Should I take possession of a certified mail?

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imyeti2
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Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by imyeti2 » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am

Hello,

We are in a situation for which we need advise/opinions.

We had obtained services of a handyman for some work around the house last month. We have a lot of projects and indicated to him that we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow. A few initial projects were done and payments made.

He texted me a couple of weeks ago to see whether there was any more work, and kept asking us whether the work was large enough ($2K-5K). I could not commit until I showed him the projects and got estimates. He came over looked at the list of projects and wanted to start the very next day demanding a deposit of $750 - to which we indicated not being sure whether we wanted to go forward with. We're evaluating options. This guy became furious that it was not reasonable and that we're just jerking around with him.

Now he has sent us something in a certified mail, which we refused to accept. We really don't want to deal with him nor are there any outstanding bills that we owe to him. Should we accept the mail or not? Any thoughts? Thank you.

Yeti.

barnaclebob
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by barnaclebob » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:20 am

Why wouldn't you accept it? I'm not aware of any liability you incur just from taking possession of some document sent by a contractor. If anything you would be more likely to incur liability by not accepting it.
Last edited by barnaclebob on Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:23 am, edited 3 times in total.

panine
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by panine » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:20 am

i would refuse it. if there is something he needs to convey to you, he should pick up the phone and have a conversation. if you owe him nothing, there should be no problem in refusing it.

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Meg77
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by Meg77 » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:22 am

I don't think refusing to accept the certified mail accomplishes anything. It may provoke him further to show up at your home to deliver the item (probably a bill for his time) in person. Receiving the bill or item doesn't make you any more or less liable; you are still free to discard it. Wondering what he's trying to send and wondering how he may proceed if you refuse to accept the mail would be more stressful to me than just opening it.
"An investment in knowledge pays the best interest." - Benjamin Franklin

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cheese_breath
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by cheese_breath » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:27 am

Just hypothetically, let's say he's hired a lawyer to sue you for (whatever), and he's sending you the mail to tell you. Wouldn't you want to know that before his attorney summons you into court.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

Rupert
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by Rupert » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:30 am

What do you think is in the letter? I'd be too curious not to open it. As part of my work, I communicate regularly with incarcerated persons, many of whom seem to believe that certified mail has magical properties -- that sending a letter by certified mail somehow enhances the merits of the quasi-legal arguments made therein. Rest assured that certified mail does not have such properties.

f35phixer
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by f35phixer » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:36 am

Strange very strange.

Keep us informed...

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lthenderson
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by lthenderson » Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:48 am

imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am
We have a lot of projects and indicated to him that we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow.

He texted me a couple of weeks ago to see whether there was any more work, and kept asking us whether the work was large enough ($2K-5K). I could not commit until I showed him the projects and got estimates. He came over looked at the list of projects and wanted to start the very next day demanding a deposit of $750 - to which we indicated not being sure whether we wanted to go forward with.
Having done this sort of work for others, I have a little different view. Granted I am only reading your side of the story but it appears to me as if you led him to believe there was a lot of work that you wanted HIM to do when you had the money. Then you showed him more projects and he gave you estimates before you pulled the rug out and said you didn't want to proceed at this time. So now he has spent time and effort meeting your demands and has nothing to show for it. He most likely is sending you a bill for that time. I doubt it is enforceable unless it was stated in advance that estimates would be billed to you but I can certainly understand why he might be a little upset with you, and perhaps more so now that you refused to accept the letter and he has to invest even more time (wrong or right) to get it to you.

imyeti2
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by imyeti2 » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:11 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:48 am
imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am
We have a lot of projects and indicated to him that we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow.

He texted me a couple of weeks ago to see whether there was any more work, and kept asking us whether the work was large enough ($2K-5K). I could not commit until I showed him the projects and got estimates. He came over looked at the list of projects and wanted to start the very next day demanding a deposit of $750 - to which we indicated not being sure whether we wanted to go forward with.
Having done this sort of work for others, I have a little different view. Granted I am only reading your side of the story but it appears to me as if you led him to believe there was a lot of work that you wanted HIM to do when you had the money. Then you showed him more projects and he gave you estimates before you pulled the rug out and said you didn't want to proceed at this time. So now he has spent time and effort meeting your demands and has nothing to show for it. He most likely is sending you a bill for that time. I doubt it is enforceable unless it was stated in advance that estimates would be billed to you but I can certainly understand why he might be a little upset with you, and perhaps more so now that you refused to accept the letter and he has to invest even more time (wrong or right) to get it to you.
Thank you for the response. He never provided any written estimate nor any scope of work.

