New Brake Pads

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GridironGems
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New Brake Pads

Post by GridironGems » Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:59 pm

I had my oil changed today and found out I need new brake pads. They quoted me:

$229 plus tax for front brake pads and resurface the front rotors
$171 plus tax for rear brake pads

Does this seem like a reasonable cost? Any suggestions?

sport
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by sport » Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:14 pm

Who quoted, a dealer or independent mechanic?

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Epsilon Delta
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by Epsilon Delta » Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:42 pm

Did you ask them to look at the brakes? It's not the sort of thing you'd just happen to notice when doing an oil change or just walking around the car. Unless the brakes are so bad they had trouble stopping or the wear indicators where squealing, in which case you should have already noticed.

If not I'd at least get a second opinion.

unstartable
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by unstartable » Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:46 pm

Brake parts can vary a lot in prince depending on car. But that is around the going rate around here. It’s an easy diy job if you watch a few YouTube videos and have basic tools. Even with buying new rotors instead of resurfacing the job can likely be done for about a fourth of what they quoted you.

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fortfun
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by fortfun » Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:47 pm

Epsilon Delta wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:42 pm
Did you ask them to look at the brakes? It's not the sort of thing you'd just happen to notice when doing an oil change or just walking around the car. Unless the brakes are so bad they had trouble stopping or the wear indicators where squealing, in which case you should have already noticed.

If not I'd at least get a second opinion.
I second this. Unless you are constantly riding your brakes, they usually last a very long time.

GridironGems
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by GridironGems » Sat Jan 20, 2018 5:17 pm

I have a 2002 Honda Accord and take my car to the Toyota/Honda dealer. They have a sheet where they follow certain checkups and brakes are on that piece of paper and they check them every other oil change

I called another shop and they quoted me a higher price. There are a couple local shops I will call when they are open on Monday.

I bought my car in 2011 when it had 82,000 miles on it. It currently has 122,000 miles. So I know they have not been replaced since then

I am not a handy person at all, so I will not do it myself

hmw
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by hmw » Sat Jan 20, 2018 5:25 pm

GridironGems wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:59 pm
I had my oil changed today and found out I need new brake pads. They quoted me:

$229 plus tax for front brake pads and resurface the front rotors
$171 plus tax for rear brake pads

Does this seem like a reasonable cost? Any suggestions?
I am not a car expert. I had my brake pads replaced for our Subaru Outback at the dealership. I think I paid a little more than what you quoted here.

tim1999
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by tim1999 » Sat Jan 20, 2018 5:36 pm

Based on what I've seen in my area, that seems to be a fair price to pay at a shop for brake service. I've seen a lot worse at some dealerships, especially on upscale brand cars.

inbox788
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by inbox788 » Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:36 pm

GridironGems wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:59 pm
I had my oil changed today and found out I need new brake pads. They quoted me:

$229 plus tax for front brake pads and resurface the front rotors
$171 plus tax for rear brake pads

Does this seem like a reasonable cost? Any suggestions?
Depends. Did they give you an estimate of how much you "needed" new brake pads? Measurement or percent? What type of car? How many miles on the car? How many miles since last brake job? Why resurface the fronts? Why not the back? Are the brake pads OEM? Are we talking $20 parts or more than $100? It's expensive if they use cheap parts, but not too terrible for a quality job, though it should not take a pro 4 hours at $50/hour to do it. I'd guess less than 15 minutes/wheel for an experienced mechanic.

https://autoservicecosts.com/brake-pad- ... ment-cost/

https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/wag ... 20609724-P
https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/ake ... 14340075-P

How much did they charge you for the oil change? Type of oil? Synthetic? Did they rotate the tires?

You should get another estimate to compare.

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htdrag11
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by htdrag11 » Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:40 pm

Sounded about right for a local mechanic.

I had my front brakes on a 2012 Lexus RX done last year but had a Toyota dealer did the rear for about 10% more (convenience). However, I'm sure Lexus would charge at least $100 more to pay for the Starbucks and bagels.

VGisforme
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by VGisforme » Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:46 pm

Well even if you aren't handy you can visit RockAuto and buy the pads and honestly new rotors are cheap too! Then have them replaced by an independent place. Many will charge a 10% markup since they don't sell you the parts but you still come out ahead.

A Honda Accord is a commodity and there are tons of rotors/pads that will work just fine (no need for OEM) in fact you can get some materials better than OEM if you want more bite.

GridironGems
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by GridironGems » Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:56 pm

inbox788 wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:36 pm
GridironGems wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:59 pm
I had my oil changed today and found out I need new brake pads. They quoted me:

$229 plus tax for front brake pads and resurface the front rotors
$171 plus tax for rear brake pads

Does this seem like a reasonable cost? Any suggestions?
Depends. Did they give you an estimate of how much you "needed" new brake pads? Measurement or percent? What type of car? How many miles on the car? How many miles since last brake job? Why resurface the fronts? Why not the back? Are the brake pads OEM? Are we talking $20 parts or more than $100? It's expensive if they use cheap parts, but not too terrible for a quality job, though it should not take a pro 4 hours at $50/hour to do it. I'd guess less than 15 minutes/wheel for an experienced mechanic.

https://autoservicecosts.com/brake-pad- ... ment-cost/

https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/wag ... 20609724-P
https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/ake ... 14340075-P

How much did they charge you for the oil change? Type of oil? Synthetic? Did they rotate the tires?

You should get another estimate to compare.
The fronts are 3 mm and rears are 2 mm. 2002 Honda Accord with 122,000 miles. I got the car in 2011 with 82,000 miles, I have not changed the brake pads. 40 dollars for oil change. I got one other estimate that was more expensive. Will call a couple more on Monday

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Kenkat
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by Kenkat » Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:58 pm

Seems reasonably in line to me.

Stonebr
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by Stonebr » Sat Jan 20, 2018 8:04 pm

Seems a reasonable price.

This is why you want a good mechanic doing routine things like an oil change. They look around and notice things. Sure, they've got a profit motive, but it's that profit motive that keeps a car well-maintained and safe. At your local minute-lube, they don't care because their business runs on volume.
"have more than thou showest, | speak less than thou knowest" -- The Fool in King Lear

Grt2bOutdoors
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Sat Jan 20, 2018 8:41 pm

New pads are 14-15mm, if your pads at 2-3mm, time to change them. New pads at rock auto are $20 for front, $20 for back - ceramics.
"One should invest based on their need, ability and willingness to take risk - Larry Swedroe" Asking Portfolio Questions

Helo80
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by Helo80 » Sat Jan 20, 2018 8:48 pm

Price is about right for front pads and rotor resurface.

