Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

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Alf 101
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Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by Alf 101 » Fri May 04, 2018 1:10 pm

For many of us, it's becoming that time of the season where thoughts turn to planting. Now some like flowers -- they like plants, they look pretty, and the help pollinators. Others like vegetables -- this saves money, and it's great having and cooking with the freshest of ingredients.

I find growing fruit to be a different category, as it seems far more of a long term commitment. While I have doubts on the possibility of ROI, it's something I'm thinking about, and wondering about others experience. You can decide how many tomato plants you want, and what varieties, each new year. Fruit requires some advanced planning, and a long term commitment. That or I'm overthinking it.

Raspberries, I've found, grow quickly and bear a lot of fruit. Blueberries I've grown in pots, but their soil requirements can make it difficult to grow easily in many places. Fruit trees -- apples, plums, or peaches -- also seem to require a lot of space, a lot work, and no small amount of patience. Which have people grown and liked?

One fruit that has my interest is the haskap, or honeyberry, which I've seen at several nurseries. This seems a good winter-hardy plant that doesn't need all that particular growing conditions -- slightly acidic to slightly alkaline soil, full to partial sun. Of course I've never eaten a haskap, which is something worth thinking about before planting a row of these. I'm curious also if anyone has familiarity with these.

We're going to plant a lot of things this year, but I am curious in others' thoughts on the subject...

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Pajamas
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by Pajamas » Fri May 04, 2018 1:17 pm

If you drive through certain rural areas you will often see a tumbled-down fireplace, a few daffodils that have naturalized, and a fig tree that still bears fruit each year. It's not necessarily difficult or labor intensive to grow fruit, although you might have to fight the birds for it.

Best advice is to choose plants that are suitable for your climate. Go to a locally owned nursery or to a county agricultural extension office.

http://pickyourown.org/countyextensionagentoffices.htm

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lthenderson
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by lthenderson » Fri May 04, 2018 1:25 pm

I also agree that it really isn't very labor intensive to grow fruit trees. I pretty much stick them in the ground and ignore them for a few years until they start setting fruit in significant quantities to pick. I generally visit my local nursery in the fall and get their leftovers for a fraction of the price they charge in the spring. Although it isn't the best time to plant them, I still have good success at getting them to survive and if they don't live the winter, the nursery will still give my money back in the spring. This way, I have gradually accumulated quite the assortment of fruit trees and shrubs over the years without much capital outlay.

roamin survivor
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by roamin survivor » Fri May 04, 2018 1:42 pm

I've grown up with fruit trees (apricot, cherry, plum, apple, persimmon) and while they can be very hands off in maintenance, they were still pains involved. Often deciduous, so fall was an annoying time cleaning up and the wildlife-eaten fruit left didn't help. All except the persimmon eventually stopped producing and got cut down, but I still have to come by and help with the persimmon on the cleaning and picking. Tree does not seem to give up even after 15 years, though I've read they live 50-75 yrs. It's also a bust/boom sort of tree. Usually a bounty year followed by a lean, but not always the case. It's probably weather dependent as the output seems to match all persimmon trees based on conversations and the office donations from other owners.

Also keep in mind about max growth and access. Being the small and lightweight of the family meant I was the one to scale up the tree to pick the upper reaches where ladders had no access.

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N1CKV
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by N1CKV » Fri May 04, 2018 3:48 pm

Highly dependent on your region.
My parents have tried plum trees, they were terrible because of the flowers and bugs they attracted.
Currently they have a lemon and a Satsuma (orange variety), we are southern so citrus does well. The lemon tree has some nasty thorns, not the most pleasant feeling to get poked by it.
I have met a lot of people that claim to love money, but they also seem to be the same people that are in the biggest hurry to get rid of it.

blmarsha123
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by blmarsha123 » Fri May 04, 2018 3:58 pm

I agree that fruit bearing trees are highly dependent on your region.

In my area, I have had apple, apricot and plum trees. The plum trees produced the best with the least overhead, apricot the worst; apple required a fair amount of maintenance (unless you wanted to pick through a bushel of wormy apples just to get a couple of pints of apple butter). Also, we had a sudden freeze one fall that wiped out all of my plum trees.

