The future of my journals and logs

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seychellois_lib
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The future of my journals and logs

Post by seychellois_lib »

Apparently many folks on the forum maintain journals. I restarted journaling eight years ago and also possess one journal from a period when I was an 18 year old at sea in the Merchant Marine. How I wish I had continued journaling for the intervening 40 years!

During my 20 years of ownership, I have also kept a log aboard my sailboat. I have three volumes and some interesting adventures - at least to me.

After reading through the Mega Downsizing thread I began to wonder what will eventually happen to these. I didn't know much about my Father's past so I always thought my kids might value these as an insight into my life.

What do others expect to happen to their journals?

Trash?
Funeral pyre?
Smithsonian?
?????
livesoft
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by livesoft »

Probably the trash. If you want to have a sense of immortality and for folks to know about your life, then you have to have a YouTube.com channel nowadays. And then to get eyeballs to your channel, you have to make your life cool and interesting. For instance, check out this merchant marine time-lapse video of 30 days at sea: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHrCI9eSJGQ
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climber2020
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by climber2020 »

I scanned all my old journals from early childhood and shredded the originals. These journals didn't contain any profound insights, so even if I would have lost them in a house fire, it wouldn't have mattered.

The journals I wrote from around age 16 going forward - those I scanned to my computer as backup, but also saved the originals. There are only about a half dozen of them so far, and they can all fit in a small box. I eventually plan on burning these when I get really old or leaving instructions for others to burn them. They're for me only and I want them to disappear when I do.
TravelforFun
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by TravelforFun »

I keep a blog of all my travels which we do extensively. I do this as a 'pay it forward' gesture since I've benefited from other people's experiences and want to provide information which might help other travellers. The blog counter tells me thousands of people have visited my commercial-free blog which I hope is useful. I pay $50 a year to keep the domain name and the blog and my adults kids have indicated they will maintain it even after I'm gone.

TravelforFun
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seychellois_lib
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by seychellois_lib »

livesoft wrote: Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:27 am Probably the trash. If you want to have a sense of immortality and for folks to know about your life, then you have to have a YouTube.com channel nowadays. And then to get eyeballs to your channel, you have to make your life cool and interesting. For instance, check out this merchant marine time-lapse video of 30 days at sea: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHrCI9eSJGQ
Yes, I suppose you are right. I will be the first to admit there is nothing particulaly interesting in them.

I was inspired to ask the question after reading a litlle about Franz Kafka in Wikipedia. Kafka requested all of his writings be burned upon his death. His good friend, Max Brod, disobeyed this final request and published Kafka's work. One is left to wonder why Kafka did not burn the material himself.

Thanks for the youtube link.
2015
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by 2015 »

Shredded several decades worth in their entirety as part of my mental software updating project. As I move forward into this new phase of life, I don't want the future to be encumbered by any stories of the past.
Mike Scott
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by Mike Scott »

There are many pretty dull life stories published as books. Why should yours be any different? :) Or put them on the internet where your fan base / personal cult can argue about them and you for generations to come.
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praxis
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by praxis »

Some children are interested in their parent's thoughts and history like me. My mom and dad told us stories of our grands and greats. I don't know if my siblings retained much. I wanted my kids to have something, so my cousin and I wrote a cookbook with three parts to each page. A recipe from our ancestors' kitchens, a photo from the cook's life from family scrapbooks and a story from one of our family legends about them. As we included recipes and stories from all the living family that responded to our request, the cookbook is pretty thick. We used one of the many cookbook web publishing sites and printed enough for all our relatives and their kids for Christmas. I think they cost $10. each including glossy color cover and spiral binder.

We did the heavy lifting for the readers . You might consider sifting through your pages and lifting out some of the best interludes from your journals. Edit them down into paragraphs. Ask for help in condensing. Add photos either from you or others or even off the internet if it illustrates your stories. Just use the best of the best. Internet publishing is so easy and cheap and the resulting book will fascinate some that know you. Others probably won't care much. Oh well. It will be fun.

You've seen photo books on coffee tables. They are easy to make on line and can include text, if you want.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by daveydoo »

Photos -> edit for legibility, exposure, etc. -> Google Drive. This is negligible storage space.

