Rowing machine motivation

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eagleeyes
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Rowing machine motivation

Post by eagleeyes » Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:25 pm

So I bought a concept 2 rowing machine. It’s awesome. But I can’t seem to last longer than 5 minutes on it. I have to struggle to get to a 1000 meters in 5 minutes...

Anybody have some tips? Pretty sure my technique is decent. Watched a bunch of YouTube vids. Or maybe it’s my conditioning.

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Alexa9
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Alexa9 » Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:48 pm

1. Workout several times a day
2. Put some fast tempo exercise music on
3. Reward yourself for working out hard (ice cream, etc.)
4. Punish yourself for not working out (salad for dinner, etc.)

mega317
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by mega317 » Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:51 pm

Alexa9 wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:48 pm
2. Put some exercise music on
This is common and good advice. But I prefer audiobooks. I feel they take more attention and so distract me from the fire in my lungs and muscles.

KT785
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by KT785 » Fri Jun 08, 2018 11:02 pm

mega317 wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:51 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:48 pm
2. Put some exercise music on
This is common and good advice. But I prefer audiobooks. I feel they take more attention and so distract me from the fire in my lungs and muscles.
Podcasts are my preferred audio accompaniment; I'm a long-distance runner and really look forward to my longer runs (2+ hours) because I can catch up with my subscriptions.

JoinToday
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by JoinToday » Fri Jun 08, 2018 11:31 pm

I have a treadmill, and find the mental aspect of using it really difficult. I use podcasts, but it is mentally challenging to stay on it for half an hour.

But I treat it like brushing my teeth. It doesn't matter if I enjoy it, it is just something I need to do for health reasons. Just getting started is the hardest part, enough for me to make it through the half hour.
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black jack
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by black jack » Sat Jun 09, 2018 12:13 am

Congratulations on the new exercise machine!

I like podcasts or audiobooks for my long runs too.

But first things first: is this your first experience with a rowing machine? If you can't last more than 5 minutes, you're going too hard, and are likely to burn yourself out and stop using the rower.

You could either do high intensity interval workouts, or scale back and go at a pace that you can keep up for more than 5 minutes (aim for 15 or more) and enjoy while you're doing it.

You may not be a beginner at this, but if you are: the #1 mistake of a novice exerciser is going too hard too soon--which is why so many people give up on exercise. Hopefully this will become a part of your life for many years to come; take it easy, and keep going.
We cannot absolutely prove [that they are wrong who say] that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason. | -T. B. Macaulay (1800-1859)

KT785
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by KT785 » Sat Jun 09, 2018 12:39 am

JoinToday wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 11:31 pm
I have a treadmill, and find the mental aspect of using it really difficult. I use podcasts, but it is mentally challenging to stay on it for half an hour.

But I treat it like brushing my teeth. It doesn't matter if I enjoy it, it is just something I need to do for health reasons. Just getting started is the hardest part, enough for me to make it through the half hour.
I run 40-50+ miles a week depending on the season and if I’m training for a marathon and similarly dread when I have to use my treadmill. We have a great paved trail system in my town and when I visit my parents, I take advantage of their extensive converted rail trails. Outdoor running makes long distances something to strive for and enjoy.

A treadmill (or indoor bike, rowing machine, etc.) is great backup when weather or time impede outdoor activity but it becomes repetitive and a chore if done exclusively. I also find I’m more prone to injury on the treadmill.

In other words, get outside if you can . . . it’s a wholly different experience.

JoinToday
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by JoinToday » Sat Jun 09, 2018 12:53 am

KT785 wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 12:39 am
JoinToday wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 11:31 pm
I have a treadmill, and find the mental aspect of using it really difficult. I use podcasts, but it is mentally challenging to stay on it for half an hour.

But I treat it like brushing my teeth. It doesn't matter if I enjoy it, it is just something I need to do for health reasons. Just getting started is the hardest part, enough for me to make it through the half hour.
I run 40-50+ miles a week depending on the season and if I’m training for a marathon and similarly dread when I have to use my treadmill. We have a great paved trail system in my town and when I visit my parents, I take advantage of their extensive converted rail trails. Outdoor running makes long distances something to strive for and enjoy.

A treadmill (or indoor bike, rowing machine, etc.) is great backup when weather or time impede outdoor activity but it becomes repetitive and a chore if done exclusively. I also find I’m more prone to injury on the treadmill.

In other words, get outside if you can . . . it’s a wholly different experience.
One thing I like about the treadmill is the ease with which the effort (speed + elevation) can be adjusted to get a reasonable workout.

