30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Hulu
Posts: 205
Joined: Wed Oct 22, 2014 7:55 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Hulu »

Halicar wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 8:38 pm
Teague wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 1:45 pm I've not read the Kondo book, mentioned above, so I'm sure there is much I don't understand about that philosophy. I think it says something like "get rid of things that do not give you joy."

I live on a couple of acres in the country, which gives me joy. So I won't give away the house, I suppose. But because of this I have a large collection of spare PVC pipes, sprinklers and valves, PVC cement, and plumbing fittings, which just don't give me much joy at all. Most of the time they take up space and are annoyingly in the way. But when water occasionally starts leaking all over the place those clutter-y items sure come in handy. The same could be said for a bunch of tools, battery chargers, a cranky old tractor, weed killer, etc.

Am I supposed to get rid of all these things? I must not be understanding this stuff very well.
I'm with you. Right now I see a flannel shirt hanging in my closet. Does it bring me joy? No--it does keep me warm when I rake leaves though. So do I keep it or not?

And if I'm feeling really uncharitable, I start to suspect that Kondo is just peddling consumerism in a subtle disguise--i.e., I should get rid of that crummy old shirt and go to the store to buy a new one that "brings me joy."
Kondo is definitely not for those who don't want to commit the time. And aren't willing to get a little out there. Ok, pretty out there haha. In my experience I thought the process grew three invaluable skills:

1.). Identify what brings you joy
2.). Appreciate what you have. She literally recommends thanking your shoes as you put them away
3.). Lighten your life by discarding the rest

I did buy new track pants and sneakers after trying the process. And donated the pants because they were too swishy. So maybe increased consumerism because you feel you've "earned" it by decluttering. That's a good point that I hadn't thought of. On the flip side the process is so involved I didn't want to bring in more items because it's more work.

Another bonus is that I misplace items less often.
User avatar
fishandgolf
Posts: 632
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2016 2:50 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by fishandgolf »

Bought and read every book authored by Tom Peters, Steve Covey, Zig Ziglar and others......couldn't part with any of them... Finally one day DW said......so.....now that you are retired, are you planning to get another job? That is all it took........within a few hours......everything was packed and gone. Now that book case is full of pictures and books of kids and grand kids.......

Oh,,,yes......I really do enjoy retirement........... :sharebeer
User avatar
Topic Author
Cycle
Posts: 1770
Joined: Sun May 28, 2017 7:57 pm
Location: Minneapolis

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Cycle »

protagonist wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 12:29 pm If your objective is to simplify your life, wouldn't it be simpler to just get rid of 465 items on day 1 and be done with it, than go through all that counting and work every day after a hard day at the office? (laughing) I don't see the advantage of trashing one tie day one, 2 day 2 etc until you trash 30 ties, as opposed to just dumping them all in the same 10 seconds.

You might even find you have way more than 465 items to trash or sell by day 2.....
Agree! we are trying to get ahead a bit and have a couple hundred items already piled up or given away. I think the quantification at least provides an achievable goal. Even if we do get through all 930 items, I know we'll still have to keep up the purging for several months before we can declare mission accomplished.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way
Halicar
Posts: 348
Joined: Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:41 am
Location: Midwest

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Halicar »

Hulu wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 8:54 pm Kondo is definitely not for those who don't want to commit the time. And aren't willing to get a little out there. Ok, pretty out there haha. In my experience I thought the process grew three invaluable skills:

1.). Identify what brings you joy
2.). Appreciate what you have. She literally recommends thanking your shoes as you put them away
3.). Lighten your life by discarding the rest
I can certainly appreciate getting a little out there. I may or may not occasionally thank my tools and appliances for their usefulness... I'm probably just fixating too much on the "joy" terminology--a little touchy-feely for me. If I change your first point to "Identify what you believe has value" I'm totally on board with those three things.
User avatar
Topic Author
Cycle
Posts: 1770
Joined: Sun May 28, 2017 7:57 pm
Location: Minneapolis

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Cycle »

randomizer wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 12:49 pm I haven't done a challenge like this but I do try to live minimally. Finding 465 items to dispose of would be pretty difficult for me, unless I am going to cheat and do things like throw out individual toothpicks or something.
That's the goal, i think we could probably go through 930 items a couple times over before we are where you are today.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way
User avatar
Topic Author
Cycle
Posts: 1770
Joined: Sun May 28, 2017 7:57 pm
Location: Minneapolis

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Cycle »

ElwoodBlues wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 1:54 pm
Teague wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 1:45 pm I've not read the Kondo book, mentioned above, so I'm sure there is much I don't understand about that philosophy. I think it says something like "get rid of things that do not give you joy."

