Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Post Reply
psteinx
Posts: 2912
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 2:24 pm

Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by psteinx » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:10 pm

TLDR:
It seems that electric dryers are, per the energystar.gov site, generally (always/almost always?) more efficient than natural gas dryers. This goes strongly against my instincts. Is it correct?

Details:
OK, so shopping a little today for a clothes dryer. Per the salesman at the big box store, most of the units are available in gas and electric, and the gas units run about $100 more, plus some parts, plus because it would be gas I'd probably need an installer versus possibly self installing an electric.

(We currently have a gas dryer, I'm pretty sure - would likely double check things one more time before any purchase, but assume we already have the necessary connection(s)...)

But of course, gas is much more efficient than electric, so, for a family that does a lot of laundry, like ours, you'll quickly make up for higher upfront costs with greater efficiency, right?

Well, step 1 might have been to check the yellow energy usage tags on the front of the dryers at the big box store. But I didn't see any such tags. The salesman claimed they were sometimes sitting in the drum, but on the unit he checked, lots of other paperwork was inside, but not the yellow energy tag. And anyways, this store, despite being a big box with lots of units on the floor, didn't have any gas units out (but they could be ordered).

So, step 2 - check Samsung's website. Unfortunately, their comparison features for dryers didn't work very well, and in any case, they seemed to use different units and different frequencies (per cycle versus annual, with no obvious # of cycles per year for the latter) for the gas and electric I checked.

OK, step 3 - let's check the EnergyStar site (energystar.gov). So I start off comparing some Samsungs. First, how to interpret it? They give two figures - a "Combined Energy Factor" (higher is more efficient), and estimated annual usage, in kWh (notably, the latter is done for both gas and electric, with the former relying, apparently, on some conversions. Surprisingly, for the Samsungs I looked at, the electric were non-trivially MORE efficient than the gas.

OK, so what about non-Samsungs? While there is a lot of variation, it seems that the top of the list on efficiency is dominated by electrics.

Of course, there are presumably some sorts of conversion factors going on here - converting gas use to comparable electrical use/cost. Its conceivable that for any given location, gas cost/availability may be unusually favorable. But I'm guessing that the ratio of natural gas cost to electric cost in our area (Missouri) is not too out of line with national averages.

So, what gives? Am I reading the data wrong, or is my intuition that a natural gas dryer should be noticeably cheaper to operate than a comparable electric, in fact, wrong?

neilpilot
Posts: 1926
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:46 pm
Location: Memphis area

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by neilpilot » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:20 pm

I'm not even going to try to answer your multiple questions, but you need to differentiate energy efficiency from cost to operate the dryer.

It obviously depends on your specific cost of NG and electricity, but the cost of ELECTRIC energy is typically 2-3 times the cost of NG energy. When you take this into account, even if the energy efficiency of an electric dryer is 25% better than a gas dryer, the much lower ENERGY cost of NG could result in the operating cost of the gas dryer being lower than electric.

User avatar
TomatoTomahto
Posts: 7767
Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:48 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by TomatoTomahto » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:26 pm

We just replaced one of our dryers (we have 2, never asked previous owner why). We had a propane hookup, and opted to go electric for a number of reasons (cost of propane, extra cost of gas dryer, extra extra cost of propane conversion). We might still have gone propane (one less call to plumber), but it occurred to me that clothes come out of the washing machine almost dry nowadays, very different than a few years ago. Conclusion: electric.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

123
Posts: 3911
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 3:55 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by 123 » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:40 pm

There can be a significant variation in the costs of gas versus electric energy in different parts of the country. So a gas dryer might be preferred in some areas versus electric dryer in others. Additionally some homes (including some condos) may be constructed as "all electric" so the bulider can save on costs of construction. One problem that can arise with electric dryers is that people sometimes install them in basements or garages and not vent the exhaust to outside the building, that often causes higher humidity can lead to mold issues.
The closest helping hand is at the end of your own arm.

psteinx
Posts: 2912
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 2:24 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by psteinx » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:41 pm

neilpilot - OK, I understand what you're saying. And per the information on the energystar site describing the ratings, it seems (though I'm not certain) they're converting energy usage, not dollar cost, so yeah, you could be using more energy but less dollars running a natural gas unit. If true, that might get me past my first hump of counter-intuition, but it still doesn't leave me with a clear answer of whether a natural gas unit is worth it.

Tomato - Yeah, there are some downsides to natural gas (or propane I suppose), aside from any operation cost advantages/disadvantages.