I'm okay with going forward with smaller projects (<$200-300 worth) but for larger projects ($2K), I'd need to have some details of the estimate.

My wife and I found it very weird that his text messages were more about deposit money and dollar amount of the projects than about the actual projects.

Anyways, as many other have indicated, will go forward and take possession of the letter. Thanks.

Yeti,

denovo
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by denovo » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:13 pm

imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am
Hello,

We are in a situation for which we need advise/opinions.

We had obtained services of a handyman for some work around the house last month. We have a lot of projects and indicated to him that we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow. A few initial projects were done and payments made.

He texted me a couple of weeks ago to see whether there was any more work, and kept asking us whether the work was large enough ($2K-5K). I could not commit until I showed him the projects and got estimates. He came over looked at the list of projects and wanted to start the very next day demanding a deposit of $750 - to which we indicated not being sure whether we wanted to go forward with. We're evaluating options. This guy became furious that it was not reasonable and that we're just jerking around with him.

Now he has sent us something in a certified mail, which we refused to accept. We really don't want to deal with him nor are there any outstanding bills that we owe to him. Should we accept the mail or not? Any thoughts? Thank you.

Yeti.
This seems like one of those "two sides to every story" situations. Something is missing. If you don't owe anything or didn't make any commitment I don't see anyone sending a cert letter.
"Don't trust everything you read on the Internet"- Abraham Lincoln

Radjob4me
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by Radjob4me » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:14 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:48 am
imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am
We have a lot of projects and indicated to him that we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow.

He texted me a couple of weeks ago to see whether there was any more work, and kept asking us whether the work was large enough ($2K-5K). I could not commit until I showed him the projects and got estimates. He came over looked at the list of projects and wanted to start the very next day demanding a deposit of $750 - to which we indicated not being sure whether we wanted to go forward with.
Having done this sort of work for others, I have a little different view. Granted I am only reading your side of the story but it appears to me as if you led him to believe there was a lot of work that you wanted HIM to do when you had the money. Then you showed him more projects and he gave you estimates before you pulled the rug out and said you didn't want to proceed at this time. So now he has spent time and effort meeting your demands and has nothing to show for it. He most likely is sending you a bill for that time. I doubt it is enforceable unless it was stated in advance that estimates would be billed to you but I can certainly understand why he might be a little upset with you, and perhaps more so now that you refused to accept the letter and he has to invest even more time (wrong or right) to get it to you.
I guess I look at it as the contractor/handyman kept asking for work, without being prompted, and the OP responded by saying "sure, come look at what we have for upcoming projects". I would agree that if the OP had initiated the contact, then yes, the handyman could be mad. But it sounds like the handyman was trying to drum up business and wanted to start in an unreasonably short amount of time...

I'd get the mail and see what it is. If it confirms your worst fear - some sort of lawsuit - then at least you know not to use him again.

barnaclebob
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by barnaclebob » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:21 pm

Radjob4me wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:14 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:48 am
imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am
We have a lot of projects and indicated to him that we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow.

He texted me a couple of weeks ago to see whether there was any more work, and kept asking us whether the work was large enough ($2K-5K). I could not commit until I showed him the projects and got estimates. He came over looked at the list of projects and wanted to start the very next day demanding a deposit of $750 - to which we indicated not being sure whether we wanted to go forward with.
Having done this sort of work for others, I have a little different view. Granted I am only reading your side of the story but it appears to me as if you led him to believe there was a lot of work that you wanted HIM to do when you had the money. Then you showed him more projects and he gave you estimates before you pulled the rug out and said you didn't want to proceed at this time. So now he has spent time and effort meeting your demands and has nothing to show for it. He most likely is sending you a bill for that time. I doubt it is enforceable unless it was stated in advance that estimates would be billed to you but I can certainly understand why he might be a little upset with you, and perhaps more so now that you refused to accept the letter and he has to invest even more time (wrong or right) to get it to you.
I guess I look at it as the contractor/handyman kept asking for work, without being prompted, and the OP responded by saying "sure, come look at what we have for upcoming projects". I would agree that if the OP had initiated the contact, then yes, the handyman could be mad. But it sounds like the handyman was trying to drum up business and wanted to start in an unreasonably short amount of time...