I will give outdoor running another try. The treadmill seems to be easier on my body -- probably due to less pounding. I can increase the elevation, slow down the pace, and achieve an elevated heart rate. I am in my early 60's, and I don't seem to have the fluid running technique that I used to have as a young lad. And I am so slow now. It is a little disheartening.
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JRod_Lando
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by JRod_Lando » Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:36 am

I find it hard to sit on there for 20+ minutes or any significant time. What I have found that works for me, I do interval rowing. My go-to workout right now is one minute max effort, one minute rest for 20 minutes. Gets the heart rate going pretty well.
JRod

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Blues
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Blues » Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:40 am

Mix up your routines. Do shorter (but intense) interval workouts as well as longer steady state rows.

Also, during your steady state, mix in some Power 10's and then go back to a more relaxed pace.

If you're not already doing so, install the ErgData app on your phone or tablet and use it to log and track your workouts on the C2 site. You may find monitoring your progress motivating.

I don't use my Concept2 rower for fun. It's hard work each and every time I'm on it...but I use it to supplement my weight training workouts which provide limited (but some) cardio/conditioning benefits.

(I don't listen to music, podcasts or watch movies when I train. I'm focused on the task at hand, heart rate, breathing and just try to get into a zone.)
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stoptothink
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by stoptothink » Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:44 am

Alexa9 wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:48 pm
3. Reward yourself for working out hard (ice cream, etc.)
4. Punish yourself for not working out (salad for dinner, etc.)
Ummm, no.

As an exercise physiologist and obesity researcher, this very common viewpoint drives me mad. If your goal is to get in better condition or lose weight (frankly, this is the goal of most people), this is just about the worst thing you can do.

lightheir
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by lightheir » Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:58 am

KT785 wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 12:39 am
JoinToday wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 11:31 pm
I have a treadmill, and find the mental aspect of using it really difficult. I use podcasts, but it is mentally challenging to stay on it for half an hour.

But I treat it like brushing my teeth. It doesn't matter if I enjoy it, it is just something I need to do for health reasons. Just getting started is the hardest part, enough for me to make it through the half hour.
I run 40-50+ miles a week depending on the season and if I’m training for a marathon and similarly dread when I have to use my treadmill. We have a great paved trail system in my town and when I visit my parents, I take advantage of their extensive converted rail trails. Outdoor running makes long distances something to strive for and enjoy.

A treadmill (or indoor bike, rowing machine, etc.) is great backup when weather or time impede outdoor activity but it becomes repetitive and a chore if done exclusively. I also find I’m more prone to injury on the treadmill.

In other words, get outside if you can . . . it’s a wholly different experience.
I actually disagree with this tm critiqur.

Tms are awesome tools and with the right setup you can run on them day in day out without soul sucking mental fatigue.

I use a combo of podcasts, music's, 32 inch TV, workout videos, and yes, half my runs are with no added av. I typically finish in top 5-10 percent of large run events and win my AG not infrequently in local events.

I used to wonder if tms were legit but more and more pro triathletes and runners lean heavily on them. One of the best triathletes in the world now Lionel Sanders runs nearly exclusively indoors on his treadmill and bikes indoors as well and had done so for years. He was world champion at half ironman distance and runner up at world ironman distance.

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legio XX
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by legio XX » Sat Jun 09, 2018 8:25 am

+1 on what black jack said.
It all depends on what you are trying to do and where you are starting from. I was advised to try a rower because I can't run - knees won't take it - and quick-walking on the treadmill with the elevation ramped up was booooring. And I just didn't feel worked out even though the readout said I was "in the zone." My young PT guy suggested rowing intervals and this plus a treadmill warmup walk does it. And the wait time for the rowers is nothing compared to the treadmills . . .

Simple routine - 20 second sprint and 10 second recovery, repeat. Started with a measly three sets and now doing five. Note I'm not mentioning the tension, but just enough to get really breathing and sweating.
So, use the training zone heart rate for your age, set the tension to what will have you glad the three intervals are over and work from there. If it's easy, add intervals or add tension or a mix until you get a good workout. If you want to build aerobic endurance or just don't like intervals, you still can determine your training heart rate and set the tension for what will keep you at that rate. I like to check my recovery, i.e., how long it takes to get back down to 90-something. There's no readout on the rower so still using the old fingers to wrist or neck method.

Figure on spending some time to self-calibrate and it's probably better to start low and work up rather than start really sore or injured and work back down. Should be fine.
Last edited by legio XX on Sat Jun 09, 2018 8:27 am, edited 2 times in total.

pilotpaul
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by pilotpaul » Sat Jun 09, 2018 8:26 am

Visit the Concept 2 forums. Many folks in your similar situation will share advice on how they train. Focus on a slower stroke rate and stronger stroke. Keep your rate below 22 strokes/min and work on a long strong strokes that begins with the legs. Definitely download ERGDATA and sync the results with the free Concept2 log. Set easily attainable goals and keep improving. I think it's an awesome piece of equipment. Get a heartrate chest strap and wirelessly connect to the PM5. Good luck.

user5027
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by user5027 » Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:44 am

I always thought watching a video while rowing would motivate me. Try a large wide screen TV or a projector and big screen with the video of a river approaching a waterfall with a huge drop, filmed from the point of view of a small kayak or canoe. The audio should be the loud sound of the water cascading below. Think Niagara Falls. :idea:

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Alexa9
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Alexa9 » Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:46 am

stoptothink wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:44 am
Ummm, no.

