Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
User avatar
WoodSpinner
Posts: 516
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2017 1:15 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by WoodSpinner » Sat Feb 03, 2018 8:20 pm

denovo wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:54 am
WoodSpinner wrote:
Thu Feb 01, 2018 12:37 am


Disclaimer: We realize this decision is much more about a lifestyle choice than about straight economic analysis. Before I got married I spent months living out of a Ford Explorer and know quite a bit about Boondocking and Stealth camping. Its a really different experience than renting hotel rooms, or travelling in larger RVs.

Thanks in advance for any insights and suggestions.

WoodSpinner 8-)
Although you have some experience with living out a vehicle, you were a lot younger then, and presumably your wife doesn't have that experience. Maybe you will both like it. I would suggest renting on for a month first to see if it's all you think it's cracked to be before making a huge purchase.
I would be happy if I could rent one for a weekend. So far it’s been much more difficult than I expected.

WoodSpinner

User avatar
TimeRunner
Posts: 1336
Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2012 9:23 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by TimeRunner » Sat Feb 03, 2018 8:22 pm

I like the idea, but one concern I have is how do you keep from getting all your stuff ripped off whilst you are out hiking or exploring around? Seems like these vehicles would be natural targets for thieves. I guess one way to deal with it is to minimize your stuff. "Go ahead, take my Walmart flashlight." IDK.
“The Party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command.” - George Orwell, 1984

User avatar
MP123
Posts: 671
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2017 3:32 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by MP123 » Sat Feb 03, 2018 9:05 pm

Is there much real life difference between a class b and a conversion van?

Let's say for a week long trip with motels as a possibility too.

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:23 pm

MP123 wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 9:05 pm
Is there much real life difference between a class b and a conversion van?

Let's say for a week long trip with motels as a possibility too.
Conversion vans for the most part only have a couch plus other passenger seating and usually some kind of TV. A B has a toilet and shower, fridge, generator, 120v air conditioner, propane heat and cooktop, microwave, table for eating, fresh and gray/black water systems, and TV.

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:32 pm

WoodSpinner wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 8:20 pm
denovo wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:54 am
WoodSpinner wrote:
Thu Feb 01, 2018 12:37 am


Disclaimer: We realize this decision is much more about a lifestyle choice than about straight economic analysis. Before I got married I spent months living out of a Ford Explorer and know quite a bit about Boondocking and Stealth camping. Its a really different experience than renting hotel rooms, or travelling in larger RVs.

Thanks in advance for any insights and suggestions.

WoodSpinner 8-)
Although you have some experience with living out a vehicle, you were a lot younger then, and presumably your wife doesn't have that experience. Maybe you will both like it. I would suggest renting on for a month first to see if it's all you think it's cracked to be before making a huge purchase.
I would be happy if I could rent one for a weekend. So far it’s been much more difficult than I expected.

WoodSpinner
Well when I was single and much younger I slept overnight in a plywood-and-carpet-padding bed I built for the back of my little 2-door Dodge Daytona (a compact hatchback - not the previous generation winged NASCAR model), but that really doesn't have anything to do with what I'd be willing/able to do now. I do think honestly a B would be a stretch for two older and possibly now larger people. As I mentioned I think not being able to stand up (I'm guessing minimum clearance is slightly less than 6 feet, so not standing room for a lot of us) would be somewhat annoying.

User avatar
WoodSpinner
Posts: 516
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2017 1:15 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by WoodSpinner » Sun Feb 04, 2018 9:40 am

tibbitts wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:32 pm
WoodSpinner wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 8:20 pm
denovo wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:54 am
WoodSpinner wrote:
Thu Feb 01, 2018 12:37 am


Disclaimer: We realize this decision is much more about a lifestyle choice than about straight economic analysis. Before I got married I spent months living out of a Ford Explorer and know quite a bit about Boondocking and Stealth camping. Its a really different experience than renting hotel rooms, or travelling in larger RVs.

Thanks in advance for any insights and suggestions.

WoodSpinner 8-)

Although you have some experience with living out a vehicle, you were a lot younger then, and presumably your wife doesn't have that experience. Maybe you will both like it. I would suggest renting on for a month first to see if it's all you think it's cracked to be before making a huge purchase.
I would be happy if I could rent one for a weekend. So far it’s been much more difficult than I expected.

WoodSpinner
Well when I was single and much younger I slept overnight in a plywood-and-carpet-padding bed I built for the back of my little 2-door Dodge Daytona (a compact hatchback - not the previous generation winged NASCAR model), but that really doesn't have anything to do with what I'd be willing/able to do now. I do think honestly a B would be a stretch for two older and possibly now larger people. As I mentioned I think not being able to stand up (I'm guessing minimum clearance is slightly less than 6 feet, so not standing room for a lot of us) would be somewhat annoying.
Actually standing is no problem (I am 5’ 10”), there is 6’ 3” clearance. Bathroom is a bit tight and storage a challenge — we will have to focus on utilitarian Items.

I think you would be surprised by the feel.

https://youtu.be/329ZePHgKeM

WoodSpinner

curmudgeon
Posts: 1557
Joined: Thu Jun 20, 2013 11:00 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by curmudgeon » Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:42 am

I don't have a lot to add, but I am interested in the topic for myself. We have friends who have really enjoyed their B over the past 15 years or so. I think the likelihood of it actually suiting you is is definitely dependent on your travel style. If you did years of tent camping when you were younger, but now need a better bed and a closer bathroom, a B is probably more likely to work for you. If you get grumpy without a long hot shower every morning, it would more likely not work so well. With a B, you do have the advantage that you can just stop at a motel for the night if you want a bit more space.

I think a big factor in the decision is whether you expect to moving on every day or two, or whether you would tend to stay in nice locations for a few days at a time and take side trips around the area.

A few years ago, we rented a largish class C for a road trip because of a great price for relocating it. That experience helped me realize that I didn't like the maneuverability limitations with something that long and wide. I'm still considering a B or a trailer, and look occasionally, but our travel schedule is fairly booked up right now, so I hate to buy, maintain, and store something that won't get a lot of use right away.

If you are looking, especially used, it can definitely be worth searching on a more regional/national basis rather than just locally. I think there are a few dealers who specialize in B.

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:44 am

WoodSpinner wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 9:40 am
tibbitts wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:32 pm
WoodSpinner wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 8:20 pm
denovo wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:54 am
WoodSpinner wrote:
Thu Feb 01, 2018 12:37 am


Disclaimer: We realize this decision is much more about a lifestyle choice than about straight economic analysis. Before I got married I spent months living out of a Ford Explorer and know quite a bit about Boondocking and Stealth camping. Its a really different experience than renting hotel rooms, or travelling in larger RVs.

Thanks in advance for any insights and suggestions.

