Dental work and hypertension issue

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Zonian59
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Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Zonian59 » Tue Sep 18, 2018 2:12 pm

Anybody here experience being denied dental work due to above normal blood pressure?

Last April my COBRA insurance, including dental insurance, expired. Figured I could wait until the ACA enrollment in Deccember when I can apply for insurance.

Murphy's Law decided to pay me a visit in July and two front teeth crowns failed while biting off some spare ribs at a Steak House. One broke off, the other became loose and fell out. The private dentist who installed the crowns a couple years ago quoted me an outrageous price, adding that he would have to grind down the perfectly good adjacent teeths and install a bridge. I didn't like that option, so decided not to go back to him.

Read in another thread here about someone needing dental work and was suggested going to a dental school clinic to keep the cost down. So I went to a dental school clinic in hopes of replacing the crowns at a more reasonable price than private practice. I'm retired so I don't mind it taking longer.

I went through the initial screening and paid $95 for full-mouth X-rays and evaluation. All went smoothly until they took my blood pressure. Normally my blood pressure is around 145/90 but at the dental school at that time it read around 165/100, which halted everything. The dental school stated acceptable blood pressure is 120/80. I stated I was willing to sign a waiver, just get the needed work done. They stated they couldn't deviate from their policy and when I get my blood pressure down to that level, we can proceed forward.

I've had dental work done through a private dentist while I had insurance couple years ago. In fact, the dentist never took my blood pressure and there were no issues while doing root canal and crown installations at that time..

I'm 59 and just can't get my blood pressure under 120/80 at this time. For the past two months, through combination of diet and medication, I've gotten it down to more or less around 137/85.....which the dental school says is still unacceptable.

So, what options do I have?

By the way, while I was working, I had Delta Dental PPO. Didn't really like it as out of pocket expense was always higher than expected. ACA offers dental PPO and HMO. PPO premiums are rather expensive whereas HMO are much lower and out of pocket expense is capped at a fixed dollar amount rather than a percentage. Anybody have experience dental HMO?

Thanks.

123
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by 123 » Tue Sep 18, 2018 2:29 pm

I don't have an answer for you. I've used a dental school in the past and been very satisfied with the results. I don't recall that I was ever specifically screened for blood pressure issues by the dental school but maybe they have other indicators that triggee when they do it (i.e. patient's age). While it's great the they like their patient's to all have great blood pressure before any work gets done I think it is probably not realistic for many patients who are over 18.
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JoeRetire
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by JoeRetire » Tue Sep 18, 2018 2:33 pm

Zonian59 wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 2:12 pm
Anybody here experience being denied dental work due to above normal blood pressure?

So, what options do I have?
Talk to a dentist that practices oral conscious sedation.

tigermilk
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by tigermilk » Tue Sep 18, 2018 2:49 pm

No advice but will add that my brother needs a bunch of dental work done. He went to a dental school a few weeks ago and was told he has to get his BP under control (way higher than yours, seemed like he was ready to pop!), so his work is on hold.

Vanguard Fan 1367
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Vanguard Fan 1367 » Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:06 pm

Sorry you are having problems. Dental schools are great places to get work done if you have plenty of time but they do tend to as you have found out be sometimes inflexible about things like blood pressure as they teach others to learn to be dentists.

As you have found out in private practice, the real world dentists tend to be a little more flexible with that issue. I hope you can find someone you can work with financially and blood pressure wise.

Dan999
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Dan999 » Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:08 pm

Must be a dental school thing, because I have never had my blood pressure taken in decades of going to the dentist.
Same for DW, and hers runs 135/70.
She has white coat syndrome, so she would never be able to get dental work. She had a 3 hour multi tooth bridge procedure last year.

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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Vanguard Fan 1367 » Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:11 pm

JoeRetire wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 2:33 pm
Zonian59 wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 2:12 pm
Anybody here experience being denied dental work due to above normal blood pressure?

So, what options do I have?
Talk to a dentist that practices oral conscious sedation.
I wouldn't expect HMO prices with an oral conscious sedation dentist. I have noticed that sometimes using laughing gas brings patient's blood pressure down to a level that I am comfortable working with.

Nowizard
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Nowizard » Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:18 pm

If they expect 120/80 in the clinic, they will have either an empty clinic or young people in great shape.

