DIY Desktop PC

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raveon
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DIY Desktop PC

Post by raveon » Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:37 pm

I am moving away from Mac and would like to build my own Dekstop PC. First time. Can someone look at this spec list and offer any critique for value/price of components. Looking for a desktop for mainly web browsing, some gaming, and general home/office work. Will install Windows and Linux. I am not sure what would be a decent graphics card for such a configuration. Interested in any opinion if the parts will have any compatibility issues as I don't follow hardware components closely.

I am in no rush to buy and can wait for lower prices.

Component list: https://pasteboard.co/Hispnea.jpg

Tech
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by Tech » Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:46 pm

500W Power supply would be too small if you happen to add a nice gaming graphic card.
16GB memory is decent, you would want 32GB if you find a good deal.
The rest looks good.

mr.ajandkj
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by mr.ajandkj » Thu Apr 26, 2018 5:29 pm

Looks decent.

I don't see an OS listed, Win10 will run you around ~$100. 16GB memory minimum, 32GB better. Unless you are doing gaming, you won't need a graphics card. If you are not gaming and don't need RAID storage or other expansion, I would definitely consider Intel NUC form factor or similar, the small size is very nice, you can attach to back of a monitor if you wish.

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whodidntante
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by whodidntante » Thu Apr 26, 2018 5:39 pm

I've been running home built PCs for about 20 years.

I would up the power supply to 650W, which will leave you headroom for extra disks and a single NVidia GTX 1080. If you don't know that you need a graphics card, don't buy it until you do. You'll know soon enough. Integrated graphics are not good enough for gaming or 3D modeling work.

I like to go with a larger SSD. 1 TB isn't too costly these days.

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oldcomputerguy
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by oldcomputerguy » Thu Apr 26, 2018 5:42 pm

raveon wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:37 pm
I am not sure what would be a decent graphics card for such a configuration.
I’ve generally had good luck under both Linux and Windows with cards featuring nVidia chipsets. Not so much with others.
It’s taken me a lot of years, but I’ve come around to this: If you’re dumb, surround yourself with smart people. And if you’re smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you.

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whodidntante
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by whodidntante » Thu Apr 26, 2018 5:46 pm

If you decide to go with the 1 TB SSD, drop the spinning disk from your shopping list. You can always buy one later.

bampf
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by bampf » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:09 pm

I build all my own computers. My current beast is a water cooled blah blah with a GTX 1080, 32GB RAM, 3 M2 NVME ssds (yes I have an extension) etc etc. Are you building it for the fun? To save Money? Not sure I understand why. Since it is your first time, do you intend to spend a lot of time tweaking the system? Why? Put another way, if it is to save money and you are a fairly "normal" user, you probably won't save money (or at least not enough to justify the hassle). If it is because you want to, sweet, I can grok that. The days of being able to build a decent system and save a lot of money over a Dell are kind of gone. If you were upgrading, that would be a different story. Usually a power supply can last you two or three generations of home builds. If you want something you can't really get (a face melting water cooled totally silent system) cool, I can grok that. Specs are middle of the road fine. I wouldn't buy a spinning disk hard drive, go for an SSD. If you want a decent box with some interesting features at a reasonable price, consider a Zotac ZBOX. Install your OS on that and be done...

Good luck
Bampf

tibbitts
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by tibbitts » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:16 pm

I don't understand the appeal of building your own computer for someone who doesn't "follow hardware components closely." Certainly you will pay more with d-i-y than for an assembled computer that won't have any hardware compatibility issues.
Last edited by tibbitts on Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Alexa9
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by Alexa9 » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:18 pm

pcpartpicker is a great resource. Put your build on there for more critiques. I was going to build a PC but chickened out and just got an Intel NUC.

raveon
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by raveon » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:19 pm

Are you building it for the fun? To save Money? Not sure I understand why. Since it is your first time, do you intend to spend a lot of time tweaking the system? Why?Are you building it for the fun? To save Money? Not sure I understand why. Since it is your first time, do you intend to spend a lot of time tweaking the system? Why?
1. Building for fun/educational + reduce costs.
2. Not intending to buy SATA drives. Will reuse 12 year old drives for now.
3. Not looking to overclock or do heavy gaming
4. Mostly an average user, but do want to experiment with CUDA programming / ML etc
Last edited by raveon on Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

raveon
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by raveon » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:21 pm

pcpartpicker is a great resource.
Thanks. Just Googled it. I will check for compatibility there.

madbrain
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by madbrain » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:34 pm

Have been building my own PCs since the age of 12. It's always fun.