WoodSpinner 8-)

Although you have some experience with living out a vehicle, you were a lot younger then, and presumably your wife doesn't have that experience. Maybe you will both like it. I would suggest renting on for a month first to see if it's all you think it's cracked to be before making a huge purchase.
I would be happy if I could rent one for a weekend. So far it’s been much more difficult than I expected.

WoodSpinner
Well when I was single and much younger I slept overnight in a plywood-and-carpet-padding bed I built for the back of my little 2-door Dodge Daytona (a compact hatchback - not the previous generation winged NASCAR model), but that really doesn't have anything to do with what I'd be willing/able to do now. I do think honestly a B would be a stretch for two older and possibly now larger people. As I mentioned I think not being able to stand up (I'm guessing minimum clearance is slightly less than 6 feet, so not standing room for a lot of us) would be somewhat annoying.
Actually standing is no problem (I am 5’ 10”), there is 6’ 3” clearance. Bathroom is a bit tight and storage a challenge — we will have to focus on utilitarian Items.

I think you would be surprised by the feel.

https://youtu.be/329ZePHgKeM

WoodSpinner
I am surprised because so many Bs are 6' or maybe 6'1", and then some have various things protruding down from the ceiling. Ouch! 6'3" is better - I had a 6' 3.75" RV once and it was okay for me - but didn't have roof (or any!) air - never would put up with not having air today!!!

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:52 am

curmudgeon wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:42 am
I don't have a lot to add, but I am interested in the topic for myself. We have friends who have really enjoyed their B over the past 15 years or so. I think the likelihood of it actually suiting you is is definitely dependent on your travel style. If you did years of tent camping when you were younger, but now need a better bed and a closer bathroom, a B is probably more likely to work for you. If you get grumpy without a long hot shower every morning, it would more likely not work so well. With a B, you do have the advantage that you can just stop at a motel for the night if you want a bit more space.

I think a big factor in the decision is whether you expect to moving on every day or two, or whether you would tend to stay in nice locations for a few days at a time and take side trips around the area.

A few years ago, we rented a largish class C for a road trip because of a great price for relocating it. That experience helped me realize that I didn't like the maneuverability limitations with something that long and wide. I'm still considering a B or a trailer, and look occasionally, but our travel schedule is fairly booked up right now, so I hate to buy, maintain, and store something that won't get a lot of use right away.

If you are looking, especially used, it can definitely be worth searching on a more regional/national basis rather than just locally. I think there are a few dealers who specialize in B.
Another appeal of the B is that you can almost always keep it at home, while a C or larger or a trailer would require storage, maybe due to neighborhood rules or just space limitations. I've had an RV at home and another I had to store and that's night and day - storage just kills so much of the appeal. Of course a B won't fit in a typical garage so that's still a disadvantage.

The point about still using motels is valid - something you might be more likely to do with a B than a larger RV. The side trip goes either way. For example in a national park you might want to stay in one place for a while, but when you go off exploring during the day it would still nice to have all your food and toilet and "stuff" (backpack, camera gear, etc.) with you without having to pack every day. The flip side is you have to disconnect the B (and will drive off without disconnecting the water, power, or sewer from time to time, which can make for an exciting experience), maybe deal with leveling, and it's still more difficult to maneuver than a compact car.

quantAndHold
Posts: 1701
Joined: Thu Sep 17, 2015 10:39 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by quantAndHold » Sun Feb 04, 2018 12:10 pm

We have a Leisure Travel Van. Here’s what I know, in no particular order.

Rent first. More than once. Rent something that’s as close to what you think you want as you can get. What we found, and what a LOT of people find, is that what they think they want is not at all what they actually want. In our case, we thought we were going to get a class B, probably Roadtrek. After a week of renting, we realized that the class B’s are much, much too small. We rented a super C next, which was too big. I know people who dropped megabucks on something they used once, then decided it was the wrong size. Or the wrong floor plan. Or that they didn’t actually like RVing at all.

Everyone would like to be able to drive Going to the Sun Highway in their RV. But between being able to drive that one specific highway, and having something we can live in the other 9.99 years that we’re planning on spending in the thing, I’ll take the latter. Most people just rent a car in Kalispell, and make GttSH a day trip in a rental car. The small C is small enough that we can drive it most anywhere, and camp it in any campground. We boondock in it a lot. We’ve rented cars or took Uber a couple of times when we wanted to explore a city and didn’t want to find parking in the city. But mostly we just drive it around, and have no problems.

Of the brands you mention, Pleasure Way is the best built. PW and LTV are the only ones I would consider, because quality. You’ll have enough problems with the components inside the RV breaking. You don’t want to deal with poor quality and stupidly designed house as well.

Small luxury RV’s sell much closer to list price when new, and depreciate much slower than the rest of the market. Assume that at some point you’re going to sell the thing. Pick one that you’ll lose the least amount of money on.

Find out what online groups exist for the brands you’re interested in. For LTV it’s on Facebook. I don’t know about the others. Join them. Listen to the owners complain. Look at what they’re complaining about. That will tell you a lot about what you’re considering buying. The user groups will be able to answer brand specific questions about rentals and where to buy used.

User avatar
Toons
Posts: 12865
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Hills of Tennessee

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Toons » Sun Feb 04, 2018 12:56 pm

Yes Storage is a HUGE factor.
The Class B can be ready to roll in a matter of
Minutes from the driveway :happy



Image
"One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity" –Bruce Lee

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Sun Feb 04, 2018 1:17 pm

Toons wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 12:56 pm
Yes Storage is a HUGE factor.
The Class B can be ready to roll in a matter of
Minutes from the driveway :happy



Image
Exactly, although the cover is likely to generate an issue with the HOA. The cover does look pretty ugly, but better than old appliances and a well-used sofa on the front porch.

User avatar
Toons
Posts: 12865
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Hills of Tennessee

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Toons » Sun Feb 04, 2018 1:58 pm

I live in an HOA of 1
I make the Rules.
Beauty Is In The Eye Of The Beholder.. :happy

Image
"One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity" –Bruce Lee

finite_difference
Posts: 934
Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2015 7:00 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by finite_difference » Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:24 pm

Or you could buy a Honda Odyssey and a nice tent and sleeping bags, and have $100,000 left over to spend on AirBNB and camp fees ;) That’s 1,000 nights at $100 per night, or 2.7 solid years on the road.
The most precious gift we can offer anyone is our attention. - Thich Nhat Hanh

TravelGeek
Posts: 2123
Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2014 3:23 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by TravelGeek » Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:39 pm

finite_difference wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:24 pm
Or you could buy a Honda Odyssey and a nice tent and sleeping bags, and have $100,000 left over to spend on AirBNB and camp fees ;) That’s 1,000 nights at $100 per night, or 2.7 solid years on the road.
That is the kind of math I bring up when my wife talks about an RV (though to be honest I wouldn’t mind having a nice Class-B; she is thinking tiny trailer) - $100k is a lot of nights in a hotel.