I live on a couple of acres in the country, which gives me joy. So I won't give away the house, I suppose. But because of this I have a large collection of spare PVC pipes, sprinklers and valves, PVC cement, and plumbing fittings, which just don't give me much joy at all. Most of the time they take up space and are annoyingly in the way. But when water occasionally starts leaking all over the place those clutter-y items sure come in handy. The same could be said for a bunch of tools, battery chargers, a cranky old tractor, weed killer, etc.

Am I supposed to get rid of all these things? I must not be understanding this stuff very well.
If I actually had acreage, I think a "cranky old tractor" would bring me joy, both working on it and still deriving use from it. And, when I accidentally break a PVC fitting in the yard by accidentally hitting it with the tractor, I'd go to the "hoard" of parts and scraps to avoid a not-joyful trip to the store. :happy

I'm guessing the minimalist mentality and the prepared DIY'er mentality don't overlap very cleanly, although I can appreciate this discusison as a reminder to occasionally try to thin things out a bit.
One of my colleagues was talking about his cylinder to age ratio and how one should always have more cylinders than your age. He's got it all: tractor, log splitter, generator, 5 cars, handful of boats, chainsaw... he meets his metric. He's in his mid-50s, makes more than me, has a 350k mortgage on his country house on 20 acres, and talks about his net worth (small). He can't wait to retire in 10 years when he has $1million in investible assets and his house is paid off, begrudging the bureaucracy of megacorp all the live long day. He has a financial advisor, that he calls "his guy." We have 4 cylinders in our household. I have a shovel for the snow, a hedge shears for the edges, and a reel mower for the lawn. I'll hit his retirement milestone in a year at age 35.

The frugalwoods people have 66 acres(https://www.frugalwoods.com/2017/06/28/ ... homestead/), they borrow what they can and don't buy tons of stuff to maintain the homestead. It's possible to live simply in the country or its possible live in service to your land and property, just depends on the choices one makes. I think you are in the happy medium, content but not frugalwoods minimlist.

Problem solving is fun, i get paid to do it at work as an engineer. At home, I want to do some DIY, but not constantly. By reducing ones stuff, there is less that requires maintenance and repair.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way
Teague
Posts: 2129
Joined: Wed Nov 04, 2015 6:15 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Teague »

Cycle wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 10:48 pm The frugalwoods people have 66 acres(https://www.frugalwoods.com/2017/06/28/ ... homestead/), they borrow what they can and don't buy tons of stuff to maintain the homestead. It's possible to live simply in the country or its possible live in service to your land and property, just depends on the choices one makes. I think you are in the happy medium, content but not frugalwoods minimlist.
Hmm, in that link the FrugalWoods folks lament that borrowing wasn't working out as well as planned, and they had to buy a buy a bunch of stuff-

"Here’s but a small sampling of the things we’ve had to purchase:

A tractor (this was included in the purchase of our house, but still… ), which allows us to clear snow from our quarter-mile long driveway, till garden beds, brush hog trails, grade the driveway, and more.
A large lawnmower.
A chainsaw and chainsaw safety gear, which allow Mr. FW to fell and buck trees for firewood to heat our home, clear fallen trees off our driveway, and build hiking trails.
An axe and a maul for splitting logs into firewood.
This dehydrator to dry our apple crop.
Canning supplies to preserve food.
A plethora of garden tools: rakes, hoes, trowels, a post-hole digger, a wheel barrow, etc.
"

There's a neighbor who likes to do the borrowing thing here, and he probably calls himself frugal. The rest of the neighborhood calls him a mooch.

