Switch between physicians in the same practice?

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jaybee747
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Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by jaybee747 »

I was searching the internet for a surgeon near me and found a very experienced physician with excellent reviews. Called the clinic and made an appointment. At the appointment I was attended by a different physician, seem to be very nice and knowledgeable, but much younger. When I got home, I searched the internet for that physician and could not find any review, I could only find that he graduated few years ago, he was even not listed in the practice website.
I am suppose to call next week to schedule the appointment for the procedure but now I am wondering, should I switch the physician? If so what is the right way to do it?
OnTrack2020
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by OnTrack2020 »

I switched our daughter to a physician/surgeon in the same practice several years ago. Note that we had several years of surgery ahead of us, and I wanted another opinion. They were hesitant, but allowed it. We ended up switching.

Being younger is not necessarily a bad thing. It took my husband to point out to me that we are getting old and, most likely, our doctors will start being younger than us. The surgeon we switched to for our daughter was younger.
123
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by 123 »

I too would want to meet with the doctor I had selected to do my surgery ahead of time. Perhaps you should call the clinic and ask to schedule a visit to talk with Dr Preferred to talk about the surgery and the results of the exam by Dr Substitute. It could be that Dr Substitute just did a standard pre-op screening exam and Dr Preferred would still be the surgeon. A lot depends on the type of surgery you have planned and what sort of pre-op exams and evaluations and tests might be needed. If the clinic just tells you you're just a patient of Dr Substitute then you may need to re-evaluate the situation.
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StormShadow
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by StormShadow »

jaybee747 wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 1:06 pm I was searching the internet for a surgeon near me and found a very experienced physician with excellent reviews. Called the clinic and made an appointment. At the appointment I was attended by a different physician, seem to be very nice and knowledgeable, but much younger. When I got home, I searched the internet for that physician and could not find any review, I could only find that he graduated few years ago, he was even not listed in the practice website.
I am suppose to call next week to schedule the appointment for the procedure but now I am wondering, should I switch the physician? If so what is the right way to do it?
I'd make an appointment with the surgeon I wanted to have the consultation with in the first place.

Barring emergencies requiring immediate surgical intervention... I would never schedule an invasive procedure with anyone I hadn't vetted out ahead of time.

(FWIW, I'm a physician.)
Jablean
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by Jablean »

123 wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 8:56 pm I too would want to meet with the doctor I had selected to do my surgery ahead of time. Perhaps you should call the clinic and ask to schedule a visit to talk with Dr Preferred to talk about the surgery and the results of the exam by Dr Substitute. It could be that Dr Substitute just did a standard pre-op screening exam and Dr Preferred would still be the surgeon. A lot depends on the type of surgery you have planned and what sort of pre-op exams and evaluations and tests might be needed. If the clinic just tells you you're just a patient of Dr Substitute then you may need to re-evaluate the situation.
This. The clinic should tell you why you didn't see the doctor you thought you had requested and who will or will not be performing the surgery. Depends a bit on what the surgery is. Knee doctor for my dad we met a couple of times with both Doctor and assistant PAs.
kenoryan
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by kenoryan »

Are you sure he was even a doc? PAs and Nurses wear white coats nowadays and walk around with a stethoscope around their neck. Easy to mistake them for a doctor. Some of them won’t even bother to correct you if you address them as doctor. Your surgeon might have PAs in his practice. You should call their office and get a clarification of the credentials of the person who saw you.
katnok
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by katnok »

kenoryan wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:05 am Are you sure he was even a doc? PAs and Nurses wear white coats nowadays and walk around with a stethoscope around their neck. Easy to mistake them for a doctor. Some of them won’t even bother to correct you if you address them as doctor. Your surgeon might have PAs in his practice. You should call their office and get a clarification of the credentials of the person who saw you.
+1

Exactly what I was thinking.
ENT Doc
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by ENT Doc »

