Fitting three young kids in the car...

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Balance
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by Balance » Mon Jun 04, 2018 10:04 am

warner25 wrote:
Wed May 30, 2018 2:48 pm
We have two kids, both still rear-facing, with a third due in the fall like you. Our Prius worked fine with two, but started getting extremely cramped when our youngest moved up to a toddler carseat. I've seen people say that they have three carseats across the back row of a Prius, but my experiment failed despite having some of the smallest carseats on the market (Clek Fllo and KeyFit).

When we started looking for a new car, we only considered minivans for the reasons that everyone here has already mentioned. I love Toyota so I immediately assumed that we'd get a Sienna, but then we read that the Sienna's middle seat in the second row is too narrow to properly install a carseat with another carseat on either side. The problem, then, is that one kid has to go in the third row, but the third row is inaccessible with two rear-facing carseats in the outboard second row spots. Honda then added the "Magic Slide" feature on the 2018 Odyssey, and that made our decision.

"Magic Slide" lets you move the second row outboard seats laterally when the middle seat is removed. So now you can easily put two little ones in rear-facing carseats in the second row, push them to one side, and let bigger kids (or adults) walk comfortably along a side aisle to the third row. Then you can pull apart the outboard seats to keep the little ones from touching each other, if you want. The Odyssey is also the only vehicle with both latches and tethers on all six seats in back, and the space to put a carseat in each spot, as far as I know, so it really provides maximum flexibility.
kjvmartin wrote:
Wed May 30, 2018 12:41 pm
I think back to when I was a kid - seemed like everyone had 4+ kids and a sedan and still made it work.
kjvmartin wrote:
Wed May 30, 2018 2:17 pm
Newborns and small toddlers really should be rear facing, as best I understand.
I keep saying that automakers can't keep up (or don't care to keep up, as a result of falling birthrates) with carseat laws. Rear-facing is now required in many states up to age two, not just a best-practice anymore. It seems like air travel and carpooling are now all but impossible with a few small children. Given the costs and limited options, I really wonder what a lot of people do; maybe they simply ignore the law?
Your situation is almost identical to ours. We have two boys 4 and 1, and our Prius was getting too cramped with the cars seats and all their stuff. Going on family vacations wasn't fun because we had to really pack light. We also looked at the Sienna and Odyssey and ended up purchasing a 2018 Odyssey. We absolutely love the minivan. The sliding middle row seats are a huge plus for us and we can haul our guests around in comfort with a true third-row seating. Minivans are people movers and my back is so much happier for it.

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bottlecap
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by bottlecap » Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:14 am

orangeandwhite wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:40 pm

Pacifica Hybrid has been on the market for two years. Exactly what you describe - a plug in electric hybrid. Sitting happily in our driveway.

It’s surprising that it doesn’t get more play here because it’s the ultimate Boglehead minivan. Crazy good gas mileage, and it comes with federal and (depending on where you live) state tax credits that make it very inexpensive. Ours is a top end version and we ended up i the mid 30s or so before TTL.

We couldn’t understand why anyone bought anything else, given how cheap it was relative to the gas models.
We've looked at the Chrysler. Here are our problems:

I don't know how you got a top-end version for mid-thirties. The top end version's MSRP is in the neighborhood of $48,000. Do you mean mid-thirties with the government subsidies?

It's a Chrysler, not known for reliability.

Long term reliability uncertain because it's new, but not traditionally promising (see above).

Not many used ones out there because they're new.

Gas savings sounds great, but your electric bill goes up. Cheaper than gas, but eats into savings considerably.

I'm afraid that in 10 to 12 years, you'll need a $12,000 battery pack. Maybe the price will come down to $8,000, but still, there go all your savings. And likely then some.

Given that its a new vehicle, you're buying a bit of a pig in a poke. And from a seller not exactly known for their quality pigs. Assuming it needs a battery pack after 10 but before 15 years, you're probably looking at break-even.

Anyway, that's been our thought process.

