kayaking!

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k.erin21
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Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2018 6:47 am

kayaking!

Post by k.erin21 » Thu Jul 12, 2018 7:05 am

Hello,
This is my first post and I'm looking for some guidance with kayaking.
I'm a 58 year old female with limited experience re: kayaking, but I would really like to
begin to try it. I live in Maine with access to a fairly large lake/pond and also the potential
to go on an ocean tidal river.....so nothing drastic!
So, I would like some advice regarding the type/style/model of kayak for beginners....
I'm in the market to purchase one...should I consider used?? Recommendations??
Thank you!

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lthenderson
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Location: Iowa

Re: kayaking!

Post by lthenderson » Thu Jul 12, 2018 1:24 pm

My recommendation would be to take a class at some nearby kayaking school. They often have many types of kayaks you can try out to see which one best fits you and you get some basic instruction. Another option would be to rent several different ones and try them on for size before investing in one.

Carefreeap
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Location: SF Bay Area

Re: kayaking!

Post by Carefreeap » Thu Jul 12, 2018 1:49 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Thu Jul 12, 2018 1:24 pm
My recommendation would be to take a class at some nearby kayaking school. They often have many types of kayaks you can try out to see which one best fits you and you get some basic instruction. Another option would be to rent several different ones and try them on for size before investing in one.
+1

And then haunt Craigslist or Next Door or post what you're looking for.

The kayakers I know tend to have more than one kind of kayak depending on the type of kayaking they do; from flat water to an ocean kayak.

txmu541
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Location: Austin, Texas

Re: kayaking!

Post by txmu541 » Thu Jul 12, 2018 2:22 pm

I would recommend a sit-on top kayak. It's versatile and can be used on lakes, ocean, rivers, etc. Find one used on craigslist, check for wear/abuse and make sure the hatches close correctly. A 10-12 footer should be stable and still allow you to move quickly. My friends and I use Wilderness Systems which I've used several of to kayak on rivers in my area and they even have enough room to kayak camp.

Tecktser
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Joined: Sat Jul 27, 2013 4:46 am

Re: kayaking!

Post by Tecktser » Thu Jul 12, 2018 6:19 pm

There are many styles of kayaks. First thing to do is to figure out the type of kayaking that interests you most. A local outfitter should be able to point you toward a model based on the type of water you want to paddle. There is no perfect type of boat that will do all things well. Check the web for local canoe/kayak clubs. American Canoe Association or American Whitewater should have info on their sites. I have 4 canoes and 3 kayaks and all have their strong and weak points. SYOTR. (See You On The River)

Lacrocious
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Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:45 pm
Location: Wisconsin

Re: kayaking!

Post by Lacrocious » Thu Jul 12, 2018 7:36 pm

Some of the more "Outdoor Store" orientated places have "Try It" days where they take kayaks to local lakes/ponds to let you try them out. Others are near water and you can try them any time. Another place near us (WI - no where near you) credits rentals towards a purchase up to a set amount - so you can rent a few times to figure out what you like and apply it towards your purchase. You don't get that at "Sporting Goods Stores" - more local sports places. Look around and ask questions.
- L

RickBoglehead
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Re: kayaking!

Post by RickBoglehead » Thu Jul 12, 2018 7:53 pm

Pelican Odyssey 100x with paddle for $224.99 at Costco if they still have any.

daheld
Posts: 264
Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2017 8:14 am

Re: kayaking!

Post by daheld » Fri Jul 13, 2018 8:07 am

lthenderson wrote:
Thu Jul 12, 2018 1:24 pm
My recommendation would be to take a class at some nearby kayaking school. They often have many types of kayaks you can try out to see which one best fits you and you get some basic instruction. Another option would be to rent several different ones and try them on for size before investing in one.
This. Find an outdoor shop that sells a lot of kayaks and holds trial days. They most all do. This will allow you to get a paddle in your hands and actually get in a boat. The folks from the store can direct you what type of kayak you should buy. Read a lot of reviews and learn as much as you can. Then, buy a lightly used boat. You can get one for significantly cheaper this way. Or, if you're not worried about the cost, buy a brand spanking new one and enjoy it!

RickBoglehead
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Re: kayaking!

Post by RickBoglehead » Sat Jul 14, 2018 8:18 am

daheld wrote:
Fri Jul 13, 2018 8:07 am
lthenderson wrote:
Thu Jul 12, 2018 1:24 pm
My recommendation would be to take a class at some nearby kayaking school. They often have many types of kayaks you can try out to see which one best fits you and you get some basic instruction. Another option would be to rent several different ones and try them on for size before investing in one.
This. Find an outdoor shop that sells a lot of kayaks and holds trial days. They most all do. This will allow you to get a paddle in your hands and actually get in a boat. The folks from the store can direct you what type of kayak you should buy. Read a lot of reviews and learn as much as you can. Then, buy a lightly used boat. You can get one for significantly cheaper this way. Or, if you're not worried about the cost, buy a brand spanking new one and enjoy it!
So you advocate learning from the store, using their equipment, and then not buying from them?

mrb09
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Re: kayaking!