Honestly though, changing brakes with calipers is not that hard, though I totally get wanting to take it to a professional for safety reasons. (note: not to denigrate anybody's chosen profession and/or paint a broad stroke of a brush, but sometimes the people that work these quick lube and brake shops I wonder if they could pass a drug test. But, people get their brakes changed all day long at this shop meaning it's an easier job than it may seem.)

Do you have any mechanical ability OP? There are probably dozens of youtube videos showing how to pop off a caliper and pulling out the brake pad.

Pro-tip: If you plan on keeping your car for awhile, Autozone Duralast Gold brake pads are decently rated, priced competitively, and have a lifetime warranty (including normal wear and tear). Give them a good number and you *should* be able to get new brake pads when you wear out your now old Duralast Gold's through normal usage. Personally, I have bought Duralas Gold ceramics and have been happy with the performance.

Pro-tip 2: EDIT: (THIS APPLIES TO BRAKE SHOPS THAT ADVERTISE "FREE PADS FOR LIFE!!!") I would not go with a local or retail chain that gives out "free pads for life". Who knows what Chinese Cat litter they're using to make those... I don't want the lowest chinese bidder to be supplying my brake pads.
Last edited by Helo80 on Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

lazydavid
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by lazydavid » Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:56 am

Helo80 wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 8:48 pm
Pro-tip: If you plan on keeping your car for awhile, Autozone Duralast Gold brake pads are decently rated, priced competitively, and have a lifetime warranty (including normal wear and tear). Give them a good number and you *should* be able to get new brake pads when you wear out your now old Duralast Gold's through normal usage.

Pro-tip 2: I would not go with a shop that gives out "free pads for life". Who knows what Chinese Cat litter they're using to make those... I don't want the lowest chinese bidder to be supplying my brake pads.
You're kinda coming down on both sides of the same topic here. Lifetime warranty on pads=good, Lifetime warranty on pads=bad.

I can only speak to the Autozone pads. They're pretty solid for the money, and they do stand behind the lifetime warranty. I've used it multiple times. I generally buy and pay for the 2nd set of pads, go do the swap, and then come back with the old ones. They look up the purchase from ~4 years before, and then issue me a full refund for the purchase I made that day. This has been true even when I replaced Duralast Gold with Duralast Max, which are a more expensive pad.

As for the service prices quoted by the OP, that's not horrible for having a dealer do the work. Looks like the OE pads for the 2002 Accord run about $75/axle (probably more like $100 at the dealer parts counter), so you're looking at about $100 or so in labor. Yes, that's high. But it's a dealer, and that's the way it goes.

If you're interested in doing it yourself, you can get the Duralast Gold pads for about $35/axle, or the Max for about $50/axle. Another couple bucks for a tube/bottle of caliper slide grease, the "rental" (in quotes because the cost is $0) of a caliper compression tool, and the investment of a couple hours of your time, you can do the entire car for less than half of what the dealer wants for one axle. The rotors are about $30/each, so you could replace all four along with the pads for less than the dealer wants to resurface the fronts.

If you choose to go that way, you'll learn a new skill, and the next time you need pads it'll cost you $0.

bubbadog
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by bubbadog » Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:32 am

I would encourage the OP to give it a shot doing it yourself. I learned about five years ago and it is incredibly easy. I wish I would have learned how to do
brakes when I was much younger. I can now change the brake pads on one axle in less than an hour. I avoid the aggravation of the past with multiple round trips dropping off and picking up a vehicle for service.

wrongfunds
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by wrongfunds » Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:15 am

Looks like dealer is good and price is good.

ask them to measure the rotors first including thickness and the run-out. you don't want them to cut them if after cutting they are on the borderline. does your car vibrate on heavy braking?

ignore people who are telling you to change the pads yourself. you said you have no inclination or drive to do that. i don't quite get why people refuse to read before offering their useless suggestions.

Helo80
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by Helo80 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:28 am

lazydavid wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:56 am
You're kinda coming down on both sides of the same topic here. Lifetime warranty on pads=good, Lifetime warranty on pads=bad.
I should have made it clear that I was referencing the "Free pads for life" brake shops that will charge you nothing on the pads on future replacements (but of course charge the labor down the road where the real money is made; and probably make recommendations to resurface or better yet, swap the rotors).

Autozone pads are implied that it would be a DIY job. Though, i'm sure some indie mechanics will install the pads for the labor costs.

tibbitts
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by tibbitts » Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:02 am

inbox788 wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:36 pm
GridironGems wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:59 pm
I had my oil changed today and found out I need new brake pads. They quoted me:

$229 plus tax for front brake pads and resurface the front rotors
$171 plus tax for rear brake pads

Does this seem like a reasonable cost? Any suggestions?
Depends. Did they give you an estimate of how much you "needed" new brake pads? Measurement or percent? What type of car? How many miles on the car? How many miles since last brake job? Why resurface the fronts? Why not the back? Are the brake pads OEM? Are we talking $20 parts or more than $100? It's expensive if they use cheap parts, but not too terrible for a quality job, though it should not take a pro 4 hours at $50/hour to do it. I'd guess less than 15 minutes/wheel for an experienced mechanic.

You should get another estimate to compare.
I think labor might have been $50/hr when my '73 Plymouth was new.

tibbitts
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by tibbitts » Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:06 am

VGisforme wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:46 pm
Well even if you aren't handy you can visit RockAuto and buy the pads and honestly new rotors are cheap too! Then have them replaced by an independent place. Many will charge a 10% markup since they don't sell you the parts but you still come out ahead.

A Honda Accord is a commodity and there are tons of rotors/pads that will work just fine (no need for OEM) in fact you can get some materials better than OEM if you want more bite.
Buying your own parts is asking for trouble. When the brakes squeak in a a week you have to pay all over again if the shop doesn't supply the parts. Sometimes you don't get the anti-squeak goop on just right or for whatever reason something chatters or just isn't quite right. And honestly there's kind of a motivation for it not to be. When I've done my own there isn't and that still happens sometimes.

