Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

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darkhorse
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Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by darkhorse »

Fellow bogleheads,

I have interesting conundrum at hand and this forum is best thing I know to ask for reliable advice.<br/>
I have a nephew who is looking to make final choices

Background:

Neither I nor my sister/brother in law had education in US. Plus I do not have background in engineering. Although I feel great that he asked me about my input, other than financial perspective.

Purdue University (45k, far from home/NJ)<br/>
Stevens Institute of Technology (49K)<br/>
George Washington University (55k)<br/>
Northe eastern (71k, have to go abroad first sem, has good paid coop program)

* I wish I could convience him for 2+2 pathway or stay in state NJ but he is not really considering this option

I mainly would like to seek idea about desirability of these colleges for someone interested in engineering but not sure about which engineering subspeciality.

Thank you
boglebill2015
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by boglebill2015 »

Purdue has very strong engineering programs, and is quite large so has a lot of breadth. If he doesnt know what type of engineer he wants to be, it would be a solid choice.
golfCaddy
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by golfCaddy »

Purdue is a top notch engineering school and would be my first choice. The only downside is it's about 58% male.
Y.A.Tittle
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by Y.A.Tittle »

Among those options, Purdue offers the best bang for the buck. It is a really big school, if that matters.

They cover most engineering disciplines and the reputation is good- resume value.
KlangFool
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by KlangFool »

https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges/ra ... -doctorate

OP,

Purdue is ranked #8. It is the best undergraduate engineering school among those in the list.

KlangFool
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Nate79
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by Nate79 »

What can he afford and why only those schools?
Bfwolf
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by Bfwolf »

Purdue seems like the natural choice here. Best engineering school and cheapest.

What are your nephew's concerns about Purdue? It is just the distance from home? Why does that bother him? Was he hoping to come home every couple of weekends or something?
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by Mudpuppy »

I would also recommend Purdue off that list. And if there are concerns about goofing off with your nephew being that far away from home, your sister and brother-in-law could put some conditions on the financial support they provide. But do keep in mind that engineering is a hard major and getting a "C" in something like second semester calculus might actually be a good grade for the difficulty of the course. So they should not assume your nephew is goofing off just because he gets C grades.
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beyou
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by beyou »

As to the 58% male comment, all engineering colleges will be that or worse in the actual engineering classrooms. And a school like Stevens would be mainly engineering, worse overall ratio than Purdue.

My son was given same offer by Northeastern, to study abroad a semester first, and pay full cost. ONLY college that didn’t offer merit scholarship. While their coop program is excellent, and Boston is a GREAT place for school and career wise, I would not go into debt. NU tries to market the idea that coop salaries help with the tuition. But they can’t guarantee getting any coop job much less how much you might make. Can’t count on that, unless you can afford to pay regardless. Great school but we turned them down. Turned down Stevens too even though they were a more affordable option for us, just not the only one. I think the prior advice is the right advice. Being far away, you can afford airfare with the $ saved.
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beyou
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by beyou »

Any more detailed questions about the schools being considered, go to collegeconfidential.com

They have subforums for each college, so you can ask Purdue questions in the Purdue forum.
student
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by student »

I will pick Purdue. It is an excellent place to study engineering.
surveyor
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by surveyor »

Purdue Engineering grad here. Purdue accepts a lot more students into engineering than graduate with engineering degrees. Entering students are accepted into the engineering program. They undergo a rigorous freshman year before applying to a particular engineering discipline. A freshman engineering class is a requirement and the disciplines each present what they offer. I didn't believe it at the time, but it was stated look to your left and look to your right - neither is likely to graduate with an engineering degree. Statistics later bore that out. At $46,000 for out of state students it is something to keep in mind. An industrial management degree, which many engineering majors change to, may not offer the same value.

For a more intimate experience and a great program also consider Rose Hulman. It won't be too far off that price and typically allocates some tuition assistance regardless of parental income. If accepted you will be looked after there. Nobody at a big school cares about you. You know the student.
bryansmile
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by bryansmile »

Purdue grad here. P engineering program is very rigorous, a lot of kids switch to other majors after their first year, let alone the fact that you are not guaranteed your engineering major, you compete for it after first year based on your gpa.

