Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

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tealeaves
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Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by tealeaves » Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:47 pm

Any point in forwarding this to the police? Should she do nothing? Trying to advise her ASAP. Not surprisingly this is unsettling to anyone, let alone a elderly woman who uses her computer only casually. Thank you!
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I know XXXX is one of your pass words. Lets get straight to the point. You may not know me and you are most likely thinking why you're getting this email? Not a single person has paid me to investigate about you.
In fact, I actually installed a malware on the 18+ streaming (pornography) web-site and guess what, you visited this web site to have fun (you know what I mean). While you were watching videos, your browser started out functioning as a RDP with a keylogger which gave me access to your display screen and cam. Just after that, my software program gathered your complete contacts from your Messenger, social networks, as well as e-mail . And then I made a double video. First part shows the video you were viewing (you've got a good taste hahah), and next part shows the recording of your webcam, and it is u.
You actually have two different choices. We are going to look at these solutions in aspects:
1st solution is to dismiss this email message. In this situation, I will send your very own recorded material to every single one of your contacts and thus just consider regarding the embarrassment yo u will see. And as a consequence if you happen to be in an intimate relationship, just how it will eventually affect?
In the second place solution should be to pay me $3000. I will describe it as a donation. In such a case, I will right away erase your video recording. You can go on your way of life like this never occurred and you are never going to hear back again from me.
You'll make the payment by Bitcoin (if you do not know this, search for "how to buy bitcoin" in Google).
BTC Address: HE/SHE PROVIDES AN ENCRYPTED SEQUENCE HERE
[case-SENSITIVE, copy and paste it]
In case you are thinking of going to the law, very well, this mail can not be traced back to me. I have taken care of my moves. I am not trying to ask you for much, I only want to be compensated.
You have one day to pay. I have a unique pixel in this mail, and now I know that you have read this mail. If I don't receive the BitCoins, I will definately send out your video to all of your contacts including members of your family, co-workers, and so forth. Nonetheless, if I receive the payment, I will erase the video immediately. If you want proof, reply with Yup then I definitely will send your video recording to your 15 friends. It is a nonnegotiable offer, thus don't waste my time & yours by responding to this e-mail.

stuper1
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by stuper1 » Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:55 pm

Based on your description, I'm guessing that she never visited a pornography web-site. Therefore, she has nothing to worry about. The creep is just on a fishing expedition. I would do nothing. I'm pretty sure the police have many other higher-priority things on which to work. You might advise her to think about getting a Chromebook, which I've been led to believe is much safer from hackers/spammers/etc, although I am no expert.

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bottlecap
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by bottlecap » Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:56 pm

If they had "proof," why wouldn't they send her the video? That would have maximum effect.

They don't have proof. I don't know what authority you would send this to, perhaps someone else will know.

I would otherwise ignore it and have someone check my computer for malware just in case.

JT

Housedoc
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by Housedoc » Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:56 pm

I received this same email in my spam folder of Gmail awhile back. Weird thing is the "password" they thought they had to my email was infact the pw to a utility acct login. I will say the pw was fairly unique. I ran many malware utilities and virus scans. Not much showed up but PUP files that were quarantined. I changed all my logins and set up 2 factor authentication where possible. Not sure where or howbthis password was captured but my bride uses Facebook and plays some games on this PC. She mainly uses a tablet for that. Make sure relative has some anti virus program running. I was relying on Defender built into Win10 but now am using AVG free version. I just ignore ad pop ups.

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SquawkIdent
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by SquawkIdent » Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:57 pm

bottlecap wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:56 pm
If they had "proof," why wouldn't they send her the video? That would have maximum effect.

They don't have proof. I don't know what authority you would send this to, perhaps someone else will know.

I would otherwise ignore it and have someone check my computer for malware just in case.

JT
+1

Calico
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by Calico » Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:57 pm

I heard about this on the radio a few weeks back. It's basically a scam. If I got the email, I would delete it and ignore it.

Here is an article about it: https://www.businessinsider.com/new-ema ... oin-2018-7

From the article
Basically, the attackers don't actually have video of you or access to your contacts, and they haven't been able to install malicious code on your computer. In reality, they're taking a password from a database that's available online, sending it to you, and hoping you're scared enough to believe their story and send them bitcoin.
They get the passwords from sites that were hacked (like all those Yahoo hacks that happened). If it's still a password she uses, she should change it everywhere she uses it.
Last edited by Calico on Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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tuningfork
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by tuningfork » Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:58 pm

Ignore it. See details about this type of scam here:
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/07/s ... ng-bitcoin

Grt2bOutdoors
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:01 pm

It’s a scam. Ignore it. The scammer is hoping the target will fall for it and immediately send them the money. You can forward the email to FTC (I believe) and if you wish file a report with local police.
"One should invest based on their need, ability and willingness to take risk - Larry Swedroe" Asking Portfolio Questions

stan1
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by stan1 » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:02 pm

Put the words into google. It's a known scam. Explain to her its disturbing but is a known scam and have her delete the email while taking no further action. I'd also congratulate her and thank her for letting you know about it and for being savvy enough to know something was fishy so she didn't get taken in.

