like a job, no matter how easy or how rewarding it is.

dknightd
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by dknightd » Sat Sep 22, 2018 2:39 pm

I don't think you have to have something to retire to.
Isn't the whole point you do not have to do anything. Except keep paying bills.
If you want to do something else, great. If you do not want to, that is up to you.
I expect my first years or so will be spent declutting my house. And reading books I did not have time for.
I guess that is a plan? I have a couple of other things I'd to do.
Worse comes to worse, I could spend years plucking out weeds before they grow. If I ran out of weeds I could help my neighbors out.

Lynette
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by Lynette » Sat Sep 22, 2018 2:49 pm

dknightd wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 2:39 pm
I don't think you have to have something to retire to.
Isn't the whole point you do not have to do anything. Except keep paying bills.
If you want to do something else, great. If you do not want to, that is up to you.
I expect my first years or so will be spent declutting my house. And reading books I did not have time for.
I guess that is a plan? I have a couple of other things I'd to do.
Worse comes to worse, I could spend years plucking out weeds before they grow. If I ran out of weeds I could help my neighbors out.
Why not get paid to pull out weeds?

I met someone recently whose wife took a Master Gardener's course a few years before she retired. In my area, it is a six-month course offered by an university that has a large agricultural department - I think - still need to investigate. She is required to do some time volunteering to get her certification. Now she works for someone and also has her own clients. From what I can gather it is basically doing some pruning and pulling out weeds. She does not mow lawns or pick up leaves. Her husband told me that she earns some "pocket money".

I'm thinking of taking a Master Gardner's class next fall. This interest arose because I was fixing up my garden. I had not planned it prior to retirement about two years ago.

dknightd
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by dknightd » Sat Sep 22, 2018 2:54 pm

That is exactly my point. As long as you can pay your bills you can do whatever you want.
If it makes extra money, smile and be happy.
I don't understand the concept of having something to retire to. Perhaps because I have not retired yet.

dknightd
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by dknightd » Sat Sep 22, 2018 3:23 pm

I've always been interested in panning for gold. I might try it one day :)

flyingaway
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by flyingaway » Sat Sep 22, 2018 3:28 pm

bhsince87 wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 1:13 pm
flyingaway, IIRC, you and I are in very similar situations, both deciding when to make the leap.

I had the chance to retire at age 50 with one year pay and "COBRA till medicare" essentially. We were at about 25-30X annual expenses, so that was a factor. But I ultimately decided not to take that deal because I had read the advice about "retiring to something", and I didn't know what that might be at the time.

3 years later, I'm kicking myself for not taking that deal! The COBRA for life deal is no longer an option. :(

On the plus side, we're now at 50-60X annual expenses, and I have done a TON of researching and soul searching with the wife about what we want retired life to look like.

We only have a rough outline, but I am now of the mind that this is perfectly fine.

as I've looked back on life, the only times I've ever been bored are in classrooms, waiting rooms, and meetings at work. Smartphones have fixed the waiting room problem, I plan to stay out of class rooms for the most part, and meetings will be a ting of the past!

But the major takeaway is that I know how to keep myself entertained and interested in stuff. So I expect zero issues with that.

Another interesting tidbit I've discovered is that every single hobby I've focused on over the last 20 years or so, is one where I could possibly turn it into a money making opportunity if need be. I think this was intentional, but maybe it was sunconcsuly driven.

But now that we're in a situation where we will probably never need to earn another $ actively ever again, I'm rethinking my hobbies.

We might set up a business for each of us for tax purposes (DW already has a successful ebay business). But for the first year or so, i am going to focus entirely on things that don't make money. There will be lots of reading, cooking, and probably fishing and bird watching/photography. I'll probably volunteer at some of the local historical societies.

But who knows? To my mind, worrying about creating a plan and then sticking with it just adds a bunch of stress for stresses sake.
It is so impress to go from 25~30X to 50~60X in three years. Once I jump, I do not play for anything that will make money.

flyingaway
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by flyingaway » Sat Sep 22, 2018 4:54 pm

dknightd wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 2:54 pm
That is exactly my point. As long as you can pay your bills you can do whatever you want.
If it makes extra money, smile and be happy.
I don't understand the concept of having something to retire to. Perhaps because I have not retired yet.
When working is not too bad, I need to have something better to retire to.

bhsince87
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by bhsince87 » Sat Sep 22, 2018 9:16 pm

Lynette wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 2:49 pm
dknightd wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 2:39 pm
I don't think you have to have something to retire to.
Isn't the whole point you do not have to do anything. Except keep paying bills.
If you want to do something else, great. If you do not want to, that is up to you.
I expect my first years or so will be spent declutting my house. And reading books I did not have time for.
I guess that is a plan? I have a couple of other things I'd to do.
Worse comes to worse, I could spend years plucking out weeds before they grow. If I ran out of weeds I could help my neighbors out.
Why not get paid to pull out weeds?