So apparently if I want to know the real operational cost of a natural gas unit, perhaps I have to do a lot more math and conversions. But Samsung (the most likely brand), seems to provide rather poor information to do such conversions and comparisons with. :(

neilpilot
Posts: 1926
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:46 pm
Location: Memphis area

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by neilpilot » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:54 pm

psteinx wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:41 pm
neilpilot - OK, I understand what you're saying. And per the information on the energystar site describing the ratings, it seems (though I'm not certain) they're converting energy usage, not dollar cost, so yeah, you could be using more energy but less dollars running a natural gas unit. If true, that might get me past my first hump of counter-intuition, but it still doesn't leave me with a clear answer of whether a natural gas unit is worth it.

Tomato - Yeah, there are some downsides to natural gas (or propane I suppose), aside from any operation cost advantages/disadvantages.

So apparently if I want to know the real operational cost of a natural gas unit, perhaps I have to do a lot more math and conversions. But Samsung (the most likely brand), seems to provide rather poor information to do such conversions and comparisons with. :(
I know Google isn't always correct: "Depending on your rates, drying a load can cost between 32-41 cents per load in an electric dryer and 15-33 cents in a gas dryer." Also, since you already have a gas dryer do you also have the 220v outlet needed to power an electric replacement?

User avatar
TomatoTomahto
Posts: 7767
Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:48 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by TomatoTomahto » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:59 pm

I know you were asking about a dryer, but to follow up on my point about washers drying clothes so much better than in my recollection, you might consider replacing the washer also if it’s getting on in years, esp if you can get a deal. We hardly run our dryer any more; just a few minutes per load. A well balanced washer can spin most of the water out of clothes.
Last edited by TomatoTomahto on Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

livesoft
Posts: 63035
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:00 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by livesoft » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:05 pm

^Add one can only buy quick-drying clothes, too. No more cotton!
Wiki This signature message sponsored by sscritic: Learn to fish.

User avatar
sunny_socal
Posts: 1707
Joined: Tue Mar 24, 2015 4:22 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by sunny_socal » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:06 pm

I'd get a natural gas unit if I had the choice. You're burning the fuel directly hence it's cost effective. It helps that the USA is sitting on large reserves and is the world's largest producer:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_g ... ted_States

Electricity tends to be expensive and must be generated (fossil fuels, solar, hydro, nuclear.) The generation and transmission are costly.

User avatar
David Jay
Posts: 5795
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2015 5:54 am
Location: Michigan

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by David Jay » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:24 pm

neilpilot wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:20 pm
I'm not even going to try to answer your multiple questions, but you need to differentiate energy efficiency from cost to operate the dryer.

It obviously depends on your specific cost of NG and electricity, but the cost of ELECTRIC energy is typically 2-3 times the cost of NG energy. When you take this into account, even if the energy efficiency of an electric dryer is 25% better than a gas dryer, the much lower ENERGY cost of NG could result in the operating cost of the gas dryer being lower than electric.
Neil is correct. As a manufacturer of industrial furnaces, I hear this argument every so often being made by manufacturers of electric furnaces.

Electric heat is almost 100% efficient in your home. Every watt of electricity can be transformed into heat. The problem is that it requires about 3 BTU of fossil fuel delivered to the power-plant to deliver 1 BTU of electricity through the generators and power grid into your home. So electricity entering your home is only about 33% efficient.

Hence the 3:1 higher cost per BTU of electricity versus natural gas in North America. It isn't magic, the costs are real, it just isn't obvious to consumers how much fuel is burned and where.
Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future - Niels Bohr | To get the "risk premium", you really do have to take the risk - nisiprius

graviteer
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Aug 19, 2017 9:30 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by graviteer » Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:17 pm

Heat pump clothes dryers are far more efficient than gas, in fact >100% efficient. Like heat-pump HVAC equipment, they can achieve this feat because they do not use energy to create heat, but merely move it from place to place. In some situations, this advantage more than makes up for the cost differential of electric over gas. (And as with all electric appliances, they can be powered by fossil-free sources like solar and wind.)

User avatar
TomatoTomahto
Posts: 7767
Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:48 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by TomatoTomahto » Wed Sep 05, 2018 5:21 pm

graviteer wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:17 pm
Heat pump clothes dryers are far more efficient than gas, in fact >100% efficient. Like heat-pump HVAC equipment, they can achieve this feat because they do not use energy to create heat, but merely move it from place to place. In some situations, this advantage more than makes up for the cost differential of electric over gas. (And as with all electric appliances, they can be powered by fossil-free sources like solar and wind.)
Thanks for that link. Fascinating, and I had no idea.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

Big Dog
Posts: 922
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2015 4:12 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by Big Dog » Wed Sep 05, 2018 5:31 pm

double check your electric outlet. A gas dryer only needs a 120v, an regular electric dryer usually requires a 240v. Thus you may need to upgrade teh circuit, all the way back to your electrical panel. (More juice requires a heavier gauge wire.)