Now, I stick with blackberries and raspberries.

barnaclebob
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by barnaclebob » Fri May 04, 2018 4:07 pm

Look into mini dwarf apple trees. The can be quite productive and have a 5' spread at 5' tall. I think we got about 40lbs of apples from 6 of them last year but they weren't up to full production yet, only 3 years old. You'll have to spray them about once a month maybe if the bugs are bad, I think we only sprayed ours a few times a year for various things.

3504PIR
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by 3504PIR » Fri May 04, 2018 4:13 pm

I'm expanding my fruit tree inventory over the next 12 months to a total of 6 trees. I currently have 2 red apple trees and a pear tree as well as a white grape vine that is probably 40 years old and planted way before my time. Ultimately, I hope to have 12 fruit trees to include apple, pear and peach trees which I hope to sell occasionally at farmers markets (the fruit, not the trees). Additionally, once I get settled in our retirement home, I will be putting down 4-6 blueberry bushes (we are currently 12 months away from moving to our retirement home full time). I haven't had a lot of luck with them in the past due to the finicky soil requirements, but I have a new pH monitor that really works and I will be giving it another shot with better results expected. If I break the code, I plan on having about 12 plants total. I am a little annoyed that I won't be able to go to our retirement home this spring, so I won't be able to plant any of the additional apple trees this year, but will be putting down several next spring.

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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by 3504PIR » Fri May 04, 2018 4:18 pm

barnaclebob wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 4:07 pm
Look into mini dwarf apple trees. The can be quite productive and have a 5' spread at 5' tall. I think we got about 40lbs of apples from 6 of them last year but they weren't up to full production yet, only 3 years old. You'll have to spray them about once a month maybe if the bugs are bad, I think we only sprayed ours a few times a year for various things.
My apple trees are dwarf thus far and I'm planning on adding more over time. I found our dwarf trees in Europe to be very productive and easy to manage, unlike our pear tree which is full size and we loose a lot of fruit from because I'm not climbing up to deal with the high fruit. If I leave the fruit on the ground after it falls it always draws wild boar in the late autumn. We've harvested about 500 lbs of boar over the past 3 years from the pears.

/rant. What do you use to spray your apple trees and where do you grow? We are in the mountains of NC and get very good production from apples and peaches in our zone.

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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by barnaclebob » Fri May 04, 2018 4:28 pm

3504PIR wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 4:18 pm
barnaclebob wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 4:07 pm
Look into mini dwarf apple trees. The can be quite productive and have a 5' spread at 5' tall. I think we got about 40lbs of apples from 6 of them last year but they weren't up to full production yet, only 3 years old. You'll have to spray them about once a month maybe if the bugs are bad, I think we only sprayed ours a few times a year for various things.
My apple trees are dwarf thus far and I'm planning on adding more over time. I found our dwarf trees in Europe to be very productive and easy to manage, unlike our pear tree which is full size and we loose a lot of fruit from because I'm not climbing up to deal with the high fruit. If I leave the fruit on the ground after it falls it always draws wild boar in the late autumn. We've harvested about 500 lbs of boar over the past 3 years from the pears.

/rant. What do you use to spray your apple trees and where do you grow? We are in the mountains of NC and get very good production from apples and peaches in our zone.
I'll spray a copper spray before flowering, and after fruit falls, a dormant spray in the winter, and permethrin if I see any evidence of bad insects. I try to avoid spraying anything around flowering time to not hurt the bees. Im in WA state and haven't had many apple maggot or worm problems but we are at a new house now with 7 trees just planted this year and that could all change.

Turning fallen pears into wild boar meat seems like a pretty good trade to me.
Last edited by barnaclebob on Fri May 04, 2018 4:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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MikeWillRetire
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by MikeWillRetire » Fri May 04, 2018 4:29 pm

I found that growing raspberries is fairly easy, but you have to commit to building a good trellis. Though not a tree or shrub, strawberries are pretty easy too.

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TierArtz
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by TierArtz » Fri May 04, 2018 4:40 pm

In production: We have more oranges, limes, and grapefruit than we can stand, and an apricot tree that provides an amazing bounty the last two weeks of May.