Tim

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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by SoAnyway » Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:34 pm

Dan999 wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:08 pm
Must be a dental school thing, because I have never had my blood pressure taken in decades of going to the dentist.
Nor have I. I think it's definitely a dental school thing. It might have started with the 2004 Journal of Dental Education article referenced here. From the linked article:
[The author of the JDE article] said that because the dental school tends to see a population that includes many patients without insurance or with minimal insurance, it is possible they are less likely to visit their doctors for check-ups than the general population. If that is the case, she said, it is even more important that dental schools around the country take the lead in making blood pressure determination a standard part of office visit procedure.

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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Freefun » Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:46 pm

Nowizard wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:18 pm
If they expect 120/80 in the clinic, they will have either an empty clinic or young people in great shape.

Tim
+1

I was thinking that the average age of their patients must be 11 !
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jfn111
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by jfn111 » Tue Sep 18, 2018 5:00 pm

I'd be screwed going to that clinic. :shock:

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MikeWillRetire
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by MikeWillRetire » Tue Sep 18, 2018 5:32 pm

The dental school near me does the same thing, but the cutoff was 140/90.

SimonJester
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by SimonJester » Tue Sep 18, 2018 5:37 pm

My DDS also takes BP with annual exams. I hope they understand that being in a dental chair in itself raises your BP.
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Fallible » Tue Sep 18, 2018 6:41 pm

SimonJester wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 5:37 pm
My DDS also takes BP with annual exams. I hope they understand that being in a dental chair in itself raises your BP.
I assume they do know this, but I don't know how they apply it to the readings. My dentist's office uses a wrist cuff, which I understand is less reliable than the arm cuff.
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Good Listener
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Good Listener » Tue Sep 18, 2018 6:43 pm

This is what dental schools do. Maybe it's a good message as your mouth should get work from a really good dentist. Check out Aetna vital savings or Cigna Dental. It is not insurance but a discount plan and very reasonable. Most dentists do not check blood pressure. I have never had mine checked. For the BP, you do need to get it controlled. Please get health insurance.

theplayer11
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by theplayer11 » Tue Sep 18, 2018 6:55 pm

I was denied a full mouth x-ray because of high blood pressure 4 1/2 years ago and it changed my life. I was negligent in seeing a doctor for years and my blood pressure had crept up and was dangerously high. I went straight to the doctor after the denial(and I mean directly from the clinic). This was a wake up call and I completely changed my diet and started exercising more. Dropped 40 pounds in 6 months and have maintained that loss.
Looking back, I'm glad I was cheap and went to a clinic instead of paying full price. Might have saved my life.

staythecourse
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by staythecourse » Tue Sep 18, 2018 6:57 pm

It seems this has NOTHING to do with dental work, HTN, or insurance. It is an issue of business practice. If they say that is their policy, well it is their policy. Does it make sense on a medical perspective? Probably not. But it doesn't matter.

Your options: 1. Find another dentist who doesn't care (most won't) and pay for what it will cost, 2. Get your pressure to 120/80, or 3. Don't do anything until you get dental insurance.

Good luck.
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JoeRetire
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by JoeRetire » Wed Sep 19, 2018 6:31 am

Vanguard Fan 1367 wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:11 pm
JoeRetire wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 2:33 pm
Zonian59 wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 2:12 pm
Anybody here experience being denied dental work due to above normal blood pressure?

So, what options do I have?
Talk to a dentist that practices oral conscious sedation.
I wouldn't expect HMO prices with an oral conscious sedation dentist. I have noticed that sometimes using laughing gas brings patient's blood pressure down to a level that I am comfortable working with.
I wasn't concentrating on the price as much as the blood pressure.

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JPH
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by JPH » Wed Sep 19, 2018 7:10 am

Nowizard wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:18 pm
If they expect 120/80 in the clinic, they will have either an empty clinic or young people in great shape.

Tim
This is correct. I receive treatment at a dental school from a faculty dentist. My pressure always is high at the dentist. Last time I was there it was 150/110. Not a problem for an exam and some minor grinding.
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Swampy » Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:26 am

After moving, I went to a couple of local dentists (who were ALL very young and had dollar signs flashing in their eyes trying to run up charges), then I tried the local dental school hoping to get better quality care when I ran into the blood pressure nonsense. Sounds like you went to the same place I did. Unfortunately, current day dentists trying to 'practice' medicine instead of practicing dentistry is a new phenomenon. I am not impressed when they don't even KNOW how to take an accurate blood pressure reading with a real mercury column sphygmomanometer and don't even know how to select the properly sized arm cuff for measurement. It seems that all these wannabe's use are the cheap automated wrist cuffs from the big box store which are usually inaccurate and give highly variable readings. The dental school clinic is doing a great disservice to the patients by scaring the hell out of them (and possibly steering business to their affiliated medical school clinic).