Future generations may or may not want to see ephemera like this. It's important to save, imo. Can keep the back-up on a card or thumb drive in your safe-deposit box.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by Shallowpockets »

Remember all the movies, Terry, we'd go see
Trying to learn how to walk like heroes we thought we had to be
And after all this time to find we're just like all the rest

Backstreets, Bruce Springsteen

I am sure you can see your journals and your views of them in this verse. Then the last line. Especiallyally the last line. I know it applies to me and mine. We are just like all the rest. Our journals, just landfill.
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seychellois_lib
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by seychellois_lib »

Mike Scott wrote: Mon Sep 03, 2018 1:28 pm There are many pretty dull life stories published as books. Why should yours be any different? :) Or put them on the internet where your fan base / personal cult can argue about them and you for generations to come.
I had to chuckle when I saw this one. My own cult.... Now that is intriguing. :D
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Jazztonight
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by Jazztonight »

You bring up a good topic, and one I've thought about for the decades I've been journaling and keeping copies of my correspondence with friends around the country and the world.

The probable truth is that no one will care about any of this, including my two adult children. Unless you reach a certain level of fame and/or notoriety, no one wants a record of your life, loves, travels, and ideas.

So what to do?

I have so far decided NOT to digitize my writings. Rather I'll hang on to all of it, then die, and let my wife and heirs decided what to do with it.
"What does not destroy me, makes me stronger." Nietzsche
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seychellois_lib
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by seychellois_lib »

Shallowpockets wrote: Mon Sep 03, 2018 5:14 pm Remember all the movies, Terry, we'd go see
Trying to learn how to walk like heroes we thought we had to be
And after all this time to find we're just like all the rest

Backstreets, Bruce Springsteen

I am sure you can see your journals and your views of them in this verse. Then the last line. Especiallyally the last line. I know it applies to me and mine. We are just like all the rest. Our journals, just landfill.
OK, got it.

But landfill? No.

Bonfire...yes! ... drinking some good beer from a frosty glass as I watch the embers rush up into a canopy of stars.
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pondering
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by pondering »

There are several places online you could store electronic copies of your journal. I hope you consider that option.
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CaliJim
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by CaliJim »

Type them up. Embellish them. Become the most fascinating man on your block.

Self publish them on Amazon for $419.99

Write up some fake positive reviews and then have friends and family post them.

More than a few people will buy a copy.
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Watty
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by Watty »

seychellois_lib wrote: Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:23 am ...and also possess one journal from a period when I was an 18 year old at sea in the Merchant Marine.
This one sounds worth keeping so I would encourage you to do something with that. There may be some nautical museum or historical society that would like to have that if no one in your family would want it.

I am not sure who organized it but in my wife's family in the 1950's through the 1970's there are several typed mini-autobiographies of people going back into the 1800's that are very interesting to read. There were people that were still alive then that had been kids in the 1800's and there were able to tell their stories and also provide stories about some prior generations. These are maybe ten to twenty pages long at most.

I would encourage you go through your papers and pick out the interesting stuff and write up a couple of dozen pages for future generations.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by lthenderson »

seychellois_lib wrote: Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:23 am What do others expect to happen to their journals?

Trash?
Funeral pyre?
Smithsonian?
?????
I have 50 years of my grandfather's journals and someday 40+ years of my father's journals along with my own 25+ years of journals. All together they can fit in a filing cabinet in the basement so I really don't see any advantage to doing anything with them other than keeping them as is and passing them on to one of my kids.

Personally, I like leafing through the originals from time to time. Though I have lots of scanned letters and things written by others in my family, I find that I'm less likely to read through them. A lot of that has to do with how they are filed when saved on my computer. I just find it much easier to flip to the page in a book versus scanning a list of file names to try and find what I'm after. Also with the book, I can read a few pages before or after to gain context versus on my computer I have to find the other files which if not saved with a date code, is almost impossible.
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pondering
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by pondering »

Does anyone have an estimate in time or money for how much it will cost to scan 100 pages?
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lthenderson
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by lthenderson »

pondering wrote: Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:30 am Does anyone have an estimate in time or money for how much it will cost to scan 100 pages?
A cheap bed scanner and an hour's worth of time is all that it would probably take. For hundreds of pages of lots of journals, I would switch to a camera on a tripod in a well lit area to digitize everything. This is much faster but a little bit more finicky to set up to get good results.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by Dottie57 »

CaliJim wrote: Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:06 pm Type them up. Embellish them. Become the most fascinating man on your block.