Planted, but too young to produce: One nectarine, two plum, and a Mandarin orange tree.

Considering planting: Pluot (plum/apricot hybrid), blood orange, peach, and/or pomegranate.

Other plants (his): Hot peppers; hers (watermelon, cucumbers, and sunflowers); kids (cotton, wheat, and deer mix for school projects and bird bait).

MildlyEccentric
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by MildlyEccentric » Fri May 04, 2018 4:54 pm

We have figs, apples and cherries. The fig trees were the lowest maintenance and very prolific producers. The apples did not do well unless they were sprayed regularly. With the cherries, you have birds and other creatures who will snack on them. My neighbor with 600 cherry trees had to spray frequently. He had to fend off bears who liked the cherries.

The fig trees died during an unusually cold winter so climate is a factor. I was lucky that I had propagated some baby fig trees which were indoors, so I could keep the figs going. Pay attention to the root stock of the trees as that determines their size. Full size, semi-dwarf, dwarf, etc. The smaller trees produce sooner and you don't need ladders to pick them, but you might have to arrange a support system to keep them from falling over.

Good luck.

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Smorgasbord
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by Smorgasbord » Fri May 04, 2018 5:10 pm

I'm in the suburbs of Chicago, right on lake Michigan, so I can't do citrus or anything that can't stand the cold, but last year I put in 200 pawpaws and 100 persimmons into my yard (planted 3 per hole since they were small and from state nursery) along with 6 blackberry bushes. The main pest in my area are deer who like to gnaw on branches/little trees, so I went with the pawpaws and persimmons since the deer seem less inclined to eat the trees. Total expenses for the trees/plants so far was less than $200, so I'll probably have a positive ROI after a few years (as long as I don't count the mountain of time spent on the project).

At my old house in West Lafayette, IN I had ~30 trees that were a mix of apples, pears, peaches, nectarines, and plums. I also sold the fruit at a local farmers market, and peaches were by far the most profitable per tree. Apples are a dime a dozen, nectarines and plums seem more susceptible to disease/pests/cold, etc., and pears take forever to produce a large crop...but peaches produce quickly and in abundance, and my oh my do people love giant juicy peachs on hot summer days.

blmarsha123
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by blmarsha123 » Fri May 04, 2018 5:30 pm

I completely forgot about my cherry tree. Until the sudden freeze that year, we looked forward to homemade sour cherry pie (that is, when we could beat the birds to the ripe cherries).

Alf 101
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by Alf 101 » Fri May 04, 2018 7:35 pm

Being at a more northern latitude, I'm looking more at fruit bearing shrubs than trees. Plus with only so much full sun space available, this might fit a little better with available space.

In the past I've grown raspberries, which were fairly productive and easy. The Japanese Beetles got at them, but otherwise this was a success.

Blueberries I've grown in pots, where you can create the right soil, no problem. Blueberries take a long time to produce though. At some point I'd like to grow enough that I can get more than a few berries at a time. This could take a good year of first amending the soil, building raised beds, etc.

Out of a sense of novelty maybe, I've been thinking about a few plants of things a skitch more exotic -- haskaps, lingonberries, blackberries (OK, maybe not that exotic). Anyone trying something a little different, just to see?

deikel
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by deikel » Fri May 04, 2018 7:46 pm

Planting fruit trees and bushes is actually rather simple. Buy the plant small, put it in the ground, water the first 6 month (if planted in spring) wait for result....no comparison to the work you have to invest in veggies IMO

The space requirement for fruit trees is not that big, remember, for your personal fun, you don't need optimal place, space or soil conditions. One Apple Tree in a good year will provide you more Apples than you will have an interest in eating or processing and in a bad year, the birds might get them all but a handful ...that's part of the fun in my view.

You can place the trees as close as 6-8 ft, cut them to a height of maybe 12 ft and still have plenty fruit at a very manageable size tree (Apple, Cherry, Pear ect.) - again, its not about optimal production rate, its for fun to pick some fresh from the tree.

