Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

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Elsebet
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Elsebet » Tue Apr 24, 2018 2:52 pm

My dream would be to buy/rent a small place in the center of the US (maybe Kansas) then buy one of those RoadTrek vehicles and take multiple trips per year for a few weeks at a time to different areas of the country.
"...the man who adapts himself to his slender means and makes himself wealthy on a little sum, is the truly rich man..." ~Seneca

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Darth Xanadu
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Darth Xanadu » Tue Apr 24, 2018 4:20 pm

Pajamas wrote:
Mon Apr 23, 2018 5:26 pm
Niemanterry wrote:
Mon Apr 23, 2018 5:21 pm
I am a bit fascinated by the old guy who “lives” on a cruiseship. Some articles paint him as always on the ship. I came accross an interview with him. He moves around different ships within the same cruiseline.
There's always this:

http://aboardtheworld.com/

but not for $100k a year.
No thanks, I'll wait until they upgrade with submarine functionality and 5-bedroom options.
"A courageous teacher, failure is."

GCD
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by GCD » Tue Apr 24, 2018 7:45 pm

Darth Xanadu wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 4:20 pm
Pajamas wrote:
Mon Apr 23, 2018 5:26 pm
Niemanterry wrote:
Mon Apr 23, 2018 5:21 pm
I am a bit fascinated by the old guy who “lives” on a cruiseship. Some articles paint him as always on the ship. I came accross an interview with him. He moves around different ships within the same cruiseline.
There's always this:

http://aboardtheworld.com/

but not for $100k a year.
No thanks, I'll wait until they upgrade with submarine functionality and 5-bedroom options.
You got some :moneybag I tracked down a few rough prices and the apts. can be resold. Apparently 2 bedroom 2 bath goes for ~$2.7 million.

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Pajamas
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Pajamas » Tue Apr 24, 2018 8:02 pm

Just want to point out that a net worth of $10 million is now apparently required. In addition to the initial cost of buying an apartment, there are significant ongoing costs related to operations, maintenance, and food & beverage.

http://aboardtheworld.com/sites/default ... hip-v4.pdf

The ship originally launched in 2002.

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VictoriaF
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by VictoriaF » Tue Apr 24, 2018 8:59 pm

barry2ipa wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:37 am
3. Our version of Nomadic is talking off for 3-5 weeks at a time to certain countries in Asia or Europe, but on the more cost effective side. i.e. we have stayed in prestige hotels at the via veneto in Rome (work paid) - but way too fancy/stuffy, and we would never do any like that on our own dime. We would then return to our home base for a month. So traveling 6 months a year on average.
You mentioned Prague earlier. I come to Prague one-two times a year and stay for two weeks at a time in an apartment equipped with a stove, refrigerator, washing machine and all necessities. The place is a 10-15 minute walk away from tourist areas and is cheaper than tourist hotels. For my long stays I pay an average of $50/night. The place is next to a street car stop serving four lines. A 10-minute walk gets me to the train station that also has a metro station.

I usually combine 2 weeks in Prague with 2 weeks elsewhere in the Czech Republic.

You can see that Czechia is one of my favorite destinations. And I have friends there. And I have been studying the language for a while now. But I don't think I would have liked to spend more than 1-2 months there at a time. I much prefer to go out from and back to my home base.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

GCD
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by GCD » Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:04 pm

Pajamas wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 8:02 pm
Just want to point out that a net worth of $10 million is now apparently required. In addition to the initial cost of buying an apartment, there are significant ongoing costs related to operations, maintenance, and food & beverage.

http://aboardtheworld.com/sites/default ... hip-v4.pdf

The ship originally launched in 2002.
Interesting. The ship isn't owned by a company, you have a fractional share of ownership once you buy a room. So basically it's a floating condo owned by people with $10M+ net worth. That's gotta lead to some interesting owner's meetings.

flyingaway
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by flyingaway » Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:44 pm

For those who do stay in a place without any friends for more than a week, what do you spend your time on after the first week?

Teague
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Teague » Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:45 pm

GCD wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:04 pm
Interesting. The ship isn't owned by a company, you have a fractional share of ownership once you buy a room. So basically it's a floating condo owned by people with $10M+ net worth. That's gotta lead to some interesting owner's meetings.
I can just imagine.

"OK, whose turn is it to pump out the bilge this week? Warren? Oh, right, you did it two weeks ago. Bill and Melinda? I think you two are next on the list. And Mark Z., you've got the watch tonight."
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by LadyGeek » Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:48 pm

This thread is now in the Personal Consumer Issues forum (where to live).
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Bfwolf
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Bfwolf » Tue Apr 24, 2018 11:24 pm

barry2ipa wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:37 am
THANK YOU AGAIN for very thoughtful comments.

1. We will not do the RV thing in N.American - wife would not like it as she hates driving a sedan - so this is out of the question
2. Condo. the sale prices might go up - however .... Even though we have no mortgage, we are probably at $20K/year expenses in 2020 (property taxes and HOA fees). The WA state McCleary school funding decision alone added $1400 to the bill. The 99 viaduct tolling and other taxes in Seattle will add more in addition to this
3. Our version of Nomadic is talking off for 3-5 weeks at a time to certain countries in Asia or Europe, but on the more cost effective side. i.e. we have stayed in prestige hotels at the via veneto in Rome (work paid) - but way too fancy/stuffy, and we would never do any like that on our own dime. We would then return to our home base for a month. So traveling 6 months a year on average.