Self publish them on Amazon for $419.99

Write up some fake positive reviews and then have friends and family post them.

More than a few people will buy a copy.
You make me wish I had kept a journal. I do think keeping journal are important for historical purposes. Historians will want to know how people lived!
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by Nowizard »

Depends on the content and desire for privacy of what is contained. My mother, a prolific writer, kept journals for probably 75 years, accumulating large boxes of them. She requested we not read them when she died, not because of them being scandalous but due to being a reasonably well known person who was very open with family but private outside it.

Tim
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by nova1968 »

I have journals going back to age 14 . I still have the written journals. I also typed thousands of pages of the previous written journals and labeled each document by the year. I backed them up in several places such as Microsoft I Cloud, Ever note, Amazon and several external drives. I did the same with documents relating to my Education, Investments, and Professional life. On occasion I find it interesting back at the documentation of my life.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by Nicolas »

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MP173
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by MP173 »

I just finished writing today's entry in my Acco Brands "Daily Reminder". I have written daily since 1980. It is probably my most valued possession.

These will go to my oldest son. He can either keep or destroy. My guess is he will keep them.

Ed
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black jack
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by black jack »

I've kept a journal pretty consistently since I was 30 (nearing 60 now). Most of it is digital (in Evernote notes, one for each week). Sometimes it's useful for me to go back and check something. It's also a therapeutic activity.

I expect I'll leave it to my daughter, who can read it or not. I don't know if she'll be interested in it (she's eighteen now, too soon to tell), but if not and she has a child or children, one of them may be ("the grandchild wants to know what the child wants to forget").

I'd dearly love to have a journal of my parents' or grandparents' lives, but tastes differ and are not predictable. I am, by inclination, a historian with a trace of archivist, so I'd encourage everyone to save their journals and pass them along. There are things in my journal that might surprise or dismay my daughter, but I'll be gone then, and I'm a big believer in honesty (though also in discretion, and that some truths may benefit from decades of ripening).
Nowizard wrote: Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:23 am Depends on the content and desire for privacy of what is contained. My mother, a prolific writer, kept journals for probably 75 years, accumulating large boxes of them. She requested we not read them when she died, not because of them being scandalous but due to being a reasonably well known person who was very open with family but private outside it.
Your mother requested that her family not read her journals after she died "because ...she was a reasonably well known person who was very open with family but private outside it?" The logic of that statement escapes me. If she was very open with her family, why would she not wish them to read her journals after she was gone? What does her being well known, or private about the details of her life among acquaintances and strangers, have to do with her wanting her presumably-knowledgeable-about-the-details-of-her-life family not to read her journals?
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by CaliJim »

pondering wrote: Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:30 am Does anyone have an estimate in time or money for how much it will cost to scan 100 pages?
Borrow or rent or buy one of these:

https://www.amazon.com/Fujitsu-ScanSnap ... B01G3JYVYM
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SoAnyway
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by SoAnyway »

seychellois_lib wrote: Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:23 am Apparently many folks on the forum maintain journals. I restarted journaling eight years ago and also possess one journal from a period when I was an 18 year old at sea in the Merchant Marine. How I wish I had continued journaling for the intervening 40 years!

During my 20 years of ownership, I have also kept a log aboard my sailboat. I have three volumes and some interesting adventures - at least to me.

After reading through the Mega Downsizing thread I began to wonder what will eventually happen to these. I didn't know much about my Father's past so I always thought my kids might value these as an insight into my life.

What do others expect to happen to their journals?

Trash?
Funeral pyre?
Smithsonian?
?????
To keep things actionable, OP, never mind what others expect to happen to THEIR journals/logs. Focus on your OWN situation.
Do you have children/heirs?
If not, then these mementos and milestone markers are for YOU while you're alive; take great joy from your memories and direct others after you're gone to burn them. At that point, the journals will have served their excellent purpose.
If so, what's your sense (without directly asking) of whether your children/heirs would value them vs. viewing them as a burden that they have to figure out what the heck to do with?
If you suspect the former, ask directly in a way that lets them know it's ok to prefer you burn them. If you suspect the latter, back to the "if not" guidance above.
Just my $.02.
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celia
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by celia »

seychellois_lib wrote: Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:23 am Apparently many folks on the forum maintain journals. I restarted journaling eight years ago and also possess one journal from a period when I was an 18 year old at sea in the Merchant Marine.
OMG, These journals are genealogy treasures!