If your nephew is not super competitive in engineering (based on Northeastern's offer of first semester study abroad, named "NU in" program, which is known to be offered to less competitive students so their stats won't bring down the school's fall freshmen stats, since on paper they attend NU in spring), I would recommend Stevens so he'll be in a "match" school, more likely to stay in engineering, and be closer to home.
Last edited by bryansmile on Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:47 am, edited 1 time in total.
ENT Doc
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by ENT Doc »

If he's dead set on engineering don't let the competitiveness of Purdue turn him off. If he's relatively bright and willing to put in the work then he's got what it takes. Does he care about being away from home or is this to serve others' interests?
KlangFool
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by KlangFool »

surveyor wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:18 am Purdue Engineering grad here. Purdue accepts a lot more students into engineering than graduate with engineering degrees. Entering students are accepted into the engineering program. They undergo a rigorous freshman year before applying to a particular engineering discipline. A freshman engineering class is a requirement and the disciplines each present what they offer. I didn't believe it at the time, but it was stated look to your left and look to your right - neither is likely to graduate with an engineering degree. Statistics later bore that out. At $46,000 for out of state students it is something to keep in mind. An industrial management degree, which many engineering majors change to, may not offer the same value.

For a more intimate experience and a great program also consider Rose Hulman. It won't be too far off that price and typically allocates some tuition assistance regardless of parental income. If accepted you will be looked after there. Nobody at a big school cares about you. You know the student.
surveyor,

As far as I know, this is common across all undergraduate engineering school. Aka, not everyone major in engineering survive with an engineering degree. The only difference is the percentage.

https://www.veenstraconsulting.com/blog ... g-colleges

http://www.thecollegesolution.com/where ... our-years/

The higher ranked engineering school has a higher graduation rate. The lower ranked school has a lower graduation rate. It is not easy to get an undergraduate engineering degree.

It could be true that it is harder to remain and enroll into the engineering program at the higher ranked school. But, as far as graduation, it is tough at any school.

KlangFool
Last edited by KlangFool on Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
TheAncientOne
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by TheAncientOne »

Northeastern and GW are very expensive programs that are no better than adequate. I agree with you that you can get a perfectly good engineering education, especially for undergrad, from Rutgers. As others have pointed out, Purdue is a well regarded university with an engineering orientation. It's been many years since I lived near Stevens but it was well regarded back then. If your nephew wants to stay near home, I'd visit the campus and learn more about it and see how it feels. Good luck.
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jadd806
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by jadd806 »

KlangFool wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:21 am
surveyor wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:18 am Purdue Engineering grad here. Purdue accepts a lot more students into engineering than graduate with engineering degrees. Entering students are accepted into the engineering program. They undergo a rigorous freshman year before applying to a particular engineering discipline. A freshman engineering class is a requirement and the disciplines each present what they offer. I didn't believe it at the time, but it was stated look to your left and look to your right - neither is likely to graduate with an engineering degree. Statistics later bore that out. At $46,000 for out of state students it is something to keep in mind. An industrial management degree, which many engineering majors change to, may not offer the same value.

For a more intimate experience and a great program also consider Rose Hulman. It won't be too far off that price and typically allocates some tuition assistance regardless of parental income. If accepted you will be looked after there. Nobody at a big school cares about you. You know the student.
surveyor,

As far as I know, this is common across all undergraduate engineering school. Aka, not everyone major in engineering survive with an engineering degree. The only difference is the percentage.

https://www.veenstraconsulting.com/blog ... g-colleges

http://www.thecollegesolution.com/where ... our-years/

The higher ranked engineering school has a higher graduation rate. The lower ranked school has a lower graduation rate. It is not easy to get an undergraduate engineering degree.

It could be true that it is harder to remain and enroll into the engineering program at the higher ranked school. But, as far as graduation, it is tough at any school.