I would agree to use a bigger PSU than 500W, if only to allow for separate GPU later, like when you upgrade to a 4K monitor, which the built-in Intel GPU may not handle.

Also, for $85 you can likely find a decent SSD bigger than 256GB, but not from Intel. I would go for a 480GB. Patriot Ignite 480GB often goes on sale and is very fast. I have it in own of my HTPCs. It's on sale for $99 at Fry's today only with promo code.

Not sure what kind of case you picked, but I would spend more on it than $27, in order to be able to upgrade the machine later with things like removable drive bays, front USB 3.x hubs, etc. I like the CoolerMaster large towers personally.

$99 for a keyboard is a bit much IMO. I don't see a pointing device. Maybe it is part of they keyboard. I like the Kensington Expert Mouse trackball.

For the monitor you chose, the built-in GPU will be fine, unless you are a gaming afficionado.

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Fudgie
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by Fudgie » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:44 pm

:oops:
Last edited by Fudgie on Fri Jun 08, 2018 6:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

raveon
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by raveon » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:46 pm

Thank you all for the responses. Very helpful.

RetiredAL
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by RetiredAL » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:51 pm

bampf

OP

Two comments:

1. Since you want dual boot, make sure the BIOS supports both EUFI and Legacy Boot simultaneously. Many Linus Distro's are not EUFI compliant because that costs money. I understand the current Mint Linus does, but have no experience with it.

To compare, I have an ACER laptop that requires me to edit BOIS settings each time I switch between Win10 and Linux, as the Win10 install occurred as EUFI, not Legacy, because the original factory Acer Win7 install was EUFI, and the BIOS does not support simultaneous types. Since it only runs Linux occasionally for Image Backups, it's not too much of a pain. It did take me hrs of research and fiddling around to understand it.

My desktop's Win10 was installed as Legacy, so I have no issues with it when doing backup images. However I believe it also supports both simultaneously.

2. As for memory, I have an older Dell Laptop I-5 2.6 Ghz with only 4gb of memory. It does not do gaming or video rendering, only normal use, and it runs just fine. I have never seen it use more than 2gb. If you want to reserve for future memory installs, buy larger but fewer sticks now so you have empty slots for later expansion.

This laptop often runs Linux and boots fine to it using the F12 Boot Sequencer function to load from the CD.
Last edited by RetiredAL on Fri Apr 27, 2018 1:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

jpsc
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by jpsc » Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:42 pm

Tech wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:46 pm
500W Power supply would be too small if you happen to add a nice gaming graphic card.
16GB memory is decent, you would want 32GB if you find a good deal.
The rest looks good.
This is quite true - don't be cheap on power supply. Get at least 1000W to 2000W power supply
if you plan to use I7 and a couple video cards. Add up the wattage at max load and x2. That is what
a power supply you need to buy. Read review on Amazon, some import power supply are junk

jpsc
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by jpsc » Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:44 pm

madbrain wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:34 pm

For the monitor you chose, the built-in GPU will be fine, unless you are a gaming afficionado.
I would never pick a motherboard with build in GPU. What if the motherboard GPU die?
also get a video/GPU that can handle 4K TV/HDMI monitor.

jpsc
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by jpsc » Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:47 pm

raveon wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:19 pm

1. Building for fun/educational + reduce costs.
2. Not intending to buy SATA drives. Will reuse 12 year old drives for now.
3. Not looking to overclock or do heavy gaming
4. Mostly an average user, but do want to experiment with CUDA programming / ML etc
All current motherboard use SATA drives, sorry but you can't even find IDE drive at the local computer store
maybe at the junk store. but if you want obsolete (pre 2010), visit your local junk store and buy refurbish PC
with IDE drive. 1TB Sata is going for $30-$35 nowadays, so don't be cheap.

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jharkin
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by jharkin » Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:55 pm

2000w power supply on a pc???? :shock: You do realize you would need a dedicated 20amp circuit to power that. And it would heat a decent sized room.