Trees took me about 3-4 years for first fruits, bushes like 3 years. I don't think they have monetary return on investment, at least that's not how I look at them. Trees cost 50 USD a pop and bushes 20 in my area, you get more fruit a year than you want to eat, some trading and give away for friends - that's about it.
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Emilyjane
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by Emilyjane » Fri May 04, 2018 8:11 pm

Alf 101 wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 1:10 pm

One fruit that has my interest is the haskap, or honeyberry, which I've seen at several nurseries. This seems a good winter-hardy plant that doesn't need all that particular growing conditions
We’ve had haskaps (honeyberries) for 3 years now. Fairly trouble free, the fruit are tarter than blueberries. A bit labor intensive to pick, but easy to get enough for topping Cheerios. You need at least 2 varieties to cross pollinate. So far, fingers crossed, the deer haven’t eaten them.
"Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance", Confucius

finite_difference
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by finite_difference » Fri May 04, 2018 8:29 pm

I love reading the responses here about folks who manage to grow stuff so well :).
The most precious gift we can offer anyone is our attention. - Thich Nhat Hanh

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Tamarind
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by Tamarind » Sat May 05, 2018 5:24 am

Another vote for figs, which will grow nearly anywhere with minimal care and no sprays. I grow a variety called "Hardy Chicago", which will indeed grow and fruit in Chicago if planted against a south facing wall. In my milder clime it forms a tree which last year produced 11 pounds of figs.... It's a good thing I really love figs.

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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by likegarden » Sat May 05, 2018 7:12 am

Gooseberries and currents! Our gooseberry bushes are now in shade and no longer bear fruits, but the currents still get sun and give good berries to eat right from the bushes.

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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by Miakis » Sat May 05, 2018 9:37 am

I'm in Zone 5.

Persimmon trees - I have planted American persimmon and an American-Asian hybrid. I can't do a full Asian persimmon here, but you can west of the Rockies. They do well, because the American persimmon is a native in my area, but they don't transplant well, so the one I planted from a tiny stick grew up bigger and better than any of the ones that were fruiting sized when planted.

I don't care for persimmons, but my husband loves them. The only problem is squirrels - since you have to wait until the fruit is really ripe, the squirrels get at them a lot. They probably eat or ruin 50% of our persimmons.

Apples - I have them. I won't plant them again. Too many diseases and pests. I don't want produce that I have to spray all the time.

Cherries - I had a great sour cherry, but they have a lot of fungus problems here and it died. I will try again when I have more space when we move next year and can plant them somewhere with more airflow. Other than birds and fungus, they don't have a lot of problems in our area. I also tried Nanking cherries. They are a large bush that flowers beautifully in the Spring, but they need both male and female bushes to fruit. Luck of the draw, but all three of mine turned out to be the same sex, so none of them fruit! I'd plant them again just for looks, though.

Asian pears - these are great. No pests or diseases to speak of in my area. Very pretty pear tree. Fruit abundantly. But they are tall. I have a big fruit-picking pole, which is helpful, but picking the tallest fruit is hard work. Nice thing is that they are a tough fruit and if you go out and pick them up as soon as they fall, they aren't bruised a ton and the ants/animals don't get a chance at them. If you leave them on the ground, they are a fan-favorite in the animal kingdom. They get hoovered up from the ground in 24 hours by squirrels, raccoons, opossums, and rabbits. They are so productive that there's fruit to spare.

Raspberries and blackberries - Easy. No problems. I planted mine along a fence line and I tie them up to the fence, but a trellis would be better.

Asparagus - Not a fruit, but a nice perennial crop to consider. Asparagus beetles are annoying, but manageable.

3504PIR
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by 3504PIR » Thu May 17, 2018 3:43 pm

barnaclebob wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 4:28 pm
3504PIR wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 4:18 pm
barnaclebob wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 4:07 pm
Look into mini dwarf apple trees. The can be quite productive and have a 5' spread at 5' tall. I think we got about 40lbs of apples from 6 of them last year but they weren't up to full production yet, only 3 years old. You'll have to spray them about once a month maybe if the bugs are bad, I think we only sprayed ours a few times a year for various things.
My apple trees are dwarf thus far and I'm planning on adding more over time. I found our dwarf trees in Europe to be very productive and easy to manage, unlike our pear tree which is full size and we loose a lot of fruit from because I'm not climbing up to deal with the high fruit. If I leave the fruit on the ground after it falls it always draws wild boar in the late autumn. We've harvested about 500 lbs of boar over the past 3 years from the pears.