Thank you for various insights.
A couple thoughts:

1) Regarding health insurance, couldn't you just buy an Obamacare plan? I can't remember if you stated your asset location, but if you have meaningful IRA/401k assets, you could do Roth conversions to keep yourself above the Medicaid line and then get major govt subsidies. When traveling, you could get something like the GeoBlue international travel insurance for multiple trips. It would probably run you about $200 a person for a whole year, and you're good as long as each overseas trip is not more than 70 days. Based on your desire for 3 to 5 week trips at a time, this would work perfectly. https://www.geobluetravelinsurance.com/index.cfm

2) Have you ever gotten into the credit card "game?" You can earn a lot of miles and points for signing up for new credit cards and this could keep your travel expenses down.

quantAndHold
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by quantAndHold » Tue Apr 24, 2018 11:29 pm

heyyou wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 1:05 am
For those drooling about the pictured van, check on the maintenance costs first. The Dodge Sprinter vans with the Benz diesel engines have $300+ oil changes due to the Mercedes parts.
True, but the service interval is 20k miles or 2 years.

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Bfwolf » Tue Apr 24, 2018 11:39 pm

Oh and another thought: whatever place you rent as your homebase, it would be ideal if you could Airbnb it out while you're out of the country. That requires a landlord who is on-board, which might require some searching, but if you were willing to pay a bit over market price, you could probably get that done. And it requires a location which is desirable for Airbnb guests for much of the year, which might mean rents will be heftier. But on the other hand, don't you want your homebase to be in a desirable area so you can enjoy it when you're living here 6 months out of the year?

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by VictoriaF » Wed Apr 25, 2018 6:53 pm

flyingaway wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:44 pm
For those who do stay in a place without any friends for more than a week, what do you spend your time on after the first week?
I usually have an approximate plan for what I'd be doing, either by staying in place or moving around. But sometimes events interfere. For example, several years ago, I was going for an event in Paris that was supposed to be followed by a week in another part of France. But shortly before the event, the second-week activities were canceled. I had a choice to stay in Paris or to go somewhere else, and decided to stay. I found an MIJE hostel in a posh neighborhood Le Marais in a converted 17th century building. It was perfectly located and very inexpensive. When I was waking up in the morning, I was greeted by a gargoyle from the roof of a church across a street. The hostel had two minor issues. First, the stay was limited to seven days per year, which was OK with me because I wanted to be there for just a week. Second, they had a long period of time, I think it was from 10am to 3pm, when everybody had to vacate the place. This was an inconvenience, but, hey, I was in Paris.

I had a guide book with me and every day I had plan-A and plan-B. Plan A involved doing something outdoors, visiting parks, exploring Paris neighborhoods on foot, people watching. Plan B was for going to museums and other covered places in case of rain. As I was visiting places I was interested in, I was occasionally striking conversations with people. I remember that the line to the Catacombs was very long and for over an hour I was torturing my audio-cassette French talking with French tourists from Bordeaux. On another occasion I was hiding from heavy rain and struck a conversation with a Polish woman who comes to Paris every year because she loves it. When the rain stopped, she took me to her favorite cemetery.

By the end of my stay, I felt that I could have easily spent another week in Paris.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

Cycle
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Cycle » Wed Apr 25, 2018 7:41 pm

Vagabonding internationally has never been easier. You don't need to speak the language thanks to map based transit apps and airbnb. Airfare is cheap and luxury buses with double wide seats are ubiquitous outside the USA.

I've extrapolated a couple trips and figure internationally traveling with flights every week for two people would run about 100k a year for all expenses including insurance. On a budget, it would be possible for $50k or less. South East Asia only... you'd probably profit off your condo rent. You might have to adjust higher if spending a lot of time in Maldives / Bora Bora or other extremely expensive locals.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by flyingaway » Wed Apr 25, 2018 10:06 pm

Bfwolf wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 11:39 pm
Oh and another thought: whatever place you rent as your homebase, it would be ideal if you could Airbnb it out while you're out of the country. That requires a landlord who is on-board, which might require some searching, but if you were willing to pay a bit over market price, you could probably get that done. And it requires a location which is desirable for Airbnb guests for much of the year, which might mean rents will be heftier. But on the other hand, don't you want your homebase to be in a desirable area so you can enjoy it when you're living here 6 months out of the year?
I guess Airbnb is for short-term rental. If you are out of the country for most of the time, you will not be able to accommodate the guests in the form of Airbnb, at least you need to change towels after one guest leaves.

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Bfwolf » Thu Apr 26, 2018 12:56 am

flyingaway wrote:
Wed Apr 25, 2018 10:06 pm
Bfwolf wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 11:39 pm
Oh and another thought: whatever place you rent as your homebase, it would be ideal if you could Airbnb it out while you're out of the country. That requires a landlord who is on-board, which might require some searching, but if you were willing to pay a bit over market price, you could probably get that done. And it requires a location which is desirable for Airbnb guests for much of the year, which might mean rents will be heftier. But on the other hand, don't you want your homebase to be in a desirable area so you can enjoy it when you're living here 6 months out of the year?
I guess Airbnb is for short-term rental. If you are out of the country for most of the time, you will not be able to accommodate the guests in the form of Airbnb, at least you need to change towels after one guest leaves.
I was Airbnbing my place for a while during 3 or 4 week trips out of the country and was able to get my awesome housekeeper to handle everything for her normal fee (which I was passing on to the renters).

If one doesn't have an awesome housekeeper, there are property management companies who will handle this for you for a fee.

LookingForward
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by LookingForward » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:29 am

quantAndHold wrote:
Mon Apr 23, 2018 5:28 pm
I read an article several years ago, which of course I can’t find now, about a couple of young(ish) retirees who had no home base, but were just traveling the world. They had a financial planner send them $7000/month, and they would make it work wherever they were. Mostly they would stay places during shoulder and off seasons, ask for a monthly rate on vacation rentals, and do a lot of their own cooking. Not something I would want to do forever, but it had an appeal.
Perhaps you're thinking of Lynne and Tim from homefreeadventures.com ? They had an article in the WSJ around 2012-ish, that's either gone or behind the WSJ paywall now. Sadly, it doesn't look like their site has been updated since last fall, and that was with a blog post about a earlier trip.

The idea of selling the house and traveling abroad sounds great to me, but my wife's not comfortable with the idea of not having a home base to tag up with, on occasion.