KlangFool
Eh, my state university essentially graduated everybody in engineering. It honestly felt like the degree was a participation trophy - if you showed up to class (or at least came more times than not) you'd be graduating. The curve would be set so the lowest student would achieve a C-, conveniently the minimum grade to pass on to the next course.

Several students confronted the department head about it and he admitted that they did it to keep their enrollment numbers high since that was how the university determined how much funding the department would get.

All engineering degrees are not created equal, even when ABET accredited.
capjak
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by capjak »

Highly recommend University of Illinois in Champaign- Urbana for overall experience and diversity of majors. Of course my wife and I went there and our son graduated 5 years ago in electrical engineering with a minor in computer science. Great Engineering program
new2bogle
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by new2bogle »

I'll have to chip in with my grad school alma mater - Univ of Michigan (Ann Arbor). Excellent and very rigorous classes. Job fair is phenomenal with basically all companies represented. If I had not gone to Michigan, then Purdue would have been an excellent choice :D
fast_and_curious
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by fast_and_curious »

Another Purdue engineering grad here. Among the institutions in the OP's list, I would wholeheartedly recommend Purdue if the nephew is pretty sure about wanting an engineering degree/career. In addition to being the best ranked (although college rankings are overrated, IMHO) and lowest cost of the list, Purdue produces a lot of engineers - which means that when you're looking for a job in the future, you have a good chance of running into another Purdue grad, which can help from a networking perspective. And they have good programs in a wide variety of engineering disciplines (electrical, mechanical, chemical, aerospace, nuclear, etc.) so no matter which area he ends up in, there's probably a great program there.

Another benefit to Purdue is that they do offer a full set of majors, so in case your nephew does end up switching to another degree, he can still obtain it at Purdue (although some of their programs are not as highly rated as engineering). I myself actually was accepted to Purdue in a different program, and switched to engineering just prior to starting my freshman year.

FWIW, after my undergrad studies, I was accepted for graduate work at MIT and ended up going to Stanford, so you certainly have lots of options with a Purdue undergrad degree. (Same is clearly true for other schools, of course - and I did get dinged by Cal Tech for grad school, so it's not like I was accepted everywhere!)

Finally, in regards to the 58% male comment - that may or may not have been true when I was there (early/mid 90s) but I met my wife of 22 years at Purdue. She was not in engineering, though.
bryansmile
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by bryansmile »

Ranking is only one factor in considering colleges. An engineering student in particular is better off attending a school that's the best "fit", so they don't always feel inadequate and lagging behind, will stay in the program, and are more likely to graduate with an engineering degree. I've seen too many students at Purdue who switched out of engineering (thus missing a great career path) but probably wouldn't have had to if they had gone to a lower ranked school like their in-state university, because of the rigor of Purdue's programs, and the fact that there are many competitive and motivated students there.

Now once he starts working as an engineer, no one cares if he got his degree from Stevens or Purdue, as long as he can do the job right. Plenty of our engineer coworkers got their degrees from lower ranked schools but do well nevertheless.

But if he has other plans like going to graduate school, it'll be a different story.
Last edited by bryansmile on Thu Apr 26, 2018 11:21 am, edited 6 times in total.
KlangFool
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by KlangFool »

jadd806 wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:55 am
KlangFool wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:21 am
surveyor wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:18 am Purdue Engineering grad here. Purdue accepts a lot more students into engineering than graduate with engineering degrees. Entering students are accepted into the engineering program. They undergo a rigorous freshman year before applying to a particular engineering discipline. A freshman engineering class is a requirement and the disciplines each present what they offer. I didn't believe it at the time, but it was stated look to your left and look to your right - neither is likely to graduate with an engineering degree. Statistics later bore that out. At $46,000 for out of state students it is something to keep in mind. An industrial management degree, which many engineering majors change to, may not offer the same value.

For a more intimate experience and a great program also consider Rose Hulman. It won't be too far off that price and typically allocates some tuition assistance regardless of parental income. If accepted you will be looked after there. Nobody at a big school cares about you. You know the student.
surveyor,

As far as I know, this is common across all undergraduate engineering school. Aka, not everyone major in engineering survive with an engineering degree. The only difference is the percentage.

https://www.veenstraconsulting.com/blog ... g-colleges

http://www.thecollegesolution.com/where ... our-years/

The higher ranked engineering school has a higher graduation rate. The lower ranked school has a lower graduation rate. It is not easy to get an undergraduate engineering degree.