JT

LiterallyIronic
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by LiterallyIronic » Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:19 am

kjvmartin wrote:
Wed May 30, 2018 12:41 pm
I think back to when I was a kid - seemed like everyone had 4+ kids and a sedan and still made it work.
That's because when we were kids (I'm 34), kids didn't sit in carseats very long. I was in a normal seatbelt at age 3. Now I'm told that kids have to sit in carseats until they're 8.

orangeandwhite
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by orangeandwhite » Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:04 pm

bottlecap wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:14 am
orangeandwhite wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:40 pm

Pacifica Hybrid has been on the market for two years. Exactly what you describe - a plug in electric hybrid. Sitting happily in our driveway.

It’s surprising that it doesn’t get more play here because it’s the ultimate Boglehead minivan. Crazy good gas mileage, and it comes with federal and (depending on where you live) state tax credits that make it very inexpensive. Ours is a top end version and we ended up i the mid 30s or so before TTL.

We couldn’t understand why anyone bought anything else, given how cheap it was relative to the gas models.
We've looked at the Chrysler. Here are our problems:

I don't know how you got a top-end version for mid-thirties. The top end version's MSRP is in the neighborhood of $48,000. Do you mean mid-thirties with the government subsidies?

It's a Chrysler, not known for reliability.

Long term reliability uncertain because it's new, but not traditionally promising (see above).

Not many used ones out there because they're new.

Gas savings sounds great, but your electric bill goes up. Cheaper than gas, but eats into savings considerably.

I'm afraid that in 10 to 12 years, you'll need a $12,000 battery pack. Maybe the price will come down to $8,000, but still, there go all your savings. And likely then some.

Given that its a new vehicle, you're buying a bit of a pig in a poke. And from a seller not exactly known for their quality pigs. Assuming it needs a battery pack after 10 but before 15 years, you're probably looking at break-even.

Anyway, that's been our thought process.

JT
All good points. Here are my responses...

Yes, mid 30s after the subsidies. $7500 from the IRS and potentially more from your state. The price that mattters is the price you actually pay, right? Why walk away from such a huge incentive?

The improved fuel economy is because it’s a hybrid, not because it’s a plug-in. You get the better fuel economy even if you never plug it in. Many people don’t.

The battery is covered by a 10/150 warranty so not that worried there. The hybrid powertrain goes out to 15/150 if you are in a “California emissions” state.

On reliability after year 10, keep in mind that a decade old minivan has little economic value. If you needed a huge repair at year 15, you would junk the car and use your 10k of upfront savings + investment return to fund the purchase of a working replacement ancient minivan. One can overpay for quality, or for perception of quality.

As a general rule... I think a lot of people associate themselves too closely with the brand identity of their cars. People see themselves as SUV people or Honda people or whatever and shaking themselves from that is impossible, people will rationalize it. Happened to me and finally noticed it... I found it easier to get over it by simply redefining myself as “cheap people” and with that, i didn’t even test drive an Odyssey...

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deanbrew
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by deanbrew » Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:24 pm

Nearly A Moose wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 8:55 am
Haven’t read all the responses, but I am so annoyed at 4-year-ago me for buying a (perfectly fine) Subaru Forester instead of a minivan for our now 2 kids. Just get the Honda Odyssey. You need to transport you, your spouse, and three kids at a minimum. Plus any stuff you want. Plus you might want to bring a friend, grandparents, niece, etc. Just buy the van. Also, those things are so well laid out inside now, it's nuts. You could live in one!
I mentioned this earlier, and came back to reiterate. If you are they type of buyer that keeps a vehicle more than a few years (aka boglehead), don't just think about you, your spouse and three kids. Think about Gramma, Grandpa, Aunts, Uncles and cousins who might ride along. And think about a few years down the road when the kiddies' friends are riding along somewhere. Keeping this in mind, crawl into and out of the third rows of all the vehicles you look at, and analyze the legroom, headroom and ease of entry and exit. If you are at all logical, sensible and practical, you will end up with a van.

Now, if you can figure out how to get three car seats across the back seat of your current car, you can probably put off the van purchase for a couple of years.
"The course of history shows that as the government grows, liberty decreases." Thomas Jefferson

Fox
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by Fox » Mon Jun 04, 2018 1:30 pm

In five weeks, our third child is arriving (3.5yo, 1.5yo currently). I have a Ford Flex which has been a great 3-row vehicle for us. The visibility and 2nd row legroom is better than any other 3-row SUV I checked out (about 3-4 years ago-can't comment on newer options).

