Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
invst65
Posts: 644
Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2014 11:04 am

Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by invst65 » Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:07 pm

I have a stacked Frigidaire washer/dryer combo that has given me very good service for the past 13 years without one single repair.

It would appear that the heating element on the dryer has finally gone out and I'm inclined to buy new separate units for both the washer and dryer.

I suspect I could probably replace whatever is wrong with the dryer for a few hundred dollars but my thinking is that in 13 years there must have been significant advancements in washer/dryer technology and I might as well buy new units to take advantage of them.

So my question is, is that thinking correct or not? Will a repaired dryer that is 13 years old work just as well as a new one - or at least close enough? Am I about to spend money on shiny new appliances without much real benefit?

JoeRetire
Posts: 1684
Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2018 2:44 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by JoeRetire » Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:15 pm

invst65 wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:07 pm
It would appear that the heating element on the dryer has finally gone out and I'm inclined to buy new separate units for both the washer and dryer.
Are you sure it's the heating element and not a thermal fuse?

When my dryer stopped heating, it was the fuse. Once that was replaced, it has worked fine since.

limeyx
Posts: 244
Joined: Wed Sep 07, 2016 5:34 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by limeyx » Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:17 pm

JoeRetire wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:15 pm
invst65 wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:07 pm
It would appear that the heating element on the dryer has finally gone out and I'm inclined to buy new separate units for both the washer and dryer.
Are you sure it's the heating element and not a thermal fuse?

When my dryer stopped heating, it was the fuse. Once that was replaced, it has worked fine since.
We had similar. It also wasn't the element but a 12cent part that was unfortunately embedded deep in the unit.
Cost around $150 to replace (Samsung)

User avatar
fishandgolf
Posts: 403
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2016 2:50 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by fishandgolf » Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:24 pm

Bought a pair of Maytags ~17 years ago. Two weeks ago the top load washer took its last breath.....replaced it with another new Maytag top loader.

Dryer still going strong........but I have yet to check it today. If it goes, will pair it up with the new Maytag washer....... :sharebeer

invst65
Posts: 644
Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2014 11:04 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by invst65 » Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:26 pm

Thanks a lot JoeRetire and limexy. Will definitely look into a fuse on the Frigidaire if there is one.

I think the gist of my question is still pertinent however. Is there any real benefit to be gained from replacing a 13 year old washer/dryer beyond the new ones just being prettier than the old ones?

westrichj312
Posts: 132
Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2017 4:25 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by westrichj312 » Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:34 pm

buy a new one I have never had either last 10 years!

mhalley
Posts: 6302
Joined: Tue Nov 20, 2007 6:02 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by mhalley » Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:37 pm

New washers are more effecient. If you do plan in getting new ones, there is a new tariff going into effect so you might shop sooner rather than later.
http://thehill.com/policy/finance/37053 ... tariffs-on

denovo
Posts: 4384
Joined: Sun Oct 13, 2013 1:04 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by denovo » Mon Feb 05, 2018 7:09 pm

As a general rule of thumb once appliances (dishwasher,oven, fridge, water heater) have lasted more than 10 years I am not going to pay a repairman to fix it. It's not worth it. At most, I will google the problem and make/model. I will try to fix it DIY possibly if the part isn't expensive.
"Don't trust everything you read on the Internet"- Abraham Lincoln

JBTX
Posts: 4238
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2017 12:46 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by JBTX » Mon Feb 05, 2018 7:14 pm

Today I had my heating element on my 20 year old dryer replaced. As far as I know the first significant repair on the dryer. I don’t think there is a lot to go wrong on your dryer. It was $200+. Probably would have been better just to buy new one but that is one more decision to make.

One thing people forget to do is keep dryer vent clean. I think my heating element may have gone bad trying to dry clothes with a clogged dryer vent. We need to have ours cleaned every year.

