Travel advice for an engineer

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Hayden
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Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Hayden » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:00 am

In my travels, three destinations have blown me away:
The Duomo in Florence
The mosque of Cordoba
Diocletian's palace in Split

I work on large, first of a kind, science/engineering/construction projects, and so am fascinated to see these old projects.

Can you suggest other travel destinations, and/or books I should read on this topic?

Gill
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Gill » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:09 am

Panama Canal
Gill
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bligh
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by bligh » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:15 am

Gill wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:09 am
Panama Canal
Gill
+1

OP, I have not visited the Panama Canal, but really enjoyed the book "The Path Between the Seas" By David McCullough. With your background I imagine you will love it.

mfng
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by mfng » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:18 am

I bet you'd like St. Paul's Cathedral in London, as well as many of Sir Christopher Wren's other buildings:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul%27s_Cathedral
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Wren

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Gill » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:20 am

bligh wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:15 am
Gill wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:09 am
Panama Canal
Gill
+1

OP, I have not visited the Panama Canal, but really enjoyed the book "The Path Between the Seas" By David McCullough. With your background I imagine you will love it.
Yes, I've also read this book and sailed through the Canal on two occasions. An engineering marvel.
Gill
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senex
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by senex » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:24 am

St. Peter's basilica in Vatican City can fit something like 60,000 people inside one cavernous space, with a dome that rises 450 feet above the floor --and it was built in the 1500s! It is truly an engineering marvel, in addition to the artistic marvels of the mosaics and such.

I've heard similar superlatives about the Pantheon (in Rome) and the Hagia Sophia (in Istanbul).

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Pajamas
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Pajamas » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:25 am

I have always been fascinated by the elegance of stepwells in India:

https://www.google.com/search?q=stepwell&tbm=isch

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by gogleheads.orb » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:35 am

I was impressed by the Patheon in Rome, but I'm guessing you've already seen that.

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Theseus » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:36 am

I was impressed the Mayan structures in Peru last year when I was trekking the Inca Trail. Especially the Machu Picchu is very impressive.

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by onourway » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:43 am

Leptis Magna in Libya.

If you have a fondness for American literature, Sundog by Jim Harrison.

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by whodidntante » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:09 am

Pajamas wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:25 am
I have always been fascinated by the elegance of stepwells in India:

https://www.google.com/search?q=stepwell&tbm=isch
Agreed about the stepwells. There are also impressive mosques and temples in India. I liked the Qutb Minar. The Taj is also worth a visit. I highly recommend hiring a private tour guide, especially if you can only dedicate a few days to your visit. You'll get a lot for your money.

England has Parliament, Westminster Abbey, Big Ben, and Stonehenge. The best way to reach Stonehenge is to rent a car, or at least that's what I did. You can also ride a bus filled with old sweaty tourists, fanny packs and all.

Rome has a lot of sites. Roman Forum, Pantheon, Colosseum, Aqueducts. Pompei is also easy to get to, but plan a full day for it. The Vatican wasn't impressive architecturally, but they have some nice art there. Italy is on the cheap side considering you are in developed Europe; I was continually surprised at how inexpensive things were.

France: Notre Dame, catacombs, Eiffel tower. France is not cheap, LOL.

Chichen Itza and other Mayan ruins in Mexico. I rented a car and it provided full flexibility to go off the beaten path. Everyone tells you not to rent a car. In my experience it was fine.

The Great Wall and Tiananmen Square in China. You can take the subway to reach Tiananmen Square. I hired a driver to take me and a colleague to the wall. He wasn't able to speak conversational English, so he was just a driver, but quite cheap.

Prague has some of the most impressive old buildings I have seen. It was not severely damaged during the war, unlike a lot of European cities. It's also very cheap to be there.

Angkor Wat in Cambodia is on my "todo" list.

I feel like I have to talk about costs since this is a financial site, but I usually don't consider that very much myself. :moneybag :beer :happy
Last edited by whodidntante on Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:13 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Hayden
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Hayden » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:13 am

Thanks for all the suggestions!

Anyone know of any travel groups that offer tours that focus on this? Lots of tours focus on the artwork, but I'm always fascinated by the engineering and by the historical context that allowed them to realize such grand projects.