My wife drives an older Buick Lucerne that we bought from her grandma. We will be able to fit 3 seats in the back of that. Someone above posted about the Diono Radian car seat. We have two in each vehicle and will have to buy a couple more once the new baby outgrows the bucket seat.

I think you should go with a minivan, but the Ford Flex Ecoboost is pretty enjoyable ride.

mmmodem
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by mmmodem » Mon Jun 04, 2018 1:51 pm

Comfort in the eyes of my, 7, 5, and newborn is a tablet with internet access with plenty of juice cups and snacks. We have one expensive Diono Radian in the middle, one rear facing seat and one carrier in the back of our Prius. It's a tight fit but we much prefer money in our wallets versus driving a larger vehicle.

DW wanted a 3 row SUV and she chose a Mitsubishi Outlander. It's one of the few compact SUV's available with 3 rows. It's the same size vehicle as a Honda CRV and because it's a Mitsubishi can be had for thousands less. The third row is too small for adults but that doesn't matter because It's only used when we actually have more than 5 passengers and only kids will go back there. By the time the kids become teenagers, I imagine the Mitsubishi will be retired for a regular sedan as no more car seats are required. No expensive Diono Radians needed for the Outlander for all the kids in the second row.

Not counting the newborn, it's comfortingly quiet in the back seats when you threaten to take away the tablet.

FiscallyResponsible
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by FiscallyResponsible » Mon Jun 04, 2018 2:29 pm

We decided to forego economical and buy a used Suburban (with bench second row). The beauty of a Suburban (or a Full size pickup for that matter) is that they are wide. 3 car seats fit in the second row. We bought the Suburban because we also have a large dog and there is enough room behind row #3 for him (luggage goes in row 3). If you don't have the dog issue, buying the full size pickup truck is a lot cheaper of an option (though not cheap by any means). Putting a car seat in the third row and loading a child into it sounds horrible.

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bottlecap
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by bottlecap » Mon Jun 04, 2018 3:04 pm

orangeandwhite wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 12:04 pm

The battery is covered by a 10/150 warranty so not that worried there. The hybrid powertrain goes out to 15/150 if you are in a “California emissions” state.

On reliability after year 10, keep in mind that a decade old minivan has little economic value. If you needed a huge repair at year 15, you would junk the car and use your 10k of upfront savings + investment return to fund the purchase of a working replacement ancient minivan. One can overpay for quality, or for perception of quality.

As a general rule... I think a lot of people associate themselves too closely with the brand identity of their cars. People see themselves as SUV people or Honda people or whatever and shaking themselves from that is impossible, people will rationalize it. Happened to me and finally noticed it... I found it easier to get over it by simply redefining myself as “cheap people” and with that, i didn’t even test drive an Odyssey...
If you consider a 10 year old vehicle "junk," then you aren't "cheap people"!

Seriously though, after year 10, a Honda Odyssey ain't "junk". Top of the line could still fetch maybe $10,000. A Chrysler, not so much.

Moreover, years 10 to 15 are the gravy years. That's when the vehicle will hopefully be a fantastic economic value - to me. Every year I squeeze out is a bonus. Have to replace the battery after the warranty expires in year 10? Then the Chrysler IS junk. Whereas you could drive the Honda another 6 years and still sell it for $5,000.

Brand identity is not a concern. We've never owned a Honda. I like Fords.

It has to do with statistics. You are statistically going to have more problems with the Chrysler. A Honda is statistically going to last longer than a Chrysler. And those are the feelings I can't shake.

It is possible that the Pacifica will turn out to be the vehicle that proves otherwise. But that's a long shot.

People do seem to love their new Pacificas, which gets your attention. My concern is is whether they will love their 12 year old Pacificas like people still love their 12 year old Odysseys or Siennas...

JT

orangeandwhite
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by orangeandwhite » Mon Jun 04, 2018 4:12 pm

bottlecap wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 3:04 pm

If you consider a 10 year old vehicle "junk," then you aren't "cheap people"!

Seriously though, after year 10, a Honda Odyssey ain't "junk". Top of the line could still fetch maybe $10,000. A Chrysler, not so much.

