What have you baked recently?

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Caligal
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Caligal » Fri May 04, 2018 6:10 pm

Lady Geek

If I may...reading blackjack's post - he/she never mentions putting the lid on so that possibly changed the results. Maybe blackjack is using the pan in lieu of a regular loaf pan? That being said, 5 cups is the amount of flour used in a 13" pullman pan in a traditional pain de mie recipe so I think you are on the right track!

For a great tasting denser loaf, I would stick with a recipe meant for the pullman which normally uses milk and a small amount of butter, and doesn't have to rise overnight to develop flavor.

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LadyGeek
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by LadyGeek » Fri May 04, 2018 7:08 pm

Caligal,

You make two good points. After this happened, it appears that most (if not all) of the Pullman loaf pan recipes use the 9" x 4" x 13" size.

My toaster oven will only fit the 9" x 4" x 4" size. In fact, the height has less than 1/2" (1 cm) of clearance. It's a tight fit, but will work. I'll look for recipes that fit the smaller size.

Thanks for the info on the Pullman recipe. I was wondering why milk and butter were used.

In my case, I want to use the no-knead technique. Minimizing the amount of effort and cleanup goes a long way towards keeping me interested.

Today was a minor setback. In hindsight, it was entertaining to watch the dough escape the bread pan. Thoughts of "The Blob" sci-fi movie crossed my mind. :D
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Caligal
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Caligal » Fri May 04, 2018 7:55 pm

Lady Geek

"The best bread for thin-slicing is called pain de mie, a butter- and milk-rich loaf baked in a special lidded pan (often called a Pullman pan). The lid ensures that the baking bread won't expand too much, keeping it very close-grained — and thus totally non-crumbly, and easy to slice." - from King Arthur Flour.

CG

keinodoggy
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by keinodoggy » Sat May 05, 2018 9:59 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Sat Apr 07, 2018 7:19 pm
LadyGeek wrote:
Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:06 am
keinodoggy wrote:
Wed Mar 21, 2018 4:40 am
ER2023 wrote:
Tue Mar 20, 2018 7:34 pm
keinodoggy wrote:
Tue Mar 20, 2018 5:07 pm
I've been baking no-knead artisan bread in my dutch oven for a few years now. Nothing smells or tastes as good as home made bread.
...
Keinodoggy, would you mind sharing the recipe? That bread looks incredible!
Start with this youtube video and tweek it to fit your needs. This is where I started.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1CKVcXe06A&t=510s
I used to bake my own bread but haven't done so far a long time. You don't have to knead bread? I never knew, as every recipe I've seen to date always required a mixer (dough hook in my case).

Thanks for the youtube video. Clicking on "Show More" leads to this website: No-Knead Bread Central which has a number of tutorials, including a history of No-Knead Bread.
Success! I have a real Dutch oven with a glass lid, so I followed this youtube video: Ultimate Introduction to No-Knead Bread (4 Ingredients... No Yeast Proofing... No Mixer)

The only thing I might do differently is coat the dough with flour while it remains in the glass bowl. Also, let the bread cool on the wire rack for at least 15 minutes after it's done.

Caveat: The oven cooking temperature is 450 deg F. Be sure to check the maximum rated temperature for your Dutch Oven, as glass lids, enamel coatings, or plastic handles can exceed the maximum rating. See: max temperature dutch oven lid - Google Search My Scanpan is rated to 500 deg F with the glass lid.
Okay LadyGeek, I'm going to help you out with making your Artisan no-knead bread. I have this all memorized and in fact, just mixed up a batch for tomorrow.
First off as you can see from my earlier post that my dutch oven is all cast iron including the lid. You said your lid was glass. Which I guess is fine as long as it can withstand a 450 degree oven.
So here we go:
In a large bowl (need room for expansion)
add 3 cups unbleached four
add 1/4 to 1/2 tsp dry yeast (Pretty small amount right?)
add 1 tsp sugar (can be omitted)
add 1 heaping tsp salt
Mix all together with sturdy spoon
next:
add 12 ounces cool water
mix all ingredients, it will be difficult to mix but get all dry ingredients mixed in good. You can add a tsp or two if needed but the end result should look a little shaggy but not too wet. It should still hold some shape.
Cover bowl with plastic wrap and store somewhere out of the way.
All of the above preparation should take place in early evening so that in the morning (12-15 hours later) it will be time to proceed.