I would start by asking your closest relatives (especially those doing genealogy) if they would be interested in keeping them as a keepsake. If not that interested, the Library of Congress' Veteran's History Project would love to have them, assuming there is a military connection. They are collecting video and audio recordings of vets that are at least 30 minutes long as they talk about their military service. They want to capture the experience from the service member's perspective no matter where they served or what role they played. They also collect journals written by them and collections of at least 10 letters written by the same vet.

I even go buy stuff like this on eBay to donate to them (after I read it, of course)!
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JoinToday
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by JoinToday »

What do you write in your journals?

1. I would like to read what my parents, grandparents, etc did; what life was like, etc. My grandparents were immigrants
2. I would be embarrassed to write some things, or it would be too painful to write other things, and I have a pretty mundane life, without a lot of drama. I cannot imagine writing things about drug use, marital problems, affairs, criminal activity, serious mistakes made, etc. Fortunately, I don't have most of these sort of issues in my past. Who wants their kids to read about dad's affairs, or that mom's #3 kid is related to the mailman? It is one thing to read that mom & dad had a rough patch and didn't get along for awhile, but it is entirely different to read the details of infidelity.
3. The reality is most of our lives are pretty boring: work, going out with friends, cooking, sleep.
4. Who wants to review the mistakes we make in life?
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celia
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by celia »

My MIL had a pen pal in Australia for 70 years. Their lives paralleled each other as they both lost brothers in WWII (which is what connected them in the first place), married, had kids, suffered through losses or illnesses, retired, etc. The Australian pen pal (who we've met) still has my MIL's letters starting before DH even existed. They are a log of the families' trials and tribulations and comparison of life in two different countries. I have been working to get those letters and her family knows I would like them some day. Meanwhile, since my MIL passed away, the pen pal still re-reads the letters as she can. There have to be thousands of them as my MIL only saved the last 300 or so letters written in the last 15 years of their friendship.

Then there is an aunt who joined a group soon after she retired and they wrote about their childhood memories. My goal is to get these published and distributed to relatives this year. While working on other genealogy projects, I met someone a month ago who belongs to the same writing group and I have started to write and share with that same group. Occasionally, as a group, they put their best stories together and self-publish them for themselves and family.

Other immigrant ancestors kept writing to relatives back home and I now have some of the letters sent to America. After they and the person they were writing to died, their children often started writing to each other. This link helped make my research in other countries much easier and we now have known relatives that we have visited while traveling.

I am now at a point in life where I am deciding where all my genealogy stuff will go after I'm gone and am putting it in writing for my trustee to know my wishes. I am organizing stuff by "project" with a "deliverable", like audio recordings, books, digitized databases, physical objects pertaining to certain locations (photos, albums, indexed records) based on where the things will go--to a person, library or historical society, other researchers, etc. Organizations such as libraries and historical societies usually need resources to help them care for these things. So I have arranged for them to receive donations along with whatever physical objects they can use. I am also trying to organize each collection so that it can be used by others by indexing, alphabetizing, or extracting the names of referenced individuals.

PS. One set of writings that is being collected, as I write this, are my posts to Bogleheads. I bookmark the posts (like this one) that tell something about me or my "financial wisdom" (if someone should call it that). :beer There's no need for my heirs to search for everything I've written, but the more unique topics are in one bookmarks folder labeled "My Best Postings".
123
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by 123 »

For preserving the information and having it accessible the best suggestions are either self-publish on Amazon (get an ISBN) or establish a blog at a major site that is likely to endure (blogspot.com or wordpress.com etc).

A problem with family histories is that generally children don't have a lot of detailed interest in the lives of their parents until the children are in their 50's or 60's. Prior to the time their own children have grown up and (perhaps) they have retired your kids are too busy with things in their own lives to be concerned much about what happened in yours. The tradegy is that by the time the children are really interested in the life hisory of their parents the parents may have forgotten a lot of the details or passed away.