Moreover, years 10 to 15 are the gravy years. That's when the vehicle will hopefully be a fantastic economic value - to me. Every year I squeeze out is a bonus. Have to replace the battery after the warranty expires in year 10? Then the Chrysler IS junk. Whereas you could drive the Honda another 6 years and still sell it for $5,000.

Brand identity is not a concern. We've never owned a Honda. I like Fords.

It has to do with statistics. You are statistically going to have more problems with the Chrysler. A Honda is statistically going to last longer than a Chrysler. And those are the feelings I can't shake.

It is possible that the Pacifica will turn out to be the vehicle that proves otherwise. But that's a long shot.

People do seem to love their new Pacificas, which gets your attention. My concern is is whether they will love their 12 year old Pacificas like people still love their 12 year old Odysseys or Siennas...

JT
I wouldn’t pay 10K extra (plus investment return) to insure against the fairly remote risk you describe. If anything, I’d be worried that at the end of your 10 year period, gasoline prices have risen a lot and low MPG used values are trading at a large discount to relatively economical ones.

I hear you about the brand anxiety but it just wasn’t worth the money to me to pay up to avoid it. I think you are also overestimating the Asian brand premium in the deep used market; the vehicles tend to converge as they get older, not diverge.

As best I can tell, the problems people have with the car relate to the infotainment system. The actual turn-the-wheels tech is pretty mature at this point.

randomguy
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by randomguy » Mon Jun 04, 2018 4:12 pm

bottlecap wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 3:04 pm

If you consider a 10 year old vehicle "junk," then you aren't "cheap people"!

Seriously though, after year 10, a Honda Odyssey ain't "junk". Top of the line could still fetch maybe $10,000. A Chrysler, not so much.

Moreover, years 10 to 15 are the gravy years. That's when the vehicle will hopefully be a fantastic economic value - to me. Every year I squeeze out is a bonus. Have to replace the battery after the warranty expires in year 10? Then the Chrysler IS junk. Whereas you could drive the Honda another 6 years and still sell it for $5,000.

Brand identity is not a concern. We've never owned a Honda. I like Fords.

It has to do with statistics. You are statistically going to have more problems with the Chrysler. A Honda is statistically going to last longer than a Chrysler. And those are the feelings I can't shake.

It is possible that the Pacifica will turn out to be the vehicle that proves otherwise. But that's a long shot.

People do seem to love their new Pacificas, which gets your attention. My concern is is whether they will love their 12 year old Pacificas like people still love their 12 year old Odysseys or Siennas...

JT
To some extent worry about battery replacement is like worrying about replacing an engine. Both are expensive. Neither is very common. That being said Chrysler doesn't exactly have a huge hybrid/EV history specifically OR a history of making reliable cars when you are talking north of 120k miles. Given my 30 year history with dodge/chrsyler minivans, I would be a lot more worried about the rest of the car versus the drive train:)

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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by Nate79 » Mon Jun 04, 2018 4:44 pm

randomguy wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 4:12 pm
bottlecap wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 3:04 pm

If you consider a 10 year old vehicle "junk," then you aren't "cheap people"!

Seriously though, after year 10, a Honda Odyssey ain't "junk". Top of the line could still fetch maybe $10,000. A Chrysler, not so much.

Moreover, years 10 to 15 are the gravy years. That's when the vehicle will hopefully be a fantastic economic value - to me. Every year I squeeze out is a bonus. Have to replace the battery after the warranty expires in year 10? Then the Chrysler IS junk. Whereas you could drive the Honda another 6 years and still sell it for $5,000.

Brand identity is not a concern. We've never owned a Honda. I like Fords.

It has to do with statistics. You are statistically going to have more problems with the Chrysler. A Honda is statistically going to last longer than a Chrysler. And those are the feelings I can't shake.

It is possible that the Pacifica will turn out to be the vehicle that proves otherwise. But that's a long shot.

People do seem to love their new Pacificas, which gets your attention. My concern is is whether they will love their 12 year old Pacificas like people still love their 12 year old Odysseys or Siennas...