Most of the reccomendarions in build guides are overkill unless you are crypto mining or something. I have a 650w supply and a 1070 card.. if I put the PC on a kill-a-watt most of the time it’s pulling less than 150w actual from the outlet.

bampf
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by bampf » Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:56 pm

RetiredAL wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:51 pm
bampf

Two comments:

I'm not OP. I assume you meant this for OP.

PFInterest
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by PFInterest » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:03 pm

raveon wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:37 pm
I am moving away from Mac and would like to build my own Dekstop PC. First time. Can someone look at this spec list and offer any critique for value/price of components. Looking for a desktop for mainly web browsing, some gaming, and general home/office work. Will install Windows and Linux. I am not sure what would be a decent graphics card for such a configuration. Interested in any opinion if the parts will have any compatibility issues as I don't follow hardware components closely.

I am in no rush to buy and can wait for lower prices.

Component list: https://pasteboard.co/Hispnea.jpg
If you are spending for an 8700, you may as well get the K chip. Which means you need a Z370 board. Look out for a case that fits then.
Yes you need a graphics card. IG can't do much.....and you are already spending....otherwise get an 8100.

PFInterest
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by PFInterest » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:04 pm

Tech wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:46 pm
500W Power supply would be too small if you happen to add a nice gaming graphic card.
16GB memory is decent, you would want 32GB if you find a good deal.
The rest looks good.
False. That will run a 1080.
16 is fine. If you need 32 you are not asking on this forum.

PFInterest
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by PFInterest » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:07 pm

Alexa9 wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:18 pm
pcpartpicker is a great resource. Put your build on there for more critiques. I was going to build a PC but chickened out and just got an Intel NUC.
You should do it, it's great.

PFInterest
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by PFInterest » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:08 pm

raveon wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:19 pm
Are you building it for the fun? To save Money? Not sure I understand why. Since it is your first time, do you intend to spend a lot of time tweaking the system? Why?Are you building it for the fun? To save Money? Not sure I understand why. Since it is your first time, do you intend to spend a lot of time tweaking the system? Why?
1. Building for fun/educational + reduce costs.
2. Not intending to buy SATA drives. Will reuse 12 year old drives for now.
3. Not looking to overclock or do heavy gaming
4. Mostly an average user, but do want to experiment with CUDA programming / ML etc
Do NOT use 12yo spinning rust discs. Replace usually after 5 yr (or warranty), or go all SSD.
Maybe a GTX 1050 will be fine then.

bampf
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by bampf » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:10 pm

raveon wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:19 pm
Are you building it for the fun? To save Money? Not sure I understand why. Since it is your first time, do you intend to spend a lot of time tweaking the system? Why?
1. Building for fun/educational + reduce costs.
2. Not intending to buy SATA drives. Will reuse 12 year old drives for now.
3. Not looking to overclock or do heavy gaming
4. Mostly an average user, but do want to experiment with CUDA programming / ML etc
1. Cool for the first part. Not so much for the second part.
2. I hope you realize that your hard drive is about to fail rather catastrophically. Spinning media isn't really meant to last more than about 4 years.
3. M'k.
4. So I was with you right till you said that. CUDA is parallel processing intended for use on GPGPU (General Purpose computing on Graphical Processing Units). Nothing cheap about GPGPU processing, you do it because it's fast. Your system is a "meh" system and not really designed for fast. You asked if you needed a separate GPU, which is really what CUDA is all about.

So, if you want a home based ML box, this isn't really it. If you want a cheap box, this isn't really it. It's kind of a middle of the road box that won't give you anything to sing about nor will it give you any significant savings. If you really want to dabble with CUDA and ML, consider either popping for a CUDA box or doing it in the cloud... https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/gpu-cloud/

Finally, this isn't meant to discourage you, quite the contrary. You can build a fairly decent high end system for about double what you are talking about spending. You can build your first low end box if you find a salvage box and tinker with the upgrades. I would pick one end of the spectrum or the other so you aren't disappointed (And I probably wouldn't go highend for my first time unless you follow a recipe... https://www.oreilly.com/learning/build- ... under-1000).