The fact that you were seen by a younger physician is not a bad thing. This assumes, as previously noted, that they were indeed a physician. Regardless of all that I think what needs to be explained is why you met with someone who you didn't make an appointment with. Just ask the practice. If you're not happy with their answer find another practice. Do we have all the details though? Did they specifically say "We have you down for x/y/zz with Dr. A at xx:xx?" Sometimes practices can treat a request from a patient as simply that - a request. Though I think good practices will accommodate that request, or give you the option of seeing someone else if they have the same skills and/or earlier availability.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by retiredjg »

I'm stumbling on the idea that you made an appointment with Dr. Preferred but Dr. Substitute showed up instead with no explanation. I would want to know what was going on with that before anything else.

And I would also want to meet with Dr. Preferred before making any further decisions.
katnok
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by katnok »

As for the excellent reviews, I know of excellent physicians, who have been practicing for nearly 20 years without any reviews. Also know of physicians with not so great reviews, who are just as good, if not better.
mhalley
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by mhalley »

Patient reviews would probably be one of the last things I would look at in deciding on a physician. People post bad reviews because the doctor didn't give them their pain meds, fill out their bogus disability claim, ran late due to an emergency, billing snafu, etc. Experience is a big factor if you are actually having surgery, asking the doc how many of the procedures he has done is reasonable.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by camden »

mhalley wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:40 am Patient reviews would probably be the last thing I would look at in deciding on a physician. People post bad reviews because the doctor didn't give them their pain meds, fill out their bogus disability claim, ran late due to an emergency, billing snafu, etc. Experience is a big factor if you are actually having surgery, asking the doc how many of the procedures he has done is reasonable.
Agree completely. The single most important bit of advice that I, as a doc myself, give to family and friends with regard to selecting a physician is to pay little or no attention to on line reviews.
InMyDreams
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by InMyDreams »

jaybee747 wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 1:06 pm ... he graduated few years ago...
I suspect he is a resident or fellow, working with the physician with whom you made the appointment.

It can be interesting to ask who will do the surgery, and who are the other MDs or students who will be in the OR. Sometimes just to know the background of those other persons, sometimes to know who you will get a bill from. I had a co-worker who received a bill from the surgeon that she expected plus his assisting surgeon - for a carpal tunnel. She had not been informed there would be another surgeon in the room who would bill.
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celia
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by celia »

Most doctors only have 10 or 20 reviews. Do you think that is all the patients they have ever seen?

Who do you think wrote those reviews? I would guess that most reviews (even for non-doctors) are written by those who had a bad experience or a very excellent experience. We just don't have enough time in this world to write reviews for every business, bakery, bagel we experienced recently! But if something is an extraordinary experience (good or bad), then we may want to share it.
toofache32
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by toofache32 »

celia wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 10:31 am Most doctors only have 10 or 20 reviews. Do you think that is all the patients they have ever seen?

Who do you think wrote those reviews? I would guess that most reviews (even for non-doctors) are written by those who had a bad experience or a very excellent experience. We just don't have enough time in this world to write reviews for every business, bakery, bagel we experienced recently! But if something is an extraordinary experience (good or bad), then we may want to share it.
And on the other side, there are medical practices that ask patients who are pleased with their care to leave a review to boost the number of good reviews. There are many marketing companies who promote and even set up avenues and online portals for this.
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eye.surgeon
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by eye.surgeon »

InMyDreams wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:45 am
jaybee747 wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 1:06 pm ... he graduated few years ago...
I suspect he is a resident or fellow, working with the physician with whom you made the appointment.
Residents and fellows are almost always found in academic institutions, not private practices. Speaking as a former resident and fellow.
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toofache32
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by toofache32 »

katnok wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:08 am
kenoryan wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:05 am Are you sure he was even a doc? PAs and Nurses wear white coats nowadays and walk around with a stethoscope around their neck. Easy to mistake them for a doctor. Some of them won’t even bother to correct you if you address them as doctor. Your surgeon might have PAs in his practice. You should call their office and get a clarification of the credentials of the person who saw you.
+1

Exactly what I was thinking.
I was thinking this also. Very common these days.
jhwkr542
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by jhwkr542 »

I agree, ignore online reviews. Also, could you clarify the reason you ended up seeing Dr. Substitute? Who is doing your surgery? If it's routine for that specialty, there's usually not a huge difference in outcomes between two surgeons.