Post by mrb09 » Sat Jul 14, 2018 9:32 am

Paddling.net is a good resource

Second the recommendation to take a class for basic technique. Learning basic strokes will help a lot.

For lakes and tidal areas, you'll probably have a choice of three types of kayaks:

- Sit on top -- self explanatory, you sit on top. The kayaks have an enclosed hollow area, you can't sink them.

- Recreational -- sit inside, but they have a large open cockpit. They're not as stable as a sit on top, but they're pretty hard to tip over.

- Touring -- sit inside, small cockpit opening. They're narrow and can tip over. You generally should be certified in a rescue class for these to make sure you can get out and back if they tip over (or paddle with someone who is certified, like a guide).

As other folks have mentioned, many places have "demo days" where you can try these out in the water. Aside from paddling, recommend lifting them as well -- you'll need to get these to and from the water, and some of the cheaper sit-on-top and rec kayaks can be *very* heavy.

My advice is go ahead and start with a cheaper new or used kayak, but splurge on the paddle and life vest. Having a light paddle (with possibly smaller diameter if you have small hands) and a comfy vest can make a huge difference. My wife and I have small rec kayaks we use in lakes, but we've gone on guided ocean tours with touring kayaks and we just take our own paddles and vests.

goodlifer
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Re: kayaking!

Post by goodlifer » Sat Jul 14, 2018 10:38 am

Check Groupon for discounted classes. I see them frequently, but I'm sure it depends on the area. You can post in Craigslist asking to borrow or rent someone's kayak for a day or even ask to go with them on an outing if you help portage. I have the Costco Pelican from last year. It is great for the money. Much nicer than the Pelican Swifty we have. The Swifty is very stable because it is very wide, but it is like paddling a barge and the tracking is awful.

You also want to pay attention to which paddle you chose. The wrong paddle can be very tiring. There are sizing guides on the internet and usually in the stores by the paddles.

wish
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Joined: Tue Feb 09, 2016 1:15 pm

Re: kayaking!

Post by wish » Sun Jul 15, 2018 6:57 am

We are in your age range and paddle on flat water which can get rough. A couple years ago, we added a Perception Pescador 12.0 .... a good sit on top for the money. Paddling.net has a good number of reviews for it.....we have 5 yaks & regularly use only our Wilderness Systems Tarpon 140 and the Perception Pescador 12.0... they are sturdy and track well and can be used safely in 2-3’ waves as they are sit on tops with scuppers to drain the cockpit

We seldom use our 1st yak which is 9’ long and tracks poorly or our 2nd yak which tracks okay at 11’ but is a swampable sit-in which is also a spider magnet in storage. We do use our Hobie Tandem Island a lot — great fun to sail but a whole different story.

I agree with the 5 star rating for the Perception Pescador 12.0 below quoted from a rental company owner on paddling.net

“I have about 30 of these...
Submitted by: Paddle Marco on 10/23/2017
I have about 30 of these kayaks for our rental and tour company. Let me just say, we beat the heck out of them. Slide them, drag them, throw them.... etc. They can take a beating. When they get worn down (usually in the back), they are easy to weld with a heat gun and spare polyethylene plastic. The only issues I have had is the handles can tear and the seats fade. Other then that, I'll keep buying them. Our renters love the kayaks too. http://www.paddlemarco.com

Junky kayaks are not a good value.

goodlifer
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Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2015 9:50 pm

Re: kayaking!

Post by goodlifer » Sun Jul 15, 2018 11:48 am

wish wrote:
Sun Jul 15, 2018 6:57 am

I agree with the 5 star rating for the Perception Pescador 12.0 below quoted from a rental company owner on paddling.net

“I have about 30 of these...
Submitted by: Paddle Marco on 10/23/2017
I have about 30 of these kayaks for our rental and tour company. Let me just say, we beat the heck out of them. Slide them, drag them, throw them.... etc. They can take a beating. When they get worn down (usually in the back), they are easy to weld with a heat gun and spare polyethylene plastic. The only issues I have had is the handles can tear and the seats fade. Other then that, I'll keep buying them. Our renters love the kayaks too. http://www.paddlemarco.com

Junky kayaks are not a good value.
I completely agree about junky kayaks. I see those cheap ones fly out the doors of Menards and Farm & Fleet every time they are on sale, and then there is a boatload (pun intended!) of near-new kayaks on CL and FB for sale a few months later. I have read that the Pescador has been redesigned for 2018 and it is wider and clunkier, which is yet another reason to shop for a used kayak.