Our washer is about 11 years old. Seems like it needs maintenance pretty frequently. I actually bought a warranty on it before it hit 10 years and have used it several times.

livesoft
Posts: 62872
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:00 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by livesoft » Mon Feb 05, 2018 7:15 pm

Our machines are 24 years old and still going. I've fixed them myself a few times for a few dollars. And that was before youtube.com had all the diagnostic and repair videos to learn how to do it.

Dryer uses natural gas, so no heating element, too.
Wiki This signature message sponsored by sscritic: Learn to fish.

HIinvestor
Posts: 1716
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 3:23 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by HIinvestor » Mon Feb 05, 2018 7:20 pm

So much depends on what's wrong. When our 20+ year old dryer abruptly stopped working, we called in the appliance repair guy and he said that honestly he thinks that my old Maytag washer and dryer (both purchased in 1988 or so) are better than anything currently on the market. He repaired it (replaced the belt) and the gasket on the washer for under $200 for both and says we ought to get several more decades of use from both. He says that folks with newer machines have to replace them much more often and they're a lot harder to repair than these older models that have fewer parts to break.

furnace
Posts: 284
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2015 3:38 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by furnace » Mon Feb 05, 2018 7:25 pm

From a longevity viewpoint, it might be better to buy a "dumb" washer/dryer without all the latest electronics. Turn the knobs by hand. Those are in general easier to fix and less costly.

JI0124
Posts: 54
Joined: Sat Aug 08, 2015 1:06 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by JI0124 » Mon Feb 05, 2018 7:31 pm

Generally speaking we’ve been quite disappointed with new appliances in comparison with the ones that they’ve replaced.

New front load high efficiency washer and dryer purchased in 2013 don’t work as well as economy top load versions purchased in 2003. The “high efficiency” characteristics have only meant that they don’t do as good of a job, take longer and sometimes require a do-over.

Similar but worse experience with dishwasher (though builder grade so maybe to be expected). Fancy/expensive refrigerator from 2013 is just ok.

Based on our experience if I own an appliance that functioned well I would at least look into repairing before replacing. It seems like many manufacturers are focused more on incorporating ‘smart’ characteristics into their appliances vs. getting the basic operations solid. I don’t find it interesting to control any of my appliances from my phone and certainly would prefer that the basics are covered.

“They don’t make ‘me like they used to...”

Afty
Posts: 842
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2014 5:31 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by Afty » Tue Feb 06, 2018 12:44 am

I believe dryers haven’t changed much over the years. They are basically a heating element and a spinning tub. Washers on the other hand have progressed quite a bit.

mrpotatoheadsays
Posts: 223
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 2:36 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by mrpotatoheadsays » Tue Feb 06, 2018 2:01 am

Based on my research, the normal life service of washers/dryers is 13 years. Had you properly budgeted a reserve for replacement items, you'd have the money for a new washer/dryer today. So, yes, replace your broken old equipment with new equipment. The new models are extremely efficient and have numerous options.

gotester2000
Posts: 594
Joined: Sun Nov 12, 2017 1:59 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by gotester2000 » Tue Feb 06, 2018 2:08 am

Newer products of any category are deliberately designed such that the customer spends routinely on the servicing or is forced to upgrade to the next version.
Unless there is a significant advantage dont throw the old ones - repair could be a trivial one but the material used in older products is of much superior quality.
Last edited by gotester2000 on Tue Feb 06, 2018 2:09 am, edited 1 time in total.

djheini
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2016 5:53 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by djheini » Tue Feb 06, 2018 2:08 am

As someone who had the ~17 year old dryer in their building catch on fire because of a spark from old internal wiring igniting lint which had built up inside over time, put me in the "buy a replacement" column

User avatar
wander
Posts: 2576
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2008 9:10 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by wander » Tue Feb 06, 2018 4:02 am

I have a washer/dryer set for 20+ years. It seems old enough and I would buy a new one when it happens.