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barry2ipa
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by barry2ipa » Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:12 am

VictoriaF wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 8:59 pm
barry2ipa wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 9:37 am
3. Our version of Nomadic is talking off for 3-5 weeks at a time to certain countries in Asia or Europe, but on the more cost effective side. i.e. we have stayed in prestige hotels at the via veneto in Rome (work paid) - but way too fancy/stuffy, and we would never do any like that on our own dime. We would then return to our home base for a month. So traveling 6 months a year on average.
You mentioned Prague earlier. I come to Prague one-two times a year and stay for two weeks at a time in an apartment equipped with a stove, refrigerator, washing machine and all necessities. The place is a 10-15 minute walk away from tourist areas and is cheaper than tourist hotels. For my long stays I pay an average of $50/night. The place is next to a street car stop serving four lines. A 10-minute walk gets me to the train station that also has a metro station.

I usually combine 2 weeks in Prague with 2 weeks elsewhere in the Czech Republic.

You can see that Czechia is one of my favorite destinations. And I have friends there. And I have been studying the language for a while now. But I don't think I would have liked to spend more than 1-2 months there at a time. I much prefer to go out from and back to my home base.

Victoria
We have stayed in a guest house in Prague (sounds similar) and had a great time. Have also done something similar in Bratislava (very cheap beer :sharebeer . Bratislava is quickly becoming our favorite city

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barry2ipa
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by barry2ipa » Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:19 am

Bfwolf wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 11:24 pm

2) Have you ever gotten into the credit card "game?" You can earn a lot of miles and points for signing up for new credit cards and this could keep your travel expenses down.
We both have a good amount of airline and hotel miles based on from many years of work travel. I am just starting to get into optimizing for new credit cards.

I have found airline miles to be great for fixed timeframes .... being flexible on dates there seem to be other travel site deals that are a little better.

I have found hotel miles to be invaluable. We generally find a low cost place to stay when we vacation - but usually for the last couple of days we will consider using hotel miles to get a nicer hotel. For instance last year in Vienna, we moved from a decent lower cost place to a hotel on the Ringstrasse for the last 2 night (that we found a good deal on miles). It is a fun way to end a trip.

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barry2ipa
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by barry2ipa » Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:26 am

Cycle wrote:
Wed Apr 25, 2018 7:41 pm
Vagabonding internationally has never been easier. You don't need to speak the language thanks to map based transit apps and airbnb. Airfare is cheap and luxury buses with double wide seats are ubiquitous outside the USA.

I've extrapolated a couple trips and figure internationally traveling with flights every week for two people would run about 100k a year for all expenses including insurance. On a budget, it would be possible for $50k or less. South East Asia only... you'd probably profit off your condo rent. You might have to adjust higher if spending a lot of time in Maldives / Bora Bora or other extremely expensive locals.
Nice - that seems to meet some of what we have been figuring out. i am thinking of budgeting more for a few reasons --- that would be very safe for 8 years of active traveling @ 6-8 months a year.

emotionally, if we are not going to settle long term in Seattle, my SO does not want the hassle of keeping and renting out the condo. I will probably go along with this - and figure out where we want to rent a small apt as our home base. We went through and cataloged our 'stuff' a couple of weeks ago - it is amazing how much can go. Just her work clothes, furniture, our tvs, cooking stuff is very substantial.

2015
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by 2015 » Thu Apr 26, 2018 11:08 am

Elsebet wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 2:52 pm
My dream would be to buy/rent a small place in the center of the US (maybe Kansas) then buy one of those RoadTrek vehicles and take multiple trips per year for a few weeks at a time to different areas of the country.
I just got back from a lovely rail trip across the Pacific Southwest to and from New Orleans. I met some incredibly interesting people on that trip, to include a fascinating couple who have traveled all over the U.S. by rental car. From a home base in Fresno, CA, they take the train across country (one doesn't life to fly), rent a car, and drive leisurely to whatever strikes their fancy. They've done this for the past fifteen years and told some amazing stories, from living in an Amish camp, to having participated in civil war reenactments. I decided after talking to them after relocating late this year I will purchase a smaller RV and become a bit of a nomad myself (I have also been inspired to do this strangely enough by the book Nomadland which I recently finished reading).

I've learned from train travel that travelling within the U.S. can be like visiting entirely different countries (ugly chain establishments notwithstanding). On this latest trip I also met a gentleman from England who served as guide for a group of English tourists travelling all over the U.S. He said he tells English tourists there is vastly more to America than it's largest cities where most tourists visit. I would agree, as the breathtaking scenic beauty of my latest and previous trips have demonstrated.

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Cycle » Thu Apr 26, 2018 11:50 am

barry2ipa wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:26 am
emotionally, if we are not going to settle long term in Seattle, my SO does not want the hassle of keeping and renting out the condo. I will probably go along with this - and figure out where we want to rent a small apt as our home base. We went through and cataloged our 'stuff' a couple of weeks ago - it is amazing how much can go. Just her work clothes, furniture, our tvs, cooking stuff is very substantial.
I don't know what rents are, but unless the condo is highly leveraged you'd probably get better returns on the money from the sale anyways.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Bfwolf » Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:14 pm

barry2ipa wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:19 am
Bfwolf wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 11:24 pm

2) Have you ever gotten into the credit card "game?" You can earn a lot of miles and points for signing up for new credit cards and this could keep your travel expenses down.
We both have a good amount of airline and hotel miles based on from many years of work travel. I am just starting to get into optimizing for new credit cards.

I have found airline miles to be great for fixed timeframes .... being flexible on dates there seem to be other travel site deals that are a little better.

I have found hotel miles to be invaluable. We generally find a low cost place to stay when we vacation - but usually for the last couple of days we will consider using hotel miles to get a nicer hotel. For instance last year in Vienna, we moved from a decent lower cost place to a hotel on the Ringstrasse for the last 2 night (that we found a good deal on miles). It is a fun way to end a trip.
Interesting, my experience with airline miles is the opposite. Namely, that with fixed dates, finding international saver awards is very difficult, but with flexibility, it's manageable. I must caveat by saying that I usually try to use the miles to fly business class where award availability is generally a bit more limited than in economy. You're right that if you're willing to fly international economy, and are flexible on dates and destinations, good fare deals often come around.

