As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

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jminv
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by jminv » Wed Aug 15, 2018 8:02 am

harrychan wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 11:37 pm
I'm interested in hearing what enables so many of you to simply move to another country and live there permanently? Do you plan to pay your way to permanent residency or citizenship of a foreign country?
It's not that difficult as an American to establish residency in many countries if you can show that you can support yourself. Note that support oneself does not necessarily equate to rich. Maybe it seems daunting/difficult to some people since you have to gather paperwork, get an initial visa, apply for residency in country, renew periodically, etc but that's just a process. It's normally even simpler if you're a retiree as there are special programs for this. As far as residency or citizenship programs that are on offer for a payment I wouldn't pay for them and, in any case, they're generally targeted at a different type of customer than an American retiree.

elderwise
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by elderwise » Wed Aug 15, 2018 8:23 am

baconavocado wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 5:56 pm
Some commenters are mentioning Italy and some other European countries. I thought it was quite difficult to get a resident visa in these places. I've heard that it's even hard for an American citizen to retire in Canada. Mexico. Central and South America, yes, Europe and Canada, no. Am I wrong?
AlphaLess wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:58 pm
TXJeff wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:55 pm
baconavocado wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 5:56 pm
Some commenters are mentioning Italy and some other European countries. I thought it was quite difficult to get a resident visa in these places. I've heard that it's even hard for an American citizen to retire in Canada. Mexico. Central and South America, yes, Europe and Canada, no. Am I wrong?
You can definitely get a resident visa in many European countries as a retired person--as to whether the process is difficult--that depends on how you feel about masses of paperwork. :happy

For example:
Here's a nice summary about the visa process and requirements in Italy: https://community.ricksteves.com/travel ... g-in-italy
Here's a similar summary about France: https://luxeadventuretraveler.com/how-t ... or-france/ (though the French consultaes in the US are in the middle of revamping part of the process)
Here's a how-to for the famous Spanish retirement visa: https://gentlecycle.net/how-we-got-our- ... ion-right/

I think you get the idea. Some of the European visas as specifically for "retirees"--people over a certain age. Others are "long stay" visas available to people of any age. Most prohibit work. All require you to show you can support yourself financially. Many thrust you into a kafka-esque type requirement nightmare where, for example, you have to show a year-long local lease (not airbnb). And to get that local lease, you need a bank account. But to get the bank account you need to show a valid long stay visa. Aarrgh! These are the kinds of things that make Boise Idaho look good.
Thanks for sharing the links. But IMHO, as a lifelong and perpetual immigrant, these are bad things:
- can not work,
- does not have permanent status,
- need to jump through hoops.

Also, missing information: health care costs.

You need (almost) the same rights as the citizens.

Are there any passport purchase avenues?
Eg, it used to be you could get a Portuguese passport with a moderately priced home purchase.
Portugal opens the door to EU.
While retired, you can provide consulting services throughout EU.
Have any of you guys heard about the Dutch American Friendship Treaty?

I wholly agree, getting any sort of permanent residence as a non EU person is a very hard thing, unless you marry a EU spouse, where things change.

Been researching this a bit, and from what I found (as a US Citizen) the easiest country to relocate / move / work (as self employed solely) - is to get a Dutch DAFT permit (residency) and its initially 2 years renewal again till you finally can get Permanent Residency / EU Long term Permit and then are free to move across the EU.The DAFT treaty / visa is for doing Independent Contract (think 1099) and Freelancing working, you cannot work solely for 1 employer.For any of the developed countries (dutch included) getting a self employed visa requires siginificant $$ , business plans contigencies and vetting by the Economic / Business MInistry of that country and then they grant the visa - netherlands due to this Treaty with USA (for US Citizens) and with Japan as well it seems has a very flexed / relaxed requirements.Only you gotta maintain EUR 4500 balance at all times (as capital)

The only caveat, is Netherlands does not allow Dual citizenship except in some circumstances, and you have to agree in principle during naturalization to renounce you former citizenship, there are some exceptions to this though and its a grey area like if your spouse is Dutch by birth etc.

Also you dont necessarily have to go for the Dutch passport, one can just keep the US citizenship and apply and have the Dutch Permanent Residence card and that is also good enough to live / travel accross the EU without the schengen limitations (90 day rule).

GT99
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by GT99 » Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:08 am

Just as a general comment, in much of Europe (and other parts of the world) where English isn't the first language, the majority of folks under ~40 or so (and obviously many older as well) speak English at least functionally if not completely fluently, especially in cities or tourist areas. I certainly get that it can be intimidating, but I've never really found it difficult to function in countries where I don't speak the native language - granted there are undoubtedly many places I've never been where that wouldn't be the case.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by flyingaway » Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:12 am

Naismith wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:38 am
I'm a 63-year-old living in Indonesia. My spouse and I are serving as full-time missionaries for our church. So we are retired from our former paid career, but are here sponsored by our church, which provides the visa. There is a visa program for retirees, but you have to hire a local maid and a few other odd things. And knowing how the paperwork is here, even having conversational-level language skills, I think it would be a huge challenge.

One huge plus is that the health insurance from one of our employers has coverage around the world. In fact, the hospital that is a preferred provider in our town for our policy is only a few blocks away. Medicare has no coverage outside the US. Of course fees tend to be lower for some things, not for others. My dental cleaning was $23 but the chiropractor charges $60 for an adjustment (it was $40 at home). Actually, the latter would be really expensive because I had to fly to another city; there are none on my island. But I am in a larger city every few months for training, which is enough for my needs. So thinking about any health issues is important.

Some food is cheap, but high quality American-style food can be pricey. A hot shower is a luxury.