I'm not sure that I would like a sit on. I really like resting my arms and paddle on the rim and having the extra room to throw my bag near my feet. The hatch in back just isn't easily accessible for me. Plus, I really, really hate getting wet from waves. I am usually on pretty flat lakes, but boaters seem to enjoy trying to swamp a kayak.

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Cycle
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Re: kayaking!

Post by Cycle » Sun Jul 15, 2018 12:36 pm

We have multiple lakes within a few miles, each of which has a rental kiosk, so we just rent kayaks, canoes, paddle boards, etc. on demand. Beats have to store something that gets used a handful of times a year, and that way we can just bike to the lake and not deal with parking.

If I didn't have the rental option, I'd get something off craigslist. Worst case it doesn't work for you and you can resell it for close to what you paid for it.

daheld
Posts: 264
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Re: kayaking!

Post by daheld » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:25 am

RickBoglehead wrote:
Sat Jul 14, 2018 8:18 am
daheld wrote:
Fri Jul 13, 2018 8:07 am
lthenderson wrote:
Thu Jul 12, 2018 1:24 pm
My recommendation would be to take a class at some nearby kayaking school. They often have many types of kayaks you can try out to see which one best fits you and you get some basic instruction. Another option would be to rent several different ones and try them on for size before investing in one.
This. Find an outdoor shop that sells a lot of kayaks and holds trial days. They most all do. This will allow you to get a paddle in your hands and actually get in a boat. The folks from the store can direct you what type of kayak you should buy. Read a lot of reviews and learn as much as you can. Then, buy a lightly used boat. You can get one for significantly cheaper this way. Or, if you're not worried about the cost, buy a brand spanking new one and enjoy it!
So you advocate learning from the store, using their equipment, and then not buying from them?
I said, "then, buy a lightly used boat." I never said that boat should not be purchased from your local shop. My local shop sells used boats. They also hold trial days where you pay like $25 and get to try out different boats. However, for someone who is just getting into the hobby, I think it makes sense to buy a used boat and save some money instead of going after a new boat. Just my opinion.

carolc
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Location: New Hampshire seacoast

Re: kayaking!

Post by carolc » Mon Jul 16, 2018 12:42 pm

I am close to your age (63) and I have a 14’ Eddyline Samba. It weighs about 40lbs. I can carry it but 2 of us load it onto the car. I suggest you get a boat that weighs no more than 40 lbs. I previously had a 16’6” boat but it was too much boat.
If you live near Kittery, check out the Kittery Trading Post. They are on a river so you can try out the kayaks before you buy. (They also have a big show at UNH in April.)

carolc

Jack FFR1846
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Re: kayaking!

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Mon Jul 16, 2018 12:53 pm

I've got a couple of perceptions. From memory, a 16 foot and an 18 foot. They're very stable and pretty forgiving. We use them on a lake. I do find that if I'm in the middle of the lake with a good wind, they are nearly impossible to keep cross wind (the wind steers you to where it wants you to go). I would assume adding a rudder would help with this but haven't added one on any of ours yet.

Think about how you're going to get the kayak from home to the lake/river. You can buy wheels if you're close enough to walk. Getting one off the roof of a car isn't overly easy. You can buy lighter kayaks, but they become very expensive, very quickly and the really light ones tend to also be narrow, so less stable.

I'd echo that if you can go rent a few times, that might help you choose. The closest place to us that rent actually sells all of their canoes and kayaks at the end of their season rather than attempting to store them and losing them to thieves.
Bogle: Smart Beta is stupid

Angst
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Re: kayaking!

Post by Angst » Mon Jul 16, 2018 5:03 pm

Welcome... kinda odd though, your first and only post so far and it's about kayaking? Go figure.

Anyhow, I used to kayak quite a bit and from my perspective, it's important for a newbie to understand that whatever organization you might end up in contact with, they may well have a very specific perspective about what kayaking means to them too, maybe just one of these:

1) whitewater
2) flatwater
3) ocean

#1 is mine, and the orgs I used to bump into one way or another typically fell into this group, i.e. boating on rivers with rapids and lots of scary excitement and so forth. Requires a lot of practice and assistance from people who know what they're doing.

#2 & #3 sound like what most people are doing today though. Very pleasant, much safer and easier, less adrenaline, fewer dislocated shoulders... Very different kinds of kayaks too, vs. what I'd be using.

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