As an exercise physiologist and obesity researcher, this very common viewpoint drives me mad. If your goal is to get in better condition or lose weight (frankly, this is the goal of most people), this is just about the worst thing you can do.
A lot of nutrition and exercise research has been proven wrong so enlighten us why it's the worst thing you can do with your physiology degree.

chevca
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by chevca » Sat Jun 09, 2018 11:34 am

eagleeyes wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:25 pm
So I bought a concept 2 rowing machine. It’s awesome. But I can’t seem to last longer than 5 minutes on it. I have to struggle to get to a 1000 meters in 5 minutes...

Anybody have some tips? Pretty sure my technique is decent. Watched a bunch of YouTube vids. Or maybe it’s my conditioning.
First things first, what do you have the tension set at? If you have it at 10, that's what's killing you. I'd have to go look it up again, but there's a way to find your proper setting through the menu on the machine. It will probably tell you to set it around 4 or 5.

I work with a couple of big time rower folks... national coach and former NCAA champ type folks. They said for machine training they always set it around 5 as well. That's most like rowing on the actual water they say, and setting it at 10 is just a good way to blow out your back. I tend to believe them based on their backgrounds.

As mentioned above, interval training is my favorite. I like one minute in the 20-25 strokes per minute range, one minute in the 30-35 strokes per minute, and to that for a set time or distance. Or, I'll pick 2000 meters and go 250 meters easy, 250 meters hard, and back and forth til done.

eagleeyes
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by eagleeyes » Sat Jun 09, 2018 2:57 pm

Alexa9 wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:48 pm
1. Workout several times a day
2. Put some fast tempo exercise music on
3. Reward yourself for working out hard (ice cream, etc.)
4. Punish yourself for not working out (salad for dinner, etc.)

I like the idea of a workout in the am and pm.

Unfortunately, I have to listen to a lot kids nursery tunes when I run, because I am usually watching my daughter as I work out.

eagleeyes
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by eagleeyes » Sat Jun 09, 2018 3:00 pm

black jack wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 12:13 am
Congratulations on the new exercise machine!

I like podcasts or audiobooks for my long runs too.

But first things first: is this your first experience with a rowing machine? If you can't last more than 5 minutes, you're going too hard, and are likely to burn yourself out and stop using the rower.

You could either do high intensity interval workouts, or scale back and go at a pace that you can keep up for more than 5 minutes (aim for 15 or more) and enjoy while you're doing it.

You may not be a beginner at this, but if you are: the #1 mistake of a novice exerciser is going too hard too soon--which is why so many people give up on exercise. Hopefully this will become a part of your life for many years to come; take it easy, and keep going.
I don’t have a good feel for if I am going too hard. I think I am doing 25-30 meters/sec? Hmmm that doesn’t sound right. Regardless doing about a 1000 meters in 5 minutes or so...is that too fast? Seems slow to me...

Indeed it’s my first foray into rowing. I didn’t row in school or anything. Just something I remember liking it when I was at the gym in my younger days

eagleeyes
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by eagleeyes » Sat Jun 09, 2018 3:02 pm

Blues wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:40 am
Mix up your routines. Do shorter (but intense) interval workouts as well as longer steady state rows.

Also, during your steady state, mix in some Power 10's and then go back to a more relaxed pace.

If you're not already doing so, install the ErgData app on your phone or tablet and use it to log and track your workouts on the C2 site. You may find monitoring your progress motivating.

I don't use my Concept2 rower for fun. It's hard work each and every time I'm on it...but I use it to supplement my weight training workouts which provide limited (but some) cardio/conditioning benefits.

(I don't listen to music, podcasts or watch movies when I train. I'm focused on the task at hand, heart rate, breathing and just try to get into a zone.)
That is hardcore! No music??

I’ll look in to the Erg thing

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jabberwockOG
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by jabberwockOG » Sat Jun 09, 2018 3:10 pm

Music is absolutely required for my non racquet sport workouts, mostly a rotating combo of weights, circuit training, elliptical, stationary recumbent bike, and some heavy bag work. I currently do five to six 50 minute sessions of this per week currently with no issues in terms of motivation. I specifically use up tempo dance music of all kinds from 60s R&B, 70's disco, to latest Rave/electronic music - whatever works to get you going. Use high quality ear pods and stream from itunes, amazon prime, pandora, etc. I'm in my early 60's and my goal is to get my heart rate up for 30-40 minutes to the typical target zone (you can read about in various sources) that is great for aerobic conditioning, with a couple of 5 minute bursts to near max heart rate for some regular anaerobic conditioning as well.
Last edited by jabberwockOG on Sat Jun 09, 2018 3:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

4nwestsaylng
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by 4nwestsaylng » Sat Jun 09, 2018 3:18 pm

eagleeyes wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 3:00 pm
black jack wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 12:13 am
Congratulations on the new exercise machine!