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by adamthesmythe » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:18 am

gogleheads.orb wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:35 am
I was impressed by the Patheon in Rome, but I'm guessing you've already seen that.
OP didn't mention that, and it is the Dome of domes. With some remaining ancient wall decoration too.

In the Dome theme there is also Hagia Sophia (haven't seen that one myself).

mrb09
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by mrb09 » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:36 am

I'm a software engineer, not a structural one, but I was fascinated by the Taj Mahal. The level of detail is just incredible.

Westminster Abby is a good architecturally, but also the resting place of Isaac Newton.

The flying buttresses supporting Notre Dame.

If you like the Florence Duomo, also see the Siena one!

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Watty
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Watty » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:50 am

While it has been at least partially been rebuilt the Aqueduct at Segovia which is north of Madrid might be of interest if you are in the area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aqueduct_of_Segovia

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by WildBill » Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:32 am

Howdy

You are my kind of guy.

Off the top of my head -

Hoover Dam.

Erie Canal - read Peter Bernstein’s book first.

Brooklyn Bridge - read David Mcculloughs book the Great Bridge first.

Woolworth Building in NYC. Frank Woolworth built the tallest building in the world ( at that time) with cash money - no financing - and had it preleased and all his money back before construction finished - a very Boglehead thing to do. That man knew what he was doing.

Clifton Suspension Bridge built by I K Brunel. Check for other stuff Brunel built.

Happy visiting.

W B
"Through chances various, through all vicissitudes, we make our way." Virgil, The Aeneid

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Ged
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Ged » Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:36 am

Hayden wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:00 am
In my travels, three destinations have blown me away:
The Duomo in Florence
The mosque of Cordoba
Diocletian's palace in Split

I work on large, first of a kind, science/engineering/construction projects, and so am fascinated to see these old projects.

Can you suggest other travel destinations, and/or books I should read on this topic?
I have a similar fascination - things that held records for size or complexity for long periods of time.

The City of Rome - was not surpassed in size until 19th Century London

The Great Pyramid of Giza. The tallest man-made structure for 3800 years. Surpassed by the Eiffel Tower.

The Antikythera Mechanism. Made circa 200-100 BC possibly by students of Archimedes. Not surpassed in complexity until the 14th Century astronomical clock in Prague.

The Pantheon. Still the largest unreinforced concrete dome ever built. M·AGRIPPA·L·F·COS·TERTIVM·FECIT. Marcus Agrippa, son of Lucius, in his third consulate, made it.

Pythagorean models of the Solar System. First heliocentric model. Not surpassed until Kepler realized the orbits of the planets were elliptical 1900 years later.

Alas I have no books or collections of references to offer.

spectec
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by spectec » Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:41 am

If you ever travel to Hyderabad, India, be sure to visit the Goldconda fort complex. You can hike all the way to the top and see various structures spanning 400+ years of construction through 5 great dynasties, beginning in the 12th-13th century. It also offers fantastic views of the surrounding areas.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golkonda# ... da_102.JPG
Last edited by spectec on Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:49 am, edited 2 times in total.
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WildBill
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by WildBill » Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:42 am

Howdy

Thought of another one.

If you are in Boston go by the Harvard Science Center. They have a museum of scientific and engineering instruments on the first floor, with the remains of the ENIAC computer and a history of its development in the lobby. Very good stuff.

W B
"Through chances various, through all vicissitudes, we make our way." Virgil, The Aeneid

WildBill
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by WildBill » Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:44 am

Howdy

One more - Museum of Computer Science in Mountain View, Ca. Self explanatory.

W B
"Through chances various, through all vicissitudes, we make our way." Virgil, The Aeneid

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by killjoy2012 » Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:46 am

Great Pyramid of Giza, and the Giza plateau - Egypt.
The Petra - Jordan.
Great Wall of China

livesoft
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by livesoft » Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:59 am

CERN in Switzerland: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/28/trav ... milab.html

American windmill museums: www.windmill.com Lubbock, TX with hundreds of windmills and many working ones on the grounds that you can touch. There would've been no railroads across America so early without windmills.

Science Museum in London. With its special homage to James Watt, arguably the father of British engineering, it is a must-see. Tons of other things in this museum as well.
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by camden » Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:02 pm

Enclosing Dike in the Netherlands. Walk along the top with the North Sea on one side and the (much lower) land on the other. Talk about an engineering marvel. Can take a day trip out of Amsterdam that focuses on historical context, construction, etc.