The next morning:

Take a large piece of parchment paper and push it down into your dutch oven and force it to the sides and bottom forcing it into the shape of the pot. This will be our liner for our bread kind of like a big cupcake paper. Do the best you can with shaping it. Since this liner can be used over several times for making your loaf. After the first loaf it will hold it's shape from the heat of the oven. Take the parchment liner out and sit it on a counter. I then use coffee cups on the outside perimeter of the parchment liner to keep it shaped as you want it.
Next take the plastic off off your bread dough bowl. You'll notice the yeast has done it's job resulting in a big wet sloppy bowl of gook!
Take about 3 tbsp of flour and make a ring around the perimeter of the dough top. Take a sturdy rubber scraper and go around the perimeter pulling the dough from the sides and pushing the flour down toward the bottom. Keep going deeper until you can get the flour all around and down under the bottom.
Reach in with your hands and pull the dough ball out. Slowly shape the ball by pulling down from the sides and rotating the dough in your hands.Do not squeeze all of the yeast gases out of the dough while doing this.
Once done, place the dough ball (it will want to flatten a little, don't worry) into your giant parchment cup cake liner. Try to place it in the center of it.
Take a piece of plastic wrap and place it over the top but don't let it fall down on the dough as it will stick to it. You are just trying to keep the dough from drying out.
Set a timer for one hour allowing the dough to rest.
After the hour has gone by, preheat oven to 450 degrees.
Once the oven has reached temperature, place dutch oven with lid on top and set timer for 30 minutes.
After 30 minutes take dutch oven out and place on stove top. DO NOT TOUCH EXTREMELY HOT!!!
At this point, I have my wife assist in placing the dough, still in the parchment cup, into the hot dutch oven. Four hands are just easier to grasp four side of the parchment and lower it gently into the pot.
Place the lid on top (REMEMBER THIS THING IS 450 DEGREES HOT) and place in the middle rack of your 450 degree oven.
Bake for 30 minutes.
Open the oven and remove the lid. Bake for about five minutes more for proper browning.
Remove from oven, lift the bread out by the parchment sides and place on cooling rack. after a few minutes take the bread out of the parchment and place bread back on rack for complete cooling.
Remember that parchment is to be saved for your next loaf. You'll notice it now holds the desired shape. I usually reuse until it begins falling apart and then start anew.
You are done! After years of making no-knead bread, I am still amazed how that goop of dough expands in that hot dutch oven and turns into a thing of beauty.

Enjoy!

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LadyGeek
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by LadyGeek » Sat May 05, 2018 11:37 pm

^^^Interesting, as the instructions I followed put the flour in last. According to the youtube video, it mixes better that way. I also followed the technique of mixing with the handle side of the spoon - it's easier and seems to work better than the spoon side.

When I'm ready to try another Dutch oven bread, I'll use your notes for comparison.

Yes, my Dutch oven is rated to 500 deg F with the glass lid.
Caligal wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 7:55 pm
Lady Geek

"The best bread for thin-slicing is called pain de mie, a butter- and milk-rich loaf baked in a special lidded pan (often called a Pullman pan). The lid ensures that the baking bread won't expand too much, keeping it very close-grained — and thus totally non-crumbly, and easy to slice." - from King Arthur Flour.

CG
I found this recipe for my next attempt: A Smaller Pain de Mie Recipe | King Arthur Flour

Thanks to both for the help.
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keinodoggy
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by keinodoggy » Sun May 06, 2018 10:09 am

LadyGeek wrote:
Sat May 05, 2018 11:37 pm
^^^Interesting, as the instructions I followed put the flour in last. According to the youtube video, it mixes better that way. I also followed the technique of mixing with the handle side of the spoon - it's easier and seems to work better than the spoon side.

When I'm ready to try another Dutch oven bread, I'll use your notes for comparison.

Yes, my Dutch oven is rated to 500 deg F with the glass lid.
Caligal wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 7:55 pm
Lady Geek

"The best bread for thin-slicing is called pain de mie, a butter- and milk-rich loaf baked in a special lidded pan (often called a Pullman pan). The lid ensures that the baking bread won't expand too much, keeping it very close-grained — and thus totally non-crumbly, and easy to slice." - from King Arthur Flour.

CG
I found this recipe for my next attempt: A Smaller Pain de Mie Recipe | King Arthur Flour

Thanks to both for the help.
Hmmm....

Not sure what you mean by putting the flour in last. :confused

This morning's freshly baked loaf.

Image

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LadyGeek
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by LadyGeek » Sun May 06, 2018 10:26 am

keinodoggy wrote:
Sun May 06, 2018 10:09 am
Hmmm....

Not sure what you mean by putting the flour in last. :confused
My apologies, as the cook seems to vary his technique. I didn't double-check the linked video.

It's from this one: My First No-Knead Bread… for Kids of all Ages (super easy… no equipment… 4 ingredients), starting at 55 Seconds in.

To me, this is a lot less effort for the same result. Mix wet ingredients, including anything that can dissolve, first. Is there any disadvantage to doing it this way?