Eventually, I took a long drive and went back to the 'old' dentist I used to see for decades who did the job without problems.

Oh, that 'high' BP at the dental school clinic? It's normal.

PS You're damned right my BP will go up at least 20 points when I know I'm going to endure pain and have sharp implements in my mouth.

PPS Don't ask for medical advice, you're post will get locked by the administrator.
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by BolderBoy » Wed Sep 19, 2018 10:14 am

Good Listener wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 6:43 pm
For the BP, you do need to get it controlled.
+1.
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toofache32
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by toofache32 » Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:22 pm

Zonian59 wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 2:12 pm

... I stated I was willing to sign a waiver, just get the needed work done. They stated they couldn't deviate from their policy and when I get my blood pressure down to that level, we can proceed forward.

....In fact, the dentist never took my blood pressure and there were no issues while doing root canal and crown installations at that time..
No such waiver exists.

If your other dentist was not checking your blood pressure, then that is a problem. In my state, dentists are required by the state board to check your blood pressure at every visit.

toofache32
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by toofache32 » Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:28 pm

Swampy wrote:
Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:26 am
Unfortunately, current day dentists trying to 'practice' medicine instead of practicing dentistry is a new phenomenon. I am not impressed when they don't even KNOW how to take an accurate blood pressure reading with a real mercury column sphygmomanometer and don't even know how to select the properly sized arm cuff for measurement.
Fascinating you prefer the dark ages of healthcare. Trephination anyone? This is not practicing medicine. You can take your own blood pressure at home without a medical degree. There are very real risks to local anesthesia, including further elevation of blood pressure an heart rate which can push an at-risk person over the edge into having a heart attack or stroke. You are exactly the person who will complain about having your blood pressure checked, but complain more when have a heart attack in the dental chair. With that being said, the numbers quoted by the OP are too low.
Last edited by toofache32 on Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:52 pm, edited 2 times in total.

mhalley
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by mhalley » Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:44 pm

Absolutely no reason not to perform the dental prcedure with those numbers. As this is starting to become too much like a medical topic, my only suggestion is that you seek treatment elsewhere. Attempting to teach the dental students with some google references such as https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5074706/ which states the cutoff for doing procedures is 180/110 would most likely prove futile. Certainly see your doctor for a recheck of the bp.

Zonian59
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Zonian59 » Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:58 pm

Everybody, Thanks for all your comments and suggestions. I agree BP shouldn't be an issue.

My regular doctor adjusted my medication and had me coming in weekly for blood pressure check. It's averaging around 137/85 more or less.
He's satisfied that it meets the target of 140/90 which is suitable for someone my age (I'm 59).

The dental school requires 120/80. I doubt I could get it down to that level.
I already paid for the initial screening and x-rays. I wonder if I can get possession of the x-rays?
I may try the "rival" dental school (I'm in Southern California) and see what happens. Otherwise I'll wait until December when I can enroll in the dental insurance under ACA and find a new dentist.

Anyone have any experience with HMO dental insurance and dentists operating under HMO?
And how do I find a dentist who is more concerned about providing dental care than extracting $$$ from my wallet?

Thanks again.
Last edited by Zonian59 on Thu Sep 20, 2018 12:13 am, edited 2 times in total.

donall
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by donall » Thu Sep 20, 2018 12:07 am

Make sure that if you sign up for Dental insurance you choose a plan that will pay for crown/bridges in first year. Some plans will only pay for crowns, etc. in the second year.

toofache32
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by toofache32 » Thu Sep 20, 2018 12:14 am

Zonian59 wrote:
Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:58 pm

I already paid for the initial screening and x-ray. I wonder if I can get possession of the x-rays?

....Anyone have any experience with HMO dental insurance and dentists operating under HMO?
You are entitled to a copy of your records including xrays (but not the original). State boards allow a nominal fee for this.

Be careful with an HMO. They reward providers for giving the least amount of care (cheapest) possible. Everyone talks about price but people tend to assume quality for some reason.