User avatar
KSOC
Posts: 314
Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2016 3:53 pm
Location: Central Florida

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by KSOC » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:14 am

We bought a set of Whirlpools in 1991 & both still in use. 27 years with 1 repair (belt replaced). Hardly use the dryer as we have portable folding wash lines in the garage to take advantage of the Florida heat. I know replacement is near. Not sure Whirlpool is as good a brand anymore. I'm with poster furnace, I'll try to find dumb appliances.
Too soon old, too late smart.

Hillview
Posts: 314
Joined: Fri Feb 02, 2018 7:27 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by Hillview » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:14 am

I think it depends on usage. Our washer lasted 10 years but our 12 year old dryer is still working -- I think it is less efficient (need to dry 2x sometimes) so I expect to replace it in the next year or 2. We do a boatload of laundry every single day. In speaking with a washer/dryer repair man he said with heavy use 10 years is time to replace vs repair (and he makes money with repair but not replace).

Uniballer
Posts: 155
Joined: Thu Apr 20, 2017 9:55 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by Uniballer » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:28 am

When my wife complained that our 1990 Maytag gas dryer wasn't working very well I found that it was cycling on the hi-limit, and replaced the thermostats. I have also replaced the gas valve coils and blower wheel. I have only had to replace the bleach hose on the matching washer. I am in no hurry to replace them.

User avatar
munemaker
Posts: 3564
Joined: Sat Jan 18, 2014 6:14 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by munemaker » Tue Feb 06, 2018 7:43 am

I have fixed our washer and dryer using videos on YouTube. Very helpful.

JoeRetire
Posts: 1684
Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2018 2:44 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by JoeRetire » Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:12 am

invst65 wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:26 pm
I think the gist of my question is still pertinent however. Is there any real benefit to be gained from replacing a 13 year old washer/dryer beyond the new ones just being prettier than the old ones?
I see nothing in washer/dryer technology that would compel me to waste money on a new one if the old one could be made to work for short money.

It's a dryer, not a cell phone.

User avatar
jharkin
Posts: 1900
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2016 7:14 am
Location: Boston suburbs

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by jharkin » Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:27 am

furnace wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 7:25 pm
From a longevity viewpoint, it might be better to buy a "dumb" washer/dryer without all the latest electronics. Turn the knobs by hand. Those are in general easier to fix and less costly.
Unfortunately true. The longevity of these appliances is getting shorter and shorter with each new generation as they get more complicated.


We had an electric range that worked fine for years, but replaced it because we wanted gas. We even got the same exact brand. The computer control panel on the new one crapped out twice in the first 6 months and the repairman basically said we were crazy for replacing an old working appliance - the new ones break down constantly.

I see this all the time in reviews for the new HE washers....


We still have an old Kenmore washer/dryer set I bought in the 90s. never had an issue... Knock on wood now I said that one of them will go.

User avatar
jharkin
Posts: 1900
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2016 7:14 am
Location: Boston suburbs

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by jharkin » Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:33 am

munemaker wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 7:43 am
I have fixed our washer and dryer using videos on YouTube. Very helpful.
Yep... people often dont realize how easy these things are to work on ... especially the older models without all the electronics in them.

A month ago our 9 year old dishwasher started leaking. It was not the usual culprit of a bad door seal. Some on here would use the 10 year rule and go pay $500 for a new one without a second thought. Others would call an appliance guy and pay a couple hundred just to get it diagnosed.

I spent some time watching youtubes and browsing the repair guides on appliancepartspros.com... it turned out to be a faulty overflow float switch. An $18 part that takes literally 5 minutes to change and the only tool you need is a Phillips screwdriver. Seriously, anybody can do it if you are just willing to do some reading.

daheld
Posts: 349
Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2017 8:14 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by daheld » Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:45 am

We have a ~23 year old Whirlpool W/D set that we inherited when we bought our current home. They work so well, we are planning to take them with us when we buy a new home (which we're currently in the process of). I have replaced the water inlet valve on the washer, and that's the only maintenance or repair I've had to do in the 4 years we've had them.