JT
To some extent worry about battery replacement is like worrying about replacing an engine. Both are expensive. Neither is very common. That being said Chrysler doesn't exactly have a huge hybrid/EV history specifically OR a history of making reliable cars when you are talking north of 120k miles. Given my 30 year history with dodge/chrsyler minivans, I would be a lot more worried about the rest of the car versus the drive train:)
The Chrysler Pacific hybrid battery is manufactured by LG Chem who makes many hybrid batteries including the Chevy Volt and Bolt. While the reliability of Chrysler is not exactly at the top of the charts the hybrid part, being manufactured by LG should not be a worry.

randomguy
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by randomguy » Mon Jun 04, 2018 5:52 pm

Nate79 wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 4:44 pm

The Chrysler Pacific hybrid battery is manufactured by LG Chem who makes many hybrid batteries including the Chevy Volt and Bolt. While the reliability of Chrysler is not exactly at the top of the charts the hybrid part, being manufactured by LG should not be a worry.
The battery reliability would be a function of it not getting cooled properly or poor charged/wear leveling software. I will not pretend to know how much of that is LG versus chrysler. It is the rest of the car (motors, transmissions, fit and finish,...) that would keep me up at night.

People have different expectations for reliability. The differences between a toyota and a chrysler is on average 1-2 trips to the dealer over 7 years.

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bottlecap
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by bottlecap » Mon Jun 04, 2018 6:03 pm

Nate79 wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 4:44 pm
The Chrysler Pacific hybrid battery is manufactured by LG Chem who makes many hybrid batteries including the Chevy Volt and Bolt. While the reliability of Chrysler is not exactly at the top of the charts the hybrid part, being manufactured by LG should not be a worry.
I'm not worried as much about the reliability of the battery (as in early failure), but it's longevity, given that we drive them 15 - 20 years.

There's a lot to think about.

JT

randomguy
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by randomguy » Mon Jun 04, 2018 6:55 pm

bottlecap wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 6:03 pm
Nate79 wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 4:44 pm
The Chrysler Pacific hybrid battery is manufactured by LG Chem who makes many hybrid batteries including the Chevy Volt and Bolt. While the reliability of Chrysler is not exactly at the top of the charts the hybrid part, being manufactured by LG should not be a worry.
I'm not worried as much about the reliability of the battery (as in early failure), but it's longevity, given that we drive them 15 - 20 years.

There's a lot to think about.

JT

Again historically this has not been an issue. You can research what 15 year old prius battery failure rate has been. It is on the same scale as your odds of blowing up your engine. A couple EVs had some bad deteriation issues but those have been the exception (like buying a car where it turns out the head gasket has issues) not a general trend.

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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by bottlecap » Mon Jun 04, 2018 8:25 pm

randomguy wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 6:55 pm
bottlecap wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 6:03 pm
Nate79 wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 4:44 pm
The Chrysler Pacific hybrid battery is manufactured by LG Chem who makes many hybrid batteries including the Chevy Volt and Bolt. While the reliability of Chrysler is not exactly at the top of the charts the hybrid part, being manufactured by LG should not be a worry.
I'm not worried as much about the reliability of the battery (as in early failure), but it's longevity, given that we drive them 15 - 20 years.

There's a lot to think about.

JT

Again historically this has not been an issue. You can research what 15 year old prius battery failure rate has been. It is on the same scale as your odds of blowing up your engine. A couple EVs had some bad deteriation issues but those have been the exception (like buying a car where it turns out the head gasket has issues) not a general trend.
Research says Toyota says an average of 8 years. That seems low. There was a recent quote from a mechanic at A1 Auto that says they typically see them last 12 to 15 years on a Prius.

Autotrader says expect 10 to 15 years, but that was 4 years back.

This doesn’t seem anywhere as low as an engine failure rate, but for the average car buyer, it’s not a concern.

JT

cantos
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by cantos » Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:35 pm

kjvmartin wrote:
Wed May 30, 2018 12:41 pm
We've got a four year old, 16 month old, and one due in September.
...
This is not a fashion statement for me. I just want the best mix of comfort, function, and economical, way to cart the kids. Thoughts?
No brainer. Odyssey. We have one and it is amazeballs.

duuuuuude
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by duuuuuude » Tue Jun 05, 2018 1:04 am

Here's my experience with 3 under 4:

I'm all in favor of a minivan! Utility over looks. I actually owned a 2005 honda odyssey while a bachelor as a bicycle racing "team car" all over the west coast. Awesome space, mileage, and comfort! NEVER HAD PROBLEMS!