In SoCal, natural gas is a no-brainer.

talzara
Posts: 638
Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2009 7:40 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by talzara » Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:40 pm

123 wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:40 pm
One problem that can arise with electric dryers is that people sometimes install them in basements or garages and not vent the exhaust to outside the building, that often causes higher humidity can lead to mold issues.
You're talking about electric vented dryers.

The highest-efficiency electric dryers are ventless condensing dryers. The water is condensed out of the air and discharged to the drain. The air remains dry, so it does not get vented.

talzara
Posts: 638
Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2009 7:40 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by talzara » Wed Sep 05, 2018 7:35 pm

graviteer wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:17 pm
Heat pump clothes dryers are far more efficient than gas, in fact >100% efficient. Like heat-pump HVAC equipment, they can achieve this feat because they do not use energy to create heat, but merely move it from place to place. In some situations, this advantage more than makes up for the cost differential of electric over gas. (And as with all electric appliances, they can be powered by fossil-free sources like solar and wind.)
The heat pump helps, but the big savings come from using the heat pump as a dehumidifier.

A traditional dryer will heat up the air to evaporate water from clothes. The hot moist air is vented outdoors, which wastes the energy used to heat the air.

A heat pump condensing dryer will condense the moisture out of the air. The condensate goes down the drain instead of being vented. The hot dry air stays in the dryer. The heat used to evaporate the water is recovered when the water condenses.

talzara
Posts: 638
Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2009 7:40 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by talzara » Wed Sep 05, 2018 8:01 pm

psteinx wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:41 pm
So apparently if I want to know the real operational cost of a natural gas unit, perhaps I have to do a lot more math and conversions. But Samsung (the most likely brand), seems to provide rather poor information to do such conversions and comparisons with. :(
Gas is selling for under $1 a therm in most states. 1 therm is 29.3 kWh. That's like paying 3.4 cents a kWh for electricity.

Valuethinker
Posts: 36727
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by Valuethinker » Thu Sep 06, 2018 1:27 pm

psteinx wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:10 pm
TLDR:
It seems that electric dryers are, per the energystar.gov site, generally (always/almost always?) more efficient than natural gas dryers. This goes strongly against my instincts. Is it correct?

Details:
OK, so shopping a little today for a clothes dryer. Per the salesman at the big box store, most of the units are available in gas and electric, and the gas units run about $100 more, plus some parts, plus because it would be gas I'd probably need an installer versus possibly self installing an electric.

(We currently have a gas dryer, I'm pretty sure - would likely double check things one more time before any purchase, but assume we already have the necessary connection(s)...)

But of course, gas is much more efficient than electric, so, for a family that does a lot of laundry, like ours, you'll quickly make up for higher upfront costs with greater efficiency, right?

Well, step 1 might have been to check the yellow energy usage tags on the front of the dryers at the big box store. But I didn't see any such tags. The salesman claimed they were sometimes sitting in the drum, but on the unit he checked, lots of other paperwork was inside, but not the yellow energy tag. And anyways, this store, despite being a big box with lots of units on the floor, didn't have any gas units out (but they could be ordered).

So, step 2 - check Samsung's website. Unfortunately, their comparison features for dryers didn't work very well, and in any case, they seemed to use different units and different frequencies (per cycle versus annual, with no obvious # of cycles per year for the latter) for the gas and electric I checked.

OK, step 3 - let's check the EnergyStar site (energystar.gov). So I start off comparing some Samsungs. First, how to interpret it? They give two figures - a "Combined Energy Factor" (higher is more efficient), and estimated annual usage, in kWh (notably, the latter is done for both gas and electric, with the former relying, apparently, on some conversions. Surprisingly, for the Samsungs I looked at, the electric were non-trivially MORE efficient than the gas.

OK, so what about non-Samsungs? While there is a lot of variation, it seems that the top of the list on efficiency is dominated by electrics.

Of course, there are presumably some sorts of conversion factors going on here - converting gas use to comparable electrical use/cost. Its conceivable that for any given location, gas cost/availability may be unusually favorable. But I'm guessing that the ratio of natural gas cost to electric cost in our area (Missouri) is not too out of line with national averages.

So, what gives? Am I reading the data wrong, or is my intuition that a natural gas dryer should be noticeably cheaper to operate than a comparable electric, in fact, wrong?
Efficiency calculation

Electricity (gas fired power station)

100 units of energy in the gas => 60 units of electricity generated (60% efficiency ratio) => 53 delivered to your home (8% transmission loss)

Now 53 units of energy in a conventional electric dryer is equivalent to 53 units of energy from gas.