I like podcasts or audiobooks for my long runs too.

But first things first: is this your first experience with a rowing machine? If you can't last more than 5 minutes, you're going too hard, and are likely to burn yourself out and stop using the rower.

You could either do high intensity interval workouts, or scale back and go at a pace that you can keep up for more than 5 minutes (aim for 15 or more) and enjoy while you're doing it.

You may not be a beginner at this, but if you are: the #1 mistake of a novice exerciser is going too hard too soon--which is why so many people give up on exercise. Hopefully this will become a part of your life for many years to come; take it easy, and keep going.
I don’t have a good feel for if I am going too hard. I think I am doing 25-30 meters/sec? Hmmm that doesn’t sound right. Regardless doing about a 1000 meters in 5 minutes or so...is that too fast? Seems slow to me...

Indeed it’s my first foray into rowing. I didn’t row in school or anything. Just something I remember liking it when I was at the gym in my younger days
I have done water rowing in an "8' shell but more recently use the Concept 2 at home, since that is what we used as the "erg" in the shell house.
The teams training there always keep the tension at about 5. I am 69 years of age, also run a mile a day. Many rowers are hard core, I am not.
At home, the only way I get through the monotony of rowing is to go to Pandora on my iPhone, run it through an inexpensive two speaker radio, and play a favorite playlist. Five songs usually take about twenty minutes.

I set the Concept PS 5 computer to "just row", there are other settings of course. I started with 15 minutes at a rate of about 27 strokes per minute, and I deliberately avoid looking at the screen. I go by the number of songs. When I get to the fourth or fifth song I look at the screen to see how long is left, and I pick up the pace the last few minutes. As you know, the rowing should be about 80% legs, the arms should be straight until the legs are almost fully extended, a common mistake is to do a lot of pulling with the arms.

Again, a great favorite song list is the only way for me. I can't listen to an audio book or podcast, I need great music. The idea of going online with the Concept web site is interesting, I have read about it, but I am still using "just row". I combine with a daily jog.

If you have read "The Boys in the Boat" you will appreciate that out on the water, you really don't look at the scenery, you have to look at the back of the person in front of you; if you look around it throws your stroke off, so being in an "8" shell with fanatics can be brutal. With your home machine you can pace yourself!! :happy

squirm
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by squirm » Sat Jun 09, 2018 3:51 pm

start rowing at a gym, much more motivating watching others on similar machines. Once you get good at it and conditioned, then try at home.

ThriftyPhD
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by ThriftyPhD » Sat Jun 09, 2018 4:15 pm

eagleeyes wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:25 pm
So I bought a concept 2 rowing machine. It’s awesome. But I can’t seem to last longer than 5 minutes on it. I have to struggle to get to a 1000 meters in 5 minutes...

Anybody have some tips? Pretty sure my technique is decent. Watched a bunch of YouTube vids. Or maybe it’s my conditioning.
First five minutes should be a gentle warmup. If you're struggling to last 5 minutes, you're going way too hard.

It's a common problem; people often start out way too hard and then get discouraged, regardless of exercise. Even if you're in good shape (say a runner or swimmer), a rower is a completely new exercise and you'll need to gradually adapt.

First 5 minutes, I would focus only on technique. Go very slow, barely elevated HR/breathing.

First few weeks, the whole workout I would focus only on technique. You're not going to be able to just jump in and set rowing records. If you compare your times or distances to people who have been rowing professionally for years, you're going to be disappointed.

If a couch potato starts running and tries to run 15 miles at a 4 minute pace, they're not going to make it very far.

Myopic squirrel
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Myopic squirrel » Sat Jun 09, 2018 4:46 pm

eagleeyes,

Congratulations on a excellent fitness device. Don't let it become a clothing depot, as what happened to so many Nordic Tracks *G*. What you're doing now is similar to someone who, beginning to run, is sprinting. You want to first build up an aerobic base, and I question if intervals are the most effective starting out. A slow stroke rate - 20 - and a low flywheel pressure - 3 - will enable you to build that base. Especially early on, don't worry about meters & instead concentrate on duration, extending your time on the seat. As you build that base you'll discover your duration will increase. After a couple of weeks you can try the intervals, which are more anaerobic, but without that aerobic base you'll really burn out. There are some excellent rowing forums, and if you really enjoy it you may be interested in seeing how your heart recovery times improve. Who knows - your next post might be about your participation in the Crash-B Sprints. I'm presently off my C2 ("the truth machine") because of an unrelated injury, but when healed it's back to pulling the chain. Have fun with it! FWIW I'm 73, and as long as these ole bones can handle it, the C2 will continue as an important part of my exercise.

chevca
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by chevca » Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:32 pm

eagleeyes wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 3:00 pm
I don’t have a good feel for if I am going too hard. I think I am doing 25-30 meters/sec? Hmmm that doesn’t sound right. Regardless doing about a 1000 meters in 5 minutes or so...is that too fast? Seems slow to me...
Well, 25 or 30 meters/sec would put you at 1500 meters or more in a minute by my math. So, either you're the best rower ever, or, no, that's not right. :happy That 25-30 you're looking at is strokes per minute, and that's a good range.