Younger physicians, while being less experienced, also tend to have trained with newer technology and newer guidelines, so an older physician may tend to have worse outcomes than a younger physician.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by staythecourse »

StormShadow wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 8:57 pm
jaybee747 wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 1:06 pm I was searching the internet for a surgeon near me and found a very experienced physician with excellent reviews. Called the clinic and made an appointment. At the appointment I was attended by a different physician, seem to be very nice and knowledgeable, but much younger. When I got home, I searched the internet for that physician and could not find any review, I could only find that he graduated few years ago, he was even not listed in the practice website.
I am suppose to call next week to schedule the appointment for the procedure but now I am wondering, should I switch the physician? If so what is the right way to do it?
I'd make an appointment with the surgeon I wanted to have the consultation with in the first place.

Barring emergencies requiring immediate surgical intervention... I would never schedule an invasive procedure with anyone I hadn't vetted out ahead of time.

(FWIW, I'm a physician.)
Agreed from another doc. Honestly, I find it borderline unethical to be doing an elective surgery on a patient you have never seen. I think it is good medical care to be evaluated by the guy who is going to be wielding the knife.

Good luck.
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toofache32
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by toofache32 »

jhwkr542 wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:33 pm Also, could you clarify the reason you ended up seeing Dr. Substitute? Who is doing your surgery?
Furthermore, Is this a private practice or an institutional setting? It is common in an institutional practice to not necessarily know who does your surgery. And the surgeons don't always know what surgery they are doing until the patient is rolling back. I am a contracted surgeon in such a setting one day a week. There are 3 of us to provide coverage for 2 ORs. One OR (the big room) is for a single 8-10 hour surgery where 2-3 surgeons work together. The other room (the small room) is for a series of shorter cases. When a patient rolls back to the small room, whichever of us is at a good stopping point will go do the other case while the other 2 surgeons continue in the longer case. Residents are the common thread linking preop and postop.
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dm200
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by dm200 »

toofache32 wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 11:13 pm
katnok wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:08 am
kenoryan wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:05 am Are you sure he was even a doc? PAs and Nurses wear white coats nowadays and walk around with a stethoscope around their neck. Easy to mistake them for a doctor. Some of them won’t even bother to correct you if you address them as doctor. Your surgeon might have PAs in his practice. You should call their office and get a clarification of the credentials of the person who saw you.
+1
Exactly what I was thinking.
I was thinking this also. Very common these days.
Folks sometimes tell me I am "strange", BUT I ALWAYS know the type of medical professional I am interacting with - if I don't see it on their name tag/badge or I already don't know - I ask. There is nothing wrong with Clinical assistants, practical nurses, registered nurses, nurse practioners, physicians assistants, etc. - but it can make a difference what you ask them and what they tell you or do.

I had eyelid surgery a few years ago - and was fully awake during the entire procedure - just could see nothing since my eyes were blocked (somehow). I could hear all the conversations. I heard the surgeon (Ophthalmologist specializing in this type of surgery) ask: "What muscle is this?" Then a faint, puzzled response from a woman - that she did not know the name of the eye area muscle. I then asked, "Who are you?" She replied that the was an Optometry student observing the surgery - and was not actually "participating".