However in a Heat Pump dryer with a Coefficient of Performance of 2.5, that 53 units of electricity generates 2,5 x 53 = 134 units of energy used to dry clothes

Efficiency (gas dryer)

100 units of energy in gas (to your home)
https://home.howstuffworks.com/which-dr ... cient2.htm

tells me the Energy Factor (clothes dried per unit of energy) is 2.67 for gas and 3.1 for a conventional dryer

Thus 100 units of gas to your home is 267 lbs of clothes.

(I have ignored all transmission losses in gas - there is an energy cost to pump gas to your home, but it shouldn't be huge).

The same 100 units of energy in gas dries 267 lbs of clothes v. (53 x 3.1 = 162 lbs of clothes) for a normal dryer or 2.5 times that for a Heat Pump dryer.

Cost considerations

- are you buying a Heat Pump dryer? If no, you get more useful energy out of your gas dryer

- electricity is usually c 2-3x cost per unit energy of that of gas (see post above giving the conversion formula). BTW if ever stuck on units conversion, just google it - you often find someone has built an online calculator

- do you have time-of-day electricity rates? That could be a big saving having a gas dryer over an electric one depending on when you do your drying

- from a Green point of view, if you live in Pacific Northwest then electricity will be far greener than gas. California is probably marginal. If you live in the US Midwest or South gas dryer is far cleaner than using electricity generated by coal.

Note if you live in New England consumer gas prices are very high due to pipeline constraints. On the other hand so are electricity prices.

I understand that gas dryers take longer for a load.

curmudgeon
Posts: 1666
Joined: Thu Jun 20, 2013 11:00 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by curmudgeon » Thu Sep 06, 2018 3:25 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
Thu Sep 06, 2018 1:27 pm

The same 100 units of energy in gas dries 267 lbs of clothes v. (53 x 3.1 = 162 lbs of clothes) for a normal dryer or 2.5 times that for a Heat Pump dryer.

Cost considerations

- are you buying a Heat Pump dryer? If no, you get more useful energy out of your gas dryer

- electricity is usually c 2-3x cost per unit energy of that of gas (see post above giving the conversion formula). BTW if ever stuck on units conversion, just google it - you often find someone has built an online calculator

- do you have time-of-day electricity rates? That could be a big saving having a gas dryer over an electric one depending on when you do your drying

- from a Green point of view, if you live in Pacific Northwest then electricity will be far greener than gas. California is probably marginal. If you live in the US Midwest or South gas dryer is far cleaner than using electricity generated by coal.

Note if you live in New England consumer gas prices are very high due to pipeline constraints. On the other hand so are electricity prices.

I understand that gas dryers take longer for a load.
My general experience is that US gas dryers dry about 3X faster than typical US electric (resistance) dryers. And my limited experience (from rental apartments when traveling in Europe) is that the more energy efficient electric (condensing) dryers are substantially slower yet. If you don't do much laundry (or do it in small batches) it may not matter that much, but Big Box store salespeople are often completely full of misinformation (and want to sell what they have at hand).

For the most part, if you have natural gas service, a gas dryer will pay back the extra cost within a couple of years, and be much faster to boot. Truck-delivered propane might be a closer call, unless you really value the faster drying.

User avatar
queso
Posts: 635
Joined: Thu Jan 07, 2016 3:52 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by queso » Fri Sep 07, 2018 7:06 am

No efficiency math to add, but if you already have the hookups for an existing gas dryer you do not need an installer. You can buy the connection kit at any big box store or from the place that you buy the dryer from. Install takes all of 5 minutes longer than an electric dryer.

Call_Me_Op
Posts: 7084
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 2:57 pm
Location: Milky Way

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by Call_Me_Op » Fri Sep 07, 2018 7:10 am

psteinx wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:10 pm
TLDR:
It seems that electric dryers are, per the energystar.gov site, generally (always/almost always?) more efficient than natural gas dryers. This goes strongly against my instincts. Is it correct?
Depends upon how you define efficiency. Electrical heaters are always 100% efficient with respect to energy drawn from the outlet because all electrical energy is converted to heat. But if you count energy lost at the plant producing the electricity (from coal, for example) and transmission losses, you get a far lower number.
Best regards, -Op | | "In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity." Einstein

Valuethinker
Posts: 36727
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by Valuethinker » Sat Sep 08, 2018 7:31 am

David Jay wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:24 pm
neilpilot wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:20 pm
I'm not even going to try to answer your multiple questions, but you need to differentiate energy efficiency from cost to operate the dryer.