At 2:20 into the video, he explains how and why he uses the handle end of the spoon for mixing. To me, it makes sense.
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by keinodoggy » Sun May 06, 2018 7:15 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Sun May 06, 2018 10:26 am
keinodoggy wrote:
Sun May 06, 2018 10:09 am
Hmmm....

Not sure what you mean by putting the flour in last. :confused
My apologies, as the cook seems to vary his technique. I didn't double-check the linked video.

It's from this one: My First No-Knead Bread… for Kids of all Ages (super easy… no equipment… 4 ingredients), starting at 55 Seconds in.

To me, this is a lot less effort for the same result. Mix wet ingredients, including anything that can dissolve, first. Is there any disadvantage to doing it this way?

At 2:20 into the video, he explains how and why he uses the handle end of the spoon for mixing. To me, it makes sense.
Funny....in his other videos, he puts the dry ingredients in first and then adds the water like I do. No big deal, shouldn't make any difference, do what you feel is easier.

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LadyGeek
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by LadyGeek » Sun May 06, 2018 8:08 pm

Thanks, I didn't know. I'll do whatever's easier.

All I could think of was chemistry - water, then acid. Acid, then water is really, really bad. (Why first water and then acid?).
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nanosour
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by nanosour » Mon May 07, 2018 8:26 am

I baked my 2009 iMac graphics card for 8 minutes at 400 Degrees. Secured the internal connections and now computer is as good as new. :)

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Elsebet
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Elsebet » Mon May 07, 2018 2:18 pm

I baked the following this weekend:

KAF Black Forest Cake - this was very tasty and pretty simple to prepare, however my layers were very large and it seemed unlikely it would survive the trip to the office intact as the gigantic 4 layer cake it turned out to be. Thus I separated them and made 2 2-layer cakes instead and kept one at home for my very thankful husband.

Cook's Illustrated Peanut Butter Cookies - I linked a non-paywall url instead of CI. This is my go-to peanut butter cookie recipe. The only difference is that I googled all the weights for the ingredients instead of using the cup sizes, unfortunately I don't have those in the office but will post them from home.

Miriam2
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Miriam2 » Mon May 07, 2018 2:37 pm

nanosour wrote: I baked my 2009 iMac graphics card for 8 minutes at 400 Degrees. Secured the internal connections and now computer is as good as new. :)
Ha! So that's the techie secret! Going to try it now with my Microsoft Office Outlook that crashed last night :annoyed

SuperGrafx
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by SuperGrafx » Mon May 07, 2018 2:48 pm

I've been trying out various no-knead bread recipes.

They are simple and yield a great finished product.
Plus you can experiment using different baking vessels and technique variations for different results using the same base dough recipe.

Easy Rhino
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Easy Rhino » Tue May 08, 2018 6:29 pm

My daughter and I made some neiman marcus recipe chocolate cookies, which are just the best.

https://www.neimanmarcus.com/NM/NM-Cook ... 0745/c.cat

p14175
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by p14175 » Wed May 09, 2018 4:20 pm

I used the No-Knead method and made a loaf of whole wheat bread yesterday. It was kind of a momentous occasion for me. I quit eating grains about 10 years ago after I had a strong reaction to a wheat product. Lately, I started thinking that maybe it was the added 'stuff' commercial bakeries put in their product, not the wheat itself. The bread I made yesterday used a store brand un-enriched organic non-GMO whole wheat flour, salt, water, and yeast. So the mix was as plain as possible. I had no reaction, so I had a roast beef sandwich for dinner. Yeah!

Tomorrow I am going to try an all white flour bread to see if I get a reaction. All the white flours at my store (Safeway in a small town) are a mixture of bleached wheat flour, malted barley flour, plus vitamins. I purchased a small bag of Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour for my experiment.

UPDATE: The third time is a charm. I made some johnny cakes the following day using a combo of the white flour and masa harina. Almost immediately I had a migraine-like headache and body aches. It took about 48 hours to recover. No wheat for this girl.
Last edited by p14175 on Mon May 14, 2018 11:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

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chickadee
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by chickadee » Wed May 09, 2018 4:29 pm

How do you keep homemade bread fresh? I’d like to make some, but don’t eat a lot of bread. Ziplock? Foil? Fridge? I don’t own a “bread box” if that’s the ol skool answer.