When speaking with friends and acquaintances, I continue to be surprised how many folks do not pay attention to what kind of medical professional they are dealing with - whether nurse or nurse practioner, Optometrist or Ophthalmologist, clinical assistant or physicians assistant --

As far as surgeons, my wife needed umbilical gallbladder removal surgery a few years ago (Kaiser) and saw one surgeon for the initial appointment. he verified all the medical details and said that, because of the need to do the surgery in the next 4-6 weeks and his schedule, it would be another surgeon that would do the surgery. It all worked out fine.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by dm200 »

staythecourse wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:27 am
StormShadow wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 8:57 pm
jaybee747 wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 1:06 pm I was searching the internet for a surgeon near me and found a very experienced physician with excellent reviews. Called the clinic and made an appointment. At the appointment I was attended by a different physician, seem to be very nice and knowledgeable, but much younger. When I got home, I searched the internet for that physician and could not find any review, I could only find that he graduated few years ago, he was even not listed in the practice website.
I am suppose to call next week to schedule the appointment for the procedure but now I am wondering, should I switch the physician? If so what is the right way to do it?
I'd make an appointment with the surgeon I wanted to have the consultation with in the first place.
Barring emergencies requiring immediate surgical intervention... I would never schedule an invasive procedure with anyone I hadn't vetted out ahead of time.
(FWIW, I'm a physician.)
Agreed from another doc. Honestly, I find it borderline unethical to be doing an elective surgery on a patient you have never seen. I think it is good medical care to be evaluated by the guy who is going to be wielding the knife.
Good luck.
My (non-medical) opinion would be that it depends on the nature of the surgery and the type of practice. If the initial evaluation was done by an experienced surgeon AND all records were fully accessible AND the actual surgeon was experienced in the specific surgery AND the type of surgery was very common - a different surgeon would not be of concern to me.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by Pajamas »

dm200 wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:41 am I had eyelid surgery a few years ago - and was fully awake during the entire procedure - just could see nothing since my eyes were blocked (somehow). I could hear all the conversations. I heard the surgeon (Ophthalmologist specializing in this type of surgery) ask: "What muscle is this?" Then a faint, puzzled response from a woman - that she did not know the name of the eye area muscle. I then asked, "Who are you?" She replied that the was an Optometry student observing the surgery - and was not actually "participating".
That's disturbing. Your doctor should specifically ask your permission for someone to observe your procedure even if it is stated in the consent form that it might be the case.

A couple of times my specialists have had medical students shadowing them and they even asked my permission for the student to be present for a routine office appointment.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by toofache32 »

Pajamas wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:49 am
dm200 wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:41 am I had eyelid surgery a few years ago - and was fully awake during the entire procedure - just could see nothing since my eyes were blocked (somehow). I could hear all the conversations. I heard the surgeon (Ophthalmologist specializing in this type of surgery) ask: "What muscle is this?" Then a faint, puzzled response from a woman - that she did not know the name of the eye area muscle. I then asked, "Who are you?" She replied that the was an Optometry student observing the surgery - and was not actually "participating".
That's disturbing. Your doctor should specifically ask your permission for someone to observe your procedure even if it is stated in the consent form that it might be the case.

A couple of times my specialists have had medical students shadowing them and they even asked my permission for the student to be present for a routine office appointment.
What makes you think the surgeon knows this ahead of time? What makes you think the student “belongs” to the surgeon? We see this all the time where an administrator brings someone into the OR after surgery has started and says “this is X who is a X student and is observing today.”
It’s in the consent for this reason.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by Pajamas »

toofache32 wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:03 pm What makes you think the surgeon knows this ahead of time? What makes you think the student “belongs” to the surgeon? We see this all the time where an administrator brings someone into the OR after surgery has started and says “this is X who is a X student and is observing today.”
It’s in the consent for this reason.
If the possibility of an observer wasn't discussed with the patient in advance, then the consent wasn't done properly. Proper consent requires more than just signatures on a form. Ultimately it's the surgeon's responsibility to obtain consent. . . . :oops:
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dm200
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by dm200 »

Pajamas wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:49 am
dm200 wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:41 am I had eyelid surgery a few years ago - and was fully awake during the entire procedure - just could see nothing since my eyes were blocked (somehow). I could hear all the conversations. I heard the surgeon (Ophthalmologist specializing in this type of surgery) ask: "What muscle is this?" Then a faint, puzzled response from a woman - that she did not know the name of the eye area muscle. I then asked, "Who are you?" She replied that the was an Optometry student observing the surgery - and was not actually "participating".
That's disturbing. Your doctor should specifically ask your permission for someone to observe your procedure even if it is stated in the consent form that it might be the case.
A couple of times my specialists have had medical students shadowing them and they even asked my permission for the student to be present for a routine office appointment.
Interesting. It didn't bother me at all - as the patient.