It obviously depends on your specific cost of NG and electricity, but the cost of ELECTRIC energy is typically 2-3 times the cost of NG energy. When you take this into account, even if the energy efficiency of an electric dryer is 25% better than a gas dryer, the much lower ENERGY cost of NG could result in the operating cost of the gas dryer being lower than electric.
Neil is correct. As a manufacturer of industrial furnaces, I hear this argument every so often being made by manufacturers of electric furnaces.

Electric heat is almost 100% efficient in your home. Every watt of electricity can be transformed into heat. The problem is that it requires about 3 BTU of fossil fuel delivered to the power-plant to deliver 1 BTU of electricity through the generators and power grid into your home. So electricity entering your home is only about 33% efficient.
That would be true for a coal fired power station (or, in fact, a nuclear one, but it's irrelevant to nuclear power) or for an Open Cycle Gas Turbine, which are used primarily for peaking power when demand spikes on the grid. The latest Combined Cycle Gas Turbine stations reach above 60% efficiency-- we are reaching the near limits of Cornot's Law.

Standard figure for Distribution & Transmission loss is 8%. So 8% of 60% would be (4.8%) but let's call it 6% ==> 54% efficiency at the household.

For electric induction heating gas heating is better assuming greater than 90% efficiency (secondary heat exchanger in the gas furnace).

If the Coefficient of Performance of the Heat Pump exceeds 2.0 then it's in fact better to generate the electricity and use it for heating/ cooling in the house.
Hence the 3:1 higher cost per BTU of electricity versus natural gas in North America. It isn't magic, the costs are real, it just isn't obvious to consumers how much fuel is burned and where.
That's part of it, but it's also more complex. The capital costs of electricity generation, transmission and distribution are amortized over the whole system. As electricity demand has been generally falling in the last few years, those costs are greater per unit -- they are costs which don't go away just because they are not being used to supply (as much) electricity.

Generally the capital costs of the gas network are more fully written down, and ditto the exploration and production costs for gas. The fixed costs of gas exploration and production are partly paid for by fracking for oil-- that's what's driving increasing gas production. Thus natural gas can be sold at its variable cost of production ie without a full recouping of fixed costs. Thus North American gas is cheap.

It will get interesting when you get to high levels of renewables. They have high capital costs, but very low (near zero) operating costs and zero fuel costs. This will tend to drive the electricity pool prices towards zero and that is already happening in some jurisdictions. To the extent that renewable generation is "behind the meter" it also is a net decrease in demand. However the grid costs still have to be born.
Last edited by Valuethinker on Sat Sep 08, 2018 7:39 am, edited 1 time in total.

Valuethinker
Posts: 36727
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by Valuethinker » Sat Sep 08, 2018 7:35 am

Call_Me_Op wrote:
Fri Sep 07, 2018 7:10 am
psteinx wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:10 pm
TLDR:
It seems that electric dryers are, per the energystar.gov site, generally (always/almost always?) more efficient than natural gas dryers. This goes strongly against my instincts. Is it correct?
Depends upon how you define efficiency. Electrical heaters are always 100% efficient with respect to energy drawn from the outlet because all electrical energy is converted to heat. But if you count energy lost at the plant producing the electricity (from coal, for example) and transmission losses, you get a far lower number.
A nuclear power plant has low 30s in terms of thermal efficiency (energy in the fuel to electricity generated) but no one cares (much). Cornot's Law again- a nuclear plant on the Great Lakes or in New England will have a somewhat higher efficiency than one in Florida, where the seas for cooling water are warmer.

In other words, the way electricity is generated varies by locale and time of day. Coal plants are inefficient but modern gas fired power stations are highly efficient (see my numbers in posts above). Roughly speaking US electricity production is 32% coal, 31% gas, balance is everything else (Nuclear, Hydro & renewables) -- https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=427&t=3 But where and when the consumer is has a huge impact.

On dryers themselves yes it appears (from the numbers I dug up, up post) that an electric dryer is c. 20% more efficient in terms of the use of the delivered energy. A Heat Pump dryer is 2-3x as efficient again.

The key thing is that domestic gas in the USA is cheap and in most jurisdictions cheap compared to electricity.

michaeljc70
Posts: 3914
Joined: Thu Oct 15, 2015 3:53 pm

Re: Electric dryers more efficient than gas?!?!?!?

Post by michaeljc70 » Sat Sep 08, 2018 11:05 am

Where I live (Chicago), almost no one has an electric dryer. Gas dryers are much cheaper to run (at least here-same for water heaters). If people have an electric dryer it is usually because it would have been very difficult/expensive to get a gas line to the dryer.

Post Reply