I met someone recently whose wife took a Master Gardener's course a few years before she retired. In my area, it is a six-month course offered by an university that has a large agricultural department - I think - still need to investigate. She is required to do some time volunteering to get her certification. Now she works for someone and also has her own clients. From what I can gather it is basically doing some pruning and pulling out weeds. She does not mow lawns or pick up leaves. Her husband told me that she earns some "pocket money".

I'm thinking of taking a Master Gardner's class next fall. This interest arose because I was fixing up my garden. I had not planned it prior to retirement about two years ago.
This sort of nails it for me, if possibly inadvertently.

I don't want to retire and have someone pay me to pull weeds.

I want to retire so I have time to pull weeds so I can grow awesome fruits and vegetables to eat!
Retirement: When you reach a point where you have enough. Or when you've had enough.

sport
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by sport » Sat Sep 22, 2018 10:26 pm

bhsince87 wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 9:16 pm
Lynette wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 2:49 pm
dknightd wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 2:39 pm
I don't think you have to have something to retire to.
Isn't the whole point you do not have to do anything. Except keep paying bills.
If you want to do something else, great. If you do not want to, that is up to you.
I expect my first years or so will be spent declutting my house. And reading books I did not have time for.
I guess that is a plan? I have a couple of other things I'd to do.
Worse comes to worse, I could spend years plucking out weeds before they grow. If I ran out of weeds I could help my neighbors out.
Why not get paid to pull out weeds?

I met someone recently whose wife took a Master Gardener's course a few years before she retired. In my area, it is a six-month course offered by an university that has a large agricultural department - I think - still need to investigate. She is required to do some time volunteering to get her certification. Now she works for someone and also has her own clients. From what I can gather it is basically doing some pruning and pulling out weeds. She does not mow lawns or pick up leaves. Her husband told me that she earns some "pocket money".

I'm thinking of taking a Master Gardner's class next fall. This interest arose because I was fixing up my garden. I had not planned it prior to retirement about two years ago.
This sort of nails it for me, if possibly inadvertently.

I don't want to retire and have someone pay me to pull weeds.

I want to retire so I have time to pull weeds so I can grow awesome fruits and vegetables to eat!
Many years ago, I worked on the grounds crew at my university to earn tuition money. If I never pull another weed, it will be too many.

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alec
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by alec » Sat Sep 22, 2018 10:33 pm

My parents are traveling the world, spending my inheritance.
"It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" - Upton Sinclair

2015
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by 2015 » Sat Sep 22, 2018 11:30 pm

No, but I sure read enough and worried enough about it (all for nothing). The only retirement book I really found useful was "What Color Is Your Parachute For Retirement"?

I'm so glad I didn't have a "plan", something to "retire to", or anything mapped out. Retirement is like any other life event, whereby one transitions from one identity and through experimentation, intended or not, gradually creates a new identity. During this transition, activities are naturally explored, some kept, others discarded. Who and what we become can be deliberate, or not, depending on our individual makeup, and in this there is no right or wrong answer.

After reading Cal Newport's book last year, my "plan" naturally evolved on its own into making this last period the most psychologically, emotionally, financially, and materially fulfilling time of my life. All of my activities flow from this "True North." As a result, I always try to find the juice in the situation I'm in, whether I like what's going on or not (hat tip, Anthony Robbins). I also strive to remain cognizant that this moment in time will never come again, so it's important to just stop and cherish it. I don't want to look back on "the good times", I want to live in moments of "good times."

Starfish
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by Starfish » Sun Sep 23, 2018 2:38 am

I would definitely use an alarm when retired.
Set at 8 or 9am.
I was always a night owl. Left to my own devices I will end up going to bet when the sun rises.
I would also like to sleep as little as possible wen retired. Say 6h, like now. Quality time is way too precious to be wasted sleeping.