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sunny_socal
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by sunny_socal » Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:23 am

Very reasonable for a dealer quote. My brother paid $650 for the same service, car is Honda Fit.

BTW, these 'brake jobs' are very easy to do at home and cost little. Aftermarket brake pads from some place like Autozone are about $50/pair for their mid-high end, or OEM pads (ie. Honda) are about $60-70/pair online. After that it's just a couple hours to do the whole car. [Assume you have some tools and you're familiar with "wrenching"] If you want to address the rotors as well, new ones cost the same as a 'resurface.' If I have wobbly brakes I just pop on new rotors, aftermarket is about $40/rotor. They are incredibly easy to replace, just held on by a couple screws.

Shallowpockets
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by Shallowpockets » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:00 am

If you have no inclination to change them yourself you are stuck with the price to have them done. Prices may vary from shop to shop but not by very much.
The only thing actionable here is whether or not you need brake pads now. If you are not inclined to get down there and pull the wheel and look then just get them done if you are worried.
It is a natural thing for mechanic doing oil changes, tires, etc to give you a list of other things that need doing. It is their method of drumming up more business. It usually results in a big concern for the car owner, as seen by your post. It creates worry about safety.
Next thing they will note is brake fluid is dirty. Radiator needs fluid change.
If you are not handy with tools, or do not want to do it, one choice you have is to get it done now, or later. The pads will need changing sometime down the road.
The other choice is to wait until they give you that squeak when the pads wear down far enough for the metal indicater to start the squeal and squeak. Then you have no choice.

I guess there are handy men who do their own stuff and then there are not. Sort of like using a financial advisor verses being a BH and doing it yourself.

gary11
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by gary11 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:46 am

GridironGems wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:59 pm
$229 plus tax for front brake pads and resurface the front rotors
In general that estimate seems reasonable based on what I paid recently for new front pads and new rotors, about $270 plus tax at a local independent shop. I would say go for it if you trust the shop.

tibbitts
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by tibbitts » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:57 am

sunny_socal wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:23 am
Very reasonable for a dealer quote. My brother paid $650 for the same service, car is Honda Fit.

BTW, these 'brake jobs' are very easy to do at home and cost little. Aftermarket brake pads from some place like Autozone are about $50/pair for their mid-high end, or OEM pads (ie. Honda) are about $60-70/pair online. After that it's just a couple hours to do the whole car. [Assume you have some tools and you're familiar with "wrenching"] If you want to address the rotors as well, new ones cost the same as a 'resurface.' If I have wobbly brakes I just pop on new rotors, aftermarket is about $40/rotor. They are incredibly easy to replace, just held on by a couple screws.
Brake pads are not incredibly or even very easy to replace unless you have lots of experience and exactly the correct tools. "Familiar with wrenching" means "very experienced." The tools usually required are not ones anyone would own unless they have done a great deal of mechanical work, and some of the tools are very specific to a car model.

inbox788
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by inbox788 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 12:42 pm

GridironGems wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:56 pm
The fronts are 3 mm and rears are 2 mm. 2002 Honda Accord with 122,000 miles. I got the car in 2011 with 82,000 miles, I have not changed the brake pads. 40 dollars for oil change. I got one other estimate that was more expensive. Will call a couple more on Monday
I missed your followup answers when I asked the questions answered there. If you still have 2-3mm usable brake pad left and the wear indicators are not squealing (they usually start around 1-2), then there's no immediate rush to get them changed and you have time to shop around, but it's time to do it. The pricing for a dealer is decent especially if they're using Honda OEM and lower chances of noisy brakes.
tibbitts wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:02 am
I think labor might have been $50/hr when my '73 Plymouth was new.
How did you know I had a Plymouth and that the last time I was charged by a mechanic was in '73? Yeah, anchoring and inflation. Who says there's no inflation? Seriously, what's a good round number to use these days? 80? 100? I'm not quite ready for the latter, kinda like Dow ̶2̶5̶,̶0̶0̶0̶ 26,000.

Boglegrappler
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by Boglegrappler » Sun Jan 21, 2018 12:47 pm

Brake pads are not incredibly or even very easy to replace unless you have lots of experience and exactly the correct tools. "Familiar with wrenching" means "very experienced." The tools usually required are not ones anyone would own unless they have done a great deal of mechanical work, and some of the tools are very specific to a car model.
As someone who has done his own brake work for the past two decades, I agree with this.

You need a good hydraulic jack, safe jack stands, a decent set of ratchets and sockets, a decent sledge to help break the wheel lose if its frozen on, the skill to horse the pads free, some c-clamps or other tools to help get the pistons retracted so the new pads will go in, etc, etc.

There are people who are handy enough to do this. At least 3/4 of people are not.

The quoted price isn't out of line, imo. I'd even say it seemed pretty fair. I would only suggest that the replacement pads be oem (genuine Honda).

tibbitts
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by tibbitts » Sun Jan 21, 2018 1:01 pm

inbox788 wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 12:42 pm

tibbitts wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:02 am
I think labor might have been $50/hr when my '73 Plymouth was new.
How did you know I had a Plymouth and that the last time I was charged by a mechanic was in '73? Yeah, anchoring and inflation. Who says there's no inflation? Seriously, what's a good round number to use these days? 80? 100? I'm not quite ready for the latter, kinda like Dow ̶2̶5̶,̶0̶0̶0̶ 26,000.
I believe $80 is low and $100 closer for an independent shop - more for a dealer.

AlwaysBeClimbing
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by AlwaysBeClimbing » Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:15 pm

Boglegrappler wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 12:47 pm
Brake pads are not incredibly or even very easy to replace unless you have lots of experience and exactly the correct tools. "Familiar with wrenching" means "very experienced." The tools usually required are not ones anyone would own unless they have done a great deal of mechanical work, and some of the tools are very specific to a car model.
As someone who has done his own brake work for the past two decades, I agree with this.

You need a good hydraulic jack, safe jack stands, a decent set of ratchets and sockets, a decent sledge to help break the wheel lose if its frozen on, the skill to horse the pads free, some c-clamps or other tools to help get the pistons retracted so the new pads will go in, etc, etc.

There are people who are handy enough to do this. At least 3/4 of people are not.