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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by TravelGeek » Thu Sep 20, 2018 12:52 am

I have been to two private dentists in recent years, in different states, and blood pressure was checked by both. It was slightly elevated, but I have come to learn that I suffer from mild white coat syndrom since my home numbers are fairly consistently in the acceptable range.

mouses
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by mouses » Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:36 am

Freefun wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:46 pm
Nowizard wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 3:18 pm
If they expect 120/80 in the clinic, they will have either an empty clinic or young people in great shape.

Tim
+1

I was thinking that the average age of their patients must be 11 !
I've never had my blood pressure taken in a regular dentist's office but it is taken every visit at a dental school faculty dental practice. I thought they were just doing random health screening; I didn't realize it was a gatekeeper thing.

OP, this may be even more expensive, but instead of grinding down healthy adjacent teeth for a bridge, you might consider implants. Also, I wonder if you could get an evaluation as to recommended work despite the blood pressure.

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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by mouses » Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:42 am

Zonian59 wrote:
Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:58 pm

I already paid for the initial screening and x-rays. I wonder if I can get possession of the x-rays?
I always get a copy of any x-rays and test results. That avoids the hassle of waiting for one office to send them to another or even losing them. The imaging stuff used to come on CDs, now it is usually emailed. Only once or twice have I been asked for a fee.

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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Cunobelinus » Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:49 am

toofache32 wrote:
Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:28 pm
Swampy wrote:
Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:26 am
Unfortunately, current day dentists trying to 'practice' medicine instead of practicing dentistry is a new phenomenon. I am not impressed when they don't even KNOW how to take an accurate blood pressure reading with a real mercury column sphygmomanometer and don't even know how to select the properly sized arm cuff for measurement.
Fascinating you prefer the dark ages of healthcare. Trephination anyone? This is not practicing medicine. You can take your own blood pressure at home without a medical degree. There are very real risks to local anesthesia, including further elevation of blood pressure an heart rate which can push an at-risk person over the edge into having a heart attack or stroke. You are exactly the person who will complain about having your blood pressure checked, but complain more when have a heart attack in the dental chair. With that being said, the numbers quoted by the OP are too low.
Local anesthesia may contain substances that raise your heart rate and blood pressure (epinephrine?) and if you're already above a threshold BP limit, it may put you at risk of a heart attack. Sometimes, beginners (students) may have to inject local anesthesia a few times to get it right -- it isn't easy inserting a needle to hit a nerve to effect a nerve block the first X times.

Some folks appear to be getting upset that they're at a higher risk of having a medical complication (or dying) in a dental student's chair -- that appears to me to be a very selfish approach. A university very likely has to set lower limits for liability purposes due to a board or HR department reviewing or making insurance decisions, whereas private practice is owned by one or several dentists that may decide what they're willing to risk.

This is not in any way intended as medical advice; rather, just something to think about in terms of risk and liability.

I can't recall ever going in for a cleaning or dental exam when I did not have my BP taken. I have read a few times that medical practitioners are often resistant to change how they practice, especially as they get older.

mouses
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by mouses » Thu Sep 20, 2018 6:00 am

Cunobelinus wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:49 am

Local anesthesia may contain substances that raise your heart rate and blood pressure (epinephrine?) and if you're already above a threshold BP limit, it may put you at risk of a heart attack. Sometimes, beginners (students) may have to inject local anesthesia a few times to get it right -- it isn't easy inserting a needle to hit a nerve to effect a nerve block the first X times.
You can ask for substances that do NOT contain stimulants. That option has always been available at any dentist I have gone to. I always ask because I'm prone to afib and stimulants can cause it. Be sure to ask them again just before they do the injections, as often they forget.

capsaicinguy
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by capsaicinguy » Thu Sep 20, 2018 6:22 am

Cunobelinus wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:49 am
toofache32 wrote:
Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:28 pm
Swampy wrote:
Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:26 am
Unfortunately, current day dentists trying to 'practice' medicine instead of practicing dentistry is a new phenomenon. I am not impressed when they don't even KNOW how to take an accurate blood pressure reading with a real mercury column sphygmomanometer and don't even know how to select the properly sized arm cuff for measurement.
Fascinating you prefer the dark ages of healthcare. Trephination anyone? This is not practicing medicine. You can take your own blood pressure at home without a medical degree. There are very real risks to local anesthesia, including further elevation of blood pressure an heart rate which can push an at-risk person over the edge into having a heart attack or stroke. You are exactly the person who will complain about having your blood pressure checked, but complain more when have a heart attack in the dental chair. With that being said, the numbers quoted by the OP are too low.
Local anesthesia may contain substances that raise your heart rate and blood pressure (epinephrine?) and if you're already above a threshold BP limit, it may put you at risk of a heart attack. Sometimes, beginners (students) may have to inject local anesthesia a few times to get it right -- it isn't easy inserting a needle to hit a nerve to effect a nerve block the first X times.