PFInterest
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by PFInterest » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:12 pm

Fudgie wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:44 pm
raveon wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:37 pm
I am moving away from Mac and would like to build my own Dekstop PC. First time. Can someone look at this spec list and offer any critique for value/price of components. Looking for a desktop for mainly web browsing, some gaming, and general home/office work. Will install Windows and Linux. I am not sure what would be a decent graphics card for such a configuration. Interested in any opinion if the parts will have any compatibility issues as I don't follow hardware components closely.

I am in no rush to buy and can wait for lower prices.

Component list: https://pasteboard.co/Hispnea.jpg
I second "whodidntante"'s recommendation on an Nvidia 1080. Great card! If you're playing something like GTA or Destiny 2 you'll want something beefy.

If you're building for fun, have at it. If you're building to save money, you probably won't.
you can play GTAV on a 1050TI at 4K and be fine.

PFInterest
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by PFInterest » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:14 pm

jpsc wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:42 pm
This is quite true - don't be cheap on power supply. Get at least 1000W to 2000W power supply
if you plan to use I7 and a couple video cards. Add up the wattage at max load and x2. That is what
a power supply you need to buy. Read review on Amazon, some import power supply are junk
ok this is wrong, and also clearly not the OPs level of expertise. where did you pull this out of?

PFInterest
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by PFInterest » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:18 pm

jpsc wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:44 pm
madbrain wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:34 pm

For the monitor you chose, the built-in GPU will be fine, unless you are a gaming afficionado.
I would never pick a motherboard with build in GPU. What if the motherboard GPU die?
also get a video/GPU that can handle 4K TV/HDMI monitor.
the GPU is integrated in the CPU, not the motherboard.
it can handle 4K.

PFInterest
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by PFInterest » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:39 pm

raveon wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:37 pm
I am moving away from Mac and would like to build my own Dekstop PC. First time. Can someone look at this spec list and offer any critique for value/price of components. Looking for a desktop for mainly web browsing, some gaming, and general home/office work. Will install Windows and Linux. I am not sure what would be a decent graphics card for such a configuration. Interested in any opinion if the parts will have any compatibility issues as I don't follow hardware components closely.

I am in no rush to buy and can wait for lower prices.

Component list: https://pasteboard.co/Hispnea.jpg
If you want value, and want to be on intel, then get this:
- i5 8400
- B360 motherboard from your favorite brand
- 16GB (2x8) DDR4. speed does not matter with intel. 2666-3200 is fine.
- SSD: do you really need an NVME drive? do you know what NVME is? if not, then skip it! you can get a Samsung 860 EVO for 85 at amazon right now. its the best. honestly though would spring for 500GB but your call. If you want value, then Sandisk Ultra 2, ADATA or Crucial MX500 are also great brands.
- get a new HDD if you need it for storage. 12 years just doesn't make sense. there is no value there.
- 500-600W 80+ bronze PS is fine. go with a big name brand. these go on sale all the time. i originally was going for a 500W then the 650W was $10 cheaper...random but always double check!
- i would really look at a $40-50 case. but to each their own. just make sure whatever you buy fits.
- GTX 1050 if the 1050TI is >$40-50 more. but wait because you clearly dont know what you need.
- $100 for a keyboard?? and its in multiple pieces......ok. you realize you are spending more on the keyboard than on your current graphic and case setup????


good luck. just do a lot of reading.

02nz
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by 02nz » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:58 pm

+1 on the recommendation for an Intel NUC. You can get a good one for as little as $180 (that's how much I just paid for a NUC with a J5005 processor, fairly low end but plenty for most uses), $90 for 8GB of RAM, $90 for 250GB SSD, $100 for Windows. Complete computer for under $500, super easy to put together.

madbrain
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by madbrain » Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:10 pm

PFInterest wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:18 pm
the GPU is integrated in the CPU, not the motherboard.
it can handle 4K.
The Intel GPU can only handle 4K with a DisplayPort monitor. It doesn't support HDMI 2.0 . For that, you will still need a discrete GPU.
Some 4K monitors have both DisplayPort and HDMI 2.0, some only one or the other. And the really old ones only support 4K through a pair of HDMI 1.4 ports (don't get those monitors).
Last edited by madbrain on Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

madbrain
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by madbrain » Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:14 pm

jpsc wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:44 pm
madbrain wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:34 pm

For the monitor you chose, the built-in GPU will be fine, unless you are a gaming afficionado.
I would never pick a motherboard with build in GPU. What if the motherboard GPU die?
You can always disable the motherboard GPU if there is an issue with it. I don't think this is common. If the GPU on the motherboard fails, other parts of the motherboard may fail too. Motherboard failures on desktops happen, but I don't know if they do any more on those with built-in GPUs than without.