This Ophthalmologist often had students with him during office appointments as well. As I recall, for the office appointments - he/they would ask about their involvement - and I always said "yes". I could never see the harm in their such involvement - and there was always a chance they might see, notice or bring up something of significance.

Many years ago, for a year or so after my wife and I were married, we had coverage with a small HMO affiliated with a medical school. During certain times of the school year, medical students (some very, very green) would use the patients for "practice". You were always asked first and if you agreed, the medical student would "examine" you first, discuss symptoms with you, etc. THEN, the "real" doctor would come in and the student would "present" the case to the real doctor. The patient was instructed to listen carefully and add or correct anything the patient heard. I always said yes and found it enlightening and, one time, it was funny.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by toofache32 »

Pajamas wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:13 pm
toofache32 wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:03 pm What makes you think the surgeon knows this ahead of time? What makes you think the student “belongs” to the surgeon? We see this all the time where an administrator brings someone into the OR after surgery has started and says “this is X who is a X student and is observing today.”
It’s in the consent for this reason.
If the possibility of an observer wasn't discussed with the patient in advance, then the consent wasn't done properly. Proper consent requires more than just signatures on a form. Ultimately it's the surgeon's responsibility to obtain consent. . . . :oops:
Well I guess you could ask the surgeon to read the form to you.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by dm200 »

toofache32 wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:21 pm
Pajamas wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:13 pm
toofache32 wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:03 pm What makes you think the surgeon knows this ahead of time? What makes you think the student “belongs” to the surgeon? We see this all the time where an administrator brings someone into the OR after surgery has started and says “this is X who is a X student and is observing today.”
It’s in the consent for this reason.
If the possibility of an observer wasn't discussed with the patient in advance, then the consent wasn't done properly. Proper consent requires more than just signatures on a form. Ultimately it's the surgeon's responsibility to obtain consent. . . . :oops:
Well I guess you could ask the surgeon to read the form to you.
The one case of mine that was a puzzle was parathyroid surgery (surgeon on private practice) was when I read the EOB from the insurance company. The insurance company paid everything quickly and satisfactorily - BUT there were paid charges noted in the EOB for a second surgeon's involvement - never brought up by my surgeon before or after. By the time I read the EOB, I had no occasion to see that surgeon again.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by Pajamas »

toofache32 wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:21 pm Well I guess you could ask the surgeon to read the form to you.
It's not the patient's responsibility to ensure that proper consent is obtained. :oops:

The "informed" in "informed consent" isn't referring to the form! :D
Last edited by Pajamas on Mon Jun 04, 2018 1:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.
staythecourse
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by staythecourse »

dm200 wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:45 am
staythecourse wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:27 am
StormShadow wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 8:57 pm
jaybee747 wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 1:06 pm I was searching the internet for a surgeon near me and found a very experienced physician with excellent reviews. Called the clinic and made an appointment. At the appointment I was attended by a different physician, seem to be very nice and knowledgeable, but much younger. When I got home, I searched the internet for that physician and could not find any review, I could only find that he graduated few years ago, he was even not listed in the practice website.
I am suppose to call next week to schedule the appointment for the procedure but now I am wondering, should I switch the physician? If so what is the right way to do it?
I'd make an appointment with the surgeon I wanted to have the consultation with in the first place.
Barring emergencies requiring immediate surgical intervention... I would never schedule an invasive procedure with anyone I hadn't vetted out ahead of time.
(FWIW, I'm a physician.)
Agreed from another doc. Honestly, I find it borderline unethical to be doing an elective surgery on a patient you have never seen. I think it is good medical care to be evaluated by the guy who is going to be wielding the knife.
Good luck.
My (non-medical) opinion would be that it depends on the nature of the surgery and the type of practice. If the initial evaluation was done by an experienced surgeon AND all records were fully accessible AND the actual surgeon was experienced in the specific surgery AND the type of surgery was very common - a different surgeon would not be of concern to me.
That is ex post. It isn't like you are changing a tire. There may be a part of the story that alters the surgical plain either in needing a different preop test, intraop equipment, and/ or postop care. That is hard to figure out WITHOUT knowing it ahead of time.