However, the math isn’t quite as simple; after those 2.7 years on the road your class B would still retain some value. The hotels wouldn’t necessarily be where I want to go, but on the other hand the Class B won’t easily go to Bali either. :beer

User avatar
Toons
Posts: 12865
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Hills of Tennessee

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Toons » Sun Feb 04, 2018 3:03 pm

TravelGeek wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:39 pm
finite_difference wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:24 pm
Or you could buy a Honda Odyssey and a nice tent and sleeping bags, and have $100,000 left over to spend on AirBNB and camp fees ;) That’s 1,000 nights at $100 per night, or 2.7 solid years on the road.
That is the kind of math I bring up when my wife talks about an RV (though to be honest I wouldn’t mind having a nice Class-B; she is thinking tiny trailer) - $100k is a lot of nights in a hotel.

However, the math isn’t quite as simple; after those 2.7 years on the road your class B would still retain some value. The hotels wouldn’t necessarily be where I want to go, but on the other hand the Class B won’t easily go to Bali either. :beer
Trust me,
After the initial the money is "exchanged" for the vehicle,,it becomes forgotten.
Good advice I first received from a Class A owner many years ago,,,
Never try to equate financial "sense" to a Recreation Vehicle,,
It is a lifestyle.
Money is fungible.
I cannot attach a "value" to the life experiences I have acquired with traveling the last 5 years around the USA in "RigBy" :D
"One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity" –Bruce Lee

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Sun Feb 04, 2018 3:19 pm

Toons wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 1:58 pm
I live in an HOA of 1
I make the Rules.
Beauty Is In The Eye Of The Beholder.. :happy

Image
Usually it's the eye of the HOA that matters. Personally I'd be good with the cover, not so much withe the appliances and furniture. But even in my $100k neighborhood (house values, that is) the cover would be a no-no. As would the B if it was based on a 3-series and not a 2-series van (yes I know that in some cases they look the same - you might have to buy some replacement labels to make your B legal.) We don't really have anyone to enforce the rules, though... and possibly you could park across the street (technically outside the neighborhood), on the street, but would have to move every 72hrs.

Nate79
Posts: 3027
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2016 6:24 pm
Location: Portland, OR

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Nate79 » Mon Feb 05, 2018 1:08 am

We have a 26ft travel trailer with long slideouts. I can't imagine a Class B - way too small. That shower/bathroom makes me claustrophobic just looking at it.

If we decide to go the RV route in the future we would go Class C.

User avatar
praxis
Posts: 443
Joined: Sun Sep 06, 2009 1:51 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by praxis » Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:41 pm

As Sandtrap and others have mentioned, B's usually have low clearance. No problem on roads, but my brother sold his after 6 months because it couldn't handle the back roads they like to use to get to their favorite camping spots. They were convinced after a trip last summer to Glacier and Banff and another Canadian provencial park in BC where they kept bottoming out. He then bought another 4WD pickup and mounted a slide in camper that was a big upgrade compared to the pickup camper they owned before trying the B. They are very happy.

denovo
Posts: 4242
Joined: Sun Oct 13, 2013 1:04 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by denovo » Mon Feb 05, 2018 3:10 pm

WoodSpinner wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 8:20 pm
denovo wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:54 am
WoodSpinner wrote:
Thu Feb 01, 2018 12:37 am


Disclaimer: We realize this decision is much more about a lifestyle choice than about straight economic analysis. Before I got married I spent months living out of a Ford Explorer and know quite a bit about Boondocking and Stealth camping. Its a really different experience than renting hotel rooms, or travelling in larger RVs.

Thanks in advance for any insights and suggestions.

WoodSpinner 8-)
Although you have some experience with living out a vehicle, you were a lot younger then, and presumably your wife doesn't have that experience. Maybe you will both like it. I would suggest renting on for a month first to see if it's all you think it's cracked to be before making a huge purchase.
I would be happy if I could rent one for a weekend. So far it’s been much more difficult than I expected.

WoodSpinner
Maybe create a new thread on renting one? I am sure you there's got to be options.. But I would honestly rent for a month if you plan on doing this for several months a year. There's many things I could stand putting up with for 2 days, but not a month. You'd want go on a long trip and see how you feel at the end of it.
"Don't trust everything you read on the Internet"- Abraham Lincoln

Emilyjane
Posts: 116
Joined: Sat Jul 27, 2013 6:39 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Emilyjane » Mon Feb 05, 2018 3:16 pm

praxis wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:41 pm
B's usually have low clearance. No problem on roads, but my brother sold his after 6 months because it couldn't handle the back roads they like to use to get to their favorite camping spots. They were convinced after a trip last summer to Glacier and Banff and another Canadian Provincial Park
We’ve traveled with our sprinter based Roadtrek to Glacier, Banff, WAterton Lakes, Jasper, multiple other Canadian Provincial Parks on north shore of Lake Superior, have not had any problem with clearance. I think it must depend on the model?
"Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance", Confucius

User avatar
Sandtrap
Posts: 5097
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 6:32 pm
Location: Hawaii😀 Northern AZ.😳 Retired.

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Sandtrap » Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:43 am

alexander29 wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 5:13 pm
WoodSpinner wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 4:51 pm
alexander29 wrote:
Thu Feb 01, 2018 11:56 pm
We have a 2016 Pleasureway Plateau TS and like it very much. Not any major problems yet. Mobility is great, but storage space is limited, as you would expect. The on-demand hot water on ours is fussy but I believe Pleasureway has gone to a better brand. Things we newbies didn’t really think about when shopping:
1. We really like having the kitchen and side door on the passenger side because when you back into a campsite, that’s usually the side with your campground table, etc.
2. Most of our utility hookups are on the driver side, as they should be, but our fill for the water tank is on the passenger side, away from the site faucet. Just a little more awkward at times.
3. Recommend as many solar panels as is affordable. Feeding the batteries becomes a big deal.
4. Ground clearance is limited. Pleasureway and Roadtrek aren’t designed as rough road or freezing winter vehicles.
5. The connections to empty the holding tank are quite low. This is good because gravity is your friend, but there is some bending and kneeling required.

But overall, our rig is well made and a lot of fun. Enjoy!
Appreciate the info! Ground Clearance and ability to go on dirt/gravel washboard is a key concern. Have you had yours off pavement?