The consumer-level motherboards with GPUs are often cheaper than the professional-level motherboards that don't include one.
The later typically force you to use more professional CPUs with different socket types, and possibly different RAM (like ECC).
Which is something I have done in the past with some of my PCs, but wouldn't do again. Speaking as someone with 4 home-built PCs in use currently at home.
I also get a video/GPU that can handle 4K TV/HDMI monitor.
This is good advice if the OP chooses a 4K monitor today. But he chose an HD monitor. The built-in GPU is good enough for that, and can be disabled in the future if OP wants to add a 4K monitor.

GT 1030 supports HDMI 2.0 and 4K . I have 2 of these, one in the HTPC in my home theater with 4K projector, another in one of the desktop PCs in my home office, actually driving a pair of 4K monitors. Not bad for a $70 GPU. The nice thing on that board is that putting a DVI-D to HDMI adapter on the DVI port gives you an HDMI 2.0 port. The same is not true on my older GTX 960.

Edit: appears those GT 1030 boards went way up in price lately. Now $130+ on Amazon ... Each of mine were bought for $70. One last September and another in late March. Gigabyte and MSI brands. Both fanless, too.
Last edited by madbrain on Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

kjvmartin
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by kjvmartin » Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:27 pm

I apologize if this has been suggested, I didn't read all replies:

Graphics cards are very pricy right now. It used to be cheaper/better to build a PC out of parts, but I don't think it's a slam dunk anymore.

If you live near a Micro Center, their PowerSpec line is very cost effective and decent/upgradable.

PFInterest
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by PFInterest » Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:29 pm

madbrain wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:10 pm
PFInterest wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:18 pm
the GPU is integrated in the CPU, not the motherboard.
it can handle 4K.
The Intel GPU can only handle 4K with a DisplayPort monitor. It doesn't support HDMI 2.0 . For that, you will still need a discrete GPU.
Some 4K monitors have both DisplayPort and HDMI 2.0, some only one or the other. And the really old ones only support 4K through a pair of HDMI 1.4 ports (don't get those monitors).
incorrect. it can handle 4K with HDMI 1.4. its not 60hz. please google.
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en ... -8400.html

PFInterest
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by PFInterest » Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:30 pm

PFInterest wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:29 pm
madbrain wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:10 pm
PFInterest wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:18 pm
the GPU is integrated in the CPU, not the motherboard.
it can handle 4K.
The Intel GPU can only handle 4K with a DisplayPort monitor. It doesn't support HDMI 2.0 . For that, you will still need a discrete GPU.
Some 4K monitors have both DisplayPort and HDMI 2.0, some only one or the other. And the really old ones only support 4K through a pair of HDMI 1.4 ports (don't get those monitors).
incorrect. it can handle 4K with HDMI 1.4. its not 60hz. please google.
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en ... -8400.html
i see you changed your original answer.

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Epsilon Delta
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by Epsilon Delta » Thu Apr 26, 2018 11:14 pm

jpsc wrote:
bampf wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:10 pm

4. Mostly an average user, but do want to experiment with CUDA programming / ML etc
4. So I was with you right till you said that. CUDA is parallel processing intended for use on GPGPU (General Purpose computing on Graphical Processing Units). Nothing cheap about GPGPU processing, you do it because it's fast. Your system is a "meh" system and not really designed for fast. You asked if you needed a separate GPU, which is really what CUDA is all about.
It depends what he means by experimenting. I developed a bunch of CUDA code on the couple of cores built in to a laptop. Once it was debugged it was thrown onto a couple of racks stuffed with GPU cards, and a fan that sounded like a jet engine, to crunch production data. So you don't need much hardware to learn to write CUDA code. You do need a lot of hardware to crunch a lot of numbers.

bampf
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by bampf » Fri Apr 27, 2018 12:09 am