For hotel redemptions, the "sweet spot" in terms of value is often in the lower tier categories, i.e. Tier 1 and Tier 2. But in places like Southeast Asia, those hotels can be really nice.

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boomer
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by boomer » Thu Apr 26, 2018 11:18 pm

barry2ipa wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:26 am
Cycle wrote:
Wed Apr 25, 2018 7:41 pm

emotionally, if we are not going to settle long term in Seattle, my SO does not want the hassle of keeping and renting out the condo. I will probably go along with this - and figure out where we want to rent a small apt as our home base. We went through and cataloged our 'stuff' a couple of weeks ago - it is amazing how much can go. Just her work clothes, furniture, our tvs, cooking stuff is very substantial.
As a landlord, I would definitely advocate selling, especially since you are not wanting to return to Seattle. So many things could happen with your property while you are out traveling. Property managers can only do so much, and there is plenty of wear and tear and repairs with even the best tenants. Have peace of mind and enjoy your journeys.

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by VictoriaF » Fri Apr 27, 2018 6:49 am

barry2ipa wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:19 am
I have found hotel miles to be invaluable. We generally find a low cost place to stay when we vacation - but usually for the last couple of days we will consider using hotel miles to get a nicer hotel. For instance last year in Vienna, we moved from a decent lower cost place to a hotel on the Ringstrasse for the last 2 night (that we found a good deal on miles). It is a fun way to end a trip.
I see your point but it would nor work for me. A move from one hotel to another is an overhead: you have to pack, vacate your lower cost place by a certain time, transition to a nice hotel, wait for the check-in time or leave your luggage, and eventually unpack. In a nice hotel, everything is more expensive and you may have to pay for small things that are free in cheaper places.

I have some hotel points but find few opportunities to use them optimally. The most common case is when I have a morning flight from Europe back to the U.S.A. I arrive a day early and stay overnight at an airport hotel, e.g., at Charles De Gaulle.

Victoria
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by LeeMKE » Fri Apr 27, 2018 10:25 am

We are launching as global nomads July 9.

Like others before us, we don't know how long we will be gone. We don't know where we will settle when we stop traveling.

We sold the home several years ago and rented, knowing this was our plan. Surprisingly, getting rid of our stuff hasn't been as traumatic as I thought it might. We are keeping just the bare minimum of art and furniture. Everything worth less than $12 p/cubic foot, or $6/lb. can be replaced when we settle down again. (moving costs $6/lb., storage costs $12/cubic foot for 3 years)

Health insurance: We are changing to a bronze Obamacare plan for the rest of 2018. And we are buying international health coverage. 2019, we'll drop US healthcare, assuming we think we'll travel another year or two. The international healthcare comparable to our US Gold coverage will be about $5k/year for two people. It allows us to return to the US for 2 weeks or 30 days (depending on which company we go with).

Washington is nomad friendly and no state income tax. Our mailing service in Seattle opened at Pikes Market in 1909, Wanderers Mail Service. They are doing a great job converting our mail to virtual delivery as we get addresses changed and ready for launch.

The RV lifestyle doesn't appeal to us. Europe, Asia, Latin America, China all beckon. We plan to do GeoArbitrage to manage costs. If everything is going well, we stay in Paris for a month, and Bangkok for 2 weeks. If the market or exchange rate are a bit scary, we stay in Paris for 2 weeks and Bangkok for a month.
The mightiest Oak is just a nut who stayed the course.

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by cruzbay » Fri Apr 27, 2018 12:36 pm

There is a great group on Facebook called Nomadic Retirement Living. Much to be learned there, whether you are a current Nomad or a Nomad-in-training. Also, a previous poster mentioned Lynne and Tim Martin of "Home Sweet Anywhere" fame. I enjoyed their book by this name and follow their Facebook group as well. I'm sure there are a bunch of other like groups, but these are my two lest I lose myself and get no work done!

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by flyingaway » Sat Apr 28, 2018 7:43 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 6:49 am
barry2ipa wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:19 am
I have found hotel miles to be invaluable. We generally find a low cost place to stay when we vacation - but usually for the last couple of days we will consider using hotel miles to get a nicer hotel. For instance last year in Vienna, we moved from a decent lower cost place to a hotel on the Ringstrasse for the last 2 night (that we found a good deal on miles). It is a fun way to end a trip.
I see your point but it would nor work for me. A move from one hotel to another is an overhead: you have to pack, vacate your lower cost place by a certain time, transition to a nice hotel, wait for the check-in time or leave your luggage, and eventually unpack. In a nice hotel, everything is more expensive and you may have to pay for small things that are free in cheaper places.

I have some hotel points but find few opportunities to use them optimally. The most common case is when I have a morning flight from Europe back to the U.S.A. I arrive a day early and stay overnight at an airport hotel, e.g., at Charles De Gaulle.

Victoria
Among miles, points, and cash, I will choose cash at any time.

flyingaway
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by flyingaway » Sat Apr 28, 2018 7:47 pm

LeeMKE wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 10:25 am
We are launching as global nomads July 9.

Like others before us, we don't know how long we will be gone. We don't know where we will settle when we stop traveling.

We sold the home several years ago and rented, knowing this was our plan. Surprisingly, getting rid of our stuff hasn't been as traumatic as I thought it might. We are keeping just the bare minimum of art and furniture. Everything worth less than $12 p/cubic foot, or $6/lb. can be replaced when we settle down again. (moving costs $6/lb., storage costs $12/cubic foot for 3 years)

Health insurance: We are changing to a bronze Obamacare plan for the rest of 2018. And we are buying international health coverage. 2019, we'll drop US healthcare, assuming we think we'll travel another year or two. The international healthcare comparable to our US Gold coverage will be about $5k/year for two people. It allows us to return to the US for 2 weeks or 30 days (depending on which company we go with).