Thanks

WoodSpinner
Yes, we take it off pavement. A reasonably maintained Forest Service road is fine, but anything with huge potholes, big rocks, or steep drops (such as a very steep driveway entering a level street) can knock things around or scrape. The rear mud flags and side flares are designed to rub before you start grinding against a pipe or the generator. The rig is not bad in light snow, but not designed for deep snow or deep sand. Our model has the "dually" twin rear wheels, which helps stabilize it in high winds: so far wind has not been much of a problem. We've also had it out during high-altitude freeze nights that warm up during the day without a problem, but an extended freeze during mid-winter risks freezing pipes or tanks.
Great info.
Thanks!
3 questions.
I notice the ground clearance is short on those fancy side rocker panels. Do they scrape on the very high nasty speed bumps that are in some parking lots. Also those side road deep dips/swales that are cut for drainage.
Also, the side sliding door. Is it powered?
Is a non "mercedes sprinter" chassis available? (dodge, chevy, etc)
That interior is really nice.
j :D
Image
Image

User avatar
Sandtrap
Posts: 5097
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 6:32 pm
Location: Hawaii😀 Northern AZ.😳 Retired.

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Sandtrap » Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:46 am

Toons wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 3:03 pm
TravelGeek wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:39 pm
finite_difference wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:24 pm
Or you could buy a Honda Odyssey and a nice tent and sleeping bags, and have $100,000 left over to spend on AirBNB and camp fees ;) That’s 1,000 nights at $100 per night, or 2.7 solid years on the road.
That is the kind of math I bring up when my wife talks about an RV (though to be honest I wouldn’t mind having a nice Class-B; she is thinking tiny trailer) - $100k is a lot of nights in a hotel.

However, the math isn’t quite as simple; after those 2.7 years on the road your class B would still retain some value. The hotels wouldn’t necessarily be where I want to go, but on the other hand the Class B won’t easily go to Bali either. :beer
Trust me,
After the initial the money is "exchanged" for the vehicle,,it becomes forgotten.
Good advice I first received from a Class A owner many years ago,,,
Never try to equate financial "sense" to a Recreation Vehicle,,
It is a lifestyle.
Money is fungible.
I cannot attach a "value" to the life experiences I have acquired with traveling the last 5 years around the USA in "RigBy" :D
Ok. Now your Roadtrek has name.
"Rigby".
Will the envy never end?

jim :D

User avatar
Sandtrap
Posts: 5097
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 6:32 pm
Location: Hawaii😀 Northern AZ.😳 Retired.

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Sandtrap » Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:54 am

praxis wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:41 pm
As Sandtrap and others have mentioned, B's usually have low clearance. No problem on roads, but my brother sold his after 6 months because it couldn't handle the back roads they like to use to get to their favorite camping spots. They were convinced after a trip last summer to Glacier and Banff and another Canadian provencial park in BC where they kept bottoming out. He then bought another 4WD pickup and mounted a slide in camper that was a big upgrade compared to the pickup camper they owned before trying the B. They are very happy.
This is the quandary I'm in. Northern Arizona has more forest roads than asphalt. 4 National Forests and 100's of square miles of BLM and state land. So a slide in camper is an option. "But", that class B sure is sweet going everywhere else.
The total cost of another truck beefy enough to handle a decent slide in camper plus a Northern Lite camper would run North of 100k. That makes a Roadtrek, Travato, etc, a viable option.
I've also thought of looking for a used Dodge Xplorer with the dually rear wheels. But again, low ground clearance and lack of 4wd.
The big consideration is purchasing something that will be the most versatile and used the most. In my neighborhood there are tons of "rock star" size Class A's that sit and sit and sit.
Decisions. Decisions.
j :D

User avatar
Sandtrap
Posts: 5097
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 6:32 pm
Location: Hawaii😀 Northern AZ.😳 Retired.

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Sandtrap » Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:56 am

Toons wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 12:56 pm
Yes Storage is a HUGE factor.
The Class B can be ready to roll in a matter of
Minutes from the driveway :happy



Image
I like that cover. Does the straps and interior of the cover wear away the fiberglass running boards and body corners in high winds?
It looks like you need to have a ladder to put it on?
This is why I was thinking of putting up a separate RV garage first. But the cover might make things so much simpler, and cheaper. Why didn't you go with an rv building?
j :D

User avatar
Sandtrap
Posts: 5097
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 6:32 pm
Location: Hawaii😀 Northern AZ.😳 Retired.

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Sandtrap » Tue Feb 06, 2018 12:03 pm

curmudgeon wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:42 am
I don't have a lot to add, but I am interested in the topic for myself. We have friends who have really enjoyed their B over the past 15 years or so. I think the likelihood of it actually suiting you is is definitely dependent on your travel style. If you did years of tent camping when you were younger, but now need a better bed and a closer bathroom, a B is probably more likely to work for you. If you get grumpy without a long hot shower every morning, it would more likely not work so well. With a B, you do have the advantage that you can just stop at a motel for the night if you want a bit more space.

I think a big factor in the decision is whether you expect to moving on every day or two, or whether you would tend to stay in nice locations for a few days at a time and take side trips around the area.

A few years ago, we rented a largish class C for a road trip because of a great price for relocating it. That experience helped me realize that I didn't like the maneuverability limitations with something that long and wide. I'm still considering a B or a trailer, and look occasionally, but our travel schedule is fairly booked up right now, so I hate to buy, maintain, and store something that won't get a lot of use right away.

If you are looking, especially used, it can definitely be worth searching on a more regional/national basis rather than just locally. I think there are a few dealers who specialize in B.
These are the same thought's I'm having. I do like the idea that the class B can fit into any hotel parking lot stall. Probably not a concern for most that have an RV but I can see that I would want a "break" from things and stay in a "Holiday Inn". . or "Four Seasons". . .or "Dynasty Suites". . . . . .
j :D

User avatar
Toons
Posts: 12865
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Hills of Tennessee

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Toons » Tue Feb 06, 2018 12:37 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:56 am
Toons wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 12:56 pm
Yes Storage is a HUGE factor.
The Class B can be ready to roll in a matter of
Minutes from the driveway :happy



Image
I like that cover. Does the straps and interior of the cover wear away the fiberglass running boards and body corners in high winds?
It looks like you need to have a ladder to put it on?
This is why I was thinking of putting up a separate RV garage first. But the cover might make things so much simpler, and cheaper. Why didn't you go with an rv building?
j :D
Cost Effective-220 for the rv cover or 2200 for a metal roof cover.
Straps can be tightened accordingly-Straps do not wear anything.
Personally I can cover it by myself with a small aluminum ladder I use.
Works Excellent.
:D
"One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity" –Bruce Lee