It could be true that it is harder to remain and enroll into the engineering program at the higher ranked school. But, as far as graduation, it is tough at any school.

KlangFool
Eh, my state university essentially graduated everybody in engineering. It honestly felt like the degree was a participation trophy - if you showed up to class (or at least came more times than not) you'd be graduating. The curve would be set so the lowest student would achieve a C-, conveniently the minimum grade to pass on to the next course.

Several students confronted the department head about it and he admitted that they did it to keep their enrollment numbers high since that was how the university determined how much funding the department would get.

All engineering degrees are not created equal, even when ABET accredited.
jadd806,

It might be true in your case. However, this is not consistent with my undergraduate engineering experience. Even now, my undergraduate engineering school has a graduation rate of less than 20%.

KlangFool
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by Captain_Video »

Stevens is ranked ninth in engineering schools for 20 year return on investment.
https://www.payscale.com/college-roi/sc ... ngineering
surveyor
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by surveyor »

KlangFool wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:21 am But, as far as graduation, it is tough at any school.

KlangFool
The point I was working towards was that at a smaller school with a smaller program you are much more likely to have someone who cares. You don't necessarily at Purdue, or other large schools, until you get to the 3 and 400 level classes in the program. Then you know the dean and they might know you. You're not even admitted to an actual discipline until late in your freshman year. By that time they've already weeded out a decent number of kids.

At a smaller school you're much more likely to be admitted directly into a program as a freshman. You're much more likely to have courses taught by professors and not TA's. You're much more likely to be noticed missing when you skip a class with 25 students versus 250 students. The trade off is typically reputation and opportunity.

Purdue freshman engineering enrollment is basically equal to the entire student enrollment at Stevens. That has implications.
voodoo72
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by voodoo72 »

Purdue allllllll day long from that list, I lived in Boston for 10 years I assure you outside of Boston, very few folks have heard of Northeastern, period. Purdue however is not only an excellent program for engineering but is well known and respected. No way I recommend spending an extra 20K on tuition for Northeaster, and remember Boston is very expensive place to live compared to West Lafayette , Indiana.
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by barnaclebob »

ENT Doc wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:11 am If he's dead set on engineering don't let the competitiveness of Purdue turn him off. If he's relatively bright and willing to put in the work then he's got what it takes. Does he care about being away from home or is this to serve others' interests?
Purdue grad here. I'd like to clarify that competitive is not really a good way to describe anything about going to Purdue IMO. There wasn't any student vs student competition and most of the curved tests were curved pretty fairly. The "competition" is just the difficulty in getting a degree. No class impossible to pass and I don't believe anything was a "weed out" class because freshman engineering was at the time mainly an intro to excel and matlab, both critical skills. But some classes can take a lot of determination to grind it out until you understand. Not sure how it is at "lesser" schools because I didn't go there.

As long as there is a direct flight from Indy or Chicago, getting home on breaks isn't that big of a deal.
Last edited by barnaclebob on Thu Apr 26, 2018 11:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
Glockenspiel
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by Glockenspiel »

Purdue, generally, is a great engineering school. I'm not familiar enough with it to tell you which specialties are the best at Purdue, though. I also know that Stevens Institute has a great reputation.

I don't think GW is the best value of those options, and I'd just skip out on Northeastern due to cost.
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Alexa9
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by Alexa9 »

Purdue is the only engineering school I would recommend from that list.
Closer to home and also good public engineering schools: UVA, Virginia Tech, Maryland
Other very good public engineering schools: Illinois, Michigan, Georgia Tech

A non tech big public school allows you to change majors if for some reason you don't like engineering without transferring. In contrast, an engineering focused school might force you to stick with it with like minded students.
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by Jack FFR1846 »

Northeastern is a 5 year school, normally, so figure that in. Transfer credit is difficult because it's not on a semester system. It is very expensive and basic classes will see 300-500 in a lecture.