I tried to report mine online to the FBI but they wanted an incredible amount of personal information to file a report so I abandoned that process.

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Raybo
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by Raybo » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:03 pm

Is there any chance that this person actually visited the listed site and has an account there? If not, then ignore the email. If the person did, in fact, have an account and that is the password, then I would use it as a lesson not to do such things over the internet and still ignore it.

Have you checked to see that the computer in question has a key logger on it? Does the computer have a webcam (mine doesn't)? Does anyone else use the computer? If so, and someone else visited the porn site, the person in the video won't be your friend, so no harm done.

If, in fact, she never visited the site but does have a key logger on her computer, then she could send emails to people she cares about and tell them she is being blackmailed, maybe send a copy of the email, and state that she has never done this and she is sorry for being the cause of someone getting such an email.

Note that a) lots of people simply ignore email these days, b) emails containing video usually get blocked, c) email addresses go out of date, and email servers are more savvy any these emails are likely to be classed as span.

If you are so motivated, send it to the FBI.
No matter how long the hill, if you keep pedaling you'll eventually get up to the top.

Dottie57
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by Dottie57 » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:10 pm

bottlecap wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:56 pm
If they had "proof," why wouldn't they send her the video? That would have maximum effect.

They don't have proof. I don't know what authority you would send this to, perhaps someone else will know.

I would otherwise ignore it and have someone check my computer for malware just in case.

JT
State Attorney General? The internet provider she uses?

ResearchMed
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by ResearchMed » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:12 pm

Definitely a scam.

However, the person who would most likely respond is someone who *was* "guilty" of such "pleasures".
That person already is worried about "being found out" :annoyed

That's the person who is more likely to scurry along and get some BitCoin....
... which is why this works.

Some "innocents" may also fall for it, but it's not clear why they would think there are any such videos, especially of "themselves", er, participating.

But yes, it's upsetting, and no doubt especially for someone who is less aware of these scams.

RM
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midareff
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by midareff » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:14 pm

Housedoc wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:56 pm
I received this same email in my spam folder of Gmail awhile back. Weird thing is the "password" they thought they had to my email was infact the pw to a utility acct login. I will say the pw was fairly unique. I ran many malware utilities and virus scans. Not much showed up but PUP files that were quarantined. I changed all my logins and set up 2 factor authentication where possible. Not sure where or howbthis password was captured but my bride uses Facebook and plays some games on this PC. She mainly uses a tablet for that. Make sure relative has some anti virus program running. I was relying on Defender built into Win10 but now am using AVG free version. I just ignore ad pop ups.
Why don't you contact the utility and ask them how their security is for their passwords?

runner3081
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by runner3081 » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:33 pm

All of these are spam. Best part is to take two sentences, copy them and Google it. It will hit, as this one did.

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bligh
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by bligh » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:33 pm

It is an obvious scam.

It is also a rip off of the plot line for a Black Mirror (Netflix) Episode "Shut up and Dance".

Ignore it ...

BTW, Black Mirror is an awesome show. :sharebeer

JoeRetire
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by JoeRetire » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:46 pm

tealeaves wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:47 pm
Any point in forwarding this to the police? Should she do nothing? Trying to advise her ASAP. Not surprisingly this is unsettling to anyone, let alone a elderly woman who uses her computer only casually.
There is no point in forwarding the email. There is nothing for the police to do.

This is a shakedown and a scam. The originator has nothing except a username and password from a hacked website. In general, she needn't be worried about any "evidence". Her computer isn't compromised.

But if she hasn't already done so, she should immediately change the password she uses for this website if she can determine it. And if she uses the same password on other websites, she should change them as well.

(She should be changing passwords periodically anyway, but that's a different question.)