More importantly, how will they build a social network? We've met one USAmerican since we've lived here. If they don't speak the language, they could be very lonely. Why would they retire someplace outside the US?

We intend to travel a lot once our work here is completed. But we already travelled a fair bit before we moved here. Our last two-week vacations when we were employed included Austria-Budapest Prague, Iceland, Greece-Rome, Brazil. It seems that if they wanted to travel during retirement, they might have already done some foreign trips?

We did a sabbatical in Brazil and I had lived in Germany as a soldier, so the thought of moving overseas was not scary to us. But it can be intimidating to someone who has never lived overseas.

And setting up a household, even in a furnished apartment, can take a lot of work and money. There is no Ikea here.

Definitely try a month someplace to see if it is a good fit.
Yes, cheap is to live like locals, which is substantially below the U.S. living standards. If you want to live in a Southeastern Asia country with the U.S. standards, it will be much more expensive than living in a low-cost area in the U.S.

michaeljc70
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by michaeljc70 » Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:21 am

GT99 wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:08 am
Just as a general comment, in much of Europe (and other parts of the world) where English isn't the first language, the majority of folks under ~40 or so (and obviously many older as well) speak English at least functionally if not completely fluently, especially in cities or tourist areas. I certainly get that it can be intimidating, but I've never really found it difficult to function in countries where I don't speak the native language - granted there are undoubtedly many places I've never been where that wouldn't be the case.
I think function and assimilate are different. If you are a retiree, how many friends are you going to make only speaking English? They may speak English at the tourist places, but do they at the grocery store and bank? These tourist areas would probably be amongst the most expensive places to live in said countries anyway. How about the guy that needs to fix your _____? How are you going to even call to get the guy that will fix your _____? I think you will find older people in jobs that don't interact with tourists speak far less English in many of these places. How about going to the doctor?

I've spent several months "living" (really long vacations) in another country where I don't speak the language fluently. I get by just fine (taking taxis or public transport, grocery shopping, dining out, etc.), but am not delusional in thinking I could navigate governmental offices (they can be difficult to navigate for native speakers) or do all the things that I need to do to keep the wheels turning in something other than a short-term rental.

GT99
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by GT99 » Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:07 am

michaeljc70 wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:21 am
GT99 wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:08 am
Just as a general comment, in much of Europe (and other parts of the world) where English isn't the first language, the majority of folks under ~40 or so (and obviously many older as well) speak English at least functionally if not completely fluently, especially in cities or tourist areas. I certainly get that it can be intimidating, but I've never really found it difficult to function in countries where I don't speak the native language - granted there are undoubtedly many places I've never been where that wouldn't be the case.
I think function and assimilate are different. If you are a retiree, how many friends are you going to make only speaking English? They may speak English at the tourist places, but do they at the grocery store and bank? These tourist areas would probably be amongst the most expensive places to live in said countries anyway. How about the guy that needs to fix your _____? How are you going to even call to get the guy that will fix your _____? I think you will find older people in jobs that don't interact with tourists speak far less English in many of these places. How about going to the doctor?

I've spent several months "living" (really long vacations) in another country where I don't speak the language fluently. I get by just fine (taking taxis or public transport, grocery shopping, dining out, etc.), but am not delusional in thinking I could navigate governmental offices (they can be difficult to navigate for native speakers) or do all the things that I need to do to keep the wheels turning in something other than a short-term rental.
Fair points, especially regarding making friends, but to be clear, my point isn't that things will be "just as easy" as home, just that it's not as difficult as some might think. Even in European countries where English isn't as common (for whatever reason, it's not nearly as common in Spain as in much of the rest of Europe), it's not that difficult to get around - getting over the intimidation of it is probably the hardest part.

That said, if I were to move overseas, I'd probably look for areas with larger than normal numbers of expats (not necessarily Americans), as that would reduce the challenges and create an environment where it is easier to make friends. Personally, I'd love to spend a couple months a year overseas when I'm retired, but I couldn't move away from family and friends permanently.

RollTide31457
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by RollTide31457 » Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:13 am

Alabama

Shallowpockets
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by Shallowpockets » Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:38 am

That sure is an open ended question. Perhaps you could talk to your dad. Perhaps you could do a google search on retirement places. Perhaps you could read some other threads here that dealt with this before. Perhaps you could research some of this stuff so you have knowledge before posting such an open end question.

So far you have Estonia, Hobart, Colorado, and every other response here. Google a couple of those.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by Jazztonight » Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:48 am

AlphaLess wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:55 pm
Evidence shows that moderate (mediterranean) climate is good for longevity...
That's why I'm staying where I am, in Oakland, CA. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oakland,_California

"Oakland has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate with an average of 260 sunny days per year. In general, the city features warm, dry summers, and mild, wet winters. Based on data gathered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oakland is ranked No. 1 in climate among U.S. cities..."

Why would I want to move from a place where my friends and communities are? So I can save some money? Nonsense! I live in a HCOL area, true. But while DW and I are not particularly wealthy, we own our residence and, so far, can afford the taxes, the HOA fees, and our groceries.

I'm a few minutes walk away from public transportation, shopping, the public library, restaurants, and post office. I'm across the street from a 3-mile circumference lake, walking path, and wildlife preserve. The walking score of my residence is 95/100. The University of California at Berkeley is nearby, as is Laney (community) College. (I have degrees from each.)

Crime? Homelessness? Noise? Other issues and conflicts? Sure, and I know people who have left because of those issues. This is life in the city. (Young people and seniors, meanwhile, seem to be moving in every day.)

Arts? Diversity? Ethnic and high-end restaurants? Nearby airports? Access to culture? Museums, symphonies, theaters, music, dance? Yes, we have them.