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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by LadyGeek » Thu May 10, 2018 7:49 pm

I put my bread in Ziplock bags and put them in the fridge (homemade and otherwise). I generally don't keep food for more than a week, so I try to plan accordingly.
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black jack
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by black jack » Thu May 10, 2018 9:30 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Fri May 04, 2018 1:16 pm
black jack wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 9:31 pm
...I bake most of my no-knead loaves in a pullman loaf pan; I bought a 9"x4" pan because it fits into my toaster oven, which I use instead of my full-sized oven for most of my baking. I use a version of a recipe from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, appropriately sized to this loaf pan (470 grams water, 18 grams salt, 150 grams white whole wheat flour and 450 grams all purpose flour), but with 1/4 teaspoon of yeast (a la Jim Lahey's slow-rise approach). I usually mix it in the evening, let it rise overnight, dump it into the pullman loaf pan in the morning, let it rise again during the day while I'm at work, put it in the toaster oven for an hour at 350 degrees in the evening. Smells great, tastes great...
I bought a 9" x 4" x 4" Pullman loaf pan to bake bread in my toaster oven. For my first attempt, I used your recipe.

There is no problem to use metric, but I wanted to be sure on converting between weight (grams) and volume (cups). The density of the flour can change the results. To confirm the conversion, I went to a trusted source: Absolutely No-Knead Crusty-Chewy Bread Recipe | King Arthur Flour. The recipe is provided in Volume (US), ounces, and grams.

600 g flour (150 g whole wheat + 450 g all purpose) is 5 Cups. Water, salt, and yeast were OK. I checked a few other recipes to be sure the quantities aligned. What could possibly go wrong?

After letting the dough rise over night, I dumped the dough into the loaf pan for the 2nd rise. The dough didn't fill the pan, so I put the lid on to keep it from drying out. So far, so good.

I checked on it 1/2 hour later and the dough was oozing out of the pan. :shock: I removed the lid and let the dough finish rising for a total of 2 hours. The pan was on a plastic cutting board, so I wasn't worried about the overflow.

After skimming off the excess dough, I baked the bread for 50 minutes at 350 deg F in my toaster oven (lid on). The bread didn't seem quite done, but the top crust was very dark brown and I couldn't leave it in any longer. Something didn't seem right.

There was enough leftover dough to fill 1/4 of the loaf pan. I baked the leftover dough for 30 minutes, but this time I monitored the temperature with my thermocouple meter probe. The toaster oven temperature was 50 deg F too low, which explains why the bread was under-cooked.

It is very difficult to mess up a bread recipe. Although the bread was undercooked, it still turned out OK.

What is the quantity of ingredients you used ("appropriately sized to this loaf pan")? Searching further, I think the flour should be closer to 3 Cups (360 g) total.
Lady Geek,

I'm puzzled that on the second rise your dough went from not filling the pan to overflowing the pan in 30 minutes. That's way fast.

Perhaps your kitchen was very warm? Like in the high 70s?

Honest, those are the quantities I use in my 9" x 4" x 4" Pullman (I measured the pan again just now to make sure I had the size right). When I dump the dough into the loaf pan after 12 hours, the dough only fills the pan about halfway; after another 12 hours it rises enough to fill the pan. The only time I've had the dough overflow was when I got delayed and the second rise lasted more than 12 hours.

I always bake with the lid on; sometimes I take it off halfway through the bake to get more browning on top of the loaf.
It is very difficult to mess up a bread recipe.
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We cannot absolutely prove [that they are wrong who say] that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason. | -T. B. Macaulay (1800-1859)

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black jack
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by black jack » Thu May 10, 2018 9:42 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Thu May 10, 2018 7:49 pm
I put my bread in Ziplock bags and put them in the fridge (homemade and otherwise). I generally don't keep food for more than a week, so I try to plan accordingly.
I put mine in Ziplock bags and put them in the freezer. Refrigerating bread supposedly makes it go stale more quickly due to starch recrystallization ( https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/06/doe ... bread.html, though in finding a reference for this I see that Nathan Myhrvold found that heating (e.g., toasting) refrigerated bread reversed the starch crystallization
http://www.chatelaine.com/food/kitchen- ... he-fridge/. Guess I'll try the fridge.
We cannot absolutely prove [that they are wrong who say] that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason. | -T. B. Macaulay (1800-1859)

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LadyGeek
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by LadyGeek » Thu May 10, 2018 10:15 pm

black jack wrote:
Thu May 10, 2018 9:30 pm
...Lady Geek,

I'm puzzled that on the second rise your dough went from not filling the pan to overflowing the pan in 30 minutes. That's way fast.

Perhaps your kitchen was very warm? Like in the high 70s?

Honest, those are the quantities I use in my 9" x 4" x 4" Pullman (I measured the pan again just now to make sure I had the size right). When I dump the dough into the loaf pan after 12 hours, the dough only fills the pan about halfway; after another 12 hours it rises enough to fill the pan. The only time I've had the dough overflow was when I got delayed and the second rise lasted more than 12 hours.