My mother is on her third washer in about 10 years. She bought all three new, and purchases them at a small, family owned appliance store in a rural area, where they live. After the first two lasted only about five years each, the salesman she deals with finally just told her to buy the cheapest thing they have, because none of the new models can realistically be expected to last very long.

You do have to wonder if all the water conservation and energy efficiency features that are now required don't make the things less reliable. I know I plan to lug our old, heavy, inefficient washer and dryer along with us as long as I can.

dsmclone
Posts: 229
Joined: Fri Oct 25, 2013 8:50 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by dsmclone » Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:53 am

Everyone I've talked to that has bought a high efficiency washer said they would "go old school" if they had the choice again.

ThriftyPhD
Posts: 735
Joined: Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:43 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by ThriftyPhD » Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:14 am

JoeRetire wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:12 am
invst65 wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:26 pm
I think the gist of my question is still pertinent however. Is there any real benefit to be gained from replacing a 13 year old washer/dryer beyond the new ones just being prettier than the old ones?
I see nothing in washer/dryer technology that would compel me to waste money on a new one if the old one could be made to work for short money.

It's a dryer, not a cell phone.
It may not be enough to justify replacing older units that work, but on the washer end the big improvement I've noticed with newer units is that they wring out the clothes much more. Old units have left the clothes soaked, the newer ones they're barely damp.

On the dryer end, auto moisture sensing can prevent you from overdrying. This saves money and protects your clothes. There are also new advances like ventless heat pump dryers that use much less energy.

beardsworth
Posts: 2135
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 4:02 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by beardsworth » Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:14 am

We have a pair of 20-year-old machines that we keep having repaired as needed. Routine stuff of the type already discussed above: a dryer fuse, some gears on the washer, etc.

We also have a friendly but somewhat curmudgeonly repairman with firm opinions, and have had the following conversation, with only slight variations, several times in recent years:

"Joe, eventually the day is going to come when we'll just have to replace these. What brands should we look at?"

"None of them. They're all crap. Machines like the ones you've got aren't being made anymore. These are solid, the housings are porcelain enamel over steel. Keep them going as long as there are parts."

"Oh, come on. There must be some company that still makes decent machines."

"No, seriously, they've all cheapened their product, and they're crap. And I'm not just saying that because I'll be losing your business if you buy new machines. I can practically guarantee you that even if you do buy new machines, well maybe except Speed Queen, you'll still be calling me for repairs in a few years."

So we keep fixing the ones we've got. Not sure what we'll do when we no longer have that option. Maybe Speed Queen.

mxs
Posts: 466
Joined: Tue Mar 24, 2015 1:54 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by mxs » Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:15 am

I had my gas dryer stop working a couple years ago. Turns out we let the vent hose get clogged, the dryer overheated, and the thermal fuse blew. I cleared the clogged vent hose and replaced the <$5 fuse, and it went back to heating just fine. When the fuse went out, it would spin and seem to work, but the gas never turned on, so it was just air drying with no heat.

Dryers have not gotten better in probably the last 25 years, there is little to improve upon. Washers are more complicated and may be worth changing, but I would go for something simple like a Speed Queen or a relatively basic non high efficiency model.

caffeperfavore
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Aug 06, 2015 11:45 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by caffeperfavore » Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:22 am

Yet another person here that has fixed their washer and dryer. These things aren't really that complicated. If you can figure out the part that needs changed - and there's so much online help available - then many repairs can be done fairly cheaply in a half hour or less.

Cody
Posts: 891
Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2007 9:19 am
Location: Stillwater, Mn

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by Cody » Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:42 am

I just tried to replace a sensor on our clothes dryer but the wiring (from the last repair guy) was done incorrectly. So I felt I had to call a differnet repair guy in the get the wiring correct.

Anyway, it turned out the real problem was the heating coil. He charged me $150 for the service call and $100 for the coil. And got the wiring right.