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by livesoft » Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:09 pm

The Vajont dam in Italy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vajont_Dam
The 'tallest dam in the world', was conceived in the 1920s, to control and harness the rivers Piave, Maè and the Boite stream, and to meet the growing demand for power generation and industrialization.
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TravelforFun
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by TravelforFun » Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:12 pm

Engineer here with a special love for architecture. I would add a couple more:

Sagrada Familia Church in Barcelona
Millau Bridge in Millau, France

TravelforFun

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by lthenderson » Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:17 pm

25 greatest engineering feats according to CNN

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/engi ... index.html

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by 02nz » Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:19 pm

I'd agree about Angkor Wat in Cambodia - building these structures would be an extraordinary feat with today's engineering and technology; that they were built centuries ago is incredible. The Mayan temples in Tikal, Guatemala, are also remarkable.

In the western world, I'd add the cathedrals of Cologne and Aachen (Aix-la-Chapelle). The first is remarkable for its sheer size, although it was only completed relatively recently. Aachen's cathedral, where Charlemagne is buried, was built well over a millennium ago.

TravelforFun
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by TravelforFun » Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:24 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:17 pm
25 greatest engineering feats according to CNN

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/engi ... index.html
Any 'greatest engineering feats' list that doesn't have the pyramids on it is not legit.

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by lthenderson » Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:30 pm

TravelforFun wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:24 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:17 pm
25 greatest engineering feats according to CNN

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/engi ... index.html
Any 'greatest engineering feats' list that doesn't have the pyramids on it is not legit.
I'm guessing the pyramid builders didn't have a license PE on site when they were building and thus weren't included in this list.

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by rob » Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:40 pm

Limiting to personal experience where they made me pause and say... wow....

* Sun/Moon pyramids near Mexico city.
* Opera House & Harbour bridge in Sydney.
* Yorkminister in York.
* Colosseum & St Peter's in Rome - I know they are a tourist trap.
* British Museum & Shad in London.
* Eiffel tower in Paris - If it's allowed now days climb the first section instead of taking elevator.
* King's College church in Cambridge.
| Rob | Its a dangerous business going out your front door. - J.R.R.Tolkien

LawyersGunsAndMoney
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by LawyersGunsAndMoney » Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:55 pm

The city of Tokyo in general is a pretty amazing feat of engineering, design and culture. Namely, how you can pack so many people into such a small geographic area and have things function so efficiently. Also, just really damn cool.

Adding on to what others have said in terms of physical structures - I was also blown away by the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul.

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by THY4373 » Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:00 pm

Some places I have found very cool when I visted:

Ancient temples of Cambodia. Amazing. Make the effort to get to some of the more remote ones, I loved Koh Ker and had the place almost entirely to myself at the height of tourist season. Amazing.

Petra Jordan. Buildings that were not built but rather carved out of living rock. Just mind blowing. The Roman city of Gerash was also very cool. Floating in the Dead Sea is also neat (1400 feet below sea level so one of the few places on earth you drive up to the ocean).

Rome has many sights, Colosseum, Pantheon, Baths of Caracalla, Forum, port city of Ostia. Were all very cool. I also find Venice breathtaking.

Sagrada Familia Church in Barcelona one of the most breathtaking places of worship I have been to.

Alhambra in Granada Spain (I also loved the mosque in Cordoba).

Burj Khalifa Dubai which is currently the tallest building in world.

While I would not call them great I did like touring the sewers of Paris.

St. Pauls in London is very interesting been there many times.

Welsh castles (really English castles to subjugate the Welsh). Very neat and often quite different from one another.

I found Easter Island to be a magical place but not really much in the way of ancient structures beyond the Moai.