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Wed Feb 07, 2018 1:04 am

Sandtrap wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:54 am
praxis wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:41 pm
As Sandtrap and others have mentioned, B's usually have low clearance. No problem on roads, but my brother sold his after 6 months because it couldn't handle the back roads they like to use to get to their favorite camping spots. They were convinced after a trip last summer to Glacier and Banff and another Canadian provencial park in BC where they kept bottoming out. He then bought another 4WD pickup and mounted a slide in camper that was a big upgrade compared to the pickup camper they owned before trying the B. They are very happy.
This is the quandary I'm in. Northern Arizona has more forest roads than asphalt. 4 National Forests and 100's of square miles of BLM and state land. So a slide in camper is an option. "But", that class B sure is sweet going everywhere else.
The total cost of another truck beefy enough to handle a decent slide in camper plus a Northern Lite camper would run North of 100k. That makes a Roadtrek, Travato, etc, a viable option.
I've also thought of looking for a used Dodge Xplorer with the dually rear wheels. But again, low ground clearance and lack of 4wd.
The big consideration is purchasing something that will be the most versatile and used the most. In my neighborhood there are tons of "rock star" size Class A's that sit and sit and sit.
Decisions. Decisions.
j :D
I think TCs and Bs are probably the most closely related to each other, and obviously there are pros and cons, but you can''t put a dually-mounted TC in the same category. You're talking single-rear-wheel truck with a 7 or 7.5ft wide camper vs. a B. The truck gives you 4x4 if you need it and ground clearance, but it's likely taller and that can limit where you can take it just as the other dimensions can. And few of the 7.x ft. models have room for a generator, so you have to carry that... somewhere. You could go with a popup camper and maybe have the best of both worlds in operating height, but then you get noise and another setup/takedown task, and not exactly stealth operation.

Incidentally I believe there are starting to be more Bs (or B+s) with dual rear wheels now, but I think they still have less width than a dually pickup. Either way, TC or B, you've got the two most top-heavy RV categories, and probably the worst-handling, so not the best choice in high winds - or when you realize you've driven onto that exit ramp a little too fast.

csm
Posts: 174
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2016 7:52 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by csm » Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:22 am

My husband and I have been researching RVs for a couple of years now, planning for what was - at the time we started looking - impending retirement. We are now retired (a month in) and are still uncertain between a B, B+, travel trailer, A class ..... or a Toyota Highland Hybrid and hotels (with a tent in the back for times we need it.

After test driving a couple of A-class at the Tampa RV Show a few weeks ago, we felt like those would be absurd for road-tripping. We really liked the new Leisure Travel Van Wonder FTB (B+) on the Ford Transit chassis (diesel). We have read many concerns about the Mercedes Sprinters (problems due to the DEF and EPA requirements), and recently read that Mercedes was going to stop selling diesels in the U.S. due to the issues. At the conclusion of several days at the Tampa show, we thought we had decided to do the car / hotel thing, but we do want to be able to make our own food, and also be able to enjoy the middle of Yosemite or Yellowstone or hundreds of other places without having to book a $500 basic hotel room a year in advance, and it's nice when traveling to have use of a toilet if desperately needed on the road. So we took another look earlier this week at a few rigs and really like one of the B's.

Our initial concern about a B rather than B+ has been the claustrophobic feeling with the center bathrooms and narrow aisle back to the seating / bed area. But earlier this week we spent some time in a Winnebago Travato 59K (21' B Class) on the Ram ProMaster chassis (gas) and really liked it. It is very open in the front with windows all the way around, and the wet bath is across the back. The driver and passenger seats swivel with options for folding out small tables. It has twin beds in the center that can be filled in with cushions, if desired, to a double/queen. My husband is 6'1" tall and most of the B's have beds that are too short, some only 74-76" whereas the Travato has one side that is 80" long. We think this could be a great one for road tripping because we will neither have to tow a car, nor get a big truck or SUV to tow a trailer. Can get in anywhere - including hotel parking lots when desired. :wink:

The major drawback is lack of four-wheel drive and low clearance. The ProMaster is front wheel drive and is, in reality, a Fiat Ducato which is the most used chassis in Europe for camper vans.

Good luck with your search and hope to read more about others' decisions and experiences as we go through much of the same thought processes.

marc515
Posts: 141
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2008 9:12 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by marc515 » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:30 am

Here is a forum you should check out:

https://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuse ... rum/21.cfm

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:59 am

csm wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:22 am
My husband and I have been researching RVs for a couple of years now, planning for what was - at the time we started looking - impending retirement. We are now retired (a month in) and are still uncertain between a B, B+, travel trailer, A class ..... or a Toyota Highland Hybrid and hotels (with a tent in the back for times we need it.

After test driving a couple of A-class at the Tampa RV Show a few weeks ago, we felt like those would be absurd for road-tripping. We really liked the new Leisure Travel Van Wonder FTB (B+) on the Ford Transit chassis (diesel). We have read many concerns about the Mercedes Sprinters (problems due to the DEF and EPA requirements), and recently read that Mercedes was going to stop selling diesels in the U.S. due to the issues. At the conclusion of several days at the Tampa show, we thought we had decided to do the car / hotel thing, but we do want to be able to make our own food, and also be able to enjoy the middle of Yosemite or Yellowstone or hundreds of other places without having to book a $500 basic hotel room a year in advance, and it's nice when traveling to have use of a toilet if desperately needed on the road. So we took another look earlier this week at a few rigs and really like one of the B's.

Our initial concern about a B rather than B+ has been the claustrophobic feeling with the center bathrooms and narrow aisle back to the seating / bed area. But earlier this week we spent some time in a Winnebago Travato 59K (21' B Class) on the Ram ProMaster chassis (gas) and really liked it. It is very open in the front with windows all the way around, and the wet bath is across the back. The driver and passenger seats swivel with options for folding out small tables. It has twin beds in the center that can be filled in with cushions, if desired, to a double/queen. My husband is 6'1" tall and most of the B's have beds that are too short, some only 74-76" whereas the Travato has one side that is 80" long. We think this could be a great one for road tripping because we will neither have to tow a car, nor get a big truck or SUV to tow a trailer. Can get in anywhere - including hotel parking lots when desired. :wink:

The major drawback is lack of four-wheel drive and low clearance. The ProMaster is front wheel drive and is, in reality, a Fiat Ducato which is the most used chassis in Europe for camper vans.

Good luck with your search and hope to read more about others' decisions and experiences as we go through much of the same thought processes.
I think some people pass buy the Promaster because, let's face it: a serious case of ugly going on with that front end - the designer must have moved on to Lexus after he finished it. And it's a Fiat - talk about domestic vehicles having a wall of worry to climb here on Bogleheads based on possibly irrelevant long-ago experiences, with Fiats that would be like scaling Everest. As you point out there may actually be more issues with the Mercedes - come to think of it that would be frowned on my Bogleheads, too. I think Bogleheads might only approve of those little Toyota micro Cs from the '70s.

I'm taller than 72" but sleep in a 72" bed with hard stops on both ends all the time, never an issue. What about stand-up room and walking around without hitting the ceiling or low-hanging accessory? That would be more of an issue I'd think.