On further review the heating element (Original factory made) cost $22 online. I could have fixed it myself except for the crappy wiring job of the first repair guy.

PS - he had to come back (anohter $175) because the vent was clogged, so he blew that out beause a sensor blown). Again I should have known better.

Best
Cody

anoop
Posts: 710
Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2014 1:33 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by anoop » Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:42 am

Afty wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 12:44 am
I believe dryers haven’t changed much over the years. They are basically a heating element and a spinning tub. Washers on the other hand have progressed quite a bit.
Many now have moisture sensors which prevent clothes from getting cooked.

Fox
Posts: 40
Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2016 2:00 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by Fox » Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:47 am

Our natural gas dryer quiet drying clothes last year but I got it fixed for about $10 with a gas valve thing-a-majig that I ordered from amazon.

I also recently had a repairman out for a self inflicted repair of our washer. I asked him what his preferences are if he were to buy a new machine. His opinion was to avoid foreign manufacturers like LG or Samsung since parts are harder to get for repairs. His domestic choice was Whirlpool/Maytag. He also prefers the front loader style.

gronkman
Posts: 55
Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2014 6:50 pm
Location: Washington DC

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by gronkman » Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:45 am

Something to think about is also the energy savings, especially compared to older washers (not dryers, that tech hasn’t changed in forever). Depending on your energy costs and usage, you could save $100-150 a year.

namekevaste
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri May 05, 2017 6:12 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by namekevaste » Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:51 am

Maytag front loading washer which failed with a known issue with the wax motor (door latch is a small switch filled with wax which is actuated by heating the wax). Repaired with a part that cost a couple of dollars. Then, someone washed a mop which disintegrated and clogged the internal pump. Took machine apart and cleaned out the pump. Now, going strong after 16 years.

bluelight
Posts: 260
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2011 12:08 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by bluelight » Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:01 pm

dsmclone wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:53 am
Everyone I've talked to that has bought a high efficiency washer said they would "go old school" if they had the choice again.
Absolutely. If I had known how much I would hate the new HE washer that came with our house, I would have taken my 15 year old Kenmore when we moved. The HE settings don't clean properly and I end up using the bulk setting to get enough water in the machine to clean the clothes.

User avatar
whodidntante
Posts: 4306
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2016 11:11 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by whodidntante » Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:24 pm

Dryers last longer if they have a vent to the outside as opposed to a lint clogged tube that leads outside.

User avatar
Epsilon Delta
Posts: 7430
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2011 7:00 pm

Twas ever thus

Post by Epsilon Delta » Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:52 pm

I have several appliances that have been giving sterling service for decades.

At the time I bought them people were talking about modern junk that did not last, just as they are now.

At work I have seen the design side of this and new technologies have relentlessly improved reliability and performance. We have had the occasional goof where a few months production has a particular problem identified after the fact, but overall all the metrics improved by orders of magnitude over a couple of decades.

That didn't stop the mechanics complaining when we went from metal cams to plastic cams, and they could no longer create replacement parts with a file. And they really started griping when we replaced the cams with software. But the electronic parts are much more reliable. We measure it.

Helo80
Posts: 761
Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2017 8:47 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by Helo80 » Tue Feb 06, 2018 2:42 pm

anoop wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:42 am
Afty wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 12:44 am
I believe dryers haven’t changed much over the years. They are basically a heating element and a spinning tub. Washers on the other hand have progressed quite a bit.
Many now have moisture sensors which prevent clothes from getting cooked.

I was going to mention this as well.

I have a 3 year old dryer (Whirpool Cabrio line) and it has a moisture sensor that turns the unit off when the clothes are dry. Generally works very well. Sometimes thick socks are ever so slightly moist.