The quoted price isn't out of line, imo. I'd even say it seemed pretty fair. I would only suggest that the replacement pads be oem (genuine Honda).
+1

Not a job I'd want to tackle as my first significant auto repair task for sure. I've done several brake jobs over the years and they're rarely a snap even though I know what I'm doing. OP is wise not to get in over head just to save a few bucks. Brakes are an obvious mission critical system, nothing to be messing around with if not absolutely clear on what needs to be done, and having the right tools for the job. Prorate the extra cost of a pro doing the job over the likely lifespan of the brake pads(and if need be rotors) and it really isn't that great of an expense.

snowman
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by snowman » Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:28 pm

Boglegrappler wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 12:47 pm
Brake pads are not incredibly or even very easy to replace unless you have lots of experience and exactly the correct tools. "Familiar with wrenching" means "very experienced." The tools usually required are not ones anyone would own unless they have done a great deal of mechanical work, and some of the tools are very specific to a car model.
As someone who has done his own brake work for the past two decades, I agree with this.

You need a good hydraulic jack, safe jack stands, a decent set of ratchets and sockets, a decent sledge to help break the wheel lose if its frozen on, the skill to horse the pads free, some c-clamps or other tools to help get the pistons retracted so the new pads will go in, etc, etc.

There are people who are handy enough to do this. At least 3/4 of people are not.

The quoted price isn't out of line, imo. I'd even say it seemed pretty fair. I would only suggest that the replacement pads be oem (genuine Honda).
As someone with similar experience, I tend to disagree. Accords are incredibly easy to work on, and an older one like OP's would provide great learning experience. One does not need a full set of specialized tools to get started. A small jack with 2 stands can be bought anytime for $20-30 on sale, and be used for years on all maintenance tasks. Plus he will want metric set that can be bought for a few dollars any time. He can get started for about $50 and add inexpensive tools later for specific jobs.

In this case, all he needs is 19mm socket to get the wheel off, and either 14 or 12mm socket to get 1 (one) bolt off and check the pads by himself. That's it! That's all there is to it, anyone can do it, and it's not fair to scare OP with all the specialized tools and experience he will need to complete such a simple task.

If he decides that maybe he will want to replace rotors as well (or if dealer tells him it's necessary), he can proceed to unscrew second 12mm bolt, and raise the caliper. He will then be instructed by numbers of youtube videos to unscrew 2 17mm bolts and remove the bracket. So 4 screws in total to get to rotors! How hard is that?

At this point, all that's standing in his way to save a lot of money are 2 screws and a screwdriver! This is where it's likely to get harder, as those 2 screws may not want to come off. So back to youtube video, where the guy will recommend cheap impact driver ($10) and a hammer after spraying screws with WD-40 first to loosen them up. He can rent it from local auto store for free before he starts working to have it handy just in case. He will want a large C-clamp, which again he can rent for free, or purchase for couple of dollars anywhere.

If he decides to give up on the rotors at this point, so what? He will put the bracket and caliper back on (4 screws in total). He at least was able to check his pads and determine if they really need to be replaced, and how evenly they are worn. He can check again later on, with much greater confidence. He can get those Akebono pads (Honda OEM) for about $40 on Amazon or local AAP store with online discount.

I understand that OP is determined not to do this himself. However, the tradeoff is always wondering if one was quoted fair price, and even a fair price will be 3-4x higher compared to simple DIY. Changing brake pads is easier than changing oil, and there is no potential mess on the floor to deal with. Add to that the fact that you can do this in the comfort of your home in less time than calling, making appt., dropping the car for estimate, and asking BHs if the price is fair, and the choice is obvious.

lazydavid
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by lazydavid » Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:36 pm

tibbitts wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:57 am
Brake pads are not incredibly or even very easy to replace unless you have lots of experience and exactly the correct tools. "Familiar with wrenching" means "very experienced." The tools usually required are not ones anyone would own unless they have done a great deal of mechanical work, and some of the tools are very specific to a car model.
This is not accurate. I own exactly one specialty tool for brake pads, which can be purchased for $13 from Amazon, or $21 if you want something more comprehensive. Prior to that, I "rented" the same tool for $0 from AutoZone. I have personally used it or lent it to friends for use on vehicles made by BMW, VW, Subaru, Nissan, Toyota, Lexus, Hyundai, Pontiac, Chrysler, and Jeep. It's compatible with a lot more vehicles, my specific copy of the tool just hasn't been used on everything. Aside from this one specialty tool--which is used to compress the caliper--the only things that are required are a jack, a socket set, and in some cases a breaker bar and/or hammer. A flathead screwdriver or similar pointy object is sometimes helpful for making sure the boot retracts evenly. Jack stands are preferred, but since you don't have to actually get under the car (Don't ever get under a car unless it's supported on jack stands!) to change pads, sliding the wheel under the rocker panel after taking it off is good enough.

I needed a sawzall once, due to a horrible caliper slide design on my wife's Lexus (freezing the slides seems to have been an explicit goal--I can come up with no other explanation for such stupidity), but otherwise nothing else over 3 decades. The only brake job I've ever personally seen in the past 30 years that can not be serviced by these basic tools was a WRX STI that has a somewhat unique opposing-piston setup on its front calipers. There are probably others in the high-performance/competition space that I haven't seen. So the idea that a brand-specific tool is generally required is absolute hogwash. Any vehicle that a typical BH would drive can have a brake service done with the same basic set of tools.

This is not to say that someone who has no interest in doing any of their own maintenance should automatically gravitate towards changing brake pads. But it IS the next easiest general maintenance task after air filters, oil changes, and tire rotations.

tibbitts
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by tibbitts » Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:13 pm

lazydavid wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:36 pm
tibbitts wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:57 am
Brake pads are not incredibly or even very easy to replace unless you have lots of experience and exactly the correct tools. "Familiar with wrenching" means "very experienced." The tools usually required are not ones anyone would own unless they have done a great deal of mechanical work, and some of the tools are very specific to a car model.
This is not accurate. I own exactly one specialty tool for brake pads, which can be purchased for $13 from Amazon, or $21 if you want something more comprehensive. Prior to that, I "rented" the same tool for $0 from AutoZone. I have personally used it or lent it to friends for use on vehicles made by BMW, VW, Subaru, Nissan, Toyota, Lexus, Hyundai, Pontiac, Chrysler, and Jeep. It's compatible with a lot more vehicles, my specific copy of the tool just hasn't been used on everything. Aside from this one specialty tool--which is used to compress the caliper--the only things that are required are a jack, a socket set, and in some cases a breaker bar and/or hammer. A flathead screwdriver or similar pointy object is sometimes helpful for making sure the boot retracts evenly. Jack stands are preferred, but since you don't have to actually get under the car (Don't ever get under a car unless it's supported on jack stands!) to change pads, sliding the wheel under the rocker panel after taking it off is good enough.