I'd get the mail and see what it is. If it confirms your worst fear - some sort of lawsuit - then at least you know not to use him again.
I think the important detail is how exactly the interaction happened where he wanted to start the next day and wanted a deposit. The word demand has very strong connotations but it might not have gone down that way. I would never pay a deposit for handyman* type work until at least materials were on site. Otherwise I would suggest ordering them myself if the contractor had cash flow or credit issues.

*I did almost do this last week but I really trusted the contractor that had already put significant time into the project before any work started and I could overhear that he was at his supplier trying to see if I could pay directly for the parts. He ended up working it out with the supplier though and all was well.

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lthenderson
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by lthenderson » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:26 pm

Radjob4me wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:14 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:48 am
imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am
We have a lot of projects and indicated to him that we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow.

He texted me a couple of weeks ago to see whether there was any more work, and kept asking us whether the work was large enough ($2K-5K). I could not commit until I showed him the projects and got estimates. He came over looked at the list of projects and wanted to start the very next day demanding a deposit of $750 - to which we indicated not being sure whether we wanted to go forward with.
Having done this sort of work for others, I have a little different view. Granted I am only reading your side of the story but it appears to me as if you led him to believe there was a lot of work that you wanted HIM to do when you had the money. Then you showed him more projects and he gave you estimates before you pulled the rug out and said you didn't want to proceed at this time. So now he has spent time and effort meeting your demands and has nothing to show for it. He most likely is sending you a bill for that time. I doubt it is enforceable unless it was stated in advance that estimates would be billed to you but I can certainly understand why he might be a little upset with you, and perhaps more so now that you refused to accept the letter and he has to invest even more time (wrong or right) to get it to you.
I guess I look at it as the contractor/handyman kept asking for work, without being prompted, and the OP responded by saying "sure, come look at what we have for upcoming projects". I would agree that if the OP had initiated the contact, then yes, the handyman could be mad. But it sounds like the handyman was trying to drum up business and wanted to start in an unreasonably short amount of time...

I'd get the mail and see what it is. If it confirms your worst fear - some sort of lawsuit - then at least you know not to use him again.
I think the OP did invite him to ask from time to time if they were ready to proceed on another project when they told him "we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow." By asking him to come quote additional projects was further initiation.

Grt2bOutdoors
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:26 pm

imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:11 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:48 am
imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am
We have a lot of projects and indicated to him that we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow.

He texted me a couple of weeks ago to see whether there was any more work, and kept asking us whether the work was large enough ($2K-5K). I could not commit until I showed him the projects and got estimates. He came over looked at the list of projects and wanted to start the very next day demanding a deposit of $750 - to which we indicated not being sure whether we wanted to go forward with.
Having done this sort of work for others, I have a little different view. Granted I am only reading your side of the story but it appears to me as if you led him to believe there was a lot of work that you wanted HIM to do when you had the money. Then you showed him more projects and he gave you estimates before you pulled the rug out and said you didn't want to proceed at this time. So now he has spent time and effort meeting your demands and has nothing to show for it. He most likely is sending you a bill for that time. I doubt it is enforceable unless it was stated in advance that estimates would be billed to you but I can certainly understand why he might be a little upset with you, and perhaps more so now that you refused to accept the letter and he has to invest even more time (wrong or right) to get it to you.
Thank you for the response. He never provided any written estimate nor any scope of work.

I'm okay with going forward with smaller projects (<$200-300 worth) but for larger projects ($2K), I'd need to have some details of the estimate.

My wife and I found it very weird that his text messages were more about deposit money and dollar amount of the projects than about the actual projects.

Anyways, as many other have indicated, will go forward and take possession of the letter. Thanks.

Yeti,
Take possession of letter. IMO, you cease and desist using this particular handyman going forward, whether you have the funds or not, this guy is trouble. The easiest way to avoid it is to steer clear in the future. Find someone else who's reputable. There are plenty of them out there. You owe him nothing, you owe yourselves peace/quiet and no stress.
"One should invest based on their need, ability and willingness to take risk - Larry Swedroe" Asking Portfolio Questions

Grt2bOutdoors
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:29 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:26 pm
Radjob4me wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:14 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:48 am
imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am
We have a lot of projects and indicated to him that we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow.