If I want to study and/or speak a foreign language, I don't have to go far to do so. I've travelled to many places around the world and continue to do so. In each location I've asked myself, "Would I rather live here?" As charming, exciting, beautiful, exotic, or interesting a place might have been, I keep returning to my chosen home (and I've lived in a number of well-known, lauded locations).

Life is filled with trade-offs and compromises. I'm fortunate to have found a place that works for me.
Last edited by Jazztonight on Wed Aug 15, 2018 11:11 am, edited 2 times in total.
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HomerJ
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by HomerJ » Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:51 am

flyingaway wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:12 am
Yes, cheap is to live like locals, which is substantially below the U.S. living standards. If you want to live in a Southeastern Asia country with the U.S. standards, it will be much more expensive than living in a low-cost area in the U.S.
This.

If money is a driving factor, there are plenty of cheap places in the U.S. to live. I wouldn't live somewhere else JUST to save money.
The J stands for Jay

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BolderBoy
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by BolderBoy » Wed Aug 15, 2018 11:27 am

jazman12 wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 3:38 pm
COLORADO is a great place! :happy
Shhhh!

Terrible place. Altitude is so high you can barely breathe and it snows 10 months out of the year.
"Never underestimate one's capacity to overestimate one's abilities" - The Dunning-Kruger Effect

protagonist
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by protagonist » Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:02 pm

AerialWombat wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 4:50 pm
Tallinn, Estonia: Much to do, friendly people, stable government, very low cost of living yet modern everything. Beautiful city.

Hobart, Australia: On the island of Tasmania. Laid back lifestyle, much cheaper cost of living than Sydney, interesting history, interesting critters and scenery, beautiful weather year-round, no language barrier.
I believe Estonia is in the Schengen Zone, which would make it very difficult for a US citizen to live there. You can only stay in the Zone for 90 days out of any 6 month period. This would also apply for much of the rest of Europe. I suspect as we tighten our immigration policies we can expect other countries to reciprocate.

I don't know about the rules regarding US passport holders in Australia.

I bought a place on a beautiful island in Venezuela in 1991. At that time, Venezuela was the most affluent and most stable "democracy" in South America. Just saying.....
Last edited by protagonist on Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:29 pm, edited 2 times in total.

protagonist
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by protagonist » Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:23 pm

elderwise wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 8:23 am
Been researching this a bit, and from what I found (as a US Citizen) the easiest country to relocate / move / work (as self employed solely) - is to get a Dutch DAFT permit (residency) and its initially 2 years renewal again till you finally can get Permanent Residency
Not applicable for retirees, I don't think. Or am I missing something?

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by Louverture » Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:28 pm

flyingaway wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:12 am
Yes, cheap is to live like locals, which is substantially below the U.S. living standards. If you want to live in a Southeastern Asia country with the U.S. standards, it will be much more expensive than living in a low-cost area in the U.S.

It probably depends a lot on your lifestyle. There are plenty of places around the world you can find a $300 a month furnished apartment (utilities included) with all the comforts of home. Are there many safe, walkable cities in the United States where this is the case? (I'm genuinely curious about this.)

On the other hand, if multiple meals a week at Western restaurants are non-negotiable, this difference in rent might not be enough. For me, rent is my biggest expense. Not needing to have a car cuts expense number 2 entirely. I've never found a place in the US where I was happy without a car. (I've never lived in NYC or the Bay Area, but my guess is $300 rents there are a pipedream.) All told, this makes life overseas much cheaper given my living expenses. I will say that is just icing on the cake for me. I'd travel even if it were more expensive, and I'm not recommending it for everyone. Living abroad certainly has its challenges.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by DetroitRick » Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:41 pm

One of my closest friends chose to retire in Mexico, Ensenada area. Moved there from LA largely for financial reasons. Moved in at age 63, left just before turning 75 last fall. He had a nice place, great neighbors, low crime, good stores, and almost universally cheap cost of living. Inconveniences were minimal, although that can be a very individual thing.

Healthcare was a mixed bag, but mostly pretty good and local docs got him smoothly through some tough issues. Still, he also went stateside to the VA for some care. The decade plus that he spent there allowed him to resurrect his poor financial position and enjoy beach life. Ultimate reasons for leaving: severe health deterioration and wanting to spend more time with his extended family (he easily flew back and forth in years past, but eventually wanted more frequent visits). But he has no regrets, more money in his pocket today, and says he would do it all again.

What he got for his time and trouble was a place far nicer (back door right on the Pacific, beautiful) than he could otherwise have afforded. It really was/is a nice home (but proving very hard to sell now). Plus the day-to-day lifestyle was much cheaper (he always delighted in calling me to tell me how cheap he got great skilled tradesman vs. stateside). So, in spite of his essentially unplanned return to the states, he really doesn't regret his years there. Weather was very nice. He lived in an ex-pat community but also enjoyed all his local interactions (even though his Spanish is worse than mine, ironically). His biggest enjoyments, besides the cost of living issues, included the local food, festivals, beach proximity and weather. Biggest negative was his night in the Tijuana jail in 2016 related to a traffic accident (but he saw the humor in it), and the long lines at San Ysidro before getting his Sentri pass for trips back to states.

So just one sample of the world's many choices. Lots of other places too. Personally, I would consider some places in North Baja, but it would not be a good choice for my wife, so....

Admiral
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by Admiral » Wed Aug 15, 2018 2:04 pm

Why move? Stay where they are, and travel and see the world, with a home to come back to.

Most older folk want to (or need to) be close to family, and particularly as health declines. They don't want (or are unable to afford) to fly from Tasmania or Hawaii to see their grand kids in Boston. And they don't want their families burdened with having to do so to see them. I cannot tell you how nice it is that I don't need to spend all my kids' school vacations flying to see their grandparents (they live nearby).