Basically, if you take dry clothes, turn the unit on a normal moisture sensor setting, it'll cut off after about 5 minutes (even if you set it for 60 mins) since the clothes are detected to be dry. If I'm not mistaken, the unit will also extend the dry time if clothes are inadequately dry. I'm about 90% certain there's a way to override said moisture sensor so that it dries no matter what, but I have never figured that part out.

goblue59
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:57 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by goblue59 » Tue Feb 06, 2018 3:34 pm

My 13 yo Bosch dryer stopped heating. I thought it was the heating element but I found a circuit breaker-type reset switch when I took off the back and now it works. It overheated and triggered the breaker. Something to at least check out.

fposte
Posts: 1230
Joined: Mon Sep 02, 2013 1:32 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by fposte » Tue Feb 06, 2018 3:52 pm

My Kenmore W/D set was in the house when I moved in in '99; I think they're from the early '90s. They're built like tanks, there's a great local repair guy, and I'm a light user, so I'd rather soldier on with these than worry about upgrading to units with a shorter lifespan, especially since installation and removal involve a tricky turn into wooden basement stairs.

jucor
Posts: 163
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2015 8:35 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by jucor » Tue Feb 06, 2018 4:05 pm

dsmclone wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:53 am
Everyone I've talked to that has bought a high efficiency washer said they would "go old school" if they had the choice again.
Not me -- we have a 9 year old Bosch HE front loading washer and love it. Reliable, clothes come out clean and with very little water. I'd NEVER go back to the old low-spin top loader (might consider a high spin HE top loader, though).

User avatar
baconavocado
Posts: 195
Joined: Fri Oct 13, 2017 3:03 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by baconavocado » Tue Feb 06, 2018 4:54 pm

jucor wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 4:05 pm
dsmclone wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:53 am
Everyone I've talked to that has bought a high efficiency washer said they would "go old school" if they had the choice again.
Not me -- we have a 9 year old Bosch HE front loading washer and love it. Reliable, clothes come out clean and with very little water. I'd NEVER go back to the old low-spin top loader (might consider a high spin HE top loader, though).
Same here. Highly recommend the Bosch Axxis front loader.

afan
Posts: 3922
Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2010 4:01 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by afan » Tue Feb 06, 2018 4:59 pm

Washer and dryer both 32 years old and counting. Have had some repairs on one, the other, or both. None for a very long time. Will replace them when it becomes unreasonably expensive or impossible to repair them.

These machines do very basic jobs. Fancy new washers are made to perform well on government tests of efficiency. I wonder how well they work in the real world? They don't seem to get clothes any cleaner, sometimes the opposite. Our old equipment gets our clothes clean and dry. What more could I ask?
We don't know how to beat the market on a risk-adjusted basis, and we don't know anyone that does know either | --Swedroe | We assume that markets are efficient, that prices are right | --Fama

invst65
Posts: 644
Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2014 11:04 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by invst65 » Wed Feb 07, 2018 1:55 pm

This is the OP.

When I looked at new Washer/Dryer sets I learned that there have been significant changes in the last 13 years, the biggest thing being the removal of the agitator and no control over the amount of water. The salesman told me the government now decides how much water and it's a LOT less than it used to be. Interestingly, the unit I bought had an inside water faucet that is supposedly there to help you pre-wash items that have stains. Thought that was a nice feature but he said you could also use it to add more water if you wanted. I'm guessing that's really why it's there. Can't imagine the water savings will amount to more than a few dollars at most on my H20 bill and since the salesman said it runs longer to compensate it might actually increase the electric bill. Sounded like a typical well thought out government mandate to me

Also has a lot more electronics, of course. There were some units available that still had all the old features to make old geezers like me comfortable, I guess. They were actually quite a bit cheaper but I decided to go with the newer technology. I guess time will tell if that was smart or not. If I get another 13 years, I'll be happy.

I did worry about one thing the salesman told me and that is that if there is a power surge it can destroy the "motherboard" and the cost of replacement can be more than the cost of the unit. A washing machine with a motherboard? WTMF?