For engineering, just sticking with northeast area that I'm familiar with, WPI, slightly cheaper than NU, 4 year, do internships and they DO have a voluntary co-op program (I did it when I was there and ran out of money). VERY undergrad focused (I chose it over MIT for that reason).

RPI: similar to WPI.

Rochester

I'd consider UConn, UMass Lowell, UMass Amherst, Virginia Tech (although very grad school focused....I have a grad degree from there).
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SmileyFace
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by SmileyFace »

While Northeastern is a 5-year school - it is because students after their first year spend 6 months in school and 6 months on PAID co-ops (internships). Some students are able to save up a lot of money to offset costs during full 2-years of working and also graduate with 2 years of engineering experience giving them a huge leg up over others (also, it allows them to try out different types of companies and disciplines to see what they enjoy doing for work). Personally - I really like the Northeastern Model - its unique and it is known to work. It is unfortunate its gotten very expensive. The other downside is if they are telling him he needs to abroad the first semester its because they don't have space for him - he isn't a top pick for them.
Perhaps Purdue would be the best choice here.
bryansmile
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by bryansmile »

DaftInvestor wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 12:07 pm While Northeastern is a 5-year school - it is because students after their first year spend 6 months in school and 6 months on PAID co-ops (internships). Some students are able to save up a lot of money to offset costs during full 2-years of working and also graduate with 2 years of engineering experience giving them a huge leg up over others (also, it allows them to try out different types of companies and disciplines to see what they enjoy doing for work). Personally - I really like the Northeastern Model - its unique and it is known to work. It is unfortunate its gotten very expensive. The other downside is if they are telling him he needs to abroad the first semester its because they don't have space for him - he isn't a top pick for them.
Perhaps Purdue would be the best choice here.
I can never understand the hype about Northeastern's co-op programs. Purdue, Stevens, etc all have co-op programs and NU's is not much different from everyone else's. A co-op is a co-op. I know lots of Purdue students did it.

As far as the notion of these giving "a huge leg up over others", do people even realize it came with a cost of time and money? 12 months working as a co-op vs. full-time employee with a college degree? Consider the time spent, pay differentials, and the difference in experience levels on the resume. I'd much prefer doing internships in the summer and graduate ON TIME.
Last edited by bryansmile on Thu Apr 26, 2018 12:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
CurlyDave
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by CurlyDave »

I would always advise going to the most well-known college that will accept a student.

When starting out, the college name on a resume will open doors that might otherwise be closed.

Is this unfair? Absolutely yes. But it is also true, so pile up every advantage you can on your side.

Do people from lesser-known schools do well, sometimes even better? Yes again. But if that door doesn't open at first, they don't have as many chances. On average, the better known school is a help.
bryansmile
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by bryansmile »

CurlyDave wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 12:31 pm I would always advise going to the most well-known college that will accept a student.

When starting out, the college name on a resume will open doors that might otherwise be closed.

Is this unfair? Absolutely yes. But it is also true, so pile up every advantage you can on your side.

Do people from lesser-known schools do well, sometimes even better? Yes again. But if that door doesn't open at first, they don't have as many chances. On average, the better known school is a help.
It holds some truth, but if a student cannot stay in a top engineering program due to its rigor then he's better off at Stevens where he has a better chance sticking with an engineering career path. OP's family needs to think about this before anything else.
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SmileyFace
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by SmileyFace »

bryansmile wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 12:26 pm
DaftInvestor wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 12:07 pm While Northeastern is a 5-year school - it is because students after their first year spend 6 months in school and 6 months on PAID co-ops (internships). Some students are able to save up a lot of money to offset costs during full 2-years of working and also graduate with 2 years of engineering experience giving them a huge leg up over others (also, it allows them to try out different types of companies and disciplines to see what they enjoy doing for work). Personally - I really like the Northeastern Model - its unique and it is known to work. It is unfortunate its gotten very expensive. The other downside is if they are telling him he needs to abroad the first semester its because they don't have space for him - he isn't a top pick for them.
Perhaps Purdue would be the best choice here.
I can never understand the hype about Northeastern's co-op programs. Purdue, Stevens, etc all have co-op programs and NU's is not much different from everyone else's. A co-op is a co-op. I know lots of Purdue students did it.