This is a generalization of course, and some people want to be far away from their families. For me, we plan to keep our paid-off house and travel as much as possible.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by AerialWombat » Wed Aug 15, 2018 2:17 pm

protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:02 pm
I believe Estonia is in the Schengen Zone, which would make it very difficult for a US citizen to live there. You can only stay in the Zone for 90 days out of any 6 month period. This would also apply for much of the rest of Europe. I suspect as we tighten our immigration policies we can expect other countries to reciprocate.
Every country within the Schengen Area has it's own residency visa schema. The Schengen agreement merely removes customs and passport checks when crossing participating countries, it does not remove or alter each country's own internal immigration visa processes (except for EU citizens, of course).

For example, getting a self-employed/freelancer visa in Germany or Spain is quite simple. For Switzerland, good luck with that. All are part of the Schengen Area.

Americans can apply for temporary residency permits of less than 5 years in Estonia based on retirement income.

Australia will issue long-stay visitor visas in 12-month intervals based on liquid assets. I've held two of these Aus visas in the past. From them, there is a path to residency.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by VictoriaF » Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:03 pm

cheese_breath wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:16 pm
Antarctica. High cultured neighborhood. Everyone always wears tuxes.
My requirement is for everyone always wearing high heels.

Victoria
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siamond
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by siamond » Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:19 pm

Great links. Thanks.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by Glockenspiel » Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:30 pm

BolderBoy wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 11:27 am
jazman12 wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 3:38 pm
COLORADO is a great place! :happy
Shhhh!

Terrible place. Altitude is so high you can barely breathe and it snows 10 months out of the year.
Lol. More like 300 days of sunshine, 70 degree day highs in February and March, snow might fall overnight but will melt by afternoon or the next day.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by midareff » Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:42 pm

Thailand and Panama come to mind right off........ lots of English spoken, low to very low cost of living and I include medical in that. Very friendly and courteous people. Good financial and banking systems.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by flyingaway » Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:45 pm

Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:48 am
AlphaLess wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:55 pm
Evidence shows that moderate (mediterranean) climate is good for longevity...
That's why I'm staying where I am, in Oakland, CA. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oakland,_California

"Oakland has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate with an average of 260 sunny days per year. In general, the city features warm, dry summers, and mild, wet winters. Based on data gathered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oakland is ranked No. 1 in climate among U.S. cities..."

Why would I want to move from a place where my friends and communities are? So I can save some money? Nonsense! I live in a HCOL area, true. But while DW and I are not particularly wealthy, we own our residence and, so far, can afford the taxes, the HOA fees, and our groceries.

I'm a few minutes walk away from public transportation, shopping, the public library, restaurants, and post office. I'm across the street from a 3-mile circumference lake, walking path, and wildlife preserve. The walking score of my residence is 95/100. The University of California at Berkeley is nearby, as is Laney (community) College. (I have degrees from each.)

Crime? Homelessness? Noise? Other issues and conflicts? Sure, and I know people who have left because of those issues. This is life in the city. (Young people and seniors, meanwhile, seem to be moving in every day.)

Arts? Diversity? Ethnic and high-end restaurants? Nearby airports? Access to culture? Museums, symphonies, theaters, music, dance? Yes, we have them.

If I want to study and/or speak a foreign language, I don't have to go far to do so. I've travelled to many places around the world and continue to do so. In each location I've asked myself, "Would I rather live here?" As charming, exciting, beautiful, exotic, or interesting a place might have been, I keep returning to my chosen home (and I've lived in a number of well-known, lauded locations).

Life is filled with trade-offs and compromises. I'm fortunate to have found a place that works for me.
I think I can like the weather of Oakland, CA, when I have doubled my portfolio.

protagonist
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by protagonist » Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:37 pm

AerialWombat wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 2:17 pm
protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:02 pm
I believe Estonia is in the Schengen Zone, which would make it very difficult for a US citizen to live there. You can only stay in the Zone for 90 days out of any 6 month period. This would also apply for much of the rest of Europe. I suspect as we tighten our immigration policies we can expect other countries to reciprocate.
Every country within the Schengen Area has it's own residency visa schema. The Schengen agreement merely removes customs and passport checks when crossing participating countries, it does not remove or alter each country's own internal immigration visa processes (except for EU citizens, of course).

For example, getting a self-employed/freelancer visa in Germany or Spain is quite simple. For Switzerland, good luck with that. All are part of the Schengen Area.

Americans can apply for temporary residency permits of less than 5 years in Estonia based on retirement income.

Australia will issue long-stay visitor visas in 12-month intervals based on liquid assets. I've held two of these Aus visas in the past. From them, there is a path to residency.
Yes, staying in Schengen over 90 days is probably doable for American retirees, but it doesn't seem particularly easy. This blog outlines some of the angles one can take if interested: https://www.nomadicmatt.com/travel-blog ... n-90-days/

My idea of perfect retirement is winters somewhere warm, fun and relatively inexpensive, by the water, where I can pursue my interests. The rest of the year I am happy surrounded by family and friends right where I am in New England. I had that all worked out perfectly for years, and then , well, the best laid plans of mice and men.... So I'm exploring.

When one lives abroad one must factor in uncertainty. True domestically as well, but to a different level. Things may change over time and you must stay flexible enough to adapt.

You mentioned Australia. What level of "liquid assets" are required to get a long stay visitor visa for 12 months in Australia? Is it simple? Can it be easily renewed? *curious*
And can those assets be in the USA?
Last edited by protagonist on Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by protagonist » Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:40 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:03 pm
cheese_breath wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:16 pm
Antarctica. High cultured neighborhood. Everyone always wears tuxes.
My requirement is for everyone always wearing high heels.