/rant. What do you use to spray your apple trees and where do you grow? We are in the mountains of NC and get very good production from apples and peaches in our zone.
I'll spray a copper spray before flowering, and after fruit falls, a dormant spray in the winter, and permethrin if I see any evidence of bad insects. I try to avoid spraying anything around flowering time to not hurt the bees. Im in WA state and haven't had many apple maggot or worm problems but we are at a new house now with 7 trees just planted this year and that could all change.

Turning fallen pears into wild boar meat seems like a pretty good trade to me.
Thanks very much for the info - I will be looking into this further.

Teague
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by Teague » Thu May 17, 2018 4:53 pm

By far the easiest to grow, and most entertaining, fruit tree we have is pomegranate. In our climate (hot summer, winter lows in the low 30's F) our tree requires literally no maintenance. No water besides rain, which is a paltry 12 inches per year. No pruning, no pest control, nothing.

And yes, it is entertaining, if a fruit tree can be that. One of our dogs thinks of it as the bush that makes all these red tennis balls each Fall. The dog will stand on its hind legs to get its chosen "ball," then spend a while tossing it up into the air, and chase it all about. When it gets bored, or the "ball" goes flat and falls apart, it eats it. A toy and a snack all in one.
Semper Augustus

3504PIR
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by 3504PIR » Thu May 17, 2018 4:56 pm

Teague wrote:
Thu May 17, 2018 4:53 pm
By far the easiest to grow, and most entertaining, fruit tree we have is pomegranate. In our climate (hot summer, winter lows in the low 30's F) our tree requires literally no maintenance. No water besides rain, which is a paltry 12 inches per year. No pruning, no pest control, nothing.

And yes, it is entertaining, if a fruit tree can be that. One of our dogs thinks of it as the bush that makes all these red tennis balls each Fall. The dog will stand on its hind legs to get its chosen "ball," then spend a while tossing it up into the air, and chase it all about. When it gets bored, or the "ball" goes flat and falls apart, it eats it. A toy and a snack all in one.
That is awesome! My dog does the same with coconuts which are everywhere near my house. She even goes into the surf to pull some out!

wolf359
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by wolf359 » Thu May 17, 2018 7:10 pm

There's a trick to preparing the soil for Blueberries. Go to Starbucks, and get a bag of what they call "Grounds for the Garden." These are their discarded coffee grounds. Develop a relationship with them, and arrange to pick them up regularly. Dig holes in your yard and bury them. Wait a year.

What happens is that worms love coffee grounds, and will nest in them. The amount of worm food will cause their population to explode. If you put the holes near each other, the worms will aerate the soil between the holes, so the whole area becomes like it was naturally tilled, acidic, and with lots of worms. Amend the soil with peat and garden Sulphur, and the area will stay sufficiently acidic for years. I used this trick to prepare clay for blueberry bushes, and the worms did most of my digging for me.

A further suggestion -- plant a mixture of commercial varieties and varieties they don't sell in the grocery stores. Blueberries work better with cross pollination. The commercial varieties will give you a large number of berries, and the non-commercial types can give you things you can't buy, like pink blueberries, or blueberries larger than a quarter. You can also time the harvests, so they produce from June to August.

If you plant enough, you don't have to fight the wildlife. We lose a third of our crop to critters, and still have plenty for our own use.

Blueberries definitely have a positive ROI. Once you get them going, they can produce for 50 years. Our oldest bushes are now 10 years old. Asparagus stands can last for 15-30 years. Raspberries where I live lasted about 5-7 years, but then developed viruses which prevented me from planting more. Strawberries can be planted on tower pots, so you can harvest them like bushes. We went from about a dozen strawberry plants to 125 at a time (in a small yard). Gooseberries and currants are good for semi-shaded areas, as long as they get a little sun.