As far as the notion of these giving "a huge leg up over others", do people even realize it came with a cost of time and money? 12 months working as a co-op vs. full-time employee with a college degree? Consider the time spent, pay differentials, and the difference in experience levels on the resume. I'd much prefer doing internships in the summer and graduate ON TIME.
All co-ops aren't created equally. There is a big difference between doing a summer internship (by the time you learn what to do you have no time to actually be a contributor and feel what being a contributor is all about) and being employed for 6 months - and they graduate with more than 12 months experience - there is NO downtime as Northeastern students rotate directly between school semesters and work semesters - there aren't long wasted summer breaks. Also - Northeastern Co-op students typically make more than summer interns - Northeastern works with a number of companies to get jobs opened up and work with them on suggested salaries, etc. I know some other schools that put students into internships where they don't get paid at all. Northeastern Graduates may take an extra year to graduate - but when they do they are paid, on average, a higher salary than graduates from other schools - especially if they accept employment at a place that they co-op'd. I realize a lot of schools are trying to replicate some of what Northeastern does - but Northeastern has been doing this for decades - they have it down to a science. Again - the work experience is only one thing to consider - but not recognizing Northeastern as the leader in getting students real work-experience would be a mistake.
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by bryansmile »

DaftInvestor wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 12:41 pm
All co-ops aren't created equally. There is a big difference between doing a summer internship (by the time you learn what to do you have no time to actually be a contributor and feel what being a contributor is all about) and being employed for 6 months - and they graduate with more than 12 months experience - there is NO downtime as Northeastern students rotate directly between school semesters and work semesters - there aren't long wasted summer breaks. Also - Northeastern Co-op students typically make more than summer interns - Northeastern works with a number of companies to get jobs opened up and work with them on suggested salaries, etc. I know some other schools that put students into internships where they don't get paid at all. Northeastern Graduates may take an extra year to graduate - but when they do they are paid, on average, a higher salary than graduates from other schools - especially if they accept employment at a place that they co-op'd. I realize a lot of schools are trying to replicate some of what Northeastern does - but Northeastern has been doing this for decades - they have it down to a science. Again - the work experience is only one thing to consider - but not recognizing Northeastern as the leader in getting students real work-experience would be a mistake.
I have friends who sent their kids to NU (just because they got full-ride scholarship there), the co-op jobs are not the kind you can't get on your own though, they are just like those my Purdue/Ball State friends got. Besides, two rotations of 6 months of work is still very entry-level and does not reach the depth of a full time engineering job after college graduation. I haven't found evidence of NU graduates having higher pay over other college graduates.
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SmileyFace
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by SmileyFace »

bryansmile wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 12:58 pm
DaftInvestor wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 12:41 pm
All co-ops aren't created equally. There is a big difference between doing a summer internship (by the time you learn what to do you have no time to actually be a contributor and feel what being a contributor is all about) and being employed for 6 months - and they graduate with more than 12 months experience - there is NO downtime as Northeastern students rotate directly between school semesters and work semesters - there aren't long wasted summer breaks. Also - Northeastern Co-op students typically make more than summer interns - Northeastern works with a number of companies to get jobs opened up and work with them on suggested salaries, etc. I know some other schools that put students into internships where they don't get paid at all. Northeastern Graduates may take an extra year to graduate - but when they do they are paid, on average, a higher salary than graduates from other schools - especially if they accept employment at a place that they co-op'd. I realize a lot of schools are trying to replicate some of what Northeastern does - but Northeastern has been doing this for decades - they have it down to a science. Again - the work experience is only one thing to consider - but not recognizing Northeastern as the leader in getting students real work-experience would be a mistake.
I have friends who sent their kids to NU (just because they got full-ride scholarship there), the co-op jobs are not the kind you can't get on your own though, they are just like those my Purdue/Ball State friends got. Besides, two rotations of 6 months of work is still very entry-level and does not reach the depth of a full time engineering job after college graduation. I haven't found evidence of NU graduates having higher pay over other college graduates.
Just a couple of additional points and one correction: It's not "two rotations of 6 months of work" it is FOUR rotations of 6 months of work. After Freshman year you are working half the months for 4 years. Yes - students can try to find work on their own - for some students this is daunting - they are studying for finals, etc. - all trying to find their own job. Compare that to Northeastern where you are assigned a co-op councilor who sends you out on multiple job interviews and you could end up with multiple options to choose from.
I do think that Northeastern has gotten crazy expensive compared to other choices (it didn't used to be) so I'm not endorsing this is the right decision necessarily for the OP - but for work experience - they are the leader.
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Will do good
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by Will do good »