I needed a sawzall once, due to a horrible caliper slide design on my wife's Lexus (freezing the slides seems to have been an explicit goal--I can come up with no other explanation for such stupidity), but otherwise nothing else over 3 decades. The only brake job I've ever personally seen in the past 30 years that can not be serviced by these basic tools was a WRX STI that has a somewhat unique opposing-piston setup on its front calipers. There are probably others in the high-performance/competition space that I haven't seen. So the idea that a brand-specific tool is generally required is absolute hogwash. Any vehicle that a typical BH would drive can have a brake service done with the same basic set of tools.

This is not to say that someone who has no interest in doing any of their own maintenance should automatically gravitate towards changing brake pads. But it IS the next easiest general maintenance task after air filters, oil changes, and tire rotations.
I still disagree. I don't claim to know anything about Hondas, but for example something like hex key sockets are something I've used for replacing brakes but not something the typical homeowner owns. I would consider that a model-specific tool if the first time you need it is for doing brakes, not that they can't be used for many other purposes that you might discover later. Another example would be the need for some kind of wide-opening caliper to measure the rear brake shoes (so they mate closely with the "hat" if you have that parking brake design.) It seems like every other time I've done brakes it's been on a different model and I need a new tool, although I already own more tools than the typical person. Also when you mention something like a breaker bar, well, maybe your 90-degree breaker bar is about two degrees off from being able to fit, so now you need to get a flex-head breaker bar. One time I had a "complete" set of metric sockets in 1/4, 3/8, and 1/2 inch drive, but of course the 18mm for the caliper mounting that I needed was one of the only sizes that didn't happen to be included. So you are really, really stretching the "basic set of tools" concept. Oh, the hand impact driver mentioned in another reply requires an angle of access to the bolts that you may not have, and ordinary sockets aren't meant for impact use. There have been several times that I couldn't get a bolt loose with a hand impact driver, but the same bolt just zipped off with an air-powered impact wrench.

But having said that, I do completely agree that you can buy the all the tools required in virtually every case for less than having just one brake job done by a pro. But then you have the tools and need somewhere to store them. And I even agree that it maybe the next easiest task after the other ones you mentioned (although I would disagree that changing filters is necessarily easy - it depends on the model.) For many years I had to do all my work in a quasi-public parking lot, and carry all my tools up and down three flights of stairs. And store everything (including winter/summer tires and wheels) in my spare bedroom. That's not an uncommon situation for people who live in cities. Sometimes you also only find out you need some tool or part (even if you try to plan) once you're involved in the job. I was lucky to sometimes be able to walk a mile or so to a parts store but not everyone can do that. I happened to have to do that once working on brakes - I broke a socket of all things, what are the odds? Well maybe not that unlikely if you're not using an impact socket with that impact driver. I was lucky - I got the last socket in the size I needed at that only parts store in walking distance. It just seems like a lot of people who post on threads like this don't consider situations like that and also just assume a lot of tools and knowledge that not everyone has.

yolli71
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by yolli71 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:51 pm

GridironGems wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:59 pm
I had my oil changed today and found out I need new brake pads. They quoted me:

$229 plus tax for front brake pads and resurface the front rotors
$171 plus tax for rear brake pads

Does this seem like a reasonable cost? Any suggestions?
Sounds reasonable to me. I just had my rear pads and rotors replaced on my 2005 Honda CR-V for $499. Granted my rotors were replaced (not resurfaced) and they used OEM parts, but I'm not sure you need that.

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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by lazydavid » Sun Jan 21, 2018 4:26 pm