Something I don't know how to do without a dealer anywhere nearby (the case for almost everyone) is how to simulate driving in high wind. I'm not sure if the commercial versions, unloaded, would be a valid comparison.

Gryphon
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat May 07, 2016 11:43 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Gryphon » Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:36 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:43 am
Great info.
Thanks!
3 questions.
I notice the ground clearance is short on those fancy side rocker panels. Do they scrape on the very high nasty speed bumps that are in some parking lots. Also those side road deep dips/swales that are cut for drainage.
Also, the side sliding door. Is it powered?
Is a non "mercedes sprinter" chassis available? (dodge, chevy, etc)
That interior is really nice.
j :D
Image
Image
Pleasure-Way makes the Lexor TS, similar to the Plateau TS in your pictures but built on a Promaster. Most of the other Class B makers have Promaster models, they've pretty much replaced the old Chevy/Ford/Dodge van with fiberglass top as the more affordable option (compared to the Mercedes).

There are one or two brands that have class B vans based on the Ford Transit - the Winnebago Paseo and the Coachman Crossfit are the ones I can recall off the top of my head. I think Sportsmobile will also build on the Transit.

And there are still a couple manufacturers (Roadtrek and Sportsmobile) making the classic fiberglass topped van. Lots of that style van on the used market, of course.

As for power sliding doors, I don't recall seeing that on any class B I ever looked at. There might be some out there, but it doesn't seem to be a typical feature.
Last edited by Gryphon on Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Gryphon
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat May 07, 2016 11:43 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Gryphon » Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:47 pm

A couple class B resources I haven't seen mentioned yet in this thread:

Class B Forum

A list of Class B manufacturers at The Fit RV.

letsgobobby
Posts: 11411
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 1:10 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by letsgobobby » Wed Feb 07, 2018 4:31 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:54 am
praxis wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:41 pm
As Sandtrap and others have mentioned, B's usually have low clearance. No problem on roads, but my brother sold his after 6 months because it couldn't handle the back roads they like to use to get to their favorite camping spots. They were convinced after a trip last summer to Glacier and Banff and another Canadian provencial park in BC where they kept bottoming out. He then bought another 4WD pickup and mounted a slide in camper that was a big upgrade compared to the pickup camper they owned before trying the B. They are very happy.
This is the quandary I'm in. Northern Arizona has more forest roads than asphalt. 4 National Forests and 100's of square miles of BLM and state land. So a slide in camper is an option. "But", that class B sure is sweet going everywhere else.
The total cost of another truck beefy enough to handle a decent slide in camper plus a Northern Lite camper would run North of 100k. That makes a Roadtrek, Travato, etc, a viable option.
I've also thought of looking for a used Dodge Xplorer with the dually rear wheels. But again, low ground clearance and lack of 4wd.
The big consideration is purchasing something that will be the most versatile and used the most. In my neighborhood there are tons of "rock star" size Class A's that sit and sit and sit.
Decisions. Decisions.
j :D
BUT
(And this is why I bought a truck plus trailer)

When you’re not camping you have a real truck, which can be useful for so many other things.

Truck plus camper or truck plus travel trailer costs less than a class B and has far more versatility. Pick one based on your own needs.

csm
Posts: 174
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2016 7:52 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by csm » Wed Feb 07, 2018 5:07 pm

tibbitts wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:59 am

I'm taller than 72" but sleep in a 72" bed with hard stops on both ends all the time, never an issue. What about stand-up room and walking around without hitting the ceiling or low-hanging accessory? That would be more of an issue I'd think.
A short bed with hard stops on both ends is a deal-breaker for him. The Leisure Vans Wonder FTB has beds shorter than 80" as well, but his feet could hang off at one end so he could live with that. But preference is for the full 80" that the Travato offers - ability to stretch out and not have the feeling of either head or feet against a wall.

I believe the clearance on the Travato is 6'3" and the A/C is fairly snug to the ceiling so he can just clear it without ducking, so standing head space has been good. I agree that some Class B's have challenging headspace, particularly those with low-hanging A/Cs. The Paseo on the Ford Transit chassis that someone mentioned actually has even higher head room, but the bed is narrow and across the back from side to side which would require two people to have to climb over one another. And it has the center bathroom across from the galley so feels more cramped.

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:08 pm

letsgobobby wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 4:31 pm
Sandtrap wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:54 am
praxis wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:41 pm
As Sandtrap and others have mentioned, B's usually have low clearance. No problem on roads, but my brother sold his after 6 months because it couldn't handle the back roads they like to use to get to their favorite camping spots. They were convinced after a trip last summer to Glacier and Banff and another Canadian provencial park in BC where they kept bottoming out. He then bought another 4WD pickup and mounted a slide in camper that was a big upgrade compared to the pickup camper they owned before trying the B. They are very happy.
This is the quandary I'm in. Northern Arizona has more forest roads than asphalt. 4 National Forests and 100's of square miles of BLM and state land. So a slide in camper is an option. "But", that class B sure is sweet going everywhere else.
The total cost of another truck beefy enough to handle a decent slide in camper plus a Northern Lite camper would run North of 100k. That makes a Roadtrek, Travato, etc, a viable option.
I've also thought of looking for a used Dodge Xplorer with the dually rear wheels. But again, low ground clearance and lack of 4wd.
The big consideration is purchasing something that will be the most versatile and used the most. In my neighborhood there are tons of "rock star" size Class A's that sit and sit and sit.
Decisions. Decisions.
j :D
BUT
(And this is why I bought a truck plus trailer)

When you’re not camping you have a real truck, which can be useful for so many other things.

Truck plus camper or truck plus travel trailer costs less than a class B and has far more versatility. Pick one based on your own needs.
But you lose so much while traveling with the truck and trailer. That's what I owned - extended cab short-bed (so, not a long wheel-base truck) and 23.5' trailer. Travel was completely different with the trailer. Without it, I'd always be coming across places to explore, and I'd be making u-turns constantly. Sometimes I'd go places where it was challenging to turn around with just the length of the truck, and with the trailer it would be impossible. And remember a lot times you'll be alone with the RV, so nobody to help with backing, hitching, etc. At various times I've crushed the truck bed and bent the trailer bumper, trying to navigate in too-small places. So you just can't compare the travel experience with a trailer (or A, etc.) vs. a B. You might be able to compare the B to a smallish truck camper but that's about the only alternative that provides close to the same travel experience.

letsgobobby
Posts: 11411
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 1:10 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by letsgobobby » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:29 pm

Definitely would consider a truck camper over a class B. Full ton SRW can hold almost 4000 lb of payload which allows for a good size TC. True 4WD in an $80k package vs these Class B for $50k more.