Again, what tension setting are you using 1 through 10? That dial on the side of the wheel part.

1000 meters in 5 minutes is pretty reasonable, IMO... maybe even a slower pace. It shouldn't leave you done and out of the race though. Depending on fitness level, of course, but you should be able to keep up a 1000 meters in 5 minute pace for a good while.

goblue100
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by goblue100 » Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:34 pm

http://www.rowingrelated.com/2012/02/ho ... art-2.html
Ultimately, the best way to get faster is to have 2-3 really high quality, high intensity speed or lactate threshold sessions a week, with everything else being about managing your aerobic development while letting your body recover on the easy days. It is much better to really bring it for those 2-3 sessions a week in which the intensity is through the roof, and go slightly easier on the easy days to allow yourself to do that, than it is to have 'mediocre' intensity everyday. Long aerobic training sessions definitely have their place when there is not time to train twice a day or in certain times of the year in one's training cycle (the further from the peak one is the more the long sessions can have their place), but mileage should still be carefully controlled and technique always monitored.
Can't take it with you when you're gone | But I want enough to get there on - Rollin with the flow - Jerry Hayes

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oldcomputerguy
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by oldcomputerguy » Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:40 pm

My exercise regimen at present consists of walking two miles a day on the walking track near my home. I must be doing something right; since I started this (and since I cut out sugar, chips, and alcohol) I've lost 23 pounds. To distract myself, I have ripped the audio from all the episodes of "The West Wing" onto my phone, and I listen to an episode while I'm on the track. It takes me only slightly longer than an entire episode to make two miles on the track.

By the way, unless you're going for extreme strength training, I'd suggest that doing the rowing machine until you have "fire in your lungs and muscles" is way overdoing it. Back off until you've built up some endurance.
It’s taken me a lot of years, but I’ve come around to this: If you’re dumb, surround yourself with smart people. And if you’re smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you.

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Tamarind
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Tamarind » Sat Jun 09, 2018 6:12 pm

Two suggestions, either of which might help:

1) Focus on HIIT as you're developing the habit. This doesn't require you to spend a lot of time on the machine but it will still help you get better.

2) Consider a story-driven podcast or app designed for running. Personally I like Zombies, Run!, which is short form British radio drama designed to be played over the duration of a workout, with pauses and, optionally, cues to push harder (the sound of zombies right behind you). But there are other apps for different themes if fight or flight is not your thing. The idea is to listen to something that you can't just tune out, but that captures your attention.

Hockey10
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Hockey10 » Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:00 pm

Read the local obituaries each day and look for people who are near your age. That should motivate you. :twisted:

HIinvestor
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by HIinvestor » Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:01 pm

We got a water rower from waterrower.com for Christmas. I have gradually built up from 5 minutes until I’m now at just over 30 minutes per rowing session. When I can, I try to do a second rowing session. The rower lives next to my computer and my H and I each try to have one or two sessions on it daily.

D recommended it because her rheumatologist recommended it as a gentler form of exercise than running where joints are jarred. It’s also nice to be seated but still be working 85% of your muscles. We have been using it pretty regularly since we got it.

It’s different from your rower because it actually has a paddle wheel and you are rowing with water against it, as if you were in a boat but never get wet. I like rowing in silence. Maybe at some point I will try something like music or a podcast but so far, silence and letting my mind calm seems good.

I have not yet tried any of the programs that are on the console, but perhaps some day as well. I aim for about 20 strokes/minute or so.

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Alexa9
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Alexa9 » Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:07 pm

Hockey10 wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:00 pm
Read the local obituaries each day and look for people who are near your age. That should motivate you. :twisted:
Recent study on Google News said drinking a couple glasses of wine daily is better for longevity than exercise! :oops:
Selling all my home gym equipment and building a wine cellar :mrgreen:

leehamster
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by leehamster » Sat Jun 09, 2018 8:18 pm

Give yourself some slack about the difficulty - an erg is designed to let your push yourself infinitely hard. So you started too hard for your current conditioning and technique.

I'd start with the Concept2 recommended workouts: http://www.concept2.com/indoor-rowers/t ... t-workouts

Then advance to harder workouts on Concept2's website: http://www.concept2.com/indoor-rowers/training/wod

There are some books with workouts. I have this one, and it's pretty good, with workouts at beginner, intermediate and advanced levels. It's out of print but you can still find copies. https://www.amazon.com/ERG-workouts-ath ... 984330305/

Intelligently designed workouts matched to your current fitness help most with motivation. After that, I like entertainment, as suggested by others:
podcasts, Netflix, TV.