tibbitts wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:13 pm
I still disagree. I don't claim to know anything about Hondas, but for example something like hex key sockets are something I've used for replacing brakes but not something the typical homeowner owns.
Usually the hex screws I've seen come off with a standard allen key. Having hex sockets makes it easier, but they're certainly not required in most cases. If you want them, a set is $12 at harbor freight, and is useful for a lot of tasks aside from brakes. I used mine extensively when disassembling/reassembling my son's bed when we moved, for example. It's therefore quite a stretch to call these "brand-specific tools".
tibbitts wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:13 pm
Another example would be the need for some kind of wide-opening caliper to measure the rear brake shoes (so they mate closely with the "hat" if you have that parking brake design.)
Now we're on the verge of talking about something else entirely. I would NEVER suggest that someone who doesn't regularly work on cars tackle a brake job on a car equipped with drum brakes. That's a whole other animal, and WAY more complicated. The drum-style parking brakes you reference are indeed somewhat common, but the home mechanic rarely has to deal with them. You're not even aware of their existence unless you're replacing the rotors, and even then there's usually no additional work involved. Takes a tiny bit more effort to remove and reinstall the rotor because of the friction, but that's about it.
tibbitts wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:13 pm
It seems like every other time I've done brakes it's been on a different model and I need a new tool, although I already own more tools than the typical person. Also when you mention something like a breaker bar, well, maybe your 90-degree breaker bar is about two degrees off from being able to fit, so now you need to get a flex-head breaker bar.
The only breaker bar I've ever owned is a simple one where the prong rotates 180 degrees, something like this, though quite a bit less fancy than that. Are there times that a flex head would have made life easier? Absolutely. But I've never needed one to get the job done.
tibbitts wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:13 pm
One time I had a "complete" set of metric sockets in 1/4, 3/8, and 1/2 inch drive, but of course the 18mm for the caliper mounting that I needed was one of the only sizes that didn't happen to be included. So you are really, really stretching the "basic set of tools" concept.
This is really strange. I just looked at my set, which is a fairly standard Craftsman one (comes in a plastic box, not one of the fancy mechanic sets) that I bought 25 years ago when I first started to do a little wrenching. If you include the spark plug socket, it has five 18mm sockets. But doing a little digging, it does seem that 18mm is one of the sizes omitted from some of the very smallest (7-10 piece) socket sets. In many cases, you have to step up to at least an 11-piece to get one. But there's a 6-piece Craftsman that includes it, for example. I don't see how that's stretching the concept of a "basic set of tools". We're not talking about the 800-piece master mechanics sets here. Just simple comprehensive sets like this one that cost less than $30.
tibbitts wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:13 pm
Oh, the hand impact driver mentioned in another reply requires an angle of access to the bolts that you may not have, and ordinary sockets aren't meant for impact use. There have been several times that I couldn't get a bolt loose with a hand impact driver, but the same bolt just zipped off with an air-powered impact wrench.
This is totally fair. I have had cases where I wish I could get my impact gun on a nut and it just wouldn't fit, usually due to suspension parts being in the way. So back to the breaker bar and 3lb sledgehammer.
tibbitts wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:13 pm
But having said that, I do completely agree that you can buy the all the tools required in virtually every case for less than having just one brake job done by a pro. But then you have the tools and need somewhere to store them. And I even agree that it maybe the next easiest task after the other ones you mentioned (although I would disagree that changing filters is necessarily easy - it depends on the model.)
Agree here as well. The "correct" procedure for changing the oil filter in my father-in-law's Nissan Murano requires removing the passenger tire and fender. WTF?? Fortunately, if you crack the inner (plastic) fender liner a tiny bit in just the right spot, it becomes very easy to bend out of the way far enough to remove the filter. But to be fair, the majority of vehicles aren't designed by idiots. Just some of them. :mrgreen: In most cases, changing the oil filter isn't an ordeal.
tibbitts wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:13 pm
For many years I had to do all my work in a quasi-public parking lot, and carry all my tools up and down three flights of stairs. And store everything (including winter/summer tires and wheels) in my spare bedroom. That's not an uncommon situation for people who live in cities. Sometimes you also only find out you need some tool or part (even if you try to plan) once you're involved in the job. I was lucky to sometimes be able to walk a mile or so to a parts store but not everyone can do that. I happened to have to do that once working on brakes - I broke a socket of all things, what are the odds? Well maybe not that unlikely if you're not using an impact socket with that impact driver. I was lucky - I got the last socket in the size I needed at that only parts store in walking distance. It just seems like a lot of people who post on threads like this don't consider situations like that and also just assume a lot of tools and knowledge that not everyone has.
Totally valid point. When I was an apartment-dweller, I did very little work in my parking lot. I even drove to my parents' house to change my oil, since they had a garage. And I've never been without a means of transport to a store to get parts or tools, whether that was a friend, family member, or spouse. I'll freely admit that an individual's situation can make a big difference on the feasibility of doing basic maintenance.

I also agree that when you decide to invest in an impact driver, it's time to also invest in impact-rated sockets, for safety as well as reliability. My wife got me a nice set probably 10 years ago for my birthday to go with the compressor she got me for Christmas that year.

AlwaysBeClimbing
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by AlwaysBeClimbing » Sun Jan 21, 2018 5:33 pm

snowman wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:28 pm
Boglegrappler wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 12:47 pm
Brake pads are not incredibly or even very easy to replace unless you have lots of experience and exactly the correct tools. "Familiar with wrenching" means "very experienced." The tools usually required are not ones anyone would own unless they have done a great deal of mechanical work, and some of the tools are very specific to a car model.
As someone who has done his own brake work for the past two decades, I agree with this.

You need a good hydraulic jack, safe jack stands, a decent set of ratchets and sockets, a decent sledge to help break the wheel lose if its frozen on, the skill to horse the pads free, some c-clamps or other tools to help get the pistons retracted so the new pads will go in, etc, etc.

There are people who are handy enough to do this. At least 3/4 of people are not.

The quoted price isn't out of line, imo. I'd even say it seemed pretty fair. I would only suggest that the replacement pads be oem (genuine Honda).
As someone with similar experience, I tend to disagree. Accords are incredibly easy to work on, and an older one like OP's would provide great learning experience. One does not need a full set of specialized tools to get started. A small jack with 2 stands can be bought anytime for $20-30 on sale, and be used for years on all maintenance tasks. Plus he will want metric set that can be bought for a few dollars any time. He can get started for about $50 and add inexpensive tools later for specific jobs.

In this case, all he needs is 19mm socket to get the wheel off, and either 14 or 12mm socket to get 1 (one) bolt off and check the pads by himself. That's it! That's all there is to it, anyone can do it, and it's not fair to scare OP with all the specialized tools and experience he will need to complete such a simple task.

If he decides that maybe he will want to replace rotors as well (or if dealer tells him it's necessary), he can proceed to unscrew second 12mm bolt, and raise the caliper. He will then be instructed by numbers of youtube videos to unscrew 2 17mm bolts and remove the bracket. So 4 screws in total to get to rotors! How hard is that?

At this point, all that's standing in his way to save a lot of money are 2 screws and a screwdriver! This is where it's likely to get harder, as those 2 screws may not want to come off. So back to youtube video, where the guy will recommend cheap impact driver ($10) and a hammer after spraying screws with WD-40 first to loosen them up. He can rent it from local auto store for free before he starts working to have it handy just in case. He will want a large C-clamp, which again he can rent for free, or purchase for couple of dollars anywhere.

If he decides to give up on the rotors at this point, so what? He will put the bracket and caliper back on (4 screws in total). He at least was able to check his pads and determine if they really need to be replaced, and how evenly they are worn. He can check again later on, with much greater confidence. He can get those Akebono pads (Honda OEM) for about $40 on Amazon or local AAP store with online discount.

I understand that OP is determined not to do this himself. However, the tradeoff is always wondering if one was quoted fair price, and even a fair price will be 3-4x higher compared to simple DIY. Changing brake pads is easier than changing oil, and there is no potential mess on the floor to deal with. Add to that the fact that you can do this in the comfort of your home in less time than calling, making appt., dropping the car for estimate, and asking BHs if the price is fair, and the choice is obvious.

From the OP's second post:
"I am not a handy person at all, so I will not do it myself"


Seems to me you ( and some others here) are injecting your opinion, without any regard to what the OP's stated position is. Not helpful. Some people are not mechanically inclined and have no wish to be. Just because you or I may be isn't going to change that.
Anyway, the best way to safe money on brake jobs, is to use them (the brakes) sparingly. It always amazes me to see people hauling butt in a race to get to the next stop sign. Intelligent driving will save one vastly more then any savings obtained from a DIY job.