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:46 pm

letsgobobby wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:29 pm
Definitely would consider a truck camper over a class B. Full ton SRW can hold almost 4000 lb of payload which allows for a good size TC. True 4WD in an $80k package vs these Class B for $50k more.
There are definite but different advantages to both a B and a TC, but I'd be very reluctant to go for the dually. Although if I did get a dually I'd get a vocational body - entirely too much wasted space with a conventional truck bed. With the dually you end up with an 8+ft wide vehicle vs. 7-ish, which is where you really want to be for exploring and lack of driving stress, and you're somewhat limited by the height with a basement-equipped TC (typical for one you'd mount on a dually.) Something I can't comment on first-hand is the difference between TC loading/unloading vs. hitching difficulty. Being able to remove the TC would be a huge advantage, but that only applies if there isn't too much difficulty involved.

letsgobobby
Posts: 11411
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 1:10 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by letsgobobby » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:50 pm

Agreed, I looked at a dually with 7000 lb of payload but passed because of width and handling. The modern SRWs have plenty of payload for a basic single slide TC. these TCs all have powered jacks so taking them off and on is pretty easy.

User avatar
JMacDonald
Posts: 2109
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 5:53 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by JMacDonald » Wed Feb 07, 2018 9:35 pm

This is an interesting conversation. I have been interested in getting a Class B. The low clearance is something that never occurred to me. That would make it a deal killer for me if I couldn't get one with good clearance. I don't want to have to avoid dirt roads. The Sportsmobile would work.

At the present time my "RV" is a 2017 GMC Sierra 4X4 SLT with a Snug Top shell and a carpet kit. I consider it a "backpacker RV." I took a small Toyota truck years ago to Alaska and back, over 10K miles, with a shell and carpet kit. The complete trip was in campgrounds. So I know I can travel that way, but a "B" would be nice.
Best Wishes, | Joe

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Thu Feb 08, 2018 10:51 pm

letsgobobby wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:50 pm
Agreed, I looked at a dually with 7000 lb of payload but passed because of width and handling. The modern SRWs have plenty of payload for a basic single slide TC. these TCs all have powered jacks so taking them off and on is pretty easy.
Yes those powered jacks are a must and must be a huge help, but I can just picture myself pushing the camper around the campground trying to get it lined up and into the truck bed. Just afraid there might be some metal-bending going on there - kind of like the side of my truck bed when I backed it into my trailer - or maybe the jacks breaking off the camper.

letsgobobby
Posts: 11411
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 1:10 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by letsgobobby » Thu Feb 08, 2018 11:10 pm

My truck has a backup camera as well as a cargo bed camera for lining up a gooseneck hitch or a truck camper. They think of everything I tell you!

rvflyer
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2017 9:39 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by rvflyer » Thu Feb 08, 2018 11:45 pm

Have had 2 Roadtrek 210Ps over about 11 years. Not retired yet so this has been a travel "hobby" so far and have gone coast to coast visiting family and friends. Have really enjoyed touring and some camping. Agree with many comments on this thread. We travel with 2 small dogs occasionally and it can get cramped for space. The Chevvy gas version gets about 15 mpg on the highway. If you need Roadtrek specific parts they can be expensive. We live in a HOA area and can park in our driveway as there is no air conditioner unit on the roof-- kind of stealthy and we do save $$ on not having to store it away from home. This vehicle is useful as a second set of wheels around town. A Class B is definitely not for full timers.

Suggestions

-Buy new if you can and are 100% certain of your make and model. Rvtrader.com is a good source of used pricing.
-Go to a dealership like Van City, St Louis that has many Class B Brands to climb around and compare (same company owns Wagon Trail RV in Las Vegas with a similar Class B selection).
-I am 6'5" and do not like the shower setup in the aisle. If an enclosed bath with shower important to you, look at the floor layouts that address these types of features. Class B + offers more room.
-Ensure the primary driver is comfortable with his/her seat and legroom!

Good luck and have fun with it!

User avatar
WoodSpinner
Posts: 516
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2017 1:15 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by WoodSpinner » Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:10 pm

All,

Thought I would update everyone on where we stand....

We are planning to buy a new 2017 Pleasure-way (PW) Plateau FL.

Here are they key factors
  • PW has a great reputation for quality. We have found a great deal of info on the PW FB groups as well as a number of You Tube channels.
  • We really like the overall layout of this RV—having the passenger side open with windows make the RV feel open and airy. This is a huge contrast to the Roadtrek (which was a strong contender).
  • RVs are really complex machines and I think PW has done a great deal to integrate the various systems into a single 7’ touch screen. It significantly simplifies managing and troubleshooting the systems.
  • This unit will have 285W of solar and 200 Amp/hrs of Lithium Ion battery. This means we can be very self contained and won’t need electric power or the generator (except if we need runAC more than a few hours)
  • Love having the screens for the side, back and rear windows! This along with the fan will go along way to keeping us cool and comfortable.
  • There are not many used models for sale (we only ran across 1 but it was quickly sold). I have not been able to figure out the immediate depreciation costs, but everyone indicates they hold their value quite well. I would really love to get more concrete info on this...
  • The MB Sprinter 3500 Sprinter platform has a great reputation for dependability and performance. Contrary to previous posts, this is a thriving platform that will be sold for many years to come.

Buying tips
  • Winter is the best time of the year to by an RV, the dealers and manufacturers are eager to deal.
  • We got our best deal by ordering the specific colors and options we wanted through a local dealer and accepting a 3 month build delivery date. This lines up well with our plans anyway plus it insures a quick profit for the dealer.
  • As indicated in the opening message to this thread, this will be an all cash deal with 10% down on ordering.
What we doidn’t like
  • No spare tire included. We are going to buy an aftermarket spare and swing away tail gate carrier.
  • Ground clearence. I think this is going to be an issue but will wait and see. The RV can be lifted 2” or converted to 4wd which lifts it about 4.5”
  • Storaage. We do not have room for this model (nor the 19’ SB) in our driveway. :( We are going to have to store it.
  • Taxes and Registration Fees :( :( Not much I can do about it... Sure makes it tougher to afford

This is a really rich area of the RV market. Lots of choices, layouts and innovations. It’s not an easy decision—especially since it’s more of a lifestyle choice than an economic strategy. In the scheme of things, if we really hate it or don’t use it we won’t be out a huge pile of money. It’s a risk, but I think we will really get a great deal of use from it and a lot of pleasure.

Plan is to take another test drive on Sunday, sign the papers, put down our deposit and celebrate!

Stoked!

WoodSpinner 8-)

csm
Posts: 174
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2016 7:52 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by csm » Sat Feb 10, 2018 9:09 am

Congrats WoodSpinner! Please keep us posted as you take delivery and start to travel.

The PleasureWay (Lexor) would be my choice if it were not for the bed length that bothers my husband. From all of our research, I think PW is a much higher quality than the Roadtrek you considered (we actually visited the Roadtrek factory a few years ago).