Some folks appear to be getting upset that they're at a higher risk of having a medical complication (or dying) in a dental student's chair -- that appears to me to be a very selfish approach. A university very likely has to set lower limits for liability purposes due to a board or HR department reviewing or making insurance decisions, whereas private practice is owned by one or several dentists that may decide what they're willing to risk.

This is not in any way intended as medical advice; rather, just something to think about in terms of risk and liability.

I can't recall ever going in for a cleaning or dental exam when I did not have my BP taken. I have read a few times that medical practitioners are often resistant to change how they practice, especially as they get older.
+1, toofache32 and cunobelinus. FWIW, as a current dental student our school's policy is consistent readings (we will take multiple, with both automatic and manual cuffs as necessary) of either >=160/ >=100 as our hard stop. I've had to deny patients treatment for plenty of other reasons too, INR too high, etc. Are they upset? Yep. Virtually all of my patients run between 140/90-160/100. People worry about the epi in the local but a stress response ("ouch doc I'm not numb!") can dump 10x as much epi (adrenal glands) into your blood stream. The risk of cardiovascular event is real. Even with the above policy we still have to call the code blue team to come crashing in like the Kool-aid man about once a semester. Blood pressure policies are in place to protect patients, that being said the one OP quoted does appear very conservative.

toofache32
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by toofache32 » Thu Sep 20, 2018 10:16 am

mouses wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 6:00 am
Cunobelinus wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:49 am

Local anesthesia may contain substances that raise your heart rate and blood pressure (epinephrine?) and if you're already above a threshold BP limit, it may put you at risk of a heart attack. Sometimes, beginners (students) may have to inject local anesthesia a few times to get it right -- it isn't easy inserting a needle to hit a nerve to effect a nerve block the first X times.
You can ask for substances that do NOT contain stimulants. That option has always been available at any dentist I have gone to. I always ask because I'm prone to afib and stimulants can cause it. Be sure to ask them again just before they do the injections, as often they forget.
Those wear off much more quickly with the epi. So it depends on the length of the procedure if this is a feasible option or not.

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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by LadyGeek » Thu Sep 20, 2018 3:30 pm

I removed a few posts containing medical advice. See: Medical Issues

Questions on medical issues are beyond the scope of the forum. If you are looking for medical information online, I suggest you start with the Medical Library Association's User's Guide to Finding and Evaluating Health Information on the Web which, in addition to providing guidance on evaluating health information, includes a list of their top recommended sites.
Please stay focused on the financial aspects.
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Yooper16 » Thu Sep 20, 2018 3:31 pm

Previous DDS, before our move, did do BP on extractions/crowns etc. Don't recall it being done for simpler(filing) procedures. It may have been because I used the oral sedation for the more involved work.

Present DDS does not do the BP check.

dekecarver
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by dekecarver » Thu Sep 20, 2018 6:17 pm

Just curious, why do you need to be 'put under' for replacement crown? :?:

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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by mouses » Thu Sep 20, 2018 8:22 pm

toofache32 wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 10:16 am
mouses wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 6:00 am
Cunobelinus wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:49 am

Local anesthesia may contain substances that raise your heart rate and blood pressure (epinephrine?) and if you're already above a threshold BP limit, it may put you at risk of a heart attack. Sometimes, beginners (students) may have to inject local anesthesia a few times to get it right -- it isn't easy inserting a needle to hit a nerve to effect a nerve block the first X times.
You can ask for substances that do NOT contain stimulants. That option has always been available at any dentist I have gone to. I always ask because I'm prone to afib and stimulants can cause it. Be sure to ask them again just before they do the injections, as often they forget.
Those wear off much more quickly with the epi. So it depends on the length of the procedure if this is a feasible option or not.
I have had many dental procedures and not had the stuff wear off.

toofache32
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Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by toofache32 » Thu Sep 20, 2018 9:08 pm

mouses wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 8:22 pm
toofache32 wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 10:16 am
mouses wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 6:00 am
Cunobelinus wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2018 5:49 am

