Travel advice for an engineer

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Hayden
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Hayden »

Wow! Thanks, everyone, for the responses. This will keep me happily traveling, and reading, for years.
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lthenderson
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by lthenderson »

TravelforFun wrote: Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:08 pm
livesoft wrote: Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:42 pm
lthenderson wrote: Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:30 pm
TravelforFun wrote: Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:24 pm
lthenderson wrote: Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:17 pm 25 greatest engineering feats according to CNN

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/engi ... index.html
Any 'greatest engineering feats' list that doesn't have the pyramids on it is not legit.
I'm guessing the pyramid builders didn't have a license PE on site when they were building and thus weren't included in this list.
Hmmm, did somebody not count to 20?
My bad! Didn't look at it close enough.

TravelforFun
Perhaps you fellows need new glasses. I count 25 so I copied, pasted and numbered them to help you out.

1 The Palm, Dubai, UAE
2 Aqueduct of Segovia, Segovia, Spain
3 Great Wall of China, China
4 Taj Mahal, Agra, India
5 Trans-Siberian Railway, Russia
6 Burj Khalifa, Dubai, UAE
7 Akashi Kaikyō Bridge, Akashi Strait, Japan
8 White Pass and Yukon Route Railroad, Canada
9 Tokyo Sky Tree, Tokyo
10 International Space Station
11 Teotihuacan, Mexico
12 Panama Canal, Panama
13 Taipei 101, Taipei, Taiwan
14 Grand Canyon Skywalk, Arizona
15 Shanghai World Financial Center, Shanghai
16 Millau Viaduct, Millau, FranceThe closest airport is Rodez-Marcillac -- a 25-minute drive away.
17 London Underground, London
18 Kansai Airport, Osaka, Japan
19 Hoover Dam, Arizona/Nevada
20 Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt
21 Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco
22 Eiffel Tower, Paris
23 Confederation Bridge, Prince Edward Island, Canada
24 Colosseum, Rome
25 CN Tower, Toronto, Canada
JD2775
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by JD2775 »

Watty wrote: Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:50 am While it has been at least partially been rebuilt the Aqueduct at Segovia which is north of Madrid might be of interest if you are in the area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aqueduct_of_Segovia
^ this. I was lucky enough to visit the Aqueduct of Segovia and the Mosque in Cordoba on my trip to Spain last year. 2 very impressive sights.
eucalyptus
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by eucalyptus »

Great thread, great lists.

Has anyone mentioned the walled cities of San Gimignano, Siena and Lucca? Especially San Gimignano, at least for me.
Last edited by eucalyptus on Sat Jun 02, 2018 11:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
livesoft
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by livesoft »

Don't forget to visit the things that didn't quite work out. That is, the disasters, too.
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btenny
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by btenny »

In my travels I have been intrigued by how city planning has evolved and drives the culture of the cities. Think about it. Some cities were actually planned and layed out with nice buildings and wide sidewalks and good street grids so the traffic and people move well. These places have great outdoor spaces built in all over. People love to stroll and stay outside in these places. Cities like Barcelona and Washington DC come to mind in this group. But in other cities the streets and buildings seem to be a crazy quilt that allows people and traffic movement but makes it hard. People seem rushed and always wanting to get back inside. Cities like NYC and Boston come to mind in this group.

Likewise new cities are all suburb like with lots of islands in the streets and between all the businesses. Movement between businesses requires a car. Everyone in these cities has a car and a garage to store the car (but it is not used for that in most cases) and that garage is a major factor in the home/neighborhood design and space allocation. Many of the towns and neighborhoods are based on freeways design and how they connect stuff. Everything is based on cars for people movement. No walking is acceptable or even safe in most of these cities. Places like LA and Phoenix come to mind that fit this model.

So look around at the city scale and see how the culture fits into the plan. Enjoy and Good Luck.
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Mursili
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Mursili »

Perhaps this is minor compared to the grand scale of the locations on the lists in this thread, but I am an engineer and have long been amazed of the ruins in Chaco Canyon here in New Mexico. For a land of limited population and resources, the ancient puebloans did some pretty amazing things. https://www.nps.gov/chcu/index.htm

Also there are the ruins at Mesa Verde.
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stan1
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by stan1 »

Hayden wrote: Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:00 am In my travels, three destinations have blown me away:
The Duomo in Florence
The mosque of Cordoba
Diocletian's palace in Split

I work on large, first of a kind, science/engineering/construction projects, and so am fascinated to see these old projects.

Can you suggest other travel destinations, and/or books I should read on this topic?
Engineer? The London Underground, Overground, DLR, and National Rail. Add in Greenwich Observatory and tunnel under the Thames for good measure while you are there. There's something impressive about watching 180 trains per hour come through Clapham Junction during morning rush hour.
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VictoriaF
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by VictoriaF »

livesoft wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 11:25 am Don't forget to visit the things that didn't quite work out. That is, the disasters, too.
Chernobyl!

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rob
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by rob »

lthenderson wrote: Sat Jun 02, 2018 10:27 am 10 International Space Station
LOL - Well that's going to stop people ticking off everything on your list :-)
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Mursili
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Mursili »

Actually you do not need to travel anywhere to see the ISS, just sign up at https://spotthestation.nasa.gov/ and wait.

Warning - you can't really get closer than 250 miles from it.
When it comes to havoc, no one wreaks like me! - Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz
dandinsac
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by dandinsac »

Le Pont du Gard in southern France is very impressive. There is a museum on site that describes how it was built by the Romans.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pont_du_Gard
wrongfunds
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by wrongfunds »

Panama Canal; you don't need visa and you don't need to convert money and you can get direct flight from most US cities. Even after 100 years, one can not but impressed with the amazing feet of engineering.
Oleanmike
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Oleanmike »

I too am an engineer with the good fortune of having traveled to many places. My Top Ten that I have visited in order from 1-10 are:

Great Wall of China, Beijing
La Sagrada Familia, Barcelona
The Acropolis/Parthenon, Athens
Berlin Wall, Germany (before demolition)
Pearl Harbor Memorial
Christ the Redeemer Statue, Rio
The Louvre, Paris
Niagara Falls
St Peters Square, Rome
St Peters Basilica, Rome

As a Brit once told me, the British Museum in London is the greatest collection of stolen artifacts in the world (includes the Rosetta Stone, mummies, pieces of the Parthenon).
Globalviewer58
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Globalviewer58 »

The Jain Temple in Ranakpur, Rajasthan, India. Off the beaten path but a marvel of carved columns from the 15th century. Here's the Wikipedia link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranakpur_ ... _India.jpg
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