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randomizer
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by randomizer » Sun Sep 23, 2018 6:43 am

Having been unemployed at times, I have had practice. I have also been self-employed and had good experiences reducing my work then to maintain higher leisure levels. I am looking forward to being retired for good. I have all manner of books, hobbies, projects, volunteering etc that I can pursue.
87.5:12.5, EM tilt — HODL the course!

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tennisplyr
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by tennisplyr » Sun Sep 23, 2018 8:20 am

I realized this morning that I've gone almost 3,000 days in a row without working....not bad, eh :D
Those who move forward with a happy spirit will find that things always work out.

pennywise
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by pennywise » Sun Sep 23, 2018 8:45 am

flyingaway wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 9:06 am
After reading the responses, I feel that, maybe, a concrete plan of retirement plan is more important for early retirees. For some people who have to retire because of ages, too much money, other obligations, not so much.
My husband started processing his retirement paperwork this week. I am counting down the final year working till I do the same. He has long had a deeply satisfying volunteer activity that will easily fill any time or attention gaps so he's the quintessential person eagerly embracing a solid set of activities post retirement. Me, not so much. However I have the same theory as expressed above--at this point in our lives and after having worked for pay for 40+ years, the concept of a life spent doing whatever we want to do is enormously appealing for both the partner who is retiring-to and the one who just wants to retire from. Were we in our mid-40s or 50s that might not be the case but at 65/61 YO the view is quite different.

Yes to obligations--both my husband and I have elderly parents living locally. One is deep into dementia and institutionalized, the other is hale and hearty yet at about to turn 85 YO presumably needs for support will only increase. Our son and DIL are talking about starting a family--we are enthusiastically on board to help provide child care as much or as little as they need/request.

We are fortunate enough to own multiple houses which require management as rentals. We are fortunate enough to have savings and investments that need monitoring. We are fortunate enough to have bought a retirement house in a vacation destination so our social lives have ratcheted up considerably. There is the daily set of quotidian tasks that have to be managed...and in retirement I am firmly convinced it has to be much more pleasant to do all of that family care taking and running life and entertaining friends and family as my primary set of life activities, rather than squeezing it all into the margins of a 40-hour/week commitment.

I also appreciate the advice for retirees to try something in retirement that one has never done, and I plan to let that something appear to me once I'm retired. So that is my retire to: to explore living life the way I want to enjoy it and to find meaning in the activities I want to pursue. :wink:

Osprey
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by Osprey » Sun Sep 23, 2018 11:36 pm

I am retiring this winter and for the past 4 years I have been creating a list of my interests including things I currently do and want to do more of (hiking, birding, kayaking, bicycling, reading/bookclub, travel), new activities to explore (volunteering, pickleball, bridge, yoga class), and activities I used to enjoy but have dropped off (cooking, drawing, knitting, seeing movies). Will also declutter house and tackle some home projects. Most importantly I will be making sure that I spend quality time with the people who I care about. I look forward to starting each day with a cup of coffee and newspapers followed by walks in the woods with my husband and our dogs rather than my current early dash out the door at the crack of dawn.

Lynette
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by Lynette » Mon Sep 24, 2018 1:56 am

bhsince87 wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 9:16 pm
Lynette wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 2:49 pm
dknightd wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 2:39 pm
I don't think you have to have something to retire to.
Isn't the whole point you do not have to do anything. Except keep paying bills.
If you want to do something else, great. If you do not want to, that is up to you.
I expect my first years or so will be spent declutting my house. And reading books I did not have time for.
I guess that is a plan? I have a couple of other things I'd to do.
Worse comes to worse, I could spend years plucking out weeds before they grow. If I ran out of weeds I could help my neighbors out.
Why not get paid to pull out weeds?

I met someone recently whose wife took a Master Gardener's course a few years before she retired. In my area, it is a six-month course offered by an university that has a large agricultural department - I think - still need to investigate. She is required to do some time volunteering to get her certification. Now she works for someone and also has her own clients. From what I can gather it is basically doing some pruning and pulling out weeds. She does not mow lawns or pick up leaves. Her husband told me that she earns some "pocket money".

I'm thinking of taking a Master Gardner's class next fall. This interest arose because I was fixing up my garden. I had not planned it prior to retirement about two years ago.
This sort of nails it for me, if possibly inadvertently.

I don't want to retire and have someone pay me to pull weeds.