Another thing I learned in the process is that there really is no point in shopping around for the best price any more once you decide what you want. Every place I checked had EXACTLY the same price. The salesman explained why this is. They all check on each other and when one lowers the price they all do. So just go to the store you like best. And if the price goes down in the next 30 days, they will even refund you the difference.
Last edited by invst65 on Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

invst65
Posts: 644
Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2014 11:04 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by invst65 » Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:07 pm

goblue59 wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 3:34 pm
My 13 yo Bosch dryer stopped heating. I thought it was the heating element but I found a circuit breaker-type reset switch when I took off the back and now it works. It overheated and triggered the breaker. Something to at least check out.
I checked into the possibility of this according to some earlier recommendations in this thread. I learned that my unit actually has two circuit breakers and after watching a youtube on the subject I also learned that I would have to almost completely disassemble the whole unit just to get to them. The fact that both the washer and dryer in the stacked unit were making lots of grinding and squealing noises led me to believe it was having end of life issues and so I decided to just bite the bullet and replace them both.

soccerrules
Posts: 803
Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2016 4:01 pm

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by soccerrules » Wed Feb 07, 2018 4:49 pm

I am not sure if a repairmen told me this or I read it somewhere.

Most appliances, garage door opener, pool pumps etc are made to have a certain life span based on # of hours of operation. Essentially they are going to fail/die after a specific number of hours of operation. Use it less it lasts longer, use it more it will need to be replaced sooner. Of course extreme conditions, no maintenance etc can shorten the life of any appliance.

I believe most large home appliances, under normal usage typically will last about 10 years. Ones that last longer basically have been used less.

I typically weigh the cost of a repair call and repair , considering the life of the appliance and determine if I am better off spending the "repair" money toward a new unit. And typically we are talking about less than $1000 (other than high end refrigerators)
Don't let your outflow exceed your income or your upkeep will be your downfall.

Chip
Posts: 2370
Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2007 4:57 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by Chip » Thu Feb 08, 2018 5:25 am

soccerrules wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 4:49 pm
Most appliances, garage door opener, pool pumps etc are made to have a certain life span based on # of hours of operation. Essentially they are going to fail/die after a specific number of hours of operation. Use it less it lasts longer, use it more it will need to be replaced sooner. Of course extreme conditions, no maintenance etc can shorten the life of any appliance.

I believe most large home appliances, under normal usage typically will last about 10 years. Ones that last longer basically have been used less.
While that seems like a reasonable way to look at things from a macro perspective, I think appliance lifespans probably have an average of X (possibly the 10 years you mentioned) with reasonably large standard deviation. And often the "failure" is a low cost, easy to replace part.

My refrigerator is 21 years old. I've replaced the ice maker twice and the fill valve for it once.
My washer is 21 years old. I've replaced the lid, lid switch and the drain pump. Low usage (2 person household).
My dryer is 21 years old. I've done nothing to it but clean out lint. Low usage (2 person household).
My dishwasher is 13 years old. I've replaced the hinge friction pads. High usage (10+ loads/week).
My cooktop is 30 years old. I've replaced two burner switches. High usage.
My double oven is 30 years old. I've replaced a heating element. High usage.
I had one garage door opener fail at 25 years. The other is at 21 years and still going strong.

Since I DIY the total cost of all of the above repairs was less than $400 (the ice makers are more than half of that). Plus, admittedly, a fair amount of my time to troubleshoot, order parts and do the repairs.

Dudley
Posts: 103
Joined: Tue May 09, 2017 5:34 am

Re: Washer/Dryer longevity ?

Post by Dudley » Thu Feb 08, 2018 5:35 am

I can't imagine any real notable technological achievements have been made in washers/dryers over the last decade(s). One sloshes stuff in water, one blows hot air (like salesmen).
I don't think age is a good indicator of when failures occur - often these failures "just happen".
Personally I DIY fix this stuff (if able). Else I would just replace with most basic model. My experience going to "repair man" is a waste of time and money (they are generally incompetent).

Post Reply