He texted me a couple of weeks ago to see whether there was any more work, and kept asking us whether the work was large enough ($2K-5K). I could not commit until I showed him the projects and got estimates. He came over looked at the list of projects and wanted to start the very next day demanding a deposit of $750 - to which we indicated not being sure whether we wanted to go forward with.
Having done this sort of work for others, I have a little different view. Granted I am only reading your side of the story but it appears to me as if you led him to believe there was a lot of work that you wanted HIM to do when you had the money. Then you showed him more projects and he gave you estimates before you pulled the rug out and said you didn't want to proceed at this time. So now he has spent time and effort meeting your demands and has nothing to show for it. He most likely is sending you a bill for that time. I doubt it is enforceable unless it was stated in advance that estimates would be billed to you but I can certainly understand why he might be a little upset with you, and perhaps more so now that you refused to accept the letter and he has to invest even more time (wrong or right) to get it to you.
I guess I look at it as the contractor/handyman kept asking for work, without being prompted, and the OP responded by saying "sure, come look at what we have for upcoming projects". I would agree that if the OP had initiated the contact, then yes, the handyman could be mad. But it sounds like the handyman was trying to drum up business and wanted to start in an unreasonably short amount of time...

I'd get the mail and see what it is. If it confirms your worst fear - some sort of lawsuit - then at least you know not to use him again.
I think the OP did invite him to ask from time to time if they were ready to proceed on another project when they told him "we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow." By asking him to come quote additional projects was further initiation.
I get estimates all the time for potential projects around the home, there is no initiation unless a written quote is provided and either earnest money in the form of a deposit has exchanged hands and/or a legal contract has been signed. How many times does the homeowner have to state we have a wish list of projects but no funds to start right now. Who is the handyman to a) demand a deposit when there is no agreement and b) to actually believe there is any initiation? No, this seems to be a form of potential extortion by this handyman. Plans change all the time. There is no law that says "you said you were going to use me, now use him or else".
"One should invest based on their need, ability and willingness to take risk - Larry Swedroe" Asking Portfolio Questions

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bottlecap
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by bottlecap » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:35 pm

See what the letter says. It could be a summons, depending on your jurisdiction.

I disagree that this sounds like a "two sides to every story" situation. This guy sounds like a weirdo. Up to and including the certified letter.

"Furious" is also a red flag. Someone who comes over to discuss a job or give a quote has no right to make you hire them. So if saying you were considering your options made the guy furious, I would say you have someone that is at the least unprofessional and at the worst possibly mentally unstable.

Good luck with this.

JT

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lthenderson
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by lthenderson » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:37 pm

Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:29 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:26 pm
Radjob4me wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:14 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:48 am
imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am
We have a lot of projects and indicated to him that we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow.

He texted me a couple of weeks ago to see whether there was any more work, and kept asking us whether the work was large enough ($2K-5K). I could not commit until I showed him the projects and got estimates. He came over looked at the list of projects and wanted to start the very next day demanding a deposit of $750 - to which we indicated not being sure whether we wanted to go forward with.
Having done this sort of work for others, I have a little different view. Granted I am only reading your side of the story but it appears to me as if you led him to believe there was a lot of work that you wanted HIM to do when you had the money. Then you showed him more projects and he gave you estimates before you pulled the rug out and said you didn't want to proceed at this time. So now he has spent time and effort meeting your demands and has nothing to show for it. He most likely is sending you a bill for that time. I doubt it is enforceable unless it was stated in advance that estimates would be billed to you but I can certainly understand why he might be a little upset with you, and perhaps more so now that you refused to accept the letter and he has to invest even more time (wrong or right) to get it to you.
I guess I look at it as the contractor/handyman kept asking for work, without being prompted, and the OP responded by saying "sure, come look at what we have for upcoming projects". I would agree that if the OP had initiated the contact, then yes, the handyman could be mad. But it sounds like the handyman was trying to drum up business and wanted to start in an unreasonably short amount of time...