But I do enjoy my cranky (circa 1947) tractor, and though sometimes I grumble a bit at the extra work and extra junk, it would be hard to go back to "city" life.
Semper Augustus
ji.isaacs
Posts: 103
Joined: Sat May 24, 2014 3:19 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by ji.isaacs »

Instant decluttering to meet a quantitative or timed goal is unappealing to me. So are these minimalist books. I read the sample pages of Marie Kondo's book and was thankful I didn't buy the book first. Each to their own.

My hardest declutter involved books. An estimated 600+ along with the bookcases that held them. I'm down to one bookcase.

Clothes and shoes are thinned out seasonally and I've cut down purchases dramatically. Furniture is down to the very hard choices and further cuts will be when I downsize.

I always keep an open donation box by the garage door and regularly drop things into it. When full, I donate. It's an ongoing project, rather than one big surge. This is a successful way for me personally, although it's interesting to read how others tackle the same problem. I liked and copied the idea of photographing sentimental items before donating or tossing. Items with monetary value or very high sentimental value have gone to family.
User avatar
climber2020
Posts: 1592
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 8:06 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by climber2020 »

Halicar wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 9:23 pm
Hulu wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 8:54 pm Kondo is definitely not for those who don't want to commit the time. And aren't willing to get a little out there. Ok, pretty out there haha. In my experience I thought the process grew three invaluable skills:

1.). Identify what brings you joy
2.). Appreciate what you have. She literally recommends thanking your shoes as you put them away
3.). Lighten your life by discarding the rest
I can certainly appreciate getting a little out there. I may or may not occasionally thank my tools and appliances for their usefulness... I'm probably just fixating too much on the "joy" terminology--a little touchy-feely for me. If I change your first point to "Identify what you believe has value" I'm totally on board with those three things.
The touchy-feely component is one that unfortunately seems to have a high association with many of the more popular authors who write or blog about minimalism. The words "joy" and "love" are thrown around a lot. Barf. I'm one of the least touchy-feely people you'll likely ever meet, so the way I deal with it is to ignore that part the best I can while absorbing the information that I do find useful.
truenorth418
Posts: 515
Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2012 7:38 am

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by truenorth418 »

One of my favorite quotes. I think I read it on this forum a few years ago: “Possessions are the boat anchor of life”.

i have a rule. If I don’t use something in a year, I donate it or throw it in the trash.

If I donate it, then someone else can enjoy it, and that’s a good thing.

Either way, the more crap I keep, the more I will be inconveniencing myself whrn I move, or the more I will be inconveniencing my loved ones when I die.
User avatar
Topic Author
Cycle
Posts: 1770
Joined: Sun May 28, 2017 7:57 pm
Location: Minneapolis

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Cycle »

Teague wrote: Thu Mar 01, 2018 9:50 am
But I do enjoy my cranky (circa 1947) tractor, and though sometimes I grumble a bit at the extra work and extra junk, it would be hard to go back to "city" life.
The great thing about 1950 era tractors is that they've been fully depreciated since about 1960 and still are in high demand with good resale, unlike most of the stuff I'm getting rid of with this purge. For better or worse the engines on old tractors are simple enough to work on yourself, I'm sure a modern John Deere is more like a car than a tractor
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way
bloom2708
Posts: 8361
Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2014 2:08 pm
Location: Fargo, ND

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by bloom2708 »

truenorth418 wrote: Thu Mar 01, 2018 11:52 am One of my favorite quotes. I think I read it on this forum a few years ago: “Possessions are the boat anchor of life”.

i have a rule. If I don’t use something in a year, I donate it or throw it in the trash.

If I donate it, then someone else can enjoy it, and that’s a good thing.

Either way, the more crap I keep, the more I will be inconveniencing myself whrn I move, or the more I will be inconveniencing my loved ones when I die.
I like this. Thanks for the perspective.

I've noticed that once I let go of "everything is worth something and to part with it you have to get what it is worth for it" that makes things much easier.

"I paid $200 for that TV. I can't possibly give it away. It must still be worth $60 or maybe more". Donate it. Done.

"I bought a new bike. My old bike was $300. It must be still worth $200 maybe more". Give it to someone who doesn't have a bike. Done.