Washington is nomad friendly and no state income tax. Our mailing service in Seattle opened at Pikes Market in 1909, Wanderers Mail Service. They are doing a great job converting our mail to virtual delivery as we get addresses changed and ready for launch.

The RV lifestyle doesn't appeal to us. Europe, Asia, Latin America, China all beckon. We plan to do GeoArbitrage to manage costs. If everything is going well, we stay in Paris for a month, and Bangkok for 2 weeks. If the market or exchange rate are a bit scary, we stay in Paris for 2 weeks and Bangkok for a month.
This is interesting.
If you get really sick, you can come back to get Obama care, as I remember that coming back from overseas is a qualifying event. Can you confirm that?
Will the mail service company not scan the junk mails?
Keep us posted about your experience from time to time.

2015
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by 2015 » Sat Apr 28, 2018 8:20 pm

LeeMKE wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 10:25 am
...

The RV lifestyle doesn't appeal to us. Europe, Asia, Latin America, China all beckon. We plan to do GeoArbitrage to manage costs. If everything is going well, we stay in Paris for a month, and Bangkok for 2 weeks. If the market or exchange rate are a bit scary, we stay in Paris for 2 weeks and Bangkok for a month.
Interesting the difference in preferences. A global nomad lifestyle would stress me out to no end. In fact, I've identified only select international locations I'm interested in visiting at this time (although that may change). I think I would invest in living aboard a sailboat before I would become an international nomad.

mrgeeze
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by mrgeeze » Sat Apr 28, 2018 8:39 pm

I would strongly suggest you NOT start by spending 50-150k on a camper van.
Its just too much $$$ for something you may quickly find is not for you.
Instead I would suggest you spend 10K+- on a used conversion van.
Drive that around for a few years and decide where to go from there.
If you don't like it you can probably sell it for what you bought it for.

We thought we were going to go the big $$$ route till a 10 year old Conversion van opportunity fell in our lap.
We paid $8500 for it. I built a queen bed frame with some old 2x4's and plywood and we put a queen size mattress ($500) in it.
$1000 put a fan/vent in the roof, another 12v battery, isolater and switch panel. Thats it
As long as the temp drops below 70 at night we are comfortable.
On really cold nights (below freezing) we use our sleeping bags.

In 3 years we've made 6 multi-month trips (Colorado Plateau, Mexico, Adirondaks,Florida, Pacific Northwest, BigBend) and have found the very inexpensive van suits us perfectly. We've put the better part of 40 k miles travelling.
We still keep a small home at the beach.

We run into a lot of people on the rode tied to their expensive RV's and or CamperVan.
It seems they spend a lot of time maintaining their rigs and planning where will spend each and every night.
They often tell us how much it costs to keep the thing going.
Not us. We roll when we want. Where we want.
We can park just about anywhere and sleep the night away.
Campground/RV park, Driveway, quite neighborhood, Starbucks, etc.
We don't need a hookup or a pump out.

One night we got a bit drunk on Vancouver Island and slept the night in the van parked in from of City Hall.
No worries at all. Not a soul bothered us

It may not suit your lifestyle but for the 2 of us still in our 50's its made travelling around quite enjoyable.
If we need pampering we just check into a nice hotel for a day or 2 or 3.

We'll probably spend 2 months this summer in Montana/Wyoming/Idaho/SouthDakota

TravelGeek
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by TravelGeek » Sat Apr 28, 2018 9:15 pm

mrgeeze wrote:
Sat Apr 28, 2018 8:39 pm
They often tell us how much it costs to keep the thing going.
Not us. We roll when we want. Where we want.
We can park just about anywhere and sleep the night away.
Campground/RV park, Driveway, quite neighborhood, Starbucks, etc.
We don't need a hookup or a pump out.

One night we got a bit drunk on Vancouver Island and slept the night in the van parked in from of City Hall.
No worries at all. Not a soul bothered us
Where do you find a bathroom in the middle of the night or a shower in the morning when parked in a quiet neighborhood or across from city hall? ;)

I think we will probably try the nomadic lifestyle with our Forester, tent/sleeping bags and plenty of motels and national park cabins etc. :)

I am dreaming of one of those Sprinter vans, but I am not convinced that we will get sufficient value out of it. We have friends that can’t make up their mind and are on their fifth nomadic vehicle in ten years.

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by LeeMKE » Sat Apr 28, 2018 9:23 pm

This is interesting.
If you get really sick, you can come back to get Obama care, as I remember that coming back from overseas is a qualifying event. Can you confirm that?
Will the mail service company not scan the junk mails?
Keep us posted about your experience from time to time.
Yes, if you keep Obamacare, you can return to the US for treatment. However, we’ve had very good experiences with medical care abroad. And you can get US coverage included in your intl health insurance for a limited period. Today, it would give you enough time to get back under Obamacare. In our case, Medicare is available soon, so we’ll get that coverage at that time.

The mail service is working great so far. I’ve been getting ready for awhile: cancelling magazines, switching vendors to online only billing, etc.

So far, the junk mail isn’t hitting the mail service yet, so I can’t be sure what will follow us once we file our change of address with USPS. Other than junk mail, we are down to less than 30 pieces a month. It is fast to check the mail, toss, forward, shred or scan the contents.
The mightiest Oak is just a nut who stayed the course.

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by GCD » Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:45 am

2015 wrote:
Sat Apr 28, 2018 8:20 pm
LeeMKE wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 10:25 am
...

The RV lifestyle doesn't appeal to us. Europe, Asia, Latin America, China all beckon. We plan to do GeoArbitrage to manage costs. If everything is going well, we stay in Paris for a month, and Bangkok for 2 weeks. If the market or exchange rate are a bit scary, we stay in Paris for 2 weeks and Bangkok for a month.
Interesting the difference in preferences. A global nomad lifestyle would stress me out to no end. In fact, I've identified only select international locations I'm interested in visiting at this time (although that may change). I think I would invest in living aboard a sailboat before I would become an international nomad.
My wife and I just started researching sailboats. We were committed to the RV/5th wheel travel plan since we met. Just recently I thought of expanding that to an international level and using a sailboat instead of an RV. Now we have sailing lessons coming up this summer.