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Meaty
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Location: Texas

Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Meaty » Sat Jun 09, 2018 8:23 pm

eagleeyes wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:25 pm
So I bought a concept 2 rowing machine. It’s awesome. But I can’t seem to last longer than 5 minutes on it. I have to struggle to get to a 1000 meters in 5 minutes...

Anybody have some tips? Pretty sure my technique is decent. Watched a bunch of YouTube vids. Or maybe it’s my conditioning.
Motivation is fickle. Even something like being a little hungry can kill motivation.

Rely on discipline instead. Discipline won’t allow you to give out, give in, or give up. Embrace its cold and relentless power and it’ll take care of you like nothing else can
"Discipline equals Freedom" - Jocko Willink

TallBoy29er
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by TallBoy29er » Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:19 pm

I get it. I really do. As a rower, I have spent more hours than you would want to think about on Concept 2's. Have you tried the countdown method? Meaning, you can set your workout for a certain number of meters (eg 2000 - a typical sprint race), and then row until you've complete that workout, all the while watching the number of meters left to row declining based on your effort. If a bigger number is a kick in the head, then do multiple workouts of smaller numbers. For instance, maybe your workout for the day is: 1000 meter warm up, going slow, breathing fully, enjoying life. Then 4 x 500 meter pieces going hard (a 500 meter piece may take you 2 or 3 minutes if you are not used to this, so 4 of them would be 8 to 12 minutes), with some rest between sets. Then close with a 1000 meter piece at a low and slow pace to cool down. Feel free to PM for other workout thoughts. Point is, don't just jump on the erg (it is an ergometer, rowers call it an erg), and hope to go for a while for a workout. that is boring, and you'll lose every time.

peace out

TallBoy29er
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by TallBoy29er » Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:34 pm

One other thing about technique. Think of your stroke in three pieces. First push with the legs. Then lever with the lower back. Then pull in the arms. The arms need to be quick!!!! your arms should stay relatively straight the whole time, and should not ever have to rise or dip over the knees. Quick arms are essential on the pull of the stroke (at the last part). On what is called the recovery (where you are done with your stroke and are going back up the slide to start your next stroke), do the exact opposite. First, quick arms away. Get those arms straight before moving your lower back or legs. Then, your lower back. Then your legs. Your recovery, initially, should be slow. If you are rowing at 18 +/- strokes per minute, that is just fine. your power is when you are pulling, do not try to get more speed by rushing up the slide on the recovery.

dn123
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by dn123 » Sun Jun 10, 2018 3:01 pm

I had over 7 million meters on my C2 before I sold it. I don't see anyone mentioning it so far, but you need to look at the time over which you pull vs the time you return. If you have equal (fast) time on both phases, you will tire yourself out too quickly. You should pull fast, and return slowly, maybe like a 1 to 2 to 1 to 3 ratio. This by far is what I see people doing wrong when I watch people try a C2 at the gym, and invariably they last <5 minutes and move on. Watch some youtube of people rowing and you will see what I mean.

kaesler
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by kaesler » Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:24 pm

(FWIW) My normal C2 workout start with 5 minutes of warmup in 4 x 75 second phases: (1) arms only, (2) arms and back, (3) half bending the knees, (4) full knee bends.

So you end up doing the full stroke. Then I stop and let my heat rate recover to about 90.

Then I do 5000m with resistance at about 130 (like real water rowing they say. On my machine this has the dial set at about 5.5.) I row at about 20 strokes per minute. The 5000m takes me between 24 and 25 minutes.

I often watch videos while doing it.

I measure heart rate throughout and it seems to rise monotonically over the 25 minutes, starting at about 90 and finishing at about 115-120.

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Blues
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Blues » Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:42 pm

kaesler wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 9:24 pm
(FWIW) My normal C2 workout start with 5 minutes of warmup...

...Then I do 5000m with resistance at about 130 (like real water rowing they say. On my machine this has the dial set at about 5.5.) I row at about 20 strokes per minute. The 5000m takes me between 24 and 25 minutes.
I start off with five minutes of warm-up as well, regardless of whether I'm doing intervals or steady state.

Like you I have my erg set at 5 1/2...but mine reads out at about 120 to 123 at that damper setting. Thankfully, ErgData makes it easy to monitor and make adjustments.

Love the erg.
“Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.” - Sun Tzu | "Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth." - Mike Tyson

barnaclebob
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by barnaclebob » Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:09 am

Alexa9 wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:46 am
stoptothink wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:44 am
Ummm, no.