“Possessions are the boat anchor of life”. :beer
"We are here to provoke thoughtfulness, not agree with you." Unknown Boglehead
User avatar
Topic Author
Cycle
Posts: 1770
Joined: Sun May 28, 2017 7:57 pm
Location: Minneapolis

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Cycle »

truenorth418 wrote: Thu Mar 01, 2018 11:52 am One of my favorite quotes. I think I read it on this forum a few years ago: “Possessions are the boat anchor of life”.
...

If I donate it, then someone else can enjoy it, and that’s a good thing.
The Marie kondo thing never struck a cord with me... Sock rolling was my biggest takeaway. None of my stuff brings me joy, perhaps my piano, but almost all of it has utility and can save me money thru DIY or reduced transportation costs.

"Someone else could use it" is the phrase that is most effective trigger for me. Listing our big stereo today, we use it like twice a year and it is UGLY
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way
Caduceus
Posts: 2809
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:47 am

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Caduceus »

lthenderson wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 9:16 am
VictoriaF wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 7:56 pm For me, the hardest things to get rid of are books. Even if I know that I will never read them, or not read them again, there is sentimental value associated with the thought process that went into selecting them in the first place.

Victoria
+1000

I never got rid of any of my books until I moved to a new house about six years ago and ended up with around 50 boxes of books! My back was a limp noodle by the time I finished moving them all down into our basement. Since that time I have weeded them down to about 15 or so boxes of books, or what I can fit on my large built in bookcase downstairs. What helped me to get rid of them is that I wrote my name on the inside of the cover and have sold/donated them around town. Then whenever I go to a used book sale, I check the covers to see if any of mine are present. I get a kick whenever I see one of my old books that someone else has read.
It's interesting because when I went through my decluttering phase, books were the easiest things to discard. What I liked about most of my books was the content, and I could get most of them on Kindle. Reading on the Kindle is so easy (one handed reading!) compared to having the strain my neck and adjust my posture to read a book.
Caduceus
Posts: 2809
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:47 am

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Caduceus »

climber2020 wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 8:13 pm
VictoriaF wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 7:56 pm
For me, the hardest things to get rid of are books. Even if I know that I will never read them, or not read them again, there is sentimental value associated with the thought process that went into selecting them in the first place.

Victoria
I have a handful of books that I've held onto as well, but these are books I re-read every few years. One of my favorites - an old copy of The Little Prince - I specifically kept because all the in-print versions are atrociously translated by a goon that butchers the original work. Usually though, I get my books from the local library.

This made me think of a great article on this topic I read a few years back. Very well written: https://medium.com/i-m-h-o/eight-things ... ed0479fb12
We must be brothers. 8-)

One of the few books I kept when I went through my extreme decluttering phase of my life was an old edition of The Little Prince as well. Which version do you have? I am curious and would like to see if we kept the same version!

Funnily enough, I also have only exactly four pairs of shoes, like you!
User avatar
climber2020
Posts: 1592
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 8:06 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by climber2020 »

Caduceus wrote: Tue Mar 06, 2018 8:45 am
climber2020 wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 8:13 pm
VictoriaF wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 7:56 pm
For me, the hardest things to get rid of are books. Even if I know that I will never read them, or not read them again, there is sentimental value associated with the thought process that went into selecting them in the first place.

Victoria
I have a handful of books that I've held onto as well, but these are books I re-read every few years. One of my favorites - an old copy of The Little Prince - I specifically kept because all the in-print versions are atrociously translated by a goon that butchers the original work. Usually though, I get my books from the local library.

This made me think of a great article on this topic I read a few years back. Very well written: https://medium.com/i-m-h-o/eight-things ... ed0479fb12
We must be brothers. 8-)

One of the few books I kept when I went through my extreme decluttering phase of my life was an old edition of The Little Prince as well. Which version do you have? I am curious and would like to see if we kept the same version!