I received the same email a while back. I knew the website they got the username and password from, and I know that it was hacked and passwords were stolen years ago. I have long since changed that password and all others.
Last edited by JoeRetire on Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:50 pm, edited 2 times in total.

gtd98765
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by gtd98765 » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:49 pm

The whole scam is explained at security journalist Brian Krebs' web site:

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/07/sex ... passwords/

"Here’s a clever new twist on an old email scam that could serve to make the con far more believable. The message purports to have been sent from a hacker who’s compromised your computer and used your webcam to record a video of you while you were watching porn. The missive threatens to release the video to all your contacts unless you pay a Bitcoin ransom. The new twist? The email now references a real password previously tied to the recipient’s email address."

lazydavid
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by lazydavid » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:56 pm

As others have said, her password was taken from one of the thousands of public breaches. To get an idea which one, put her email address in here:

https://haveibeenpwned.com/

It will tell you how many instances of publicly-compromised credentials there are associated with that email address. The site is run by Troy Hunt, a white-hat security researcher. It will NOT ask you for or provide the password that was compromised, just notify you that you were included.

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munemaker
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by munemaker » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:00 pm

Tell her to ignore it and stay off the porn sites.

bob60014
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by bob60014 » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:07 pm

Mark it as spam, then delete.

Madbull
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by Madbull » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:11 pm

lazydavid wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:56 pm
As others have said, her password was taken from one of the thousands of public breaches. To get an idea which one, put her email address in here:

https://haveibeenpwned.com/

It will tell you how many instances of publicly-compromised credentials there are associated with that email address. The site is run by Troy Hunt, a white-hat security researcher. It will NOT ask you for or provide the password that was compromised, just notify you that you were included.
In addition to this, and one of the many things I do to 'do my part', is having multiple email accounts. IE; one for junk emails that I actually want to see from time to time/signing up for contests, a separate email for important items but not financial related, a third email for financial sites, and a fourth email address that is used for friends & family, (ie;, actually emailing people). It's a very minimal hassle for a bit of extra security. (Still need to cycle through PW changes of course, even on the spam account).

JenniferG
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by JenniferG » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:15 pm

I received basically the same threat, sent to my work email! Don’t know how it slipped through the spam filter. Difference was the email I received didn’t state a password. It gave me a good laugh but it’s infuriating when elderly/non-tech savvy people are frightened by these thugs.
Delete and move on.
IANAL. I am a CPA, but I’m probably posting too late at night or too far into tax season to be 100% accurate. You get what you pay for.

sco
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by sco » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:21 pm

It is a scam, but if they really have her password then she should change it. This has started to be a fairly common one.

Gnirk
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by Gnirk » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:35 pm

I received the same email. At first I was shocked, and then I laughed! I knew it was a scam because I'm the only one who uses my computer, and I don't troll porn sites. I found it's a pretty common scam. It was an old password, but I immediately changed all of my passwords, just to be safe.
I simply deleted the email.

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parsi1
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by parsi1 » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:43 pm

Just because of these type of scams I am thinking about getting a dedicated computer for my bill pay and taxes and the rest of the time it stays unplugged.
Do you all think this might be safer?

lazydavid
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by lazydavid » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:45 pm

Madbull wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:11 pm
In addition to this, and one of the many things I do to 'do my part', is having multiple email accounts. IE; one for junk emails that I actually want to see from time to time/signing up for contests, a separate email for important items but not financial related, a third email for financial sites, and a fourth email address that is used for friends & family, (ie;, actually emailing people). It's a very minimal hassle for a bit of extra security. (Still need to cycle through PW changes of course, even on the spam account).
I haven't gone this far, but a friend of mine owns his own domain, fullname.com. Every time he creates a new account for a service or vendor, he adds an alias named after it, and uses that email address as the login name. so when he starts getting spam to dropbox@fullname.com or adobe@fullname.com, he knows exactly how the spammers got his email address. If it gets bad, he just deletes the alias.

tealeaves
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by tealeaves » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:53 pm

OP here. Thank you for all the reassuring insights. I printed all of your comments out and showed them to her. Definitely put her at ease. Such a pity that these scammers exist. Thanks again.

ResearchMed
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by ResearchMed » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:54 pm

lazydavid wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:45 pm
Madbull wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:11 pm
In addition to this, and one of the many things I do to 'do my part', is having multiple email accounts. IE; one for junk emails that I actually want to see from time to time/signing up for contests, a separate email for important items but not financial related, a third email for financial sites, and a fourth email address that is used for friends & family, (ie;, actually emailing people). It's a very minimal hassle for a bit of extra security. (Still need to cycle through PW changes of course, even on the spam account).
I haven't gone this far, but a friend of mine owns his own domain, fullname.com. Every time he creates a new account for a service or vendor, he adds an alias named after it, and uses that email address as the login name. so when he starts getting spam to dropbox@fullname.com or adobe@fullname.com, he knows exactly how the spammers got his email address. If it gets bad, he just deletes the alias.
This is exactly what I do.

So I have used something like "RM-Adobe@<OurDomain>.com , etc.