Victoria
Mine would immediately rule out any place where people (or penguins) wore tuxes or high heels, including to weddings and funerals. Nobody wearing more than board shorts, sandals and occasionally a t-shirt would work.
Last edited by protagonist on Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

bpp
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by bpp » Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:47 pm

peterinjapan wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 1:29 am
a) Tokyo? It's a nice place, and surprisingly cheap.
Almost anywhere else in Japan is cheaper. And I would heartily endorse Japan for quality of life, especially for retirees. Plus, a first-rate medical system, and as importantly, a first-rate medical insurance system (never fight with your insurance company again!)

But, there are no retirement visas that I know of. Sure, lots of work visas, that can eventually lead to permanent residency or citizenship if desired, but that’s by definition not retirement, at least not until one gets PR or citizenship and can then truly retire. I guess it depends on how “active” a retirement one is contemplating for the first few years.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by VictoriaF » Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:47 pm

protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:40 pm
VictoriaF wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:03 pm
cheese_breath wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:16 pm
Antarctica. High cultured neighborhood. Everyone always wears tuxes.
My requirement is for everyone always wearing high heels.

Victoria
Mine would immediately rule out any place where people wore tuxes or high heels, including to weddings and funerals. Nobody wearing more than board shorts, sandals and occasionally a t-shirt would work.
It sounds like you have never windsurfed in a tux and high heels.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by protagonist » Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:54 pm

midareff wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:42 pm
Thailand and Panama come to mind right off........ lots of English spoken, low to very low cost of living and I include medical in that. Very friendly and courteous people. Good financial and banking systems.
Panama is on the top of most internet lists these days. I will probably be there this winter for the Panama Jazz Festival. It will be interesting to see what I find.

I was in Thailand last winter. Thailand is a wonderful country, very cheap, great food, good transportation, exquisitely beautiful, fascinating culture and history, very kind people, lost of recreational opportunities. That said it is also very far away, and the language is daunting enough that you probably would never integrate yourself into local culture.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by protagonist » Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:57 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:47 pm
protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:40 pm
VictoriaF wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:03 pm
cheese_breath wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:16 pm
Antarctica. High cultured neighborhood. Everyone always wears tuxes.
My requirement is for everyone always wearing high heels.

Victoria
Mine would immediately rule out any place where people (or penguins) wore tuxes or high heels, including to weddings and funerals. Nobody wearing more than board shorts, sandals and occasionally a t-shirt would work.
It sounds like you have never windsurfed in a tux and high heels.

Victoria
It is fair to say I never did anything in a tux and high heels. One prominent male member of our windsurfing community in Venezuela, however, was a cross-dresser, and frequently windsurfed in a sundress or bikini (with windsurfing harness of course). Does that count?

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by michaeljc70 » Wed Aug 15, 2018 5:02 pm

bpp wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:47 pm
peterinjapan wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 1:29 am
a) Tokyo? It's a nice place, and surprisingly cheap.
Almost anywhere else in Japan is cheaper. And I would heartily endorse Japan for quality of life, especially for retirees. Plus, a first-rate medical system, and as importantly, a first-rate medical insurance system (never fight with your insurance company again!)

But, there are no retirement visas that I know of. Sure, lots of work visas, that can eventually lead to permanent residency or citizenship if desired, but that’s by definition not retirement, at least not until one gets PR or citizenship and can then truly retire. I guess it depends on how “active” a retirement one is contemplating for the first few years.
I have heard from people and read that discrimination against foreigners that live in Japan is pretty common. Not only derogatory comments, but discrimination in housing and entrance to establishments and things like that. The government actually conducted their own survey which corroborated this.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by VictoriaF » Wed Aug 15, 2018 5:03 pm

protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:57 pm
VictoriaF wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:47 pm
protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:40 pm
VictoriaF wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:03 pm
cheese_breath wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:16 pm
Antarctica. High cultured neighborhood. Everyone always wears tuxes.
My requirement is for everyone always wearing high heels.

Victoria
Mine would immediately rule out any place where people wore tuxes or high heels, including to weddings and funerals. Nobody wearing more than board shorts, sandals and occasionally a t-shirt would work.
It sounds like you have never windsurfed in a tux and high heels.

Victoria
It is fair to say I never did anything in a tux and high heels. One prominent male member of our windsurfing community in Venezuela, however, was a cross-dresser, and frequently windsurfed in a sundress or bikini (with windsurfing harness of course). Does that count?
Tuxedo bikini could help with the tux requirement, but without high heels his catwalk would not be authentic.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by AerialWombat » Wed Aug 15, 2018 5:25 pm

protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:37 pm
Yes, staying in Schengen over 90 days is probably doable for American retirees, but it doesn't seem particularly easy. This blog outlines some of the angles one can take if interested: https://www.nomadicmatt.com/travel-blog ... n-90-days/
Again, don't think of it as a Schengen thing. Residency visas are completely on a country-by-country basis for each Schengen country individually. There are extremely simple ways to do it -- German freelancer visa, Spanish language student visa, etc. -- and far-from-simple ways.

For Estonian visas, visit the website for the Estonian state police. The English version of their website is a bad translation, but it's readable:

https://www2.politsei.ee/en/teenused/re ... lamisluba/

Note that US citizens are specifically exempted from the residency quota cap. Also, for some reason they love people with a PhD, and that greases the wheel, too.
protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:37 pm
You mentioned Australia. What level of "liquid assets" are required to get a long stay visitor visa for 12 months in Australia? Is it simple? Can it be easily renewed? *curious*
And can those assets be in the USA?
There is no hard and fast rule. Basically, they want you to prove you can pay for your stay and then have enough left over to buy a flight home. First time, I did it by sending copies of my US-based bank statements showing consistency of my income along with flight receipts and passport stamps showing that I earned that income while outside the US. Second time was much easier, I did it based on $25,000 in my Aus bank account (AUD and USD were near parity at the time), and nothing else.