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sperry8
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by sperry8 » Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:50 am

flyingaway wrote:
Sat Apr 28, 2018 7:43 pm
VictoriaF wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 6:49 am
barry2ipa wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:19 am
I have found hotel miles to be invaluable. We generally find a low cost place to stay when we vacation - but usually for the last couple of days we will consider using hotel miles to get a nicer hotel. For instance last year in Vienna, we moved from a decent lower cost place to a hotel on the Ringstrasse for the last 2 night (that we found a good deal on miles). It is a fun way to end a trip.
I see your point but it would nor work for me. A move from one hotel to another is an overhead: you have to pack, vacate your lower cost place by a certain time, transition to a nice hotel, wait for the check-in time or leave your luggage, and eventually unpack. In a nice hotel, everything is more expensive and you may have to pay for small things that are free in cheaper places.

I have some hotel points but find few opportunities to use them optimally. The most common case is when I have a morning flight from Europe back to the U.S.A. I arrive a day early and stay overnight at an airport hotel, e.g., at Charles De Gaulle.

Victoria
Among miles, points, and cash, I will choose cash at any time.
While that is your prerogative, it is not the way to optimize return especially when using credit cards for most of your spend. The best cashback cards earn 2%, but many points/miles cards net you more when redeemed optimally. Especially for a global nomad, you will be able to redeem properly since you'll have so much opportunity. I've easily earned greater than 3% over the years, 50% over what a cash back card could do.
BH contest results: 2019: #233 of 645 | 18: #150 of 493 | 17: #516 of 647 | 16: #121 of 610 | 15: #18 of 552 | 14: #225 of 503 | 13: #383 of 433 | 12: #366 of 410 | 11: #113 of 369 | 10: #53 of 282

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VictoriaF
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by VictoriaF » Sun Apr 29, 2018 9:31 am

GCD wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:45 am
2015 wrote:
Sat Apr 28, 2018 8:20 pm
LeeMKE wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 10:25 am
...

The RV lifestyle doesn't appeal to us. Europe, Asia, Latin America, China all beckon. We plan to do GeoArbitrage to manage costs. If everything is going well, we stay in Paris for a month, and Bangkok for 2 weeks. If the market or exchange rate are a bit scary, we stay in Paris for 2 weeks and Bangkok for a month.
Interesting the difference in preferences. A global nomad lifestyle would stress me out to no end. In fact, I've identified only select international locations I'm interested in visiting at this time (although that may change). I think I would invest in living aboard a sailboat before I would become an international nomad.
My wife and I just started researching sailboats. We were committed to the RV/5th wheel travel plan since we met. Just recently I thought of expanding that to an international level and using a sailboat instead of an RV. Now we have sailing lessons coming up this summer.
For each her own.

With RVs and sailboats, you have an additional responsibility for maintaining your vehicle. You are responsible for driving or sailing it, which is work. You are less likely to visit large cities. And, importantly, you are isolating yourself from the local people.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

lostdog
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by lostdog » Sun Apr 29, 2018 10:20 am

Toons wrote:
Mon Apr 23, 2018 3:52 pm
Get Yourself one of these and take off........
:happy

Image


http://www.roadtrek.com/models/cs-adventurous/




:sharebeer
is this what you have? Looks like an amazing vehicle.
VTWAX and chill.

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Hyperborea
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Hyperborea » Sun Apr 29, 2018 10:33 am

I'll point out 2 well known in the FIRE community couples that have done this. Both of these couples have interesting info that may help you out in your own planning.

The first is the Terhorsts who have been at the nomad FIRE life for 35 years. Their book, Cashing in on the American Dream: How to Retire at 35, was part of what set me on the road to FIREing myself.
https://www.nextavenue.org/30-years-ago ... 35-update/

The second is the Kaderlis - http://www.retireearlylifestyle.com
It’s hard to win an argument with a smart person, it's damn near impossible to win an argument with a stupid person. - Bill Murray

GCD
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by GCD » Sun Apr 29, 2018 11:46 am

VictoriaF wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 9:31 am
For each her own.

With RVs and sailboats, you have an additional responsibility for maintaining your vehicle. You are responsible for driving or sailing it, which is work. You are less likely to visit large cities. And, importantly, you are isolating yourself from the local people.

Victoria
Well, I'm kind of half in agreement with you. Maintenance is definitely an issue. I don't even like the chores associated with maintaining a house let alone what I anticipate with a boat.

We'll see how the large city thing works out though. A 5th wheel is different from an RV, but I guess I've used the terms interchangeably and imprecisely. Our plan is to dump the 5th wheel somewhere 50-100 miles out from a major city. Then use the pick-up truck to get in as close as comfortable. When the driving seems like a pain in a truck we would ditch the truck and use Uber and hotel rooms for a day or two. The focus of the 5th wheel travel is to see countryside with random excursions into cities.

The boat is a different deal altogether. Many large cities are on the coast. I'm not going to see most of the world anyway, so if the parts I see are on the coast that's cool.

I'm interested in meeting foreign locals, but I don't really care about meeting American locals. The retirees at the RV campground are good enough for me. From what I've heard from friends that have done the RV thing there is a network and culture of RVrs that is quite robust.

You seem to have developed your own brand of nomadism with longer stays in a foreign city. That has some attractive qualities. My wife and I are fortunate/unfortunate in that we both retired with kids in middle/high school. I keep telling her we shouldn't waste this opportunity to move to Greece for a year or whatever. I think the idea of longer term stays is a good one.

The 3 major things I like about bringing your roof with you:
- buying groceries and cooking
- no constant packing/unpacking
- you know you will always have a good mattress (something I have become enamored of as I get older).