I'd get the mail and see what it is. If it confirms your worst fear - some sort of lawsuit - then at least you know not to use him again.
I think the OP did invite him to ask from time to time if they were ready to proceed on another project when they told him "we'll enlist his services from time to time as we manage our personal cash flow." By asking him to come quote additional projects was further initiation.
I get estimates all the time for potential projects around the home, there is no initiation unless a written quote is provided and either earnest money in the form of a deposit has exchanged hands and/or a legal contract has been signed. How many times does the homeowner have to state we have a wish list of projects but no funds to start right now. Who is the handyman to a) demand a deposit when there is no agreement and b) to actually believe there is any initiation? No, this seems to be a form of potential extortion by this handyman. Plans change all the time. There is no law that says "you said you were going to use me, now use him or else".
You are totally misreading what I'm saying. A previous person said that the handyman kept asking for work without being prompted. I disagree with that because the OP said there would be more work for the handyman when they got the funds. I'm in agreement that this doesn't justify the handyman demanding a deposit if he indeed demanded it. I also agree that plans change all the time and the OP has no obligation to continue on with this handyman. But I can see how a handyman might have been led to believe that more work was coming his way and how he might be upset when after providing time and effort for a quote, he was denied.

Swarm Trap
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by Swarm Trap » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:50 pm

Is it possible that the certified mail is a written estimate for the projects that you showed him? As others have mentioned, I don't think that accepting certified mail changes/increases your liability. I would open it.

Please keep us posted.

scottgekko
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by scottgekko » Tue Jun 12, 2018 1:09 pm

The purpose of certified mail is to create a paper trail and that's it. You accept it, there is proof it was sent to you. You decline it, there is proof it was sent to you. Whether you refuse or accept has little bearing on the actual outcome of whatever the contents of the letter were. I'd be too curious to not accept it. There is no increased risk by reading your mail....

theplayer11
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by theplayer11 » Tue Jun 12, 2018 1:45 pm

guy sounds unstable, be careful

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oldcomputerguy
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by oldcomputerguy » Tue Jun 12, 2018 1:53 pm

Take it, open it, and read it. It's possible the handyman is suing you. If he is, and you ignore the suit, the court may enter default judgment against you.
It’s taken me a lot of years, but I’ve come around to this: If you’re dumb, surround yourself with smart people. And if you’re smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you.

tim1999
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by tim1999 » Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:10 pm

If he actually filed a suit against the OP, the paperwork on that would come from the court, not the handyman. I’d still accept and open the letter out of curiousity. In a prior job we sent certified letters to prove we attempted to communicate with a person, whether they accepted it or not from the USPS. Or when notice was required to be sent in that manner to the other party per terms of a formal agreement. But the OP doesn’t have that with the handyman.

Righty
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by Righty » Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:19 pm

Did he by chance get injured during any of his previous project work? During his last visit?

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cheese_breath
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by cheese_breath » Tue Jun 12, 2018 7:17 pm

tim1999 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 2:10 pm
If he actually filed a suit against the OP, the paperwork on that would come from the court, not the handyman...
The official paperwork. But if this guy's a loony as OP would have us believe who know what he might send?
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

mouses
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by mouses » Tue Jun 12, 2018 7:42 pm

He's a nut.

I would read the letter; if I drank, I would take a stiff drink first :-) But I would try to cut off all contact with him, other than maybe you need a lawyer depending on the contents of the letter.

In my town, you can get a no contact order just by asking the police for one, if it comes to that, at no cost. They go and talk to him to inform him of what he can't do.

Finridge
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by Finridge » Wed Jun 13, 2018 2:26 am

I would not sign for the certified letter. As someone noted, he's trying (for whatever reason) to create a paper trail. This is something he is doing to use against you. Why cooperate in this?

Also, I would cut off all contact.

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JoMoney
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by JoMoney » Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:26 am

My suspicion would be that they want the record to substantiate something as a legal record, likely for court.
I wouldn't have a good feeling about it, but I would accept it and open it, because it will need to be responded to. If he's trying to bill you, you will need to respond and refute the bill (and save your response for your own records). Ignoring these things doesn't make them go away, and it can potentially make you look culpable for whatever the other party is alleging.
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gd
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by gd » Wed Jun 13, 2018 5:50 am

imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:11 pm
I'm okay with going forward with smaller projects (<$200-300 worth)
This would be a really bad idea. The reason to take possession of the letter is to ensure you have no loose ends when ending your relationship. Either he's a manipulative kook or you've misunderstood the commitments implied in your discussions with him, or both, but either way it's water under the bridge.

I fall into this trap consistently. People often get into these handyman occupations because the entry is easy and they avoid the interpersonal and business skills needed for sustained professional relationships that they do not have. Unless they are a very known quantity, best deal with them defensively.