Shallowpockets
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by Shallowpockets » Sun Jan 21, 2018 6:01 pm

Well we all went off on a tangent here.
To answer the OPs question.
Yes, those prices you quote seem very reasonable.
I would not even shop around.

N10sive
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by N10sive » Sun Jan 21, 2018 6:28 pm

OP, that is a fair price. Typically around my area and depending on vehicle complete brake jobs are 350-550 for sedans. I would never pay more than 450-500 for a sedan though.

You could look how much they are charging for the resurfacing and pads. I’m more experienced in civics and Corolla but usually those rotors are cheap.

Besides resurfacing an experienced mechanic could do a front brake job in 45 min or less.

snowman
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by snowman » Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:36 pm

AlwaysBeClimbing wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 5:33 pm



From the OP's second post:
"I am not a handy person at all, so I will not do it myself"


Seems to me you ( and some others here) are injecting your opinion, without any regard to what the OP's stated position is. Not helpful. Some people are not mechanically inclined and have no wish to be. Just because you or I may be isn't going to change that.
Anyway, the best way to safe money on brake jobs, is to use them (the brakes) sparingly. It always amazes me to see people hauling butt in a race to get to the next stop sign. Intelligent driving will save one vastly more then any savings obtained from a DIY job.
I saw what OP wrote, and I tried to be helpful by encouraging him to do something that is super easy and that even people not mechanically inclined can do no problem. I used to be that person many years ago, so I know. If it wasn't for my wife's encouragement to try DIY (we were pressed for money at that time), I would probably still be "not mechanically inclined" and paying $500 instead of $100 for Honda brake job just like a poster above.

What I find interesting is that when people buy their first home, they quickly realize there is ongoing maintenance for which they will need some basic tools - ladder (or 2), drill, drill bits, tape measure, you name it. After all, they are not going to call service every time the light bulb goes off in a foyer, furnace filter needs replacement, or wife wants to hang pictures on the wall.

Yet, when it comes to cars, different logic applies. We don't need even basic tools like a socket set because car is so incredibly complicated we better leave it to experts! I am not advocating OP tries timing belt replacement, I am merely just suggesting that in his case it is just 1 (one!) bolt to find out wear on the pads, and replace it by himself if he chooses to do so.

When my daughter was about 12, she asked me what I was doing in the garage. I told her checking the brake pads, and explained what they do and how they work. She said that was cool and asked if she could try it herself. So I put the wheel back on, lowered the jack, and watched her do it. In 10 minutes she had all 4 pads in her hand, saying "this was easy". Yep, it is that easy - if she could do it, OP can do it too.

bubbadog
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by bubbadog » Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:57 pm

snowman wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:36 pm
AlwaysBeClimbing wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 5:33 pm



From the OP's second post:
"I am not a handy person at all, so I will not do it myself"


Seems to me you ( and some others here) are injecting your opinion, without any regard to what the OP's stated position is. Not helpful. Some people are not mechanically inclined and have no wish to be. Just because you or I may be isn't going to change that.
Anyway, the best way to safe money on brake jobs, is to use them (the brakes) sparingly. It always amazes me to see people hauling butt in a race to get to the next stop sign. Intelligent driving will save one vastly more then any savings obtained from a DIY job.
I saw what OP wrote, and I tried to be helpful by encouraging him to do something that is super easy and that even people not mechanically inclined can do no problem. I used to be that person many years ago, so I know. If it wasn't for my wife's encouragement to try DIY (we were pressed for money at that time), I would probably still be "not mechanically inclined" and paying $500 instead of $100 for Honda brake job just like a poster above.

What I find interesting is that when people buy their first home, they quickly realize there is ongoing maintenance for which they will need some basic tools - ladder (or 2), drill, drill bits, tape measure, you name it. After all, they are not going to call service every time the light bulb goes off in a foyer, furnace filter needs replacement, or wife wants to hang pictures on the wall.

Yet, when it comes to cars, different logic applies. We don't need even basic tools like a socket set because car is so incredibly complicated we better leave it to experts! I am not advocating OP tries timing belt replacement, I am merely just suggesting that in his case it is just 1 (one!) bolt to find out wear on the pads, and replace it by himself if he chooses to do so.

When my daughter was about 12, she asked me what I was doing in the garage. I told her checking the brake pads, and explained what they do and how they work. She said that was cool and asked if she could try it herself. So I put the wheel back on, lowered the jack, and watched her do it. In 10 minutes she had all 4 pads in her hand, saying "this was easy". Yep, it is that easy - if she could do it, OP can do it too.
Amen Snowman!

wrongfunds
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by wrongfunds » Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:43 am

Yes, I understand your point but it was made perfectly clear that OP had zero knowledge or intention to acquire that knowledge. There was no point to tell a newbie to just do their own pad replacement even though you yourself know for sure that the guy would never be able to get those screws off without the correct tool :-(

Let me put it this way. If OP was my neighbor and he wanted to get his hands dirty, I will be glad to oversee it for him if he wanted to try doing it himself. I have every single tool needed including bunch of battery operated impact wrenches and handheld impact screw extractors.

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welderwannabe
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by welderwannabe » Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:49 am

I wouldn't bother resurfacing rotors nowadays. New ones are pretty cheap, and I have had mixed results with resurfacing over the years. Just my .02
I am not an investment professional, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

barnaclebob
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by barnaclebob » Mon Jan 22, 2018 11:18 am

GridironGems wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:56 pm
I had my oil changed today and found out I need new brake pads. They quoted me:

$229 plus tax for front brake pads and resurface the front rotors
$171 plus tax for rear brake pads


The fronts are 3 mm and rears are 2 mm. 2002 Honda Accord with 122,000 miles. I got the car in 2011 with 82,000 miles, I have not changed the brake pads. 40 dollars for oil change. I got one other estimate that was more expensive. Will call a couple more on Monday
The prices are very reasonable.

Is that 2 or 3mm to the wear bars or 2 or 3 mm left on the total pad? If the pads are wearing evenly you can drive them down to the wear bars (if your car has them) which you will know when the car starts making terrible noises. That noise wont be causing terrible damage just letting you know to get the pads changed immediately.