I always bake with the lid on; sometimes I take it off halfway through the bake to get more browning on top of the loaf.
Yes, my kitchen was very warm. My Pullman pan was more than halfway full when I dumped the dough for the second rise. Thanks for the additional info, as I'll know this for the next time I try this recipe.

Posted earlier, my next attempt is this recipe: A Smaller Pain de Mie Recipe | King Arthur Flour It is more work, but I have a KitchenAid mixer with a dough hook. I'm going to cook this in my toaster oven.
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by LadyGeek » Sun May 13, 2018 6:45 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Thu May 10, 2018 10:15 pm
...Posted earlier, my next attempt is this recipe: A Smaller Pain de Mie Recipe | King Arthur Flour It is more work, but I have a KitchenAid mixer with a dough hook. I'm going to cook this in my toaster oven.
Success! This time, the dough didn't rise very much and never made it to the top of the pan.

To make up the shortfall, I made another bread using the no-knead "turbo technique" described here: How to Bake No-Knead Bread in a Poor Man’s Dutch Oven, but using my Pullman pan with a modified recipe using 3 Cups flour from another video. Nope, that dough didn't rise to the top, either. I cooked the bread with the Pullman pan covered for 45 minutes, then another 5 minutes with the lid off.

So, last week I had far too much dough. This week, not enough. On average, I'd say it's perfect. :)

The outside temperature here was 55 deg F (13 C), much cooler than last week.

Comparing the two, the pain de mie seems a bit too sweet for a daily sandwich bread. It is very good, though. I used Eucalyptus honey (what I had available).
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Elsebet » Mon May 14, 2018 9:34 am

chickadee wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 4:29 pm
How do you keep homemade bread fresh? I’d like to make some, but don’t eat a lot of bread. Ziplock? Foil? Fridge? I don’t own a “bread box” if that’s the ol skool answer.
My sourdough loaves seem to stay fresh forever if I keep them in a ziploc bag in the refrigerator. My recipe makes two loaves at a time so I freeze one and refrigerate the other.

The non-sourdough breads I make like the occasional Italian loaf or sandwich buns I usually portion out and freeze and just take out what I need and toast/defrost it.

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Elsebet
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Elsebet » Mon May 14, 2018 10:34 am

This weekend I made:

KAF White Chocolate Hazelnut Cheesecake - unfortunately I can't link the exact recipe as it does not appear to be on KAF's website. I got it from their paper cookbook. This one from BigOven is the closest one I could find. Very good recipe although I did not add the praline paste to the filling, it was optional in the recipe.

KAF Chocolate Cream Pie - I actually do not use the crust from this recipe, my husband prefers an Oreo cookie crust. For that I just take 16 Oreos and chop them into fine crumbs in a food processor, then mix them with 1 oz (2 tablespoons) butter and press them into the pie plate.

My own extremely rich, occasional treat vegetable pot pie recipe:

1. Make your favorite pie crust recipe (needs 2 for the top and bottom), I use KAF Classic Double Pie Crust
2. Blind bake the bottom crust
3. Make your favorite cheese sauce recipe, I use 8oz cheese, 16 oz hot milk, 1 oz flour, 1 oz butter, salt & pepper & ground mustard to taste. Short version: In a medium-high saucepan make a roux with butter + flour + spices, add the hot milk all at once, bring to boil then turn down heat, add the cheese, done.
4. To the cheese sauce add any slightly undercooked veggies you like, I lightly steam a mix of carrots, potatoes, peas, and broccoli but you can use whatever you like. Water chestnuts and green beans are really good here.
5. Roll out the top crust
6. Pour the cheese/veggie filling into the bottom crust, put the top crust over the pie and seal the edges however you like. Make some vents in the top crust for steam to escape. Egg wash the top crust if desired.
7. Bake at 350 for about 35-40 minutes or until the top is nicely brown, put pie crust shields on if needed so the edges don't brown too much, usually after about 20 minutes.

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Epsilon Delta
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Epsilon Delta » Tue May 15, 2018 9:56 am

SuperGrafx wrote:
Mon May 07, 2018 2:48 pm
I've been trying out various no-knead bread recipes.

They are simple and yield a great finished product.
Plus you can experiment using different baking vessels and technique variations for different results using the same base dough recipe.
While I would not want to deter anyone from trying the no-knead recipes I will say I don't think kneading is difficult. Some of the no knead methods look more complex / difficult than a basic kneaded recipe. It only takes a minute or two to knead, as long as you use enough flour to avoid a gooey mess that sticks to everything.