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bottlecap
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by bottlecap » Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:30 am

Two points to correct from previous posters:

Summons for lawsuits are typically issued by the court, but not necessarily served by a government official. And local rules vary, but his guy could send a copy of a summons issued by a court via certified mail and it might be considered "good" service under your jurisdiction's rules whether you agree to accept it or not.

Not accepting a certified letter does not magically make it go away. And if this guy was that focused on the money, the letter is either a bill or a lawsuit. I would want to know so I could react and, if he is building a paper trail, put an end to it.

JT

JoeRetire
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by JoeRetire » Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:51 am

imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am
Now he has sent us something in a certified mail, which we refused to accept. We really don't want to deal with him nor are there any outstanding bills that we owe to him. Should we accept the mail or not? Any thoughts? Thank you.
You are afraid to open your mail?

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JPH
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by JPH » Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:00 am

I would not pay a deposit to a contractor. I would pay when the work is done to my satisfaction.
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J295
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by J295 » Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:33 am

1. OP indicated in follow up he would accept the letter, which I think is good judgment.

2. We have worked with multiple subcontractors over the years, including a complete renovation of our most recent townhome with 18 subs. We won’t work with someone unless there is a high level of compatibility/mutual respect. If this subcontractor doesn’t fit that requirement, which he apparently does not, I would not work with him even on a modest project.

NotWhoYouThink
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:38 am

Now that you have started this you have to let us know what it says.

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David Jay
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by David Jay » Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:44 am

NotWhoYouThink wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:38 am
Now that you have started this you have to let us know what it says.
Inquiring minds...
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by michaeljc70 » Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:55 am

It is unlikely he would sue. A mechanic's lien against your home would be more likely. That is much cheaper/easier. As others said, I would just receive and read the letter. It could be a simple "I'm disappointed I spent the time and didn't get the work, don't call me again." kind of thing.

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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by BolderBoy » Wed Jun 13, 2018 8:18 am

imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:18 am

Now he has sent us something in a certified mail, which we refused to accept. We really don't want to deal with him nor are there any outstanding bills that we owe to him. Should we accept the mail or not? Any thoughts? Thank you.
Accept and open the letter. If there is anything even remotely threatening in the letter (let an objective person read it), then go to court and get a restraining order against him and have him served.

If he is a lunatic, be prepared to defend yourself.
"Never underestimate one's capacity to overestimate one's abilities" - The Dunning-Kruger Effect

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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by straws46 » Wed Jun 13, 2018 8:30 am

Before I accepted the letter I would check my name in your local court records to see if you have been sued in small claims court. Most states have online access to such records through casenet or some other official court website. Service by certified mail is common for small claims courts. He may be suing for the value of the time he spent on estimates. I would like to know beforehand.

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gasdoc
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by gasdoc » Wed Jun 13, 2018 10:00 am

Accept the certified letter and go from there. Signing for a letter only confirms that you received it.

gasdoc

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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by EyeYield » Wed Jun 13, 2018 11:41 am

“Anyways, as many other have indicated, will go forward and take possession of the letter. Thanks.

Yeti,”
I admit to being intrigued by this mystery. Would you be willing to share the outcome?
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by samsoes » Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:04 pm

If it were me,I wouldn't accept the letter.

What good news has ever come from an unexpected certified letter, except perhaps from the estate attorney of a rich relative?
"Happiness Is Not My Companion" - Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren. | (Avatar is the statue of Gen. Warren atop Little Round Top @ Gettysburg National Military Park.)

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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by Gort » Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:26 pm

I can't believe some people here would refuse to accept a certified letter. One of the reasons previously stated is that the sender is attempting to establish a paper trail. Does anyone here really believe that refusal would serve to disrupt the paper trail? Refusal would be a significant disadvantage should the situation escalate to legal actions as it would show the receiver to be uncooperative in attempts to resolve the problem.
Last edited by Gort on Wed Jun 13, 2018 1:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by samsoes » Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:53 pm

Gort wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:26 pm
I can't believe some people here would refuse to accept a certified letter. One of the ressons previously stated is that the sender is attempting to establish a paper trail. Does anyone here really believe that refusal would serve to disrupt the paper trail? Refusal would be a significant disadvantage should the situation escalate to legal actions as it would show the receiver to be uncooperative in attempts to resolve the problem.
"Uncooperative? Huh? What letter? I never received any letter or notification..."