As an exercise physiologist and obesity researcher, this very common viewpoint drives me mad. If your goal is to get in better condition or lose weight (frankly, this is the goal of most people), this is just about the worst thing you can do.
A lot of nutrition and exercise research has been proven wrong so enlighten us why it's the worst thing you can do with your physiology degree.
Well for one eating ice cream will cancel out that rowing workout, don't need a degree to figure that out.

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Higman
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Higman » Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:23 am

Start out with Concept2's First Workouts recommendations:
https://www.concept2.com/indoor-rowers/ ... t-workouts

Glockenspiel
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Glockenspiel » Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:33 am

Alexa9 wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:46 am
stoptothink wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:44 am
Ummm, no.

As an exercise physiologist and obesity researcher, this very common viewpoint drives me mad. If your goal is to get in better condition or lose weight (frankly, this is the goal of most people), this is just about the worst thing you can do.
A lot of nutrition and exercise research has been proven wrong so enlighten us why it's the worst thing you can do with your physiology degree.
For weight loss, eating drives 80% of the results and exercise drives only 20% of the results. So eating more poorly while also exercising is a worse alternative than eating healthily and not exercising at all.

stoptothink
Posts: 4397
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by stoptothink » Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:40 am

Alexa9 wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:46 am
stoptothink wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:44 am
Ummm, no.

As an exercise physiologist and obesity researcher, this very common viewpoint drives me mad. If your goal is to get in better condition or lose weight (frankly, this is the goal of most people), this is just about the worst thing you can do.
A lot of nutrition and exercise research has been proven wrong so enlighten us why it's the worst thing you can do with your physiology degree.
How long would you have to row to simply counteract the negative effects of treating yourself with ice cream because you exercised? And should we go into how this promotes negative outcomes from a behavioral psychology standpoint? I'm not trying appeal to authority, really, but to condescendingly state "with my physiology degree" is quite disingenuous; yes, I have a masters degree in exercise physiology (along with undergrad degrees in kinesiology and nutritional science), along with a PhD in obesity studies, and am the chief exercise scientist for a health megacorp with one of my job responsibilities conducting primary research on topics such as these - this is what I do.

The reality is that most people exercise today in effort to improve body composition. If that is the OPs reason for wanting to increase motivation to row (I'm not going to assume, I am asking the OP), then your advice was in fact counterproductive. It is true that some people exercise, a lot, so that they can enjoy eating treats without as much negative repercussions, but considering OP is asking how to improve exercise motivation, doesn't sound like that is the case here.

stoptothink
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by stoptothink » Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:43 am

Glockenspiel wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:33 am
Alexa9 wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:46 am
stoptothink wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:44 am
Ummm, no.

As an exercise physiologist and obesity researcher, this very common viewpoint drives me mad. If your goal is to get in better condition or lose weight (frankly, this is the goal of most people), this is just about the worst thing you can do.
A lot of nutrition and exercise research has been proven wrong so enlighten us why it's the worst thing you can do with your physiology degree.
For weight loss, eating drives 80% of the results and exercise drives only 20% of the results. So eating more poorly while also exercising is a worse alternative than eating healthily and not exercising at all.
And this. I'm trying not to be too rude, but Alexa9's advice is one of the worst things you can tell someone if they are trying to improve body composition. If the OP is simply looking to improve rowing performance, that changes everything.

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DWesterb2iz2
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by DWesterb2iz2 » Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:57 am

A trainer once told me: “The difference between a dream and a goal is that a goal has a date.”

Make a goal, use metrics (distance, time, etc) and give yourself a reasonable date to reach it. Then make another goal.

wolf359
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by wolf359 » Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:18 pm

There are multiple tools that I use to get motivation to use my Concept2.

1) An accountability partner.
2) Competition (both with myself and others).
3) Better graphics and feel of rowing.
4) Introduction of heartrate monitor data.

I achieved this by using rowing software. I plugged an old Windows PC into my Concept2, and use Digital Rowing software. This let me hook it up to my WiFi network and compete against other rowers (random strangers) in realtime. I can also compete against a friend. By recording each session, I can even plug in an old row as my pacing partner, and race against myself.

When even those variants started getting old, I introduced new variables. The laptop actually provides graphics so that it feels more like you're on the water (and I projected that onto a big screen TV.) I added a fan to the room to improve the physical feel of being on the water. I added a heartrate monitor to add new data and improve my rowing efficiency.

The ability to race against myself was the biggest motivation. I can visually tell if I beat my personal best, because I am literally rowing against a pace boat that was my last row.

Digital Rowing software is available here: http://www.digitalrowing.com/ It isn't free.

Spedward
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Spedward » Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:28 pm

I have a concept 2. Had the same problem initially.

I was however getting on the thing and giving it everything I had - I would get to 500M and be destroyed.

I then started on focusing on maintaining an even Strokes/Min. And I did it all kinds of ways. Like 500M for 26 s/m. Then then next 24, then 22.... All kinds of different things. Now I can jump on the thing a few months later for 60 min if I want and crank out 10,000M.