I don't think you would be happy if you saw their partner for x procedure preop. Then came to the hospital and the new surgeon goes, "Oh with this x past medical problem I don't like to do this procedure without y work up so I am going to cancel you so you can get y work up".

Anyone can do what they want, but as a doctor myself I would be NEVER let someone touch me without meeting me first and going over my story AND discuss the surgical plan.

Good luck.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by mouses »

kenoryan wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:05 am Are you sure he was even a doc? PAs and Nurses wear white coats nowadays and walk around with a stethoscope around their neck. Easy to mistake them for a doctor. Some of them won’t even bother to correct you if you address them as doctor. Your surgeon might have PAs in his practice. You should call their office and get a clarification of the credentials of the person who saw you.
In an emergency room, a PA introduced himself as Dr. X, and I only found out later he was a PA. God knows what he has a doctorate in.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by mouses »

mhalley wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:40 am Patient reviews would probably be one of the last things I would look at in deciding on a physician. People post bad reviews because the doctor didn't give them their pain meds, fill out their bogus disability claim, ran late due to an emergency, billing snafu, etc. Experience is a big factor if you are actually having surgery, asking the doc how many of the procedures he has done is reasonable.
I look at patient reviews, although I don't take them at face value necessarily. However, the oral surgeon my dentist sent me to had one review, a terrible one. I got back to my dentist and said, are you sure about this guy and he assured me he was a good oral surgeon. No, he wasn't. I wound up with eye damage from a tooth extraction. Who knew a tooth extraction could cause eye damage, now you know.
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by toofache32 »

Pajamas wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:53 pm
toofache32 wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:21 pm Well I guess you could ask the surgeon to read the form to you.
It's not the patient's responsibility to ensure that proper consent is obtained. :oops:

The "informed" in "informed consent" isn't referring to the form! :D
Yes, informed consent is a process not a form. Part of the process is the patient signing the form. Thank you for your vital contribution. :oops:
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by Pajamas »

toofache32 wrote: Tue Jun 05, 2018 6:03 am
Pajamas wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:53 pm
toofache32 wrote: Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:21 pm Well I guess you could ask the surgeon to read the form to you.
It's not the patient's responsibility to ensure that proper consent is obtained. :oops:

The "informed" in "informed consent" isn't referring to the form! :D
Yes, informed consent is a process not a form. Part of the process is the patient signing the form. Thank you for your vital contribution. :oops:
You're welcome. When a surgeon has a sloppy approach to consent, it makes you wonder what other shortcuts they are taking.
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Strider
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by Strider »

I visited a local orthopedic practice to be evaluated for a foot problem; saw physician A (good credentials, several years out of residency, mid-30's). Put off making a decision.

I saw another doctor (physician B) in the same practice, for an entry different problem. I asked him for the name of someone for a second opinion re the foot pain; he suggested physician C (same physicians group, better credentials than physician A, different office location, mid-40's, has great manner of dealing with patients). Physician B ever-so-subtly suggested that physician C should be my choice for the surgery. I went with physician C and do not regret it.