However, wife is anti-minivan to the core. We just had our 3rd kid last week. Since she gave birth to our 3 kids, what she wants completely trumps what I know is more functional and practical. Happy wife, happy life!

Initially, I was planning on keeping our station wagon and go with Diono 3 across, but it was going to be a tight fit for family and wouldn't allow for extended family adventures.

Earlier this year, we compromised with a 2007 Toyota Sequoia (last of the well regarded 1st generation Sequoias, so bugs should have been worked out). Got a Craigslist special for $8k (after a trusted mechanic checked it all out and the single owner produced all maintenance records).

Pros: Wife accepts of the vehicle because it's not a minivan
It purrs with no hiccups
Being a "bigger car" I win with physics if there's a collision
Kids seem to like it because it's a "truck" (they're 3 and 1)
When they spill food and milk all over, I don't really care because it's an "old" car!
Insurance and registration are CHEAP!
Runs on conventional oil, so that's super cheap to maintain.
Gives me hope that we'll be able to take the thing on bigger and longer adventures in the future when the kids get older.
3-point turns are not always necessary ;-)
We already had Diono car seats, so now it feels like we have even more room with car seats installed!

Cons: Gas mileage is terrible (12-13 mpg)....but not paying $35k+ for a new car/insurance/registration, etc. eases the pain at the pump a little bit
Doors are not sliding
Annoying getting in and out of the car/loading the kids into the car

Being the Boglehead I am, I'm planning on keeping it until the wheels fall off.

There seems to be some hope in keeping it for a very long time...

http://www.trucktrend.com/features/1602 ... ta-tundra/

http://www.trucktrend.com/how-to/projec ... tear-down/

Easy Rhino
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by Easy Rhino » Tue Jun 05, 2018 5:02 pm

We have a couple of combi cocorro seats. Also small, also expensive like the diono. can't carry quite as huge of a kid.

Once they're older they can get a basic booster (we have evenflo amp, they are cheap) so there's gotta be a narrow verison.

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wander
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by wander » Tue Jun 05, 2018 5:20 pm

bottlecap wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 6:03 pm
Nate79 wrote:
Mon Jun 04, 2018 4:44 pm
The Chrysler Pacific hybrid battery is manufactured by LG Chem who makes many hybrid batteries including the Chevy Volt and Bolt. While the reliability of Chrysler is not exactly at the top of the charts the hybrid part, being manufactured by LG should not be a worry.
I'm not worried as much about the reliability of the battery (as in early failure), but it's longevity, given that we drive them 15 - 20 years.

There's a lot to think about.

JT
I rented a 2018 Chrysler Pacifica a few months ago. It took me awhile to fill up the gas since I had no idea where the opener inside the van. From the look, it should be opened from the inside. But there was none, I had to open it from outside. The van stops the engine at traffic lights and restarts when moving foot from brake to gas pedal. For me, it was fine, but some may not like it.

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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by jdb » Tue Jun 05, 2018 5:24 pm

greg24 wrote:
Wed May 30, 2018 12:52 pm
kjvmartin wrote:
Wed May 30, 2018 12:41 pm
I think back to when I was a kid - seemed like everyone had 4+ kids and a sedan and still made it work.
It helped when a lot of people didn't even put on seat belts.

Fortunately, we've driven the automotive death rate down quite a bit by changing things.
A 1957 Buick Roadmaster with newest gimmick, air conditioning. Worked for cross country excursion with four school age kids plus dog (why did we take dog?) on cross country odyssey from Wisconsin to visit various family in northern and southern California in early 60’s, returning on Route 66 (this was before interstates). And we were pulling pop up camper to sleep in. Memorable to say the least. But I digress and we had never heard of seat belts. Good luck.

dk240t
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Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by dk240t » Wed Jun 06, 2018 9:15 am

Minivans are great for this situation.

We just bought one, looked at Odyssey, Sienna, and Kia Sedona.