The key is to have the letter returned "unclaimed" rather than "refused." Just ignore those little slips the postal carrier leaves.
I believe they try 3x.
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by SrGrumpy » Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:59 pm

EyeYield wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 11:41 am
“Anyways, as many other have indicated, will go forward and take possession of the letter. Thanks.

Yeti,”
I admit to being intrigued by this mystery. Would you be willing to share the outcome?
I was intrigued. Now I've lost interest.

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Gort
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by Gort » Wed Jun 13, 2018 1:37 pm

samsoes wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:53 pm
Gort wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:26 pm
I can't believe some people here would refuse to accept a certified letter. One of the ressons previously stated is that the sender is attempting to establish a paper trail. Does anyone here really believe that refusal would serve to disrupt the paper trail? Refusal would be a significant disadvantage should the situation escalate to legal actions as it would show the receiver to be uncooperative in attempts to resolve the problem.
"Uncooperative? Huh? What letter? I never received any letter or notification..."

The key is to have the letter returned "unclaimed" rather than "refused." Just ignore those little slips the postal carrier leaves.
I believe they try 3x.
Good luck with that! I would hate to explain that to a judge.

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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by JoeRetire » Wed Jun 13, 2018 1:39 pm

samsoes wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:53 pm
Gort wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:26 pm
I can't believe some people here would refuse to accept a certified letter. One of the ressons previously stated is that the sender is attempting to establish a paper trail. Does anyone here really believe that refusal would serve to disrupt the paper trail? Refusal would be a significant disadvantage should the situation escalate to legal actions as it would show the receiver to be uncooperative in attempts to resolve the problem.
"Uncooperative? Huh? What letter? I never received any letter or notification..."

The key is to have the letter returned "unclaimed" rather than "refused." Just ignore those little slips the postal carrier leaves.
I believe they try 3x.
That isn't going to make a lawsuit go away...

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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by samsoes » Wed Jun 13, 2018 2:12 pm

Gort wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 1:37 pm
samsoes wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:53 pm
Gort wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:26 pm
I can't believe some people here would refuse to accept a certified letter. One of the ressons previously stated is that the sender is attempting to establish a paper trail. Does anyone here really believe that refusal would serve to disrupt the paper trail? Refusal would be a significant disadvantage should the situation escalate to legal actions as it would show the receiver to be uncooperative in attempts to resolve the problem.
"Uncooperative? Huh? What letter? I never received any letter or notification..."

The key is to have the letter returned "unclaimed" rather than "refused." Just ignore those little slips the postal carrier leaves.
I believe they try 3x.
Good luck with that! I would hate to explain that to a judge.
 "What letter? I never received any letter or notification..."

Like I said, unless it's a letter from rich Uncle Elmer's estate attorney, an unexpected certified letter is rarely something good.
"Happiness Is Not My Companion" - Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren. | (Avatar is the statue of Gen. Warren atop Little Round Top @ Gettysburg National Military Park.)

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JoMoney
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by JoMoney » Wed Jun 13, 2018 2:26 pm

samsoes wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 2:12 pm
...unless it's a letter from rich Uncle Elmer's estate attorney, an unexpected certified letter is rarely something good.
I agree with that, but I think ignoring the letter is more likely to hurt in the long term. Whatever it is, will eventually come back around. Better to start documenting your own case early, then trying to explain to a judge that "yes, that is your address... but somehow the post office messed up delivery multiple times"
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by CaliJim » Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:15 pm

Sound to me like he owes somebody some money in a bad way. Possibly has a drug problem (accounting for his emotional volatility)? Anyhow, a guy like this is nothing but trouble.

What would you spend to consult with a lawyer for an hour in your area?

Give him this amount in exchange for him signing a note, in front of a witness, that he has been paid in full for all prior work, all formal and implied contracts between the two of you have been fulfilled, and he will cease and desist all further contact with you.
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by denovo » Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:35 pm

imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:11 pm


Anyways, as many other have indicated, will go forward and take possession of the letter. Thanks.

Yeti,
So what was in the letter??
"Don't trust everything you read on the Internet"- Abraham Lincoln

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gasdoc
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Re: Should I take possession of a certified mail?

Post by gasdoc » Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:20 pm

denovo wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:35 pm
imyeti2 wrote:
Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:11 pm


Anyways, as many other have indicated, will go forward and take possession of the letter. Thanks.

Yeti,
So what was in the letter??
+1

gas doc

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