For odd ball sights I find Atlas Obscura to be an interesting tool: https://www.atlasobscura.com/

I haven't been to these yet but high on my list:
Istanbul (remains of Byzantine empire)
Egypt

MJS
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by MJS » Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:13 pm

Notable engineering, but not necessarily grand.
Newgrange in Ireland
Fogous in Cornwall
La Mezquita in Spain

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by VictoriaF » Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:15 pm

Moscow Metro
Paris catacombs
Sagrada Familia in Barcelona (is already recommended but worth repeating)

Victoria
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livesoft
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by livesoft » Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:42 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:30 pm
TravelforFun wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:24 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:17 pm
25 greatest engineering feats according to CNN

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/engi ... index.html
Any 'greatest engineering feats' list that doesn't have the pyramids on it is not legit.
I'm guessing the pyramid builders didn't have a license PE on site when they were building and thus weren't included in this list.
Hmmm, did somebody not count to 20?
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TravelforFun
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by TravelforFun » Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:08 pm

livesoft wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:42 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:30 pm
TravelforFun wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:24 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:17 pm
25 greatest engineering feats according to CNN

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/engi ... index.html
Any 'greatest engineering feats' list that doesn't have the pyramids on it is not legit.
I'm guessing the pyramid builders didn't have a license PE on site when they were building and thus weren't included in this list.
Hmmm, did somebody not count to 20?
My bad! Didn't look at it close enough.

TravelforFun

InMyDreams
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by InMyDreams » Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:22 pm

PBS ran a series on TV that tried to recreate engineering feats that peoples of ancient times achieved, that modern people don't seem to be able to do without their modern tools. Included were:
Uprighting the obelisk that was constructed in another location.
Stonehenge
Shading the coliseum's seating
Roman baths
Catapults.
And so on. They had teams of scientists/engineers trying to actually recreate, often on scale, and they were not always successful. I thought it was Secrets of the Dead but the episode list on wikipedia isn't striking any bells.

People have mentioned Mayan ruins - I'd throw in Inka ruins - Machu Picchu's walls are an engineering feat. Their irrigation system. Crop development. And remember - they didn't have refined metals, and the only pack animals they had were llamas.

So many places in the world to go see. Unfortunately, some are in rather unsafe places.

vabeek
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by vabeek » Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:34 pm

If you make it to Egypt for the pyramids - I highly recommend Abu Simbel. This temple was originally on the flood plain that has now become Lake Nasser. In the late 60's, the entire temple was moved to high ground with the construction of the Aswan dam.

The temple is amazing in itself. An added bonus is the "behind the scenes" tour that demonstrates how the whole thing is constructed and held together.

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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by VictoriaF » Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:26 pm

TravelforFun wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:08 pm
livesoft wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:42 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:30 pm
TravelforFun wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:24 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:17 pm
25 greatest engineering feats according to CNN

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/engi ... index.html
Any 'greatest engineering feats' list that doesn't have the pyramids on it is not legit.
I'm guessing the pyramid builders didn't have a license PE on site when they were building and thus weren't included in this list.
Hmmm, did somebody not count to 20?
My bad! Didn't look at it close enough.

TravelforFun
I had a similar faux pas a few weeks ago when I speed-read a list of universities and claimed that MIT was not on the list. Triceratop has brought to my attention that "Massachusetts Institute of Technology" was the first entry on the list.

Victoria
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TravelforFun
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by TravelforFun » Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:50 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:26 pm
TravelforFun wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:08 pm
livesoft wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 1:42 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:30 pm
TravelforFun wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:24 pm

Any 'greatest engineering feats' list that doesn't have the pyramids on it is not legit.
I'm guessing the pyramid builders didn't have a license PE on site when they were building and thus weren't included in this list.
Hmmm, did somebody not count to 20?
My bad! Didn't look at it close enough.

TravelforFun
I had a similar faux pas a few weeks ago when I speed-read a list of universities and claimed that MIT was not on the list. Triceratop has brought to my attention that "Massachusetts Institute of Technology" was the first entry on the list.

Victoria
Ha... it happens. Even the poster in my case, LTHenderson, missed it too.

TravelforFun

Rebecca_S
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Rebecca_S » Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:54 pm

Istanbul: Hagia sofia, basilica cisterns and the national history museum.

Northern Flicker
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Northern Flicker » Fri Jun 01, 2018 7:02 pm

spectec wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:41 am
If you ever travel to Hyderabad, India, be sure to visit the Goldconda fort complex. You can hike all the way to the top and see various structures spanning 400+ years of construction through 5 great dynasties, beginning in the 12th-13th century. It also offers fantastic views of the surrounding areas.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golkonda# ... da_102.JPG
Engineered so that handclaps in the lookout could be heard 1km away in the palace enabling warning codes if an attack was imminent.
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Cycle » Fri Jun 01, 2018 7:18 pm

Theseus wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:36 am
I was impressed the Mayan structures in Peru last year when I was trekking the Inca Trail. Especially the Machu Picchu is very impressive.
I thought this Incan crop lab at Moray was pretty cool. They experimented with different crop varieties there.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moray_(Inca_ruin)

Mall of America. Just kidding, stay far far away from there.