I want to retire so I have time to pull weeds so I can grow awesome fruits and vegetables to eat!
The Master Gardener's course seems to offer opportunities to volunteer if one so chooses. At the same time one obtain a lot of knowledge about the environment at the same time:

http://ahsgardening.org/gardening-resou ... -gardeners

I know that in Michigan, lectures are offered through Michigan State University. I suppose one can determine the amount of involvement one chooses to volunteer. I took a photography course at a community college last winter. I found I was taking photographs outside in the freezing weather so this time I will wait till the fall to take the class.

As someone mentioned above, one can see a great deal of the world if one has five weeks vacation. I have been doing this for many years and have traveled extensively. In addition I worked into my seventies and my plan on retirement was to spend a few years taking classes for which I did not have time while working. I intended to gradually determine how I wanted to spend my time doing more volunteer work. I am currently doing a semester in Spanish but am finding that they do not offer sufficient advanced classes where I live. I will have to determine how much time/effort I want to spend on immersion classes either by skype or overseas visits. I took Latin and history in high school and at university so this remains my primary interest. I have taken classes in a community college in German/French and Italian. As I was born in South Africa, I had to take twelve years of Afrikaans which is close to Dutch. This also helps me with German. The world is an exciting place to explore. Best wishes to everyone in the last phase of life.

Smoke
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by Smoke » Mon Sep 24, 2018 3:23 am

Retired 14 yrs ago, got the heck out.
Living every min doing whatever I want to do, no plan, no job, no hassles :beer
Not one regret.

flyingaway
Posts: 1917
Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2014 10:19 am

Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by flyingaway » Mon Sep 24, 2018 9:50 am

Lynette wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 1:56 am
The Master Gardener's course seems to offer opportunities to volunteer if one so chooses. At the same time one obtain a lot of knowledge about the environment at the same time:

http://ahsgardening.org/gardening-resou ... -gardeners

I know that in Michigan, lectures are offered through Michigan State University. I suppose one can determine the amount of involvement one chooses to volunteer. I took a photography course at a community college last winter. I found I was taking photographs outside in the freezing weather so this time I will wait till the fall to take the class.

As someone mentioned above, one can see a great deal of the world if one has five weeks vacation. I have been doing this for many years and have traveled extensively. In addition I worked into my seventies and my plan on retirement was to spend a few years taking classes for which I did not have time while working. I intended to gradually determine how I wanted to spend my time doing more volunteer work. I am currently doing a semester in Spanish but am finding that they do not offer sufficient advanced classes where I live. I will have to determine how much time/effort I want to spend on immersion classes either by skype or overseas visits. I took Latin and history in high school and at university so this remains my primary interest. I have taken classes in a community college in German/French and Italian. As I was born in South Africa, I had to take twelve years of Afrikaans which is close to Dutch. This also helps me with German. The world is an exciting place to explore. Best wishes to everyone in the last phase of life.
I work at a university and I could enroll in a language class for free each semester. But formally studying a language seems like a serious commitment to me, although I am studying Spanish in my spare time.
Have you found any opportunities that mastering a foreign language helps you in your travel in a meaningful way, i.e., not superficially when the other party could speak English and you insisted on speaking their language?

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FrugalInvestor
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Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by FrugalInvestor » Mon Sep 24, 2018 9:59 am

I have many hobbies and interests that I couldn't pursue or pursue to the degree I would have liked while working. Now work doesn't get in the way of those things and hasn't for 15 years. I haven't been bored for a moment in retirement and marvel at those who can't find anything to do with their time. I'm busy....and when I want I'm busy doing nothing!
IGNORE the noise! | Our life is frittered away by detail... simplify, simplify. - Henry David Thoreau

Lynette
Posts: 1800
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2014 9:47 am

Re: Did you really have something to retire to?

Post by Lynette » Mon Sep 24, 2018 10:19 am

As you are no doubt aware learning a language involves different skills: speaking, hearing, writing and reading. As I studied Latin at High School for 5 years and university for 4 years, I am really good at grammar. I can read most of the Romance languages fairly well. This helped me when I was in Rome and I was reading descriptions in the museums. I can read the basics of most Romance languages.

I have spent a lot of time listening to mindless Spanish soaps so I can understand Spanish fairly well. I'm not so good at speaking but in a pinch I can make myself understood.. Yes, learning another language is a serious commitment. If I were starting from scratch I would likely start more with immersion.

Even if one doesn't use it extensively overseas, I think that learning the language helps one understand some of the culture. So for me it is a hobby and when I lose my physical capabilities, I can always relearn Latin and maybe classical Greek.

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