2015
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by 2015 » Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:07 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 9:31 am
GCD wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:45 am
2015 wrote:
Sat Apr 28, 2018 8:20 pm
LeeMKE wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 10:25 am
...

The RV lifestyle doesn't appeal to us. Europe, Asia, Latin America, China all beckon. We plan to do GeoArbitrage to manage costs. If everything is going well, we stay in Paris for a month, and Bangkok for 2 weeks. If the market or exchange rate are a bit scary, we stay in Paris for 2 weeks and Bangkok for a month.
Interesting the difference in preferences. A global nomad lifestyle would stress me out to no end. In fact, I've identified only select international locations I'm interested in visiting at this time (although that may change). I think I would invest in living aboard a sailboat before I would become an international nomad.
My wife and I just started researching sailboats. We were committed to the RV/5th wheel travel plan since we met. Just recently I thought of expanding that to an international level and using a sailboat instead of an RV. Now we have sailing lessons coming up this summer.
For each her own.

With RVs and sailboats, you have an additional responsibility for maintaining your vehicle. You are responsible for driving or sailing it, which is work. You are less likely to visit large cities. And, importantly, you are isolating yourself from the local people.

Victoria
Maintaining a smaller RV on the road is not a problem when one has the money to pay for it, if necessary. As to driving or sailing, that's half the fun, and to me much better than being cramped in a tin can flying to and from a destination. Not that I don't plan to engage in being cramped in such tin cans in the future, as there are some world destinations I want to visit that will necessitate it (e.g., the Amazon, parts of Africa, Antartcica, etc.).

Moving soon out of one of the world's most cacophonic cities, I don't miss visiting large cities anymore (and also disagree that one is less inclined to visit large cities when either driving or sailing). And to the contrary, I spend more time with local people, no matter where I go, enjoying how locals live versus visiting highly touted tourist "must-sees".

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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by reggiesimpson » Sun Apr 29, 2018 4:29 pm

Check out Audre and Dimitris Traveling love affair. They have done what you are looking for.

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VictoriaF
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by VictoriaF » Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:37 pm

GCD wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 11:46 am
The 3 major things I like about bringing your roof with you:
- buying groceries and cooking
- no constant packing/unpacking
- you know you will always have a good mattress (something I have become enamored of as I get older).
It's a bit off-topic, but paradoxically, the best places for buying groceries and cooking when traveling are youth hostels. I usually try to find a hostel that has single rooms and last year I even paid for a double room. As a couple, you are more likely to find private double rooms in hostels.

I agree that if you carry your own roof, packing and unpacking cease being issues.

The only value I see in a good mattress is to hold banknotes after my other mattresses become saturated with cash.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

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VictoriaF
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by VictoriaF » Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:48 pm

2015 wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:07 pm
VictoriaF wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 9:31 am
For each her own.

With RVs and sailboats, you have an additional responsibility for maintaining your vehicle. You are responsible for driving or sailing it, which is work. You are less likely to visit large cities. And, importantly, you are isolating yourself from the local people.

Victoria
Maintaining a smaller RV on the road is not a problem when one has the money to pay for it, if necessary. As to driving or sailing, that's half the fun, and to me much better than being cramped in a tin can flying to and from a destination. Not that I don't plan to engage in being cramped in such tin cans in the future, as there are some world destinations I want to visit that will necessitate it (e.g., the Amazon, parts of Africa, Antartcica, etc.).
The difference is that after you spend several hours in a tin can, you emerge from the can in your destination and are free to explore by train, bus, streetcar, and of course by foot. With an RV or a boat you are always tethered to your property.

2015 wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:07 pm
Moving soon out of one of the world's most cacophonic cities, I don't miss visiting large cities anymore (and also disagree that one is less inclined to visit large cities when either driving or sailing). And to the contrary, I spend more time with local people, no matter where I go, enjoying how locals live versus visiting highly touted tourist "must-sees".
The cacophonic city is too spread out and does not have a city feel. San Francisco is a city. New York is a city. Washington, Boston, Philadelphia are cities. And when you come to Europe, you usually want to see large cities. You can bring your sailboat to Marseilles, but probably not to Paris, London, Berlin, or Prague.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

GCD
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by GCD » Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:21 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:37 pm
The only value I see in a good mattress is to hold banknotes after my other mattresses become saturated with cash.
For a retiree, you are a stud! :beer I had a similar view when I was in my 20s. My back needs a decent mattress now. But then you sleep on nails too...
VictoriaF wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:48 pm
The difference is that after you spend several hours in a tin can, you emerge from the can in your destination and are free to explore by train, bus, streetcar, and of course by foot. With an RV or a boat you are always tethered to your property.
I have a lot to learn about boats, slips, docking fees, whatever. But my understanding is plenty of people live aboard boats and leave their boat behind to go on vacation. What would stop and RVr or a boater from taking an Uber/train/bus/whatever to nearby towns and staying in a hotel overnight or longer? (I wouldn't consider that packing/unpacking because we are just talking an overnight bag, not all the junk I would take for a 4 month trip).

Maybe you can't see London when you take your first step off your boat, but Conde Nast made this list of the 25 best coastal cities in the world. Take off the US ones (including Chicago :confused , which I guess is technically coastal) and I have more than enough to keep me entertained. And that's not even counting all the places that don't impress Conde Nast.
https://www.cntraveler.com/galleries/20 ... -the-world

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VictoriaF
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by VictoriaF » Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:26 pm

GCD wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:21 pm
VictoriaF wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:37 pm
The only value I see in a good mattress is to hold banknotes after my other mattresses become saturated with cash.
For a retiree, you are a stud! :beer I had a similar view when I was in my 20s. My back needs a decent mattress now. But then you sleep on nails too...
Ahh, but there is difference between sleeping on nails and lying on a Bed of Nails. Mine looks like this:

Image

You should try it!
GCD wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:21 pm
VictoriaF wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:48 pm
The difference is that after you spend several hours in a tin can, you emerge from the can in your destination and are free to explore by train, bus, streetcar, and of course by foot. With an RV or a boat you are always tethered to your property.
I have a lot to learn about boats, slips, docking fees, whatever. But my understanding is plenty of people live aboard boats and leave their boat behind to go on vacation. What would stop and RVr or a boater from taking an Uber/train/bus/whatever to nearby towns and staying in a hotel overnight or longer? (I wouldn't consider that packing/unpacking because we are just talking an overnight bag, not all the junk I would take for a 4 month trip).