It's the subclass 600 visa if you're interested:

http://www.visabureau.com/australia/tourist-visas.aspx

Converting to permanent residency once you're there is obviously more difficult. But, last time I checked (a few years ago), anybody with AU$2.5 million or more in assets is welcomed with open arms for a pink card.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by bpp » Wed Aug 15, 2018 7:16 pm

michaeljc70 wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 5:02 pm
bpp wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:47 pm
peterinjapan wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 1:29 am
a) Tokyo? It's a nice place, and surprisingly cheap.
Almost anywhere else in Japan is cheaper. And I would heartily endorse Japan for quality of life, especially for retirees. Plus, a first-rate medical system, and as importantly, a first-rate medical insurance system (never fight with your insurance company again!)

But, there are no retirement visas that I know of. Sure, lots of work visas, that can eventually lead to permanent residency or citizenship if desired, but that’s by definition not retirement, at least not until one gets PR or citizenship and can then truly retire. I guess it depends on how “active” a retirement one is contemplating for the first few years.
I have heard from people and read that discrimination against foreigners that live in Japan is pretty common. Not only derogatory comments, but discrimination in housing and entrance to establishments and things like that. The government actually conducted their own survey which corroborated this.
There is some discrimination, sure, particularly with apartment rentals. Once had a problem with that myself.

I’ve only ever lived in two other countries in my life, but I would say that the situation in Japan overall is much better than it is in either of them, for example. (Or at least better than it was when I was in either of them, which was some time ago now.)

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by Jazztonight » Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:42 am

AlphaLess wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:55 pm
Evidence shows that moderate (mediterranean) climate is good for longevity...
Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:48 am
That's why I'm staying where I am, in Oakland, CA. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oakland,_California

"Oakland has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate with an average of 260 sunny days per year. In general, the city features warm, dry summers, and mild, wet winters. Based on data gathered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oakland is ranked No. 1 in climate among U.S. cities..."
flyingaway wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:45 pm
I think I can like the weather of Oakland, CA, when I have doubled my portfolio.
You'd be surprised. There are lots of places to live here. Also, my portfolio is nothing fantastic.
"What does not destroy me, makes me stronger." Nietzsche

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by flyingaway » Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:22 am

Jazztonight wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:42 am
AlphaLess wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:55 pm
Evidence shows that moderate (mediterranean) climate is good for longevity...
Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:48 am
That's why I'm staying where I am, in Oakland, CA. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oakland,_California

"Oakland has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate with an average of 260 sunny days per year. In general, the city features warm, dry summers, and mild, wet winters. Based on data gathered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oakland is ranked No. 1 in climate among U.S. cities..."
flyingaway wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:45 pm
I think I can like the weather of Oakland, CA, when I have doubled my portfolio.
You'd be surprised. There are lots of places to live here. Also, my portfolio is nothing fantastic.
My son lives in San Francisco, he makes more than combined salaries of me and my wife.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by oilrig » Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:37 am

My plan is to retire in San Juan, Puerto Rico where I’m originally from! Lots of pros for American retirees: Part of the US, English is widely spoken, US dollar, Direct flights to most major US cities, no passport required for people to visit you, cheap housing (plenty of $100k beach condos and dirt cheap apartments), great beaches around the island, consistent warm tropical weather.

My sister lived there briefly last year and said she was able to buy medical insurance from the government for $200/month there.

PR isn’t perfect, lots of poverty and government corruption, and inefficiencies. But tons of Americans choose to retire there for a reason!

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by flyingaway » Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:45 am

oilrig wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:37 am
My plan is to retire in San Juan, Puerto Rico where I’m originally from! Lots of pros for American retirees: Part of the US, English is widely spoken, US dollar, Direct flights to most major US cities, no passport required for people to visit you, cheap housing (plenty of $100k beach condos and dirt cheap apartments), great beaches around the island, consistent warm tropical weather.

My sister lived there briefly last year and said she was able to buy medical insurance from the government for $200/month there.

PR isn’t perfect, lots of poverty and government corruption, and inefficiencies. But tons of Americans choose to retire there for a reason!
Is this insurance available to the Americans moving there from mainland?

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by BolderBoy » Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:56 am

VictoriaF wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:47 pm
It sounds like you have never windsurfed in a tux and high heels.
You're a class act, Victoria.
"Never underestimate one's capacity to overestimate one's abilities" - The Dunning-Kruger Effect

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by midareff » Thu Aug 16, 2018 3:07 pm

protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:54 pm
midareff wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:42 pm
Thailand and Panama come to mind right off........ lots of English spoken, low to very low cost of living and I include medical in that. Very friendly and courteous people. Good financial and banking systems.
Panama is on the top of most internet lists these days. I will probably be there this winter for the Panama Jazz Festival. It will be interesting to see what I find.

I was in Thailand last winter. Thailand is a wonderful country, very cheap, great food, good transportation, exquisitely beautiful, fascinating culture and history, very kind people, lost of recreational opportunities. That said it is also very far away, and the language is daunting enough that you probably would never integrate yourself into local culture.
Try having a look at Boquete .. a little altitude, high American concentration and temperate weather. LOL, for me the Thai language is not a problem, wife is Thai.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by protagonist » Thu Aug 16, 2018 5:40 pm

midareff wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 3:07 pm
protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:54 pm
midareff wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:42 pm
Thailand and Panama come to mind right off........ lots of English spoken, low to very low cost of living and I include medical in that. Very friendly and courteous people. Good financial and banking systems.
Panama is on the top of most internet lists these days. I will probably be there this winter for the Panama Jazz Festival. It will be interesting to see what I find.