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Elsebet
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Elsebet » Mon May 21, 2018 2:26 pm

I made a few things this weekend from the KAF Baking cookbook, however I have learned my lesson and will consult the web version of the recipes first. :)

KAF Tuiles - wanted to try these for a long time after seeing them made on the Great British Baking show. I used the book recipe however in hindsight I should have checked the online one, the one from the book uses different methods and a 350 degree oven and the edges of my tuiles did not brown even after 10 minutes (the recipe had 6-8 min). They also turned out rather limp rather than crisp. I will try again with the online recipe that uses a 400 degree oven and slightly different volume. They are fun to make, the dough is so airy and light it's like marshmallow. Trying to get them into a flat circle is kind of tedious though.

Florentines - same as above pretty much, should have checked online first. My first batch spread all over the cookie sheet, it was like 1 enormous cookie. The second one I made a little smaller on separate pans and they turned out better, but still not very crisp. I'll have to try these again.

Crusty hard rolls - No comment on these yet because they are still in the refrigerator, I will bake them once I get home from work. :)

KAF Blueberry Muffins - I made the recipe from the book which I was not as happy with, definitely use the web version.

Also made my usual 2 sourdough loaves, was a busy baking weekend for me.

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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by LadyGeek » Sun May 27, 2018 2:14 pm

I'm now at the point where I look at my ingredients and think "What bread can I make with that?". I had a jar of sliced roasted garlic laying around. (Yes, fresh roasted garlic is much better.)

I found this recipe: Roasted Garlic & Rosemary No Knead Artisan Bread I modified the technique, as there was no allotted time for a second rise.
  1. Combine all the dry ingredients.
    Tip: Use a knife to chop fresh rosemary, as those hand-held food chopping tools won't work. The dried garlic slices work fine with a food chopper.
  2. Add water, mix using the handle end of a plastic spoon. Cover with plastic wrap and let it sit overnight.
  3. Grease (Crisco) a Pullman bread pan (9" x 4" x 4").
  4. Degas and stretch the dough using the handle end of a plastic spoon.
  5. With a plastic spatula, scoop the dough into the Pullman bread pan. Whack the pan down on the cooking surface to spread the dough evenly across the pan (I have a granite counter top).
  6. Cover the dough with the plastic wrap used for the bowl (it fits). Let it sit for 2 hours - this is the second rise.
  7. Put the lid on the Pullman pan and place it into a toaster oven. Set the oven for 400 deg F, do not preheat.
  8. Cook for 45 minutes at 400 deg F.
  9. Remove the lid and cook for another 10 minutes. The top crust should be brown (done).
  10. Dump the bread onto a wire rack and wait for it to cool.
When I was done, the bread still didn't seem right - it was too moist inside. Something was wrong, but I didn't know why.

I use the left-over garlic to make another loaf. For this loaf, I set my toaster over to "bake / toast" which turned on the upper heating element. The previous bread was set to "Bake / slow roast" which only turned on the lower element. That was it!

Following the same approach, the bread had an over-done crust. I think recipes for toaster ovens assume that the top and bottom elements are turned on. Next time, I'll try the same approach, but only use 5 minutes with the lid off, i.e. 400 deg F for 45 minutes with the lid on, 5 additional minutes with the lid off.

BTW, the recipe I linked to has some interesting combinations. I may try a cheese bread next.
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Caligal
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Caligal » Sun May 27, 2018 5:22 pm

Thanks to a previous poster - have a Cook's Illustrated chocolate sour cream bundt cooling on the countertop - which I will serve with a mixed berry compote. It smelled like the best brownies while in the oven!

Ribs (coated with a spice rub) in the oven baking low and slow to be finished off on the grill. Side of black bean/corn salad with honey chipotle dressing.

Yummy! Happy Memorial Day baking.

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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Sandi_k » Mon May 28, 2018 3:13 pm

I made a strawberry layered cake/torte.

Used Barefoot Contessa's Strawberry Country Cake recipe:
https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina ... 88578486=1

The cake had a high proportion sugar to flour - it rose nicely, so I used one layer, sliced horizontally, for one cake.

I made a strawberry compote for soaking into the cake layers:

1.5C sliced strawberries
1.5 T sugar
1/2C water
1T cornstarch
1T lemon juice

I smashed the strawberries with a ricer, then cooked over medium heat for 10 minutes as it thickened. Cooled, and then spooned the mixture over the layer cake to soak in. Then added a spread of whipped cream (1 pint heavy cream, 1.5T of sugar, 1t of vanilla) on top, then added sliced strawberries.

Then the second layer on top, more compote, more whipped cream, and then fresh strawberries on the surface, arranged artistically. Very good, the drier cake was offset with the not-too-sweet compote, and I got to eat lots of berries with whipped cream. Not a bad outcome at all. :D

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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by mrsbetsy » Mon May 28, 2018 10:06 pm

Lemon pound cake. It pairs so nicely with fresh strawberries and a glass of crisp Riesling. So delightful on this 92 degree day in Northern California.