Funnily enough, I also have only exactly four pairs of shoes, like you!
The one I have is a paperback Katherine Woods translation published in 1988 by Trumpet Club. I got it at a school book fair. I hear there's also a translation by Alan Wakeman that rivals the Woods version, but I've never seen one of those out in the wild.
User avatar
lthenderson
Posts: 5423
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 12:43 pm
Location: Iowa

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by lthenderson »

Caduceus wrote: Tue Mar 06, 2018 8:41 am
lthenderson wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 9:16 am
VictoriaF wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 7:56 pm For me, the hardest things to get rid of are books. Even if I know that I will never read them, or not read them again, there is sentimental value associated with the thought process that went into selecting them in the first place.

Victoria
+1000

I never got rid of any of my books until I moved to a new house about six years ago and ended up with around 50 boxes of books! My back was a limp noodle by the time I finished moving them all down into our basement. Since that time I have weeded them down to about 15 or so boxes of books, or what I can fit on my large built in bookcase downstairs. What helped me to get rid of them is that I wrote my name on the inside of the cover and have sold/donated them around town. Then whenever I go to a used book sale, I check the covers to see if any of mine are present. I get a kick whenever I see one of my old books that someone else has read.
It's interesting because when I went through my decluttering phase, books were the easiest things to discard. What I liked about most of my books was the content, and I could get most of them on Kindle. Reading on the Kindle is so easy (one handed reading!) compared to having the strain my neck and adjust my posture to read a book.
One of the biggest joys I get from books is passing it on to someone I know and then discussing it after they have read it. I haven't been able to do that with other kindle readers without one of us having to go purchase the book. The second thing I have a hard time with is that I've watched my entire music collection go from records through eight track tapes, cassettes and CD's into MP3 files on my computer and phone. What happens when Kindle software becomes obsolete, Kindle itself ceases to be a company or perhaps something better comes along? I'm not convinced that I will still have that content available to me years from now. Finally, some of my most treasured books aren't available on Kindle and most likely never will be.
leftcoaster
Posts: 544
Joined: Mon Jul 23, 2007 4:04 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by leftcoaster »

Cycle wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 8:57 pm
climber2020 wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 7:51 pm
Cycle wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 7:14 pm 50 pairs of shoes
One comment about this. I own 4 pair of shoes, and one of them is a super old pair that I use strictly for mowing the lawn. If you're trying to hit your number at the end of day 30, this is a good place to start. I'd count each shoe as one item :beer
If you only have 4 pairs of shoes, I know you are legit. Definitely easier to get rid of 930 items.

One of my biggest problems is I'm a DIY'er, so I accumulated a ton of tools when I did a two kitchen / two bath remodel. Having all those tools taking up tons of space and not getting used is a big stress point, but I know when I've gotten them down to just the essentials I will feel great freedom. Since completing the remodel 99% of the stuff hasn't been used, and I'm going to buy turn-key in the future.
My town library has a branch with a knowledgeably staffed tool lending library. Amazing service. I have donated a few things there because, in part, I can borrow them in the future if I need.
User avatar
Edie
Posts: 129
Joined: Fri May 06, 2016 4:03 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Edie »

Jack FFR1846 wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 2:28 pm Getting 465 items would be a piece of cake for me. Getting them past the wife is the impossible task. Why we still have onesies when our youngest is 17 is beyond me.
We have 2 boxes of "baby saves". The youngest is 15, oldest is 20. The oldest wore a dress home from the hospital that I wore on my first outing (not home from the hospital). That's in there. The price someone would have to pay me to get rid of those 2 boxes would be extraordinarily high. If my kids don't want them for their kids, they can make that choice, but in the meantime, they are saved, waiting for the next generation.

There's a couple dozen boxes in our garage filled with my husband's mother's things (china, trinkets, who knows what). I have no such attachment to those items, but since he accepts my sentimentalism, I return the favor.
2015
Posts: 2906
Joined: Mon Feb 10, 2014 2:32 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by 2015 »

Can any person, book, or article tell us what is right for each of us in this area? Some people are hoarders, some aren't. Is there a "right way", or are there only judgments?