One guy I worked with told me he spent a considerable amount of time and effort in writing his own unpublished biography (it was like 500+ pages) over a couple of years in his spare times. As far as I know he didn't ever do anything remarkable. He had lots of spare time, he never married and had no children. While I'm sure the exercise of writing it was an interesting experience for him I can't think of anyone who would ever read it.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by a_movable_life »

Ideally since storage is cheap we save much of it for some PhD student in the future who will want to use it as primary sources for some work about "How people lived back then..."
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by rich126 »

money_bunny wrote: Wed Sep 05, 2018 6:19 am Ideally since storage is cheap we save much of it for some PhD student in the future who will want to use it as primary sources for some work about "How people lived back then..."
Do you have any idea how many billions of photos are being stored now? Most will end up being deleted and never seen again. At least with photographs, due to the cost, substantially less were taken and put into albums for families to pass down. Now people take hundreds or more per trip and no one has time to view all of them.

At least storage devices are cheap.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by a_movable_life »

Absolutely. Which will be a tremendous treasure trove for the researcher. It's one of the reasons why story corps is trying to get some of this stuff saved.

The volume alone will help give weight against the standard typical "The winner writes the history." It's hard to deny the MOVE Bombing did not happen if there are 1000 journal entries, or saved newspaper clippings, and amateur photography.

One of the concerns is that we won't have the letters and other paper documents saved. When the person passes away the email trove will just be erased.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by iamlucky13 »

I recommend keeping it, as long as it isn't onerous to do so, and you have removed or created a disposal instructions anything you may consider to personal to pass along.

Your family may simply toss it all, or they may treasure it.

As my grandparents have pass away, it has been wonderful to have some of the letters, recognitions, newspaper clippings, photos, and other documents they saved. I'm sure almost everyone wishes they had more time to learn about their relatives, and this is one way to help them learn more about you, if they choose.

When I have free time, I even like to see some of these records from my great-grandparents, etc, who I never knew.

That said, most of my family could have downsized more - wedding, graduation, and newborn photos, official commendations, letters while overseas during WWII - all treasures. I sometimes even think I should write more letters Pictures of unknown buildings during various vacations, and receipts or manuals from VCR's they bought 30 years ago - chaff to sort through.

I'll accept sorting the chaff for the sake of the wheat, but judicious disposal of the unimportant stuff in your free time will make it more likely your family will recognize there are items there that they may appreciate.

I pity the families of millennial like myself who may find themselves sorting through tens of thousands of digital pictures of our food, or selfies badly edited with various "filters", searching for those cherished newborn photos of themselves or their grandparents.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by JoeRetire »

seychellois_lib wrote: Mon Sep 03, 2018 10:23 amI didn't know much about my Father's past so I always thought my kids might value these as an insight into my life.
Have you asked your kids?
Why don't you have them read your journals now?

If the are actually interested, give them to your kids now. Then hand over new editions as you complete them.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by black jack »

123 wrote: Wed Sep 05, 2018 12:45 am A problem with family histories is that generally children don't have a lot of detailed interest in the lives of their parents until the children are in their 50's or 60's. Prior to the time their own children have grown up and (perhaps) they have retired your kids are too busy with things in their own lives to be concerned much about what happened in yours. The tragedy is that by the time the children are really interested in the life history of their parents the parents may have forgotten a lot of the details or passed away.
That is an excellent point, and certainly true in my own case.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by Nowizard »

Blackjack: Your opinion is not the one held by my mother, so explaining it is not necessary or germane. It was just a request she made.

Tim
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by zxllxz »

Try your local historical society to see if they may be interested in the journals.
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by RickBoglehead »

My FIL had stacks of little books with tiny handwriting including all the wonderful things in his daily life including bowel movements. Fascinating on!y to him. My wife scanned them and tossed them.

He also video taped everything in excruciating detail, every museum he went to, every exhibit. No one is going to watch them.
Avid user of forums on variety of interests-financial, home brewing, F-150, PHEV, home repair, etc. Enjoy learning & passing on knowledge. It's PRINCIPAL, not PRINCIPLE. I ADVISE you to seek ADVICE.
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seychellois_lib
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by seychellois_lib »

RickBoglehead wrote: Thu Sep 06, 2018 6:17 pm My FIL had stacks of little books with tiny handwriting including all the wonderful things in his daily life including bowel movements. Fascinating on!y to him. My wife scanned them and tossed them.