capjak wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:07 am Highly recommend University of Illinois in Champaign- Urbana for overall experience and diversity of majors. Of course my wife and I went there and our son graduated 5 years ago in electrical engineering with a minor in computer science. Great Engineering program
+1
But not everyone can get in from our own state, they rather want kids from out of state or country to get higher fees. :annoyed
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by buccimane »

I didn't read all the responses.. But I'd throw Rowan University into the bucket of choices if you can convince him to visit one NJ school.. Your nephew would get the in-state tuition (26k when I attended), and it is in the US News Top 20 for Public School Engineering programs.
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by caffeinefree »

surveyor wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:18 am For a more intimate experience and a great program also consider Rose Hulman. It won't be too far off that price and typically allocates some tuition assistance regardless of parental income. If accepted you will be looked after there. Nobody at a big school cares about you. You know the student.
I would NOT recommend Rose Hulman as a price-similar alternative to Purdue. While you will get a great education, it will end up costing a lot more than Purdue based on what I've seen. $100k debt is not unusual for my friends who graduated from Rose, while $50k is more common for the Purdue grads. I can't speak to all of the details, but I know at least a half-dozen graduates from each school and those numbers seem to bear out.

In a more general response to OP's question, looking at that list, I'd recommend Purdue hands-down. I used to work at a Fortune 100 company in aerospace engineering. I know lots of Purdue grads and only one Northeastern grad. I've never met an engineer from one of the other universities, which means my company (and companies like it) probably didn't recruit there. That said: if your nephew wants to go to Purdue, he'd better be darn sure that he actually wants to be an engineer AND has the chops to make it. Otherwise he's probably better off at a place like Northwestern, which has better general courses of study available if he decides to change majors.
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by surveyor »

Will do good wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 1:23 pm
+1
But not everyone can get in from our own state, they rather want kids from out of state or country to get higher fees. :annoyed
+2. Purdue's up there with Illinois. On the positive side I believe that has helped with a seventh straight year of no tuition (not fee) increases for in state students.
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by bloom2708 »

What are his ACT/SAT scores? Any scholarships?

Who will co-sign for his loans above the $5,500 Federal loans available?

I love spending other people's money, but an 18 year old, the financial aspects should be discussed and considered heavily.

Is $150k or $200k+ in student loans viable?

Being a nephew, I think all you can do is encourage fiscally responsible choices. Many paths.
"We are here to provoke thoughtfulness, not agree with you." Unknown Boglehead
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Re: Help! Nephew is asking for college advice (undergrad choices)

Post by ncbill »

surveyor wrote: Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:18 am Purdue Engineering grad here. Purdue accepts a lot more students into engineering than graduate with engineering degrees. Entering students are accepted into the engineering program. They undergo a rigorous freshman year before applying to a particular engineering discipline. A freshman engineering class is a requirement and the disciplines each present what they offer. I didn't believe it at the time, but it was stated look to your left and look to your right - neither is likely to graduate with an engineering degree. Statistics later bore that out. At $46,000 for out of state students it is something to keep in mind. An industrial management degree, which many engineering majors change to, may not offer the same value.
again, there are cheaper ways:

https://polytechnic.purdue.edu/armyrotc ... mp-program
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