Personally, I have been heavily engaged in my own Lifestyle by Design since retiring 3 years ago. I've cleared out everything--and I do mean everything (people, places, things)--tantamount to friction in my life. I subscribe to the Scarcity Idea that our precious mental resources must be preserved for high value adding activities only. My own personally identified Wildly Important Idea (hat tip, Cal Newport) in retirement is to make this the very best time of my entire life. Anything--people, places, things, activities--that does not funnel into this Idea is jettisoned. Digitizing everything--from papers to books to viewing and listening habits and more--as well as creating habits, routines, and rituals for all low value activities has dramatically increased my effectiveness and productivity with respect to those high value activities that optimize energy, satisfaction, and fulfillment in my life.
bloom2708
Posts: 8361
Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2014 2:08 pm
Location: Fargo, ND

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by bloom2708 »

Thanks 2015. I like your ideas.

I also do not want to wait for retirement to implement such a strategy. The power of "now". :D
"We are here to provoke thoughtfulness, not agree with you." Unknown Boglehead
User avatar
alpenglow
Posts: 1089
Joined: Tue May 31, 2011 12:02 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by alpenglow »

2015 wrote: Wed Mar 07, 2018 12:38 pm Personally, I have been heavily engaged in my own Lifestyle by Design since retiring 3 years ago. I've cleared out everything--and I do mean everything (people, places, things)--tantamount to friction in my life. I subscribe to the Scarcity Idea that our precious mental resources must be preserved for high value adding activities only. My own personally identified Wildly Important Idea (hat tip, Cal Newport) in retirement is to make this the very best time of my entire life. Anything--people, places, things, activities--that does not funnel into this Idea is jettisoned. Digitizing everything--from papers to books to viewing and listening habits and more--as well as creating habits, routines, and rituals for all low value activities has dramatically increased my effectiveness and productivity with respect to those high value activities that optimize energy, satisfaction, and fulfillment in my life.
I agree with this and have been moving in this direction over the past year or so. At work, I'm done with wasting my time on all of the pointless small time. Mind you, I'm not rude and antisocial to people. I just avoid those situations as much as possible now because they were adding absolutely no value to my life while taking away from my productivity. At home, we're getting rid of as much stuff as possible and developing systems and habits that represent best practices for us. It's been very satisfying and encouraging.
2015
Posts: 2906
Joined: Mon Feb 10, 2014 2:32 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by 2015 »

I think it takes a bit of a revolution in internal thinking to ruthlesly guard ourselves from distraction and disruption, because present day society values noise and 24/7 inputs/activity of all kinds. The question is, are even 5% of these inputs/activities valuable?

Whenever I read one of the many circular investing arguments here, or the latest expert prediction, or Larry, Pfau, fill-in-the-blank author or academic study, I always think of Taylor Larimore’s sailng picture. Why do we work, invest, manage our money, interact with people, etc., if not to go sailing, whatever our version of sailing is?

Life is indeed a banquet, and most poor suckers have their noses buried too deep in spreadsheets to eat. To me, simplicity in all forms is the ultimate elegance, leading to peace, contentment, fulfillment.
User avatar
Topic Author
Cycle
Posts: 1770
Joined: Sun May 28, 2017 7:57 pm
Location: Minneapolis

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Cycle »

2015 wrote: Wed Mar 07, 2018 3:54 pm I think it takes a bit of a revolution in internal thinking to ruthlesly guard ourselves from distraction and disruption, because present day society values noise and 24/7 inputs/activity of all kinds. The question is, are even 5% of these inputs/activities valuable?

Whenever I read one of the many circular investing arguments here, or the latest expert prediction, or Larry, Pfau, fill-in-the-blank author or academic study, I always think of Taylor Larimore’s sailng picture. Why do we work, invest, manage our money, interact with people, etc., if not to go sailing, whatever our version of sailing is?

Life is indeed a banquet, and most poor suckers have their noses buried too deep in spreadsheets to eat. To me, simplicity in all forms is the ultimate elegance, leading to peace, contentment, fulfillment.
Your posts encourage self examination, thanks for that. We've already gotten through 300+ items. Much of the big stuff has been jetosoned and I've deposited $1500 from tool and gadget sales. Lot of work left but its been very rewarding to simplify the home space.
Never look back unless you are planning to go that way
User avatar
Taylor Larimore
Advisory Board
Posts: 30178
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 8:09 pm
Location: Miami FL

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Taylor Larimore »

2015 wrote: Wed Mar 07, 2018 3:54 pm I think it takes a bit of a revolution in internal thinking to ruthlesly guard ourselves from distraction and disruption, because present day society values noise and 24/7 inputs/activity of all kinds. The question is, are even 5% of these inputs/activities valuable?