Is there another doctor in the practice you can rely on for honest (but discreet) advice?
Glockenspiel
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by Glockenspiel »

kenoryan wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:05 am Are you sure he was even a doc? PAs and Nurses wear white coats nowadays and walk around with a stethoscope around their neck. Easy to mistake them for a doctor. Some of them won’t even bother to correct you if you address them as doctor. Your surgeon might have PAs in his practice. You should call their office and get a clarification of the credentials of the person who saw you.
In defense of PAs and NPs, many don't bother to correct you because they hear it every day and it seems like the general public has poor understanding about what PAs and NPs are/do.
Glockenspiel
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by Glockenspiel »

mouses wrote: Tue Jun 05, 2018 5:37 am
kenoryan wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:05 am Are you sure he was even a doc? PAs and Nurses wear white coats nowadays and walk around with a stethoscope around their neck. Easy to mistake them for a doctor. Some of them won’t even bother to correct you if you address them as doctor. Your surgeon might have PAs in his practice. You should call their office and get a clarification of the credentials of the person who saw you.
In an emergency room, a PA introduced himself as Dr. X, and I only found out later he was a PA. God knows what he has a doctorate in.
Uff dah. That's poor judgment on his part. I've never experienced anything like this and I'm sure his licensing board wouldn't like knowing he did/does this.
staythecourse
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by staythecourse »

Glockenspiel wrote: Tue Jun 05, 2018 10:54 am
kenoryan wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:05 am Are you sure he was even a doc? PAs and Nurses wear white coats nowadays and walk around with a stethoscope around their neck. Easy to mistake them for a doctor. Some of them won’t even bother to correct you if you address them as doctor. Your surgeon might have PAs in his practice. You should call their office and get a clarification of the credentials of the person who saw you.
In defense of PAs and NPs, many don't bother to correct you because they hear it every day and it seems like the general public has poor understanding about what PAs and NPs are/do.
Or more likely the like to be called "Dr.". EVERYONE likes to be considered more well educated then they are in their current position. It is human nature and don't blame them. No different then someone who thinks their boss has an MBA and he/ her never correct them just like the Samsonite CEO.

Good luck.
"The stock market [fluctuation], therefore, is noise. A giant distraction from the business of investing.” | -Jack Bogle
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dm200
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Location: Washington DC area

Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by dm200 »

Glockenspiel wrote: Tue Jun 05, 2018 10:56 am
mouses wrote: Tue Jun 05, 2018 5:37 am
kenoryan wrote: Sun Jun 03, 2018 6:05 am Are you sure he was even a doc? PAs and Nurses wear white coats nowadays and walk around with a stethoscope around their neck. Easy to mistake them for a doctor. Some of them won’t even bother to correct you if you address them as doctor. Your surgeon might have PAs in his practice. You should call their office and get a clarification of the credentials of the person who saw you.
In an emergency room, a PA introduced himself as Dr. X, and I only found out later he was a PA. God knows what he has a doctorate in.
Uff dah. That's poor judgment on his part. I've never experienced anything like this and I'm sure his licensing board wouldn't like knowing he did/does this.
Interesting.. In all the years/decades of dealing with a variety of health/medical providers - I do not recall ever having someone call themselves "Dr." unless he/she was a Physician (MD or DO), Optometrist (OD) or PhD (such as Psychologist). Sometimes a nurse, nurse practitioner or PA might say something like "and what problem brings you here today to see Dr X?"
kenoryan
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by kenoryan »

As the number of PAs and DNPs are increasing, they are getting bolder in introducing themselves as doctors. It’s getting ridiculous. I just don’t get how they claim equivalence.
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dm200
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Re: Switch between physicians in the same practice?

Post by dm200 »

kenoryan wrote: Tue Jun 05, 2018 11:28 pm As the number of PAs and DNPs are increasing, they are getting bolder in introducing themselves as doctors. It’s getting ridiculous. I just don’t get how they claim equivalence.
I have great respect for just about all medical providers - as long as they operate within their recognized field of training, competence and licensing. There is also a lot of overlap as well.

I do find it quite amazing that PAs and NPs would ever even hint at being "Doctors".

Some states (Virginia just changed the law/regulations) do allow Nurse Practioners to have their own independent practices (cannot cite the details).
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