He also video taped everything in excruciating detail, every museum he went to, every exhibit. No one is going to watch them.
Ha ha ha.. OK, well I haven't (yet) written about any of my bowel movements but I am looking at my last two days. I speent about four hundred words on the following topics:

A buyer for my sailboat emergency rudder (that's interesting for sure)
Execution of a re-balancing trade at a good price ( my heirs with consider me a genius, now they will know how I did it)
Discussion regarding how the market will surely drop once my re-balancing is complete (they will wonder if it did)
The pain associated with restarting my workout routine after six months (Our Dad was a real trooper)
Ruminations re discussion with my Spouse about re-modeling vs spending more money on my boat (OK, we did not discuss the boat part)

How could this not be interesting to future generations?

OK, OK, the bonfire it is :D
SoAnyway
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by SoAnyway »

seychellois_lib wrote: Sat Sep 08, 2018 8:15 pm Ha ha ha.. OK, well I haven't (yet) written about any of my bowel movements but I am looking at my last two days. I speent about four hundred words on the following topics:

A buyer for my sailboat emergency rudder (that's interesting for sure)
Execution of a re-balancing trade at a good price ( my heirs with consider me a genius, now they will know how I did it)
Discussion regarding how the market will surely drop once my re-balancing is complete (they will wonder if it did)
The pain associated with restarting my workout routine after six months (Our Dad was a real trooper)
Ruminations re discussion with my Spouse about re-modeling vs spending more money on my boat (OK, we did not discuss the boat part)

How could this not be interesting to future generations?

OK, OK, the bonfire it is :D
Hahaha. Take comfort in your decision, OP. :sharebeer As I said before, these mementos and milestone markers are for YOU while you're alive. Keep journaling and marking your progress/production/occasional genius that maybe only you can appreciate. (No matter - Pity the fools...) Take great joy from your memories while you'll still here on Earth, and feel free to direct others after you're gone to burn them. At that point, the journals will have served their most excellent purpose. ; ) All best to you and yours, OP.
Nothing in this post constitutes legal or medical advice. | Consult your attorney or physician to verify if/how anything stated might or might not be applicable to your specific situation.
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VictoriaF
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by VictoriaF »

I have so many notebooks and stapled notes sets that it would take a superhuman to tackle them. I hope to become so famous that after my death people will be searching my notes for the pearls of truth similarly to A. S. Byatt's "Possession."

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
Rwsawbones
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by Rwsawbones »

It is improbable that our electronic files will be accessible even 20 years from now. Looking at the really long term archeologists may well find objects like the Gutenberg Bibles, paintings and many of our buildings especially the pyramids. So for the next few generations perhaps reducing our records and journals to archive quality paper and ink has the greatest chance of being usable. For hundreds to thousands of years all bets are off
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randomizer
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by randomizer »

I have thought a lot about preserving my digital artifacts (photos, writings etc) and I'll do my best to leave them in a format that my heirs can access if they want. But the truth is it won't matter. I will be dust and ash, they will be soon enough too, and the cosmos will march on.
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seychellois_lib
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Re: The future of my journals and logs

Post by seychellois_lib »

randomizer wrote: Sun Sep 09, 2018 3:27 am I have thought a lot about preserving my digital artifacts (photos, writings etc) and I'll do my best to leave them in a format that my heirs can access if they want. But the truth is it won't matter. I will be dust and ash, they will be soon enough too, and the cosmos will march on.
The mods may assert I am getting a bit off topic, but your post reminds me of something I have thought about for awhile. It seems to me someone could start an online business - I don't know what one would call it - which would focus on a slightly different aspect of genealogy. To wit, memorializing one's digital "things". What we have been talking about is the disposition on items which could be digitized. Given the exponentially increasing capacity of digital storage, one could include writings, pictures, etc in a family tree type structure which would slowly expand through the generations. That might be pretty interesting to heirs and would certainly be a gold mine for researchers if the resulting huge database(s) became searchable in some fashion.
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