I was in Thailand last winter. Thailand is a wonderful country, very cheap, great food, good transportation, exquisitely beautiful, fascinating culture and history, very kind people, lost of recreational opportunities. That said it is also very far away, and the language is daunting enough that you probably would never integrate yourself into local culture.
Try having a look at Boquete .. a little altitude, high American concentration and temperate weather. LOL, for me the Thai language is not a problem, wife is Thai.

Thanks, midareff.
I speak fairly conversational Spanish. In the best of all possible worlds I would not want to be isolated in a community of expats, though from prior experience it does tend to solidify bonds between people.

I have wintered annually in a great world-class windsurfing village, also a local fishing village, in Venezuela , where I bought property in 1991. I had a tight circle of friends- about 3/4 expats and 1/4 locals (very few Americans there). Complicating that these days, beyond the politics of which we are all aware, is that my fiancee is afraid that I will die if I go back there, and even more to the point, she is still working and if I spent my winters there she would be freezing all winter alone in NYC, which would break my heart. So we are seeking alternative solutions.....

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by Jazztonight » Thu Aug 16, 2018 9:45 pm

flyingaway wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 10:22 am
Jazztonight wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:42 am
AlphaLess wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:55 pm
Evidence shows that moderate (mediterranean) climate is good for longevity...
Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:48 am
That's why I'm staying where I am, in Oakland, CA. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oakland,_California

"Oakland has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate with an average of 260 sunny days per year. In general, the city features warm, dry summers, and mild, wet winters. Based on data gathered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oakland is ranked No. 1 in climate among U.S. cities..."
flyingaway wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:45 pm
I think I can like the weather of Oakland, CA, when I have doubled my portfolio.
You'd be surprised. There are lots of places to live here. Also, my portfolio is nothing fantastic.
My son lives in San Francisco, he makes more than combined salaries of me and my wife.
I'm sure you're proud of him!
I have friends with limited incomes who live in comfortable neighborhoods in Oakland. Life's full of little compromises.
"What does not destroy me, makes me stronger." Nietzsche

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by midareff » Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:19 am

protagonist wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 5:40 pm
midareff wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 3:07 pm
protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:54 pm
midareff wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:42 pm
Thailand and Panama come to mind right off........ lots of English spoken, low to very low cost of living and I include medical in that. Very friendly and courteous people. Good financial and banking systems.
Panama is on the top of most internet lists these days. I will probably be there this winter for the Panama Jazz Festival. It will be interesting to see what I find.

I was in Thailand last winter. Thailand is a wonderful country, very cheap, great food, good transportation, exquisitely beautiful, fascinating culture and history, very kind people, lost of recreational opportunities. That said it is also very far away, and the language is daunting enough that you probably would never integrate yourself into local culture.
Try having a look at Boquete .. a little altitude, high American concentration and temperate weather. LOL, for me the Thai language is not a problem, wife is Thai.

Thanks, midareff.
I speak fairly conversational Spanish. In the best of all possible worlds I would not want to be isolated in a community of expats, though from prior experience it does tend to solidify bonds between people.

I have wintered annually in a great world-class windsurfing village, also a local fishing village, in Venezuela , where I bought property in 1991. I had a tight circle of friends- about 3/4 expats and 1/4 locals (very few Americans there). Complicating that these days, beyond the politics of which we are all aware, is that my fiancee is afraid that I will die if I go back there, and even more to the point, she is still working and if I spent my winters there she would be freezing all winter alone in NYC, which would break my heart. So we are seeking alternative solutions.....
How about Miami... great winter weather, lots of water sports available year round, predominately or at least mostly Spanish speaking mix from Cuba and South America, great medical care available and it's soooo close to the United States. Only 2.5 hours from fiance in NY who can easily come south and warm up for long weekends.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by protagonist » Fri Aug 17, 2018 9:36 am

midareff wrote:
Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:19 am
protagonist wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 5:40 pm
midareff wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 3:07 pm
protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 4:54 pm
midareff wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 3:42 pm
Thailand and Panama come to mind right off........ lots of English spoken, low to very low cost of living and I include medical in that. Very friendly and courteous people. Good financial and banking systems.
Panama is on the top of most internet lists these days. I will probably be there this winter for the Panama Jazz Festival. It will be interesting to see what I find.

I was in Thailand last winter. Thailand is a wonderful country, very cheap, great food, good transportation, exquisitely beautiful, fascinating culture and history, very kind people, lost of recreational opportunities. That said it is also very far away, and the language is daunting enough that you probably would never integrate yourself into local culture.
Try having a look at Boquete .. a little altitude, high American concentration and temperate weather. LOL, for me the Thai language is not a problem, wife is Thai.

Thanks, midareff.
I speak fairly conversational Spanish. In the best of all possible worlds I would not want to be isolated in a community of expats, though from prior experience it does tend to solidify bonds between people.

I have wintered annually in a great world-class windsurfing village, also a local fishing village, in Venezuela , where I bought property in 1991. I had a tight circle of friends- about 3/4 expats and 1/4 locals (very few Americans there). Complicating that these days, beyond the politics of which we are all aware, is that my fiancee is afraid that I will die if I go back there, and even more to the point, she is still working and if I spent my winters there she would be freezing all winter alone in NYC, which would break my heart. So we are seeking alternative solutions.....
How about Miami... great winter weather, lots of water sports available year round, predominately or at least mostly Spanish speaking mix from Cuba and South America, great medical care available and it's soooo close to the United States. Only 2.5 hours from fiance in NY who can easily come south and warm up for long weekends.
The thought has crossed our minds, for just those reasons. We are doing an exploratory probe , both there (North Beach) and St Petersburg, this winter.