Whenever I read one of the many circular investing arguments here, or the latest expert prediction, or Larry, Pfau, fill-in-the-blank author or academic study, I always think of Taylor Larimore’s sailng picture. Why do we work, invest, manage our money, interact with people, etc., if not to go sailing, whatever our version of sailing is?

Life is indeed a banquet, and most poor suckers have their noses buried too deep in spreadsheets to eat. To me, simplicity in all forms is the ultimate elegance, leading to peace, contentment, fulfillment.
2015:

Thank you for this beautiful post.

Best wishes.
Taylor
"Simplicity is the master key to financial success." -- Jack Bogle
Jelloanddon
Posts: 103
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2014 12:18 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by Jelloanddon »

NotWhoYouThink wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2018 6:03 pm A relative died with a basement and garage fool of old tools and parts. Some got sold in a hasty estate sale, probably some useful tools went to the landfill. (I wasn't in charge of the cleaning-out process.) Truckloads of books went to the landfill. If your family doesn't share your hobby, they won't do a good job disposing of your treasures. Give them away or sell them, or else you own the waste when they go to the landfill.

I sneak things out of the house at every opportunity.
There’s a new method called “Swedish Death Cleaning” http://www.businessinsider.com/swedish- ... ng-2017-10. The premise is sparing your family the agony of getting rid of all your stuff when you die. I’ve observed this when cleaning out my in-laws home and friends whose parents just passed away. As you get older you don’t have the energy or inclination to get rid of stuff. And there are so many photos and “heirlooms” that nobody wants when you’re gone.
HoosierJim
Posts: 815
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 7:11 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by HoosierJim »

VictoriaF wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 7:56 pm the hardest things to get rid of are books.
My new strategy is to buy books at the Humane Resale shop. $1 per book. Just picked up some books on the Middle East, a biography on Colin Powell and college textbook. The vast supply seems to lower the sentimental value of books like my Catcher in the Rye paperback - read them and donate them back and get more.
User avatar
abuss368
Posts: 23043
Joined: Mon Aug 03, 2009 2:33 pm
Location: Where the water is warm, the drinks are cold, and I don't know the names of the players!
Contact:

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by abuss368 »

VictoriaF wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 7:56 pm
climber2020 wrote: Tue Feb 27, 2018 7:44 pm I'd say the hardest stuff to get rid of are the sentimental items that stay in boxes in the back of the closet but you feel bad when you attempt to throw them out. Taking pictures of these things really helps so that you can still retain the memories associated with them without having to hoard the actual items.
For me, the hardest things to get rid of are books. Even if I know that I will never read them, or not read them again, there is sentimental value associated with the thought process that went into selecting them in the first place.

Victoria
That was one area that became easier for me over time. You should see my book shelf now. I have donated all books that had no more value and I would not reread anymore. I prefer my morning newspaper The Wall Street Journal and I am good. Of course all Vanguard themed and Jack Bogle books are on my shelf and forever will be!
John C. Bogle: “Simplicity is the master key to financial success."
User avatar
abuss368
Posts: 23043
Joined: Mon Aug 03, 2009 2:33 pm
Location: Where the water is warm, the drinks are cold, and I don't know the names of the players!
Contact:

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by abuss368 »

To me it is more of an ongoing lifestyle process and evolution over time. As I look back over the years, I can;t not believe how far it has come.
John C. Bogle: “Simplicity is the master key to financial success."
kenoryan
Posts: 226
Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2017 7:11 pm

Re: 30-Day Minimalist Challenge

Post by kenoryan »

I would happily get rid of everything. Except for my tools. Nothing in my garage is going. I would happily wear one pair of Costco jeans and a couple of t shirts all my life. I’d keep one pair of running shoes and a flip flops. But my garage stuff, I just can’t minimize..
Post Reply