Local anesthesia may contain substances that raise your heart rate and blood pressure (epinephrine?) and if you're already above a threshold BP limit, it may put you at risk of a heart attack. Sometimes, beginners (students) may have to inject local anesthesia a few times to get it right -- it isn't easy inserting a needle to hit a nerve to effect a nerve block the first X times.
You can ask for substances that do NOT contain stimulants. That option has always been available at any dentist I have gone to. I always ask because I'm prone to afib and stimulants can cause it. Be sure to ask them again just before they do the injections, as often they forget.
Those wear off much more quickly with the epi. So it depends on the length of the procedure if this is a feasible option or not.
I have had many dental procedures and not had the stuff wear off.
Thanks for sharing.
I'm not sure what you're trying to prove, but your anecdote doesn't change the fact that the purpose of the epi is to make the anesthetic stay around and last longer. I was trying to say that the non-epi choices can be good for shorter procedures with no bleeding anticipated. But no way for a 3-4 hour procedure. I was simply trying to point out that things are not always that simple.
Last edited by toofache32 on Fri Sep 21, 2018 7:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

Zonian59
Posts: 52
Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2017 4:12 pm
Location: California

Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Zonian59 » Fri Sep 21, 2018 4:47 am

by mouses » Thu Sep 20, 2018 3:36 am

OP, this may be even more expensive, but instead of grinding down healthy adjacent teeth for a bridge, you might consider implants. Also, I wonder if you could get an evaluation as to recommended work despite the blood pressure.
Yes, I had been thinking about implants and believed the dental school would be less expensive (without insurance) than private practice. But they seemed to shy away from it for a couple reasons: 1) it would be surgical intensive; and 2) they were concerned the effect of putting me under would do to my blood pressure. Instead they suggested zirconia crowns would be a preferred option.

Back in 2016 private practice dentist did root canals and crowns under local anesthesia and it didn't bother me. This dental school seems hypersensitive

Well, I'm going to get the X-rays and try the other dental school.

If I go back to private practice under insurance, do HMO insurance covers implants or would I be better off going with the PPO insurance?

sfchris
Posts: 201
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2015 1:41 am

Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by sfchris » Fri Sep 21, 2018 4:57 am

I'm treated for high blood pressure and generally my blood pressure is just a few points above normal (I measure it often).

My last dental visit, after going to the same dentist for 25 years, they took my blood pressure for the first time. Maybe it is a new trend or insurance requirement?

Anyway, after watching the way the hygenist took it (talking with me, my arm not level and not near my heart, and my stress from just having walked a few blocks and worrying about dental work, I told her "it's gonna be high". Sure enough, it was about 145/99. They still did the dental work. If they had refused I would have told them to take the blood pressure properly first.

Vanguard Fan 1367
Posts: 758
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2017 3:09 pm

Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by Vanguard Fan 1367 » Sun Sep 23, 2018 5:28 am

Zonian59 wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 4:47 am
by mouses » Thu Sep 20, 2018 3:36 am

OP, this may be even more expensive, but instead of grinding down healthy adjacent teeth for a bridge, you might consider implants. Also, I wonder if you could get an evaluation as to recommended work despite the blood pressure.
Yes, I had been thinking about implants and believed the dental school would be less expensive (without insurance) than private practice. But they seemed to shy away from it for a couple reasons: 1) it would be surgical intensive; and 2) they were concerned the effect of putting me under would do to my blood pressure. Instead they suggested zirconia crowns would be a preferred option.

Back in 2016 private practice dentist did root canals and crowns under local anesthesia and it didn't bother me. This dental school seems hypersensitive

Well, I'm going to get the X-rays and try the other dental school.

If I go back to private practice under insurance, do HMO insurance covers implants or would I be better off going with the PPO insurance?
Dental "Insurance" isn't like insurance for most of the rest of the body. It is more of a helping with some of the expenses plan. The limit is usually 1 to 2k per year and you can't carry the unused portion to next year. Getting help with implants is increasing with the plans but I don't think you will get much help with implants under most HMO or PPO plans.

HongKonger
Posts: 1079
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 10:35 am
Location: Deep in the Balkans

Re: Dental work and hypertension issue

Post by HongKonger » Sun Sep 23, 2018 5:58 am

Never heard of having BP taken at the dentists - and its a good job too as my dentist is young, very fit, and movie star handsome. :wink:

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