Make sure you download the concept 2 app and use it every time. Lets you log your workouts automatically on the Website. Every so often I log on to see how I processed overtime, depending on my goals.

I also would recommend signing up for their workout of the day emails. I generally check my email as soon as I wake up, and seeing provides a degree of motivation to get on it. I generally do not do the workouts they provide, but I do use them as a benchmark. This morning for instance I did 4 5,000M intervals based on what was in their workout of the day email.

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Alexa9
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by Alexa9 » Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:11 pm

stoptothink wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:40 am
Alexa9 wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:46 am
stoptothink wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:44 am
Ummm, no.

As an exercise physiologist and obesity researcher, this very common viewpoint drives me mad. If your goal is to get in better condition or lose weight (frankly, this is the goal of most people), this is just about the worst thing you can do.
A lot of nutrition and exercise research has been proven wrong so enlighten us why it's the worst thing you can do with your physiology degree.
How long would you have to row to simply counteract the negative effects of treating yourself with ice cream because you exercised? And should we go into how this promotes negative outcomes from a behavioral psychology standpoint? I'm not trying appeal to authority, really, but to condescendingly state "with my physiology degree" is quite disingenuous; yes, I have a masters degree in exercise physiology (along with undergrad degrees in kinesiology and nutritional science), along with a PhD in obesity studies, and am the chief exercise scientist for a health megacorp with one of my job responsibilities conducting primary research on topics such as these - this is what I do.

The reality is that most people exercise today in effort to improve body composition. If that is the OPs reason for wanting to increase motivation to row (I'm not going to assume, I am asking the OP), then your advice was in fact counterproductive. It is true that some people exercise, a lot, so that they can enjoy eating treats without as much negative repercussions, but considering OP is asking how to improve exercise motivation, doesn't sound like that is the case here.
Ummmm no.
If you don't work out hard: salad and no ice cream.
If you do work out hard: a little ice cream doesn't hurt assuming OP is not morbidly obese. The reward doesn't have to be ice cream either. I was just making a point.
I stand by my statement and I don't need a PhD to prove it. It's called positive/negative reinforcement and it's very effective.
Obviously you have to watch calories. Look out we've got an expert though.

barnaclebob
Posts: 2947
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Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by barnaclebob » Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:24 pm

Alexa9 wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:11 pm
Ummmm no.
If you don't work out hard: salad and no ice cream.
If you do work out hard: a little ice cream doesn't hurt assuming OP is not morbidly obese. The reward doesn't have to be ice cream either. I was just making a point.
I stand by my statement and I don't need a PhD to prove it. It's called positive/negative reinforcement and it's very effective.
Obviously you have to watch calories. Look out we've got an expert though.
Yes, healthy food as a punishment for not working out. I'm sure that's a great way to frame healthy eating.

stoptothink
Posts: 4397
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 9:53 am

Re: Rowing machine motivation

Post by stoptothink » Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:33 pm

Alexa9 wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:11 pm
stoptothink wrote:
Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:40 am
Alexa9 wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:46 am
stoptothink wrote:
Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:44 am
Ummm, no.

As an exercise physiologist and obesity researcher, this very common viewpoint drives me mad. If your goal is to get in better condition or lose weight (frankly, this is the goal of most people), this is just about the worst thing you can do.
A lot of nutrition and exercise research has been proven wrong so enlighten us why it's the worst thing you can do with your physiology degree.
How long would you have to row to simply counteract the negative effects of treating yourself with ice cream because you exercised? And should we go into how this promotes negative outcomes from a behavioral psychology standpoint? I'm not trying appeal to authority, really, but to condescendingly state "with my physiology degree" is quite disingenuous; yes, I have a masters degree in exercise physiology (along with undergrad degrees in kinesiology and nutritional science), along with a PhD in obesity studies, and am the chief exercise scientist for a health megacorp with one of my job responsibilities conducting primary research on topics such as these - this is what I do.

The reality is that most people exercise today in effort to improve body composition. If that is the OPs reason for wanting to increase motivation to row (I'm not going to assume, I am asking the OP), then your advice was in fact counterproductive. It is true that some people exercise, a lot, so that they can enjoy eating treats without as much negative repercussions, but considering OP is asking how to improve exercise motivation, doesn't sound like that is the case here.
Ummmm no.
If you don't work out hard: salad and no ice cream.
If you do work out hard: a little ice cream doesn't hurt assuming OP is not morbidly obese. The reward doesn't have to be ice cream either. I was just making a point.
I stand by my statement and I don't need a PhD to prove it. It's called positive/negative reinforcement and it's very effective.
Obviously you have to watch calories. Look out we've got an expert though.
Great that you stand by your statement, it doesn't make it less contraindicated based upon the breadth of current evidence-based research. This is exactly how bad lifestyle habits (what really matters in regards to achieving short-term goals, and improving health outcomes and long-term health overall) are formed.

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