An overlooked advantage of retiring abroad is instant community. Expats instantly welcome new expats into their "group". I have lived in a number of places around the world and I found this was always the case...even more so if you are living somewhere "unusual" where there are less people like you.
Community is very important, especially if you are leaving friends and family behind.
I imagine it would be much harder to make new friends in an American city, where the natives are much less hungry for new friends and you just blend into the crowd.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by VinVedii » Sat Aug 18, 2018 1:18 pm

Jazztonight wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:48 am
AlphaLess wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:55 pm
Evidence shows that moderate (mediterranean) climate is good for longevity...
That's why I'm staying where I am, in Oakland, CA. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oakland,_California

"Oakland has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate with an average of 260 sunny days per year. In general, the city features warm, dry summers, and mild, wet winters. Based on data gathered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oakland is ranked No. 1 in climate among U.S. cities..."

Why would I want to move from a place where my friends and communities are? So I can save some money? Nonsense! I live in a HCOL area, true. But while DW and I are not particularly wealthy, we own our residence and, so far, can afford the taxes, the HOA fees, and our groceries.

I'm a few minutes walk away from public transportation, shopping, the public library, restaurants, and post office. I'm across the street from a 3-mile circumference lake, walking path, and wildlife preserve. The walking score of my residence is 95/100. The University of California at Berkeley is nearby, as is Laney (community) College. (I have degrees from each.)

Crime? Homelessness? Noise? Other issues and conflicts? Sure, and I know people who have left because of those issues. This is life in the city. (Young people and seniors, meanwhile, seem to be moving in every day.)

Arts? Diversity? Ethnic and high-end restaurants? Nearby airports? Access to culture? Museums, symphonies, theaters, music, dance? Yes, we have them.

If I want to study and/or speak a foreign language, I don't have to go far to do so. I've travelled to many places around the world and continue to do so. In each location I've asked myself, "Would I rather live here?" As charming, exciting, beautiful, exotic, or interesting a place might have been, I keep returning to my chosen home (and I've lived in a number of well-known, lauded locations).

Life is filled with trade-offs and compromises. I'm fortunate to have found a place that works for me.
YMMV Oakland has the random gun violence issues and urban blight

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by Jazztonight » Sat Aug 18, 2018 5:30 pm

VinVedii wrote:
Sat Aug 18, 2018 1:18 pm
YMMV Oakland has the random gun violence issues and urban blight
Most cities have violence, and I mentioned crime in my post.

As far as urban blight, perhaps you haven't been to Oakland lately and seen the construction and other projects going on. PM me and visit, and I'll show you around.
"What does not destroy me, makes me stronger." Nietzsche

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by flyingaway » Sat Aug 18, 2018 5:56 pm

midareff wrote:
Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:19 am
How about Miami... great winter weather, lots of water sports available year round, predominately or at least mostly Spanish speaking mix from Cuba and South America, great medical care available and it's soooo close to the United States. Only 2.5 hours from fiance in NY who can easily come south and warm up for long weekends.

Last time I was there (in March), we saw many rich people's houses. I think you need some serious dollars to live comfortablely in Miami.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by midareff » Sun Aug 19, 2018 6:30 am

flyingaway wrote:
Sat Aug 18, 2018 5:56 pm
midareff wrote:
Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:19 am
How about Miami... great winter weather, lots of water sports available year round, predominately or at least mostly Spanish speaking mix from Cuba and South America, great medical care available and it's soooo close to the United States. Only 2.5 hours from fiance in NY who can easily come south and warm up for long weekends.

Last time I was there (in March), we saw many rich people's houses. I think you need some serious dollars to live comfortablely in Miami.
I'd suggest this to U in return ... having now visited > 40 countries and > 40 states ... if you want to live on the water or in a new high rise in almost all of those places you will need some serious dollars. I'm not suggesting Miami is on the top ten affordable places to live since for awhile the Miami/Fort Lauderdale areas were on the wrong end of the affordability scale in relation to wages. OTOH, there are lots of places to live in Miami that are nice and aren't on the water or in a new high rise.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by Rick Ferri » Sun Aug 19, 2018 6:32 am

livesoft wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 3:19 pm
Near the grandchildren seems to be a top choice for many people I know.
+1
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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by exoilman » Sun Aug 19, 2018 7:06 am

livesoft wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 3:19 pm
Near the grandchildren seems to be a top choice for many people I know.
+1

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by SurferLife » Sun Aug 19, 2018 8:05 am

We don't really feel like we fit in America, but also don't want to retire in a foreign country either. We chose Hawaii. It's like being overseas in another country, but it's still America. A good fit for us. Also bonus is low low property taxes and they don't tax military retirement. Housing IS pricey but outer islands are nicer and cheaper.

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Re: As an American, where are some great places in the world to retire?

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Aug 19, 2018 8:12 am

protagonist wrote:
Wed Aug 15, 2018 12:02 pm
AerialWombat wrote:
Tue Aug 14, 2018 4:50 pm
Tallinn, Estonia: Much to do, friendly people, stable government, very low cost of living yet modern everything. Beautiful city.

Hobart, Australia: On the island of Tasmania. Laid back lifestyle, much cheaper cost of living than Sydney, interesting history, interesting critters and scenery, beautiful weather year-round, no language barrier.
I believe Estonia is in the Schengen Zone, which would make it very difficult for a US citizen to live there. You can only stay in the Zone for 90 days out of any 6 month period. This would also apply for much of the rest of Europe. I suspect as we tighten our immigration policies we can expect other countries to reciprocate.
Look on the map and see Estonia's neighbours. Then think about Ukraine & Crimea.

I would not move permanently to Estonia. Unless I had a pretty clear destination in mind as a refugee.

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