Cheers.

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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by parsi1 » Tue May 29, 2018 8:20 am

All these recipes sound good with wine.

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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Elsebet » Tue May 29, 2018 2:47 pm

This holiday weekend I made a lot of older recipes I've already linked. It's my last week at my current job and I've been baking for my colleagues for a long time, so as a way of saying goodbye I made a few of their old favorites:

KAF White Chocolate Macadamia Nut Tart - this is gone within the day I bring it in every time. I'm surprised there aren't more reviews for it on the site, it's really good.

Cooking Light Ginger Coins - one of my favorite cookies, very simple with a nice ginger bite

KAF On the Fence (Fudge) Brownies - this isn't the exact recipe from the KAF Cookbook but it's close. I prefer the one from the book honestly. I use 6 oz lightly toasted walnuts and 6 oz chocolate chips instead of all chocolate chips.

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black jack
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by black jack » Wed May 30, 2018 1:14 am

p14175 wrote:
Wed May 09, 2018 4:20 pm
I used the No-Knead method and made a loaf of whole wheat bread yesterday. It was kind of a momentous occasion for me. I quit eating grains about 10 years ago after I had a strong reaction to a wheat product. Lately, I started thinking that maybe it was the added 'stuff' commercial bakeries put in their product, not the wheat itself. The bread I made yesterday used a store brand un-enriched organic non-GMO whole wheat flour, salt, water, and yeast. So the mix was as plain as possible. I had no reaction, so I had a roast beef sandwich for dinner. Yeah!

Tomorrow I am going to try an all white flour bread to see if I get a reaction. All the white flours at my store (Safeway in a small town) are a mixture of bleached wheat flour, malted barley flour, plus vitamins. I purchased a small bag of Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour for my experiment.

UPDATE: The third time is a charm. I made some johnny cakes the following day using a combo of the white flour and masa harina. Almost immediately I had a migraine-like headache and body aches. It took about 48 hours to recover. No wheat for this girl.
That must be very frustrating, especially after having gotten your hopes raised.

Did you use a slow-rise approach in any of these three tests? I've seen a reference to some experiments by Italian scientists suggesting that the slow-rise method (using, e.g., a quarter-teaspoon of yeast, so that it takes the dough 24 hours to rise, rather than the 2-3 hours of typical bread recipes) produces bread that doesn't trigger reactions in people who do have reactions to regular commercial bread.
We cannot absolutely prove [that they are wrong who say] that we have seen our best days. But so said all who came before us, and with just as much apparent reason. | -T. B. Macaulay (1800-1859)

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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by LadyGeek » Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:47 pm

Jalapeño Cheese Bread

This is a modification of No-Knead Artisan Cheddar Cheese Bread with fresh shredded Jalapeño cheese instead of cheddar. I also modified the technique, as this is a wet dough. I skipped the step where he rolled / folded the dough on the work surface.

I went with the Dutch oven technique, as adding a cup of cheese would be too much for my Pullman bread pan. Also, it makes for a nicer presentation.

Ingredients
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1-1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp instant yeast
  • 14 oz cool tap water
  • 1 cup shredded Jalapeño cheese - 8 oz pack of Jalapeño cheese, shred it yourself.
First Rise
  • Combine flour, salt, yeast
  • Add cheese, mix
  • Add water, mix with handle end of plastic spoon.
  • Cover with plastic wrap, sit overnight
Second Rise, Bake
  • Degas and stretch using the handle end of a plastic spoon, dump into greased skillet.
  • Cover with plastic wrap, rise for 1 hour, set timer for 1 hour
  • At end of hour, put dutch oven in oven, set to 450 deg F, set timer for 30 minutes.
  • At end of 30 min (2 hours total for the dough to rise), dump bread into dutch oven. Score top with scissors (I forgot to do this).
  • Cook 30 min at 450 deg F with the lid on.
  • Remove the lid, cook an additional 15-30 min. Check at 15 min. Minimum internal temperature should be 190 deg F.
  • Dump onto wire rack and cool.
I ended up using only 15 minutes with the lid off. The crust was a very impressive golden brown. The internal temperature was 208 deg F.

FYI - If you have real Jalapeño peppers, try this: Easy No-Knead Jalapeño Cheese Bread, but it uses a clay cooking pot.
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by LadyGeek » Wed Jul 04, 2018 5:13 pm

I had planned to make a pepperoni stromboli, but...