We ended up buying a 2018 Odyssey new - we preferred the way it drove and the magic slide seats to provide easy access to the 3rd row with car seats in the captains chairs. We preferred the way it drove to the Sienna by a wide margin.

I thought the best buy out there was a 1-2 yr old Kia Sedona - there are tons of these out there for ~$20k, with <35k miles, 1 year old, with leather, that come off rental car use. They don't have all the features as they are bottom level models with a leather package but for 40% off the cost of a new Odyssey or Sienna that's pretty good. Maybe can find a rare higher end model with low mileage for not much more.

barelybarefoot
Posts: 41
Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2013 7:15 pm

Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by barelybarefoot » Wed Jun 06, 2018 2:07 pm

mjk280 wrote:
Wed May 30, 2018 1:31 pm
I fit 3 diono radian car seats in the back of my Sonata so they should work with a CRV. Eventually you'll want to separate them to stop fighting and minivans are better for 3rd row access. First time one of your kids swings the car door into another vehicle in a parking lot you'll quickly become a convert to sliding doors.
I can fit three dionos across in everyone’s cars: Camry, MDX, Rdx, crv

doug1022
Posts: 38
Joined: Sat Jan 24, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Suburban Boston

Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by doug1022 » Wed Jun 06, 2018 3:44 pm

We have three kids as well and solved this dilemma by driving a Honda Odyssey, which we eventually replaced with a Toyota Sienna (all wheel drive). We loved both cars. Minivans give you a lot more flexibility and storage when compared to three row SUVs. Also, getting into the third row of an SUV can be challenging depending on design (thinking of Honda Pilot, Toyota Highlander, etc).

likashing
Posts: 149
Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 7:58 pm

Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by likashing » Wed Jun 06, 2018 4:05 pm

kjvmartin wrote:
Wed May 30, 2018 12:41 pm
We tried to arrange our three car seats in the Honda/Chevy and don't see it working out. .... I'm thinking about other options, and if I decided to get another vehicle my top budget is $35,000.
I am not going to be the one that give you an excuse get a new car for $35k when your current cars work fine :D

Lots of information online on what car seats fit 3 across in a CRV or Equinox. In general, Diono and Combi Coccoro are the go to "narrower" car seats. The sites below give you specific info.

https://www.thecarcrashdetective.com/3- ... tions-crv/
https://www.thecarcrashdetective.com/3- ... s-equinox/

Feel free to get a new car but don't use the car seat situation as an excuse. Lots of options to put 3 car seats in your current cars. Heck, 3 seats can fit even if you had a Honda Fit:

https://www.thecarcrashdetective.com/3- ... tions-fit/

Spending a couple of hundred $ to get the seats that fit is nothing compared to a $35k car.

Stores like buybuybaby let you try a seat out in the parking lot. Amazon will let you return your seat if you find their listed "width" does not match the description.

mags
Posts: 21
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2014 1:14 pm

Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by mags » Wed Jun 06, 2018 6:33 pm

We have 3 across in a Rav4, Highlander and CRV. We use Diono Radian car seats. Works well for us with 2 (rear facing),4 and 6 year old.

finite_difference
Posts: 1050
Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2015 7:00 pm

Re: Fitting three young kids in the car...

Post by finite_difference » Fri Jun 08, 2018 5:42 pm

orangeandwhite wrote:
Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:40 pm
finite_difference wrote:
Wed May 30, 2018 9:22 pm
Odyssey or Sienna, $30k OTD or less.

They need to make an EV version though, could pack a lot of batteries into a minivan chassis. Maybe we’ll have to wait for Tesla for that particular innovation.
Pacifica Hybrid has been on the market for two years. Exactly what you describe - a plug in electric hybrid. Sitting happily in our driveway.

It’s surprising that it doesn’t get more play here because it’s the ultimate Boglehead minivan. Crazy good gas mileage, and it comes with federal and (depending on where you live) state tax credits that make it very inexpensive. Ours is a top end version and we ended up i the mid 30s or so before TTL.

We couldn’t understand why anyone bought anything else, given how cheap it was relative to the gas models.
That’s really cool, did not know that. When it comes time to replace the Odyssey I will be looking at Pacifica then ;) The next car will be hybrid or preferably EV.
The most precious gift we can offer anyone is our attention. - Thich Nhat Hanh

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