But in our case, they are just "inbound aliases", so we can't delete them.
That is, "Rumplestilskin@<OurDomain>.com" will arrive.
But we can't send from anything other than one outbound e-address.

It is interesting to see who "shares/sells" e-addresses. Or perhaps who got hacked.
(But most of the obviously "hacked" spam/nasty inbounds are clearly from someone who used our real e-addresses, be it professionally, or former small business.)

And then we have a few more anonymous e-addresses, such as "<fake-name/initials/descriptor>@gmail.com" (or yahoo.com, etc.).
We use these for "real" email correspondence with "online acquaintances" when we don't quite want to pierce the veil yet.

RM
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JoeRetire
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by JoeRetire » Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:57 pm

lazydavid wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:45 pm
I haven't gone this far, but a friend of mine owns his own domain, fullname.com. Every time he creates a new account for a service or vendor, he adds an alias named after it, and uses that email address as the login name. so when he starts getting spam to dropbox@fullname.com or adobe@fullname.com, he knows exactly how the spammers got his email address. If it gets bad, he just deletes the alias.
You can do something similar with Gmail.

[yourname]+adobe@gmail.com will get delivered to the normal inbox for [yourname]@gmail.com. You can create as many of these aliases as you like and use them after the + sign.

That way you always know which website did nasty things to you. And you can always block all mail sent to [yourname]+alias@gmail.com.

ResearchMed
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by ResearchMed » Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:00 pm

JoeRetire wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:57 pm
lazydavid wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 3:45 pm
I haven't gone this far, but a friend of mine owns his own domain, fullname.com. Every time he creates a new account for a service or vendor, he adds an alias named after it, and uses that email address as the login name. so when he starts getting spam to dropbox@fullname.com or adobe@fullname.com, he knows exactly how the spammers got his email address. If it gets bad, he just deletes the alias.
You can do something similar with Gmail.

[yourname]+adobe@gmail.com will get delivered to the normal inbox for [yourname]@gmail.com. You can create as many of these aliases as you like and use them after the + sign.

That way you always know which website did nasty things to you. And you can always block all mail sent to [yourname]+alias@gmail.com.
Thanks very much. I didn't know this about the "+" use with gmail.
But deleting the base e-address account would the also disable all of the other email uses.

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

mptfan
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by mptfan » Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:19 pm

Do nothing.

JoeRetire
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by JoeRetire » Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:06 pm

ResearchMed wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 4:00 pm
Thanks very much. I didn't know this about the "+" use with gmail.
But deleting the base e-address account would the also disable all of the other email uses.
Yes, but I wouldn't delete the base account. I just send all emails addressed to the offending alias into the Spam folder.

investingdad
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by investingdad » Wed Sep 05, 2018 7:04 pm

It's clever and I award the scammer partial points for the effort.

But Black Mirror earns full marks for the idea.

Hit delete.

Then show them this thread.

gotester2000
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by gotester2000 » Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:11 pm

The worst action here is sending money to the scammer. The demands will never stop...

By the way, use a junk gmail account for general online purpose since
google pretty much tracks everything you do.

TallBoy29er
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by TallBoy29er » Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:34 pm

I didn't read the prior responses, but your original post is a very well known scam a this point. It combines something that is readily available to a malfeasant in many places (passwords that have been owned), and then associates that valid knowledge with a set of facts that is contrived and not actually known by the malfeasant, but may have some embarrassing truths associated with it for the victim. The malfeasant uses fear to prey on the victim.

See https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/07/sex ... passwords/ for a more in depth explanation.

Please do not let yourselves, or others, fall prey to this extortion.

sil2017
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by sil2017 » Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:40 pm

I received an email similar to yours . First time I read it then deleted the email . I received several more from an unknown person with similar subjects which I just deleted.

Person left me alone after a week.

41Fin
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by 41Fin » Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:47 pm

While this is probably a scam webcams do get hacked and videos leaked. I don’t use my computer much but I always keep a piece of tape over the camera just Incase

Big Dog
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by Big Dog » Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:56 pm

wife received teh same a couple of weeks ago. Just told her to go change key passwords, just in case.

drawpoker
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by drawpoker » Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:57 pm

Make sure that your relative's email program offers the "block senders address" and also "block sender's domain" options for all pieces of mail.
Make sure she knows how to use it to prevent any more of these coming thru to inbox

Nate79
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by Nate79 » Wed Sep 05, 2018 11:41 pm

I'm surprised so many people actually read these junk emails. They either go on the junk folder never to be read or if they get thru which is rare they are easy to pick out and just delete without needing to read them

Cyclone
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by Cyclone » Thu Sep 06, 2018 12:31 am

Even if this was true, what could the blackmailer really do? People would see a split-screen of the victim staring at a computer screen on one side, then on the other would be a porn video? What would that prove anyway?

daveydoo
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by daveydoo » Thu Sep 06, 2018 12:51 am

tealeaves wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:47 pm
...I have a unique pixel in this mail, and now I know that you have read this mail...
I don't think this person knows what they're talking about.