Epsilon Delta wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 11:14 pm
jpsc wrote:
bampf wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:10 pm

4. Mostly an average user, but do want to experiment with CUDA programming / ML etc
4. So I was with you right till you said that. CUDA is parallel processing intended for use on GPGPU (General Purpose computing on Graphical Processing Units). Nothing cheap about GPGPU processing, you do it because it's fast. Your system is a "meh" system and not really designed for fast. You asked if you needed a separate GPU, which is really what CUDA is all about.
It depends what he means by experimenting. I developed a bunch of CUDA code on the couple of cores built in to a laptop. Once it was debugged it was thrown onto a couple of racks stuffed with GPU cards, and a fan that sounded like a jet engine, to crunch production data. So you don't need much hardware to learn to write CUDA code. You do need a lot of hardware to crunch a lot of numbers.
Completely fair point. I guess it all depends on why and what. System design is rarely a one size fits all. I would want to have some ability to do real work with it. If you are tinkering, the cloud is a cheaper and better option. But, I tinker all the time and I have tensorflow running on a pi,so, you can do a bunch of things with all kinds of different systems.

Doug E. Dee
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by Doug E. Dee » Fri Apr 27, 2018 7:17 am

raveon wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:19 pm

2. Not intending to buy SATA drives. Will reuse 12 year old drives for now.
Please no

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jabberwockOG
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Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by jabberwockOG » Fri Apr 27, 2018 7:37 am

As a learning exercise this is a reasonable project but if you really want an actual high performance system at a reasonable cost, I recommend buying an integrated system rather than diy. I assume you are aware that there is a lot more involved (design, iterative testing, and tuning on dedicated high end test platform) in building a high performance system than simply choosing some hardware to screw/plug together. Brand name companies that sell integrated systems spend a lot of time and money on testing various hardware configs to find what combo works best overall. Because of relatively subtle integration and architecture issues, you could end up with a relatively costly but at best average performance system by randomly connecting various pieces even if individual pieces are touted as high performance.
Last edited by jabberwockOG on Fri Apr 27, 2018 7:39 am, edited 1 time in total.

geekpryde
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Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 2:37 pm

Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by geekpryde » Fri Apr 27, 2018 7:39 am

The cooked-in graphics in most modern Intel desktop chips is really good. Meaning, unless you are a "gamer" you can totally skip the video card in normal uses. I tested a GPU-less system for a month while waiting for my dedicated card to come in stock, and it really surprised me.

I HIGHLY recommend you ditch all SATA, and do m.2. The snappiness of Windows 10 on a NVMe based m.2 OS Harddrive is just awesome.

I understand if the budget will limit you, but serious consider this: Samsung 970 evo. (about to be released) I run the Samsung 960 PRO in 5 machines, and it's perfection. Tiny, Fast, zero noise, and no spinning disks creating a ton of heat. here is the current version: https://www.amazon.com/Samsung-960-EVO- ... ds=960+evo

M.2 is supported by the MotherBoard you chose: "Dual Ultra-Fast M.2 with PCIe Gen3 X4"

So, if you ditch you GPU you can afford the better OS drive. Just an idea.

youngpleb
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Location: VA, USA

Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by youngpleb » Fri Apr 27, 2018 5:04 pm

Hi, I've built 3 desktops in the past 5 years, and I'd say your build looks pretty good. If you're planning on CUDA programming, you're gonna want a decent GPU, which in turn will require a larger power supply (I'd do 650W to be safe, but PCPartPicker should make sure everything is ok). The GPU suggestions for a 1080 are by no means mid-tier though. I've got one in my current build along with 32 GB RAM, and all the CUDA programming I did in grad school ran nicely. You might want to think about jumping up to 32GB RAM depending on what you'll be programming. I did a lot of machine learning and often times I'd be using 20-25 GB of RAM easily. One other recommendation I'd say is to get a bigger SSD if you can...they're awesome and so much faster than HDDs. I bit the bullet and got a 1TB for my last build, and have never regretted it.
27. Always learning.

madbrain
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Location: San Jose, California

Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by madbrain » Fri Apr 27, 2018 6:58 pm