Using the "hands free" no-knead technique, I made a pizza dough as shown here: World’s Easiest Pizza Dough

When it was time to roll the dough out, all it did was stick to my wooden rolling surface. In spite of flouring the work surface, the dough still stuck to it. :annoyed

I cut the dough in half, coated two 9" pie pans with olive oil, and spread the dough into them. My stromboli has now become 2 pizzas. I added a few toppings (including the pepperoni) to finish.

Cheese - I didn't have Mozarella, but the cheddar I had on-hand was a good substitute.
Sauce - I almost never use sauce when I make a pizza. I don't see the need for it.

I put each pan in the toaster oven at 450 deg F for 14 minutes. After cooling on a wire rack, I extracted the pizza from the pie pan by going around the edge with a thin spatula. Put a plate on top of the pie pan, then flip the pie pan onto the plate. Flip the upside down pizza onto another plate to bring it right-side up.

This was my first pizza using bread flour. It was more "bread" than "pizza crust", but was good.

Would a granite work surface be better for rolling out a sticky dough instead of a wooden board?

Reference: How to Make Homemade Perfect Little 9” Pizza in a Toaster Oven (the amount of dough is 1/2 of what I used)
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Trism
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Trism » Thu Jul 05, 2018 6:49 am

LadyGeek wrote:
Wed Jul 04, 2018 5:13 pm
I had planned to make a pepperoni stromboli, but...

Using the "hands free" no-knead technique, I made a pizza dough as shown here: World’s Easiest Pizza Dough

When it was time to roll the dough out, all it did was stick to my wooden rolling surface. In spite of flouring the work surface, the dough still stuck to it. :annoyed

I cut the dough in half, coated two 9" pie pans with olive oil, and spread the dough into them. My stromboli has now become 2 pizzas. I added a few toppings (including the pepperoni) to finish.

Cheese - I didn't have Mozarella, but the cheddar I had on-hand was a good substitute.
Sauce - I almost never use sauce when I make a pizza. I don't see the need for it.

I put each pan in the toaster oven at 450 deg F for 14 minutes. After cooling on a wire rack, I extracted the pizza from the pie pan by going around the edge with a thin spatula. Put a plate on top of the pie pan, then flip the pie pan onto the plate. Flip the upside down pizza onto another plate to bring it right-side up.

This was my first pizza using bread flour. It was more "bread" than "pizza crust", but was good.

Would a granite work surface be better for rolling out a sticky dough instead of a wooden board?

Reference: How to Make Homemade Perfect Little 9” Pizza in a Toaster Oven (the amount of dough is 1/2 of what I used)
Get a Silpat. No more sticking.

SuperGrafx
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by SuperGrafx » Thu Jul 05, 2018 1:28 pm

Trism wrote:
Thu Jul 05, 2018 6:49 am
LadyGeek wrote:
Wed Jul 04, 2018 5:13 pm
I had planned to make a pepperoni stromboli, but...

Using the "hands free" no-knead technique, I made a pizza dough as shown here: World’s Easiest Pizza Dough

When it was time to roll the dough out, all it did was stick to my wooden rolling surface. In spite of flouring the work surface, the dough still stuck to it. :annoyed

I cut the dough in half, coated two 9" pie pans with olive oil, and spread the dough into them. My stromboli has now become 2 pizzas. I added a few toppings (including the pepperoni) to finish.

Cheese - I didn't have Mozarella, but the cheddar I had on-hand was a good substitute.
Sauce - I almost never use sauce when I make a pizza. I don't see the need for it.

I put each pan in the toaster oven at 450 deg F for 14 minutes. After cooling on a wire rack, I extracted the pizza from the pie pan by going around the edge with a thin spatula. Put a plate on top of the pie pan, then flip the pie pan onto the plate. Flip the upside down pizza onto another plate to bring it right-side up.

This was my first pizza using bread flour. It was more "bread" than "pizza crust", but was good.

Would a granite work surface be better for rolling out a sticky dough instead of a wooden board?

Reference: How to Make Homemade Perfect Little 9” Pizza in a Toaster Oven (the amount of dough is 1/2 of what I used)
Get a Silpat. No more sticking.
I'm not sure if a Silicone Mat would totally prevent no-knead dough from sticking.
The best thing I've found when making no knead dough is to use a well-floured wooden board. Even then, it likes to stick, but at least it's somewhat controllable.

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Elsebet
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Re: What have you baked recently?

Post by Elsebet » Thu Jul 05, 2018 4:16 pm

For my very wet (high hydration) doughs I use a little oil instead of flour when kneading/rolling by hand; olive for pizza crusts/italian bread and a more neutral canola for my sourdough. Some doughs are so wet (like foccacia and brioche) and difficult that I just let my Kitchenaid knead them. :)

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