This post has so many gems I didn't know about.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

livesoft
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by livesoft » Fri Jun 01, 2018 7:33 pm

Cathedral/tomb building has been replaced by modern sports stadiums. Sure, go see the Colosseum in Rome, but don't forget to get a tour of every domed (or undomed) stadium in the USA and rest of the world as well. Remember all the buzz about the 2008 Olympics in Beijing? I'm not sure those buildings lasted, but see them anyways.
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InMyDreams
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by InMyDreams » Fri Jun 01, 2018 8:09 pm

Filipino Rice Terraces
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banaue_Rice_Terraces

Seven Wonders
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wonders_of_the_World

Tipon was another Inka agricultural site
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tipon

which led to the ASCE list of historical CE sites
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of ... _Landmarks

iamlucky13
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by iamlucky13 » Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:35 pm

The Duomo in Florence is on my list, too. I've been fascinated reading about that project.

Petra Jordan is probably another place I'd really like to visit, as well as Machu Pichu and Angkor Wat.

The Pantheon is an obvious must see for any engineer or history buff.

Closer to home for US residents, a relative just shared some good pictures of the Cliff Dwellings at Mesa Verde.

I had the opportunity a couple years ago to spend half a day at the rediscovered Mayan city of Lamanai in Belieze. That was very well worth the additional half day we spent getting there. There is not a lot of signage there to read, but I think with a good guidebook, I could have spent a solid 2 days looking over the pyramids and other buildings (admittedly, my travel companions aren't as nerdy as me and probably would not have enjoyed that long) and reading about what historians have figured out so far about what they discovered.

Yet Lamanai is only mid-pack in terms of scope and complexity of what remains. There are quite a few other Mayan cities you could also visit.

Itaipu Dam seems like another good one, but Grand Coulee and Boulder Dam are pretty solid US alternatives, built in a different era.

It's a different sort of project, but I think Kennedy Space Center should be on your list. Unfortunately, the tour operator NASA has contracted out to has made parts of the visitor's center a bit theme park like, but seeing the Saturn V they have on display there is one of my lifetime highlights.

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Mursili
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by Mursili » Sat Jun 02, 2018 12:36 am

Ged wrote:
Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:36 am
The Great Pyramid of Giza. The tallest man-made structure for 3800 years. Surpassed by the Eiffel Tower.

The Pantheon. Still the largest unreinforced concrete dome ever built. M·AGRIPPA·L·F·COS·TERTIVM·FECIT. Marcus Agrippa, son of Lucius, in his third consulate, made it.
I was surprised to see the first mention of the great pyramid so far down the list. It seems to be the epitome of engineering marvel. So much so that some people can only believe that aliens had a hand in it.

There is a book I read some time ago called Route 66 A.D. It is more about Roman tourism, so I am not sure it is what you are looking for. Still, I thought is was a worthwhile read.

By the way, the version of the Pantheon as it stands today was built by Hadrian, but he kept the original inscription.
When it comes to havoc, no one wreaks like me! - Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz


SrGrumpy
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by SrGrumpy » Sat Jun 02, 2018 1:29 am

Winchester Cathedral. The vast Norman building, not the song. You can Google the info, but the gist is that the church was in danger of collapse in the early 20th century on account of its soft, waterlogged foundation, so a diver named William Walker worked six days a week for six years in darkness in pits dug around the church to extract rotten trees and water and put in millions (?) of sandbags to save the cathedral. There are tributes to him inside and outside + the William Walker pub.

SrGrumpy
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Re: Travel advice for an engineer

Post by SrGrumpy » Sat Jun 02, 2018 1:44 am

P.S. I'm surprised no one mentioned the Sydney Opera House, arguably the most recognizable building in the world. Architect Jørn Utzon's design looked good on paper, but it was the engineers who overcame the myriad impracticalities and controversies to make the building a reality:

https://www.arup.com/projects/s/sydney-opera-house

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