We have the same problem with storage as we currently live in a condominium and only have an outdoor parking lot with no dedicated spaces. While we think a B van would technically and legally fit (some people park trucks with crew cab and long bed that have the same length), we are concerned that it would be provoking to many and could cause tension. That would mean paying for off-site storage as you are experiencing.

We are still undecided between a B van and buying something like a Toyota Highlander Hybrid with hotel stays for our travels, so will be interested to hear how you enjoy the PleasureWay.

User avatar
Toons
Posts: 12865
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Hills of Tennessee

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Toons » Sat Feb 10, 2018 9:29 am

WoodSpinner wrote:
Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:10 pm
All,

Thought I would update everyone on where we stand....

We are planning to buy a new 2017 Pleasure-way (PW) Plateau FL.

Here are they key factors
  • PW has a great reputation for quality. We have found a great deal of info on the PW FB groups as well as a number of You Tube channels.
  • We really like the overall layout of this RV—having the passenger side open with windows make the RV feel open and airy. This is a huge contrast to the Roadtrek (which was a strong contender).
  • RVs are really complex machines and I think PW has done a great deal to integrate the various systems into a single 7’ touch screen. It significantly simplifies managing and troubleshooting the systems.
  • This unit will have 285W of solar and 200 Amp/hrs of Lithium Ion battery. This means we can be very self contained and won’t need electric power or the generator (except if we need runAC more than a few hours)
  • Love having the screens for the side, back and rear windows! This along with the fan will go along way to keeping us cool and comfortable.
  • There are not many used models for sale (we only ran across 1 but it was quickly sold). I have not been able to figure out the immediate depreciation costs, but everyone indicates they hold their value quite well. I would really love to get more concrete info on this...
  • The MB Sprinter 3500 Sprinter platform has a great reputation for dependability and performance. Contrary to previous posts, this is a thriving platform that will be sold for many years to come.

Buying tips
  • Winter is the best time of the year to by an RV, the dealers and manufacturers are eager to deal.
  • We got our best deal by ordering the specific colors and options we wanted through a local dealer and accepting a 3 month build delivery date. This lines up well with our plans anyway plus it insures a quick profit for the dealer.
  • As indicated in the opening message to this thread, this will be an all cash deal with 10% down on ordering.
What we doidn’t like
  • No spare tire included. We are going to buy an aftermarket spare and swing away tail gate carrier.
  • Ground clearence. I think this is going to be an issue but will wait and see. The RV can be lifted 2” or converted to 4wd which lifts it about 4.5”
  • Storaage. We do not have room for this model (nor the 19’ SB) in our driveway. :( We are going to have to store it.
  • Taxes and Registration Fees :( :( Not much I can do about it... Sure makes it tougher to afford

This is a really rich area of the RV market. Lots of choices, layouts and innovations. It’s not an easy decision—especially since it’s more of a lifestyle choice than an economic strategy. In the scheme of things, if we really hate it or don’t use it we won’t be out a huge pile of money. It’s a risk, but I think we will really get a great deal of use from it and a lot of pleasure.

Plan is to take another test drive on Sunday, sign the papers, put down our deposit and celebrate!

Stoked!

WoodSpinner 8-)

Spinner,
Congratulations!!!!
Excellent.
Allow yourself time to familiarize,with the sophisticated workings of Both your Sprinter Chassis and PleaureWay workings.
You made a superb choice in my opinion going with PleasureWay.
Cash-Excellent
Let us know how it goes....
We are planning to head out for a couple months towards the end of March
:sharebeer
"One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity" –Bruce Lee

TravelGeek
Posts: 2123
Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2014 3:23 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by TravelGeek » Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:04 am

WoodSpinner wrote:
Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:10 pm
All,

Thought I would update everyone on where we stand....

We are planning to buy a new 2017 Pleasure-way (PW) Plateau FL.

...

Plan is to take another test drive on Sunday, sign the papers, put down our deposit and celebrate!

Stoked!

WoodSpinner 8-)
Congratulations! Watched the video; it looks like a very comfortable and well-designed vehicle. I am officially jealous :)

How much does it cost to register, store and insure it? (obviously will vary by location)

I think of all the various “camping” options to choose from, a vehicle like this one would be my preferred choice.

User avatar
Sandtrap
Posts: 5097
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 6:32 pm
Location: Hawaii😀 Northern AZ.😳 Retired.

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by Sandtrap » Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:26 am

WoodSpinner wrote:
Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:10 pm
. . . .

Plan is to take another test drive on Sunday, sign the papers, put down our deposit and celebrate!

Stoked!

WoodSpinner 8-)
I am officially envious. . .drooling. . . . .

Please post some pics of your new wheels . . . .to spread the "drooling factor" :shock: .
j :D
Congratulations.
:sharebeer

tibbitts
Posts: 7800
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 6:50 pm

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by tibbitts » Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:36 am

csm wrote:
Sat Feb 10, 2018 9:09 am
Congrats WoodSpinner! Please keep us posted as you take delivery and start to travel.

The PleasureWay (Lexor) would be my choice if it were not for the bed length that bothers my husband. From all of our research, I think PW is a much higher quality than the Roadtrek you considered (we actually visited the Roadtrek factory a few years ago).

We have the same problem with storage as we currently live in a condominium and only have an outdoor parking lot with no dedicated spaces. While we think a B van would technically and legally fit (some people park trucks with crew cab and long bed that have the same length), we are concerned that it would be provoking to many and could cause tension. That would mean paying for off-site storage as you are experiencing.

We are still undecided between a B van and buying something like a Toyota Highlander Hybrid with hotel stays for our travels, so will be interested to hear how you enjoy the PleasureWay.
If people are parking pickups I think you'd be save with a B. My condo prohibits any kind of pickup (or motorhome) except in a reserved area of the parking lot for short-term purposes. I do agree the argument could be made that it's a motorhome and not a van but if a B still meets the letter of the law I'd park it there.

csm
Posts: 174
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2016 7:52 am

Re: Tips on Buying a Class-B RV

Post by csm » Sat Feb 10, 2018 1:50 pm

tibbitts wrote:
Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:36 am
If people are parking pickups I think you'd be save with a B. My condo prohibits any kind of pickup (or motorhome) except in a reserved area of the parking lot for short-term purposes. I do agree the argument could be made that it's a motorhome and not a van but if a B still meets the letter of the law I'd park it there.
Thanks! If we do get one, we will take a chance and park it in the lot. If anyone complains we will cite the law, but even if we are in the right, we prefer not to antagonize our neighbors.

Time will tell. We are only a month into retirement, still sorting out our routine (and have to return overseas in the spring to sell our house there). In the meantime, we will probably take some road trips with the rental car & hotels to get a better feel for what we want.

Post Reply