PFInterest wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:29 pm
incorrect. it can handle 4K with HDMI 1.4. its not 60hz. please google.
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en ... -8400.html
I forgot about that, but IMO, 30 Hz refresh rate is not usable, and I would use a 4K monitor with HDMI on the built-in GPU.
If the monitor has DisplayPort, then I believe the Intel GPU should work at 4K60.
If it only has HDMI 2.0, it will not. 4K TVs only have HDMI 2.0 also.
IMO, Intel really dropped the ball on HDMI 2.0 . I still can't believe so many years after HDMI 2.0 came out that their built-in GPUs don't support it.

madbrain
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Location: San Jose, California

Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by madbrain » Fri Apr 27, 2018 7:08 pm

PFInterest wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:30 pm
PFInterest wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:29 pm
madbrain wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:10 pm
PFInterest wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:18 pm
the GPU is integrated in the CPU, not the motherboard.
it can handle 4K.
The Intel GPU can only handle 4K with a DisplayPort monitor. It doesn't support HDMI 2.0 . For that, you will still need a discrete GPU.
Some 4K monitors have both DisplayPort and HDMI 2.0, some only one or the other. And the really old ones only support 4K through a pair of HDMI 1.4 ports (don't get those monitors).
incorrect. it can handle 4K with HDMI 1.4. its not 60hz. please google.
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en ... -8400.html
i see you changed your original answer.
The only reason I had changed it was because some old 4K monitors will allow 4K 60 with a pair of HDMI 1.4, if the GPU and drivers support it. The 4K panel is basically split into two halves at lower resolution. There would be no reason to buy such a monitor in 2018. I am not sure if any are still on the market new. But watch out if buying a used 4K monitor. New 4K monitors have either HDMI 2.0 or DisplayPort 1.2+, or both . I bought a pair of LG 32UD59-B monitors recently, and they have 2 HDMI 2.0 inputs, and a DisplayPort, all of which are 4K60 capable. I am able to connect 3 different computers to these monitors, and each can drive 4K .
My main desktop uses a GTX 960 with 2 DisplayPort and is running those at 12-bit color. Second desktop uses a GT 1030 and HDMI 2.0 + DVI with DVI to HDMI adapter providing a second HDMI 2.0 . The third computer is a laptop with a docking station which has two DisplayPort 1.2 . I bought some DP to HDMI 2.0 converters which did not work correctly - all kind of random problems especially when switching inputs. The laptop has a built-in Intel GPU which cannot be replaced unfortunately. Even running natively with the two DP outputs on the docking station to the two DP inputs on the LG monitors, horrible problems occur. This a Lenovo laptop with Skylake CPU and Intel graphics (500 series I think). I think it's the combination of Intel GPU and docking station on this Lenovo laptop causing issues. In any case, no 4K for it. Maybe a USB 3.0 GPU with HDMI 2.0 output would work, but I would need a pair of them, and they would be much slower, limited by USB bus speed. I did not bother. Instead, I am running this laptop with on the docking station with one straight HDMI cable, and one DP to HDMI passive adapter, at 2560x1440 60 Hz. That's a bit worse than was I was getting with my previous pair of non-4K monitor, an HP LP3065 with dual link DVI inputs, that worked correctly with the laptop docking station with a pair of Accell DisplayPort to DVI-Dual Link adapters. This enabled 2560x1600 @ 60 Hz on both HP monitors on the same laptop docking station. Unfortunately, 4K was a no go with this Intel GPU and docking station. I sold both accell adapters and one of the HP monitors. Still have one up for sale.

Anyway, I didn't edit the response because of 4K 30, which I had forgotten about, but IMO is not usable for a desktop computer.

SimonJester
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Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2011 12:39 pm

Re: DIY Desktop PC

Post by SimonJester » Sat Apr 28, 2018 7:56 am

Unless you have a retail boxed copy of Windows, you need to add the Windows OS to you build for about $100.

Research you motherboard and read the reviews, this part will be the biggest problem maker with a PC build and will be the one component you have to live with the longest. If you are going to spend extra money this is where I would choose to spend it.

You might also go a little bigger on the case, more space will allow for more airflow around the components.


I have built over 5K pcs in my career, used to build 5-10 pcs a day back in my early days. Its fairly easy these days, no jumpers on the motherboard, no manually wiring a power supply to the case switch (fun results when you got that one wrong :o )...
"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin

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