Maybe you can't see London when you take your first step off your boat, but Conde Nast made this list of the 25 best coastal cities in the world. Take off the US ones (including Chicago :confused , which I guess is technically coastal) and I have more than enough to keep me entertained. And that's not even counting all the places that don't impress Conde Nast.
https://www.cntraveler.com/galleries/20 ... -the-world
I admit that when it comes to boats I am out of my depth.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

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Toons
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by Toons » Mon Apr 30, 2018 12:03 pm

lostdog wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 10:20 am
Toons wrote:
Mon Apr 23, 2018 3:52 pm
Get Yourself one of these and take off........
:happy

Image


http://www.roadtrek.com/models/cs-adventurous/




:sharebeer


is this what you have? Looks like an amazing vehicle.

Yes,,we thoroughly enjoy it, :happy
"One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity" –Bruce Lee

2015
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by 2015 » Mon Apr 30, 2018 12:26 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:48 pm
2015 wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:07 pm
VictoriaF wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 9:31 am
For each her own.

With RVs and sailboats, you have an additional responsibility for maintaining your vehicle. You are responsible for driving or sailing it, which is work. You are less likely to visit large cities. And, importantly, you are isolating yourself from the local people.

Victoria
Maintaining a smaller RV on the road is not a problem when one has the money to pay for it, if necessary. As to driving or sailing, that's half the fun, and to me much better than being cramped in a tin can flying to and from a destination. Not that I don't plan to engage in being cramped in such tin cans in the future, as there are some world destinations I want to visit that will necessitate it (e.g., the Amazon, parts of Africa, Antartcica, etc.).
The difference is that after you spend several hours in a tin can, you emerge from the can in your destination and are free to explore by train, bus, streetcar, and of course by foot. With an RV or a boat you are always tethered to your property.

2015 wrote:
Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:07 pm
Moving soon out of one of the world's most cacophonic cities, I don't miss visiting large cities anymore (and also disagree that one is less inclined to visit large cities when either driving or sailing). And to the contrary, I spend more time with local people, no matter where I go, enjoying how locals live versus visiting highly touted tourist "must-sees".
The cacophonic city is too spread out and does not have a city feel. San Francisco is a city. New York is a city. Washington, Boston, Philadelphia are cities. And when you come to Europe, you usually want to see large cities. You can bring your sailboat to Marseilles, but probably not to Paris, London, Berlin, or Prague.

Victoria
Victoria, you're not tethered to an RV. You're free to leave the RV and do all kinds of exploring on foot or otherwise, and you can go places you can't access by train or bus. A small C class RV will travel (almost) anyplace a passenger car will.

As to Paris, London, Berlin, or Prague, I've been there and done that, and with very few exceptions, have no desire to visit large cities, European or otherwise, anymore. I think the distinction is between wanting to visit cities or nature, which I'm now more inclined to toward. I only recently completed train travel through the deserts of the Pacific Southwest, and it was more breathtaking than any city I've ever seen. I can definitely see myself engaging in the nomadic life there, particularly after having just read the book Nomadland. At this point in life, I seek emancipation from civilization, not the other way around.

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VictoriaF
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Apr 30, 2018 1:06 pm

2015 wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 12:26 pm
I think the distinction is between wanting to visit cities or nature, which I'm now more inclined to toward. I only recently completed train travel through the deserts of the Pacific Southwest, and it was more breathtaking than any city I've ever seen. I can definitely see myself engaging in the nomadic life there, particularly after having just read the book Nomadland. At this point in life, I seek emancipation from civilization, not the other way around.

This is a good way to highlight the distinction. I grew up in a large city in what used to be the Soviet Union. After I have immigrated to the United States, for a long time, I was dissatisfied with the suburban, mall-centered, food-focused, car-based living. Only after I have moved to the D.C. area, which was quite recently, I started getting the satisfaction of being in a large city, where people walk and take metro and have other interests than shopping and food. It's not New York or London, but it's a definite improvement for me.

By the way, your recommendations, and especially Farnam Street are a gift that keeps on giving. Thanks!

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

quantAndHold
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by quantAndHold » Mon Apr 30, 2018 1:15 pm

My in-laws traveled all over Europe in a caravan. They bought it there, spent a couple of years traveling around Europe, shipped it home, spent a couple of years traveling around mostly in Mexico. Got tired of that, sold it, bought a boat, and spent several years doing that, then sold the boat and bought an urban condo. None of our early retirement choices is a life sentence.

At home, we live an urban lifestyle (yes, that’s possible, even in Southern California), so when we travel, we tend to prefer nature. But we do go to cities in the motorhome from time to time. Some cities, like San Francisco, have RV parks right in the middle of the city. They’re not usually idyllic places, but they do the job. In others, like NYC, the RV Park is in the suburbs (Jersey City), and transit/Uber/rental cars are available. With some research, other options are available. https://www.gonewiththewynns.com/downto ... rv-camping

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VictoriaF
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Re: Nomadic lifestyle in their 50s

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Apr 30, 2018 1:20 pm

quantAndHold wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 1:15 pm
None of our early retirement choices is a life sentence.
Good point.
quantAndHold wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 1:15 pm
Some cities, like San Francisco, have RV parks right in the middle of the city. They’re not usually idyllic places, but they do the job. In others, like NYC, the RV Park is in the suburbs (Jersey City), and transit/Uber/rental cars are available. With some research, other options are available. https://www.gonewiththewynns.com/downto ... rv-camping
I did not know that there were RV parks served by public transportation of San Francisco or New York. Thanks.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

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