In years that we've skipped the vegetable garden, our perrenial fruit plants have given us plenty, with little effort.

Another hint: If you only have room for a single tree and pick a fruit that requires cross-pollination, it is possible to buy a single tree with multiple varieties grafted onto the same trunk. We have a plum tree which has three varieties of plums on it.

Edit: I'm in Zone 7
Last edited by wolf359 on Sat May 19, 2018 8:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

gd
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by gd » Thu May 17, 2018 8:28 pm

Alf 101 wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 1:10 pm
I am curious in others' thoughts on the subject...
My thoughts are this is a pointless thread without everyone identifying their location.

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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by flyingaway » Thu May 17, 2018 8:48 pm

I have been growing fruit trees for over 10 years, and learned a lot from experience, such as pollinations, weather, etc. Figs die during winter and grow back in Spring. However, most figs do not get ripen before winter comes to kill them. This winter is particularly cold and killed most of my fig trees (they did not grow back this Spring).

I usually grow fruits that are not available in most grocery stores, such as persimmons, jojobees (dates), Asian pears, pawpaws. (I grew cherry trees for many years without success and not cut all down. Since cherry is available cheaply in grocery stores). Winter killed my Asian persimmons many times and I started growing American and hybrid varieties. Asian pears taste better, but attract insects. I also started grafting fruit tress.

It is NOT an easy task to grow fruit trees WITH FRUITS.

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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by forgeblast » Fri May 18, 2018 9:49 am

We are rural, zone 5 lots of deer, and everything else that make growing items difficult.
Everything we plant has to be fenced, or tree tubed.
We have had luck with hazelnuts, now that they are established the deer do not make a big dent in them.
Pear trees, love fresh pears, the hybrids are great.
Just planted 10 more paw-paw trees have two that are about 5 foot tall now.
Cherries, the birds get them before I do, same with currants.
Was looking at the honeyberries and may plant a few I just need to buy more fencing before I tackle that project.
I grew hops for a bit too, they would climb right up our deck.
Nourse farms has great product, their black berries are still going strong for us at least 10 years old. Same with their asparagus.

Alf 101
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by Alf 101 » Fri May 18, 2018 10:33 am

I recently moved from Zone 4 to Zone 5, and have started our first season of planting in our new home. I started planting 6 blueberries -- two Jersey, two Patriot, and two Duke. I had to do some work on the soil for the blueberries; I sent a sample in for analysis to the local university which showed a pH just below 6, and very low potassium levels, as well as low levels for some secondary nutrients (e.g., magnesium, calcium). Mainly I dug a much wider hole to plant them, filled it with a compost-peat moss combination, and gave them a small amount of fertilizer/acidifier.

I planted four haskaps, or honeyberries (same fruit, different name). Allegedly these plants don't require nearly as particular conditions as the blueberries, but we'll see. All these shrubs are planted in a sunny spot with good drainage. So far none of them have shown any new growth, but they've only been in the ground 1-2 weeks.

We thought about apple trees, but there are several well established orchards near us, where we can pick as many apples as we want for $1/lb, choosing from multiple varieties. I am considering a Saskatoonberry, or Serviceberry as it's also called. There's a variety that grows to about 6' that might be nice. I'm curious if anyone has experience with these. Blackberries too, are in play.

Our location is fairly wooded also. We have trail cameras up on our property, and over the last several months have only seen one deer. That said, the previous owners put in a large fenced garden area, where we planted our vegetables. Something about an 8' tall fence makes me think grazing has been a problem in the past. Particularly later in the summer and into the fall, I feel I'll need to get more fencing in.
Last edited by Alf 101 on Fri May 18, 2018 12:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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mclovin
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Re: Growing Fruit Trees and Shrubs

Post by mclovin » Fri May 18, 2018 10:36 am

I grow Owari satsumas in South Louisiana.

By growing at home, I can leave the fruit on the tree until it is wonderfully sweet. The peels can get puffy and they look ugly, but it is much tastier than anything that is available at the grocery store.

I also have some blueberries and figs which do not require much maintenance. I put bird netting out when it is getting close to time to pick them.

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