Also, if they had a pic of you from the camera or from anywhere, they could screenshot any sleazy website and say you were on it. It wouldn't need to be true.

If the password is correct, is it a common password? Not sure if this is even targeted at all.

P.S. This was a Black Mirror episode :D
"I mean, it's one banana, Michael...what could it cost? Ten dollars?"

CFM300
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by CFM300 » Thu Sep 06, 2018 2:35 am

I thought everyone knew to put tape over their webcams? I mean, if Zuckerberg and Comey do it, shouldn't we all?

ResearchMed
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by ResearchMed » Thu Sep 06, 2018 4:13 am

Cyclone wrote:
Thu Sep 06, 2018 12:31 am
Even if this was true, what could the blackmailer really do? People would see a split-screen of the victim staring at a computer screen on one side, then on the other would be a porn video? What would that prove anyway?
Uh, that "computer cam" shot of the computer owner... isn't supposed to be of someone sitting there "working" and staring at the computer.

This was supposedly (per the scam) captured while viewing porn.
Use your imagination a bit more about what the scammer is suggesting.

THOSE are the "victims" who will panic first..... :shock:
And be more likely to rush and get those bitcoins sent...
(Even though it's a scam; that type of victim is more likely to panic.)

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

gotester2000
Posts: 594
Joined: Sun Nov 12, 2017 1:59 am

Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by gotester2000 » Thu Sep 06, 2018 5:23 am

ResearchMed wrote:
Thu Sep 06, 2018 4:13 am
Cyclone wrote:
Thu Sep 06, 2018 12:31 am
Even if this was true, what could the blackmailer really do? People would see a split-screen of the victim staring at a computer screen on one side, then on the other would be a porn video? What would that prove anyway?
Uh, that "computer cam" shot of the computer owner... isn't supposed to be of someone sitting there "working" and staring at the computer.

This was supposedly (per the scam) captured while viewing porn.
Use your imagination a bit more about what the scammer is suggesting.

THOSE are the "victims" who will panic first..... :shock:
And be more likely to rush and get those bitcoins sent...
(Even though it's a scam; that type of victim is more likely to panic.)

RM
Most of the devices have onboard webcams pointing at you, so cant imagine how they can capture you and your screen together?
Only an external cam that is remotely controlled can record such activity.

Call_Me_Op
Posts: 7069
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Location: Milky Way

Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by Call_Me_Op » Thu Sep 06, 2018 8:00 am

Clearly a scam by a foreign scammer. I would tell her to ignore it. Even if the scammer does what he says (highly doubtful), who cares?
Best regards, -Op | | "In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity." Einstein

GoldenFinch
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Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by GoldenFinch » Thu Sep 06, 2018 8:13 am

My husband works in IT. He gets calls from clients about getting these emails regularly. This is a common email sent out to MANY people! Delete it. Change passwords. Forget about it. Never respond.

squirm
Posts: 1511
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 11:53 am

Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by squirm » Thu Sep 06, 2018 8:26 am

I just read the first half but Sounds like a typical email scam to me. Just change the passwords if you feel uncomfortable, I suggest 2fa then forget about it. Set the email to exclusive, maybe that will be best for her.

My elderly mom gets all sorts of crap including sexual emails. I'm the one that has to block them or reassure her nothing is wrong, I guess that's because I'm the IT guy.

mptfan
Posts: 4786
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:58 am

Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by mptfan » Thu Sep 06, 2018 11:05 am

Cyclone wrote:
Thu Sep 06, 2018 12:31 am
Even if this was true, what could the blackmailer really do? People would see a split-screen of the victim staring at a computer screen on one side, then on the other would be a porn video? What would that prove anyway?
The victim may be doing something other than just staring at the screen.
:shock:

daveydoo
Posts: 1564
Joined: Sun May 15, 2016 1:53 am

Re: Elderly (innocent) relative received this horrible email

Post by daveydoo » Thu Sep 06, 2018 1:56 pm

lazydavid wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:56 pm
As others have said, her password was taken from one of the thousands of public breaches. To get an idea which one, put her email address in here:

https://haveibeenpwned.com/
This was a huge public service to BH -- thank you for posting!
"I mean, it's one banana, Michael...what could it cost? Ten dollars?"

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