I've been trying to push my car to go until the wear bars start rubbing and its at 87k on the OEM pads right now with another 2 or 3mm until the wear bars start rubbing. That might take another 15k at this point.

inbox788
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by inbox788 » Mon Jan 22, 2018 12:03 pm

welderwannabe wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:49 am
I wouldn't bother resurfacing rotors nowadays. New ones are pretty cheap, and I have had mixed results with resurfacing over the years. Just my .02
If there are no problems, I wouldn't bother with the rotors at all. Some mechanics insist on doing something all the time, especially when they're getting paid for it. And they'll boast about all the customers who don't resurface or change their rotors out and had to come back. We just don't know what percentage that represents, and it's possible that 99.8% who don't go the extra step are quite happy till their next service. If I found a reliable source that said 10-25% of rotors that appeared well required a redo, I might change my mind about the extra preventive measure.

https://community.cartalk.com/t/really- ... ds/47559/3

The quotes didn't mention anything about turning the rear rotors, so I assume they've inspected them and found them adequate (or maybe they're drum brakes).
Epsilon Delta wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:42 pm
Did you ask them to look at the brakes? It's not the sort of thing you'd just happen to notice when doing an oil change or just walking around the car. Unless the brakes are so bad they had trouble stopping or the wear indicators where squealing, in which case you should have already noticed.
I'm guessing they did a tire rotation and brake inspection as part of the service, which would be quite appropriate. It's easy to become cynical about mechanics when you hear about and experience so many inappropriate or incorrect repairs. It's not all bad mechanics as preventive maintenance involves taking out a lot of good parts to find the bad part that truly needs to be replaced, so you are performing a lot of unnecessary replacements to prevent a failure. You just don't know they're unnecessary until after the fact, but it adds to the perceptions and misconceptions.

TN_Boy
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by TN_Boy » Mon Jan 22, 2018 12:49 pm

wrongfunds wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:43 am
Yes, I understand your point but it was made perfectly clear that OP had zero knowledge or intention to acquire that knowledge. There was no point to tell a newbie to just do their own pad replacement even though you yourself know for sure that the guy would never be able to get those screws off without the correct tool :-(

Let me put it this way. If OP was my neighbor and he wanted to get his hands dirty, I will be glad to oversee it for him if he wanted to try doing it himself. I have every single tool needed including bunch of battery operated impact wrenches and handheld impact screw extractors.
+100 or so. I think I could replace brake pads if I wanted to. And I have friends who could help me a bit. But I have no interest in borrowing or buying any tools required. Or crawling around under the car. Or spending an afternoon messing with the car. If money were tight, I might consider it. Otherwise, it is one of those things I have no interest in doing. My cars usually get about 100k before they need new pads, so it's not like this is something I'd be doing a lot.

In fact ...... I confess I don't even change my own oil!! Imagine that.

3feetpete
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by 3feetpete » Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:00 pm

At the shop right now getting the rears on my 2006 Outback replaced. Was quoted $120 parts and labor. Just a few months ago had the fronts done for $90. Don’t know why the increase. The owner must be a boglehead who has read the posts what everybody else is charging :annoyed

I’m still $ ahead though. I had gone to a different tire shop for their $39 rotate special. They did a “courtesy inspection” of the brakes and told me the rears needed being done and wanted $450

N10sive
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by N10sive » Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:04 pm

OP should actually state an area where he is getting this done. Labor rates(which really drive this quote) vary quite a lot. In seattle where I live, labor rate is something like 140 an hour or even higher. Dealership is pry even worse.

luckily I can do all the work on a car myself though dont have any tools or space. There is a self service auto garage with lift and plethora of tools for rent at $40 an hour which is great. I have gotten an oil change, tire rotation, brake change, and front strut change in an hours time. Id imagine id spend $500 alone in labor costs to do all of that.

AlwaysBeClimbing
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Re: New Brake Pads

Post by AlwaysBeClimbing » Mon Jan 22, 2018 3:33 pm

snowman wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:36 pm
AlwaysBeClimbing wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 5:33 pm



From the OP's second post:
"I am not a handy person at all, so I will not do it myself"


Seems to me you ( and some others here) are injecting your opinion, without any regard to what the OP's stated position is. Not helpful. Some people are not mechanically inclined and have no wish to be. Just because you or I may be isn't going to change that.
Anyway, the best way to safe money on brake jobs, is to use them (the brakes) sparingly. It always amazes me to see people hauling butt in a race to get to the next stop sign. Intelligent driving will save one vastly more then any savings obtained from a DIY job.
I saw what OP wrote, and I tried to be helpful by encouraging him to do something that is super easy and that even people not mechanically inclined can do no problem. I used to be that person many years ago, so I know. If it wasn't for my wife's encouragement to try DIY (we were pressed for money at that time), I would probably still be "not mechanically inclined" and paying $500 instead of $100 for Honda brake job just like a poster above.

What I find interesting is that when people buy their first home, they quickly realize there is ongoing maintenance for which they will need some basic tools - ladder (or 2), drill, drill bits, tape measure, you name it. After all, they are not going to call service every time the light bulb goes off in a foyer, furnace filter needs replacement, or wife wants to hang pictures on the wall.

Yet, when it comes to cars, different logic applies. We don't need even basic tools like a socket set because car is so incredibly complicated we better leave it to experts! I am not advocating OP tries timing belt replacement, I am merely just suggesting that in his case it is just 1 (one!) bolt to find out wear on the pads, and replace it by himself if he chooses to do so.

When my daughter was about 12, she asked me what I was doing in the garage. I told her checking the brake pads, and explained what they do and how they work. She said that was cool and asked if she could try it herself. So I put the wheel back on, lowered the jack, and watched her do it. In 10 minutes she had all 4 pads in her hand, saying "this was easy". Yep, it is that easy - if she could do it, OP can do it too.

As someone else pointed out we are getting off on a tangent, so this will be my last post on the subject. Those relatively simple homeowner tasks you mentioned pale in comparison to what is involved with replacing brake pads(and perhaps rotors) on a car. Not even close, in terms of effort required, knowledge and safety issues alone. For someone who's handy and willing to learn, get hands dirty, desperate to save a few bucks, whatever... fine. Not everyone is so inclined. Beyond basic math I'm math challenged, a math "wiz" could tell me it's "easy" to learn calculus. I'd tell him to stick it. It's good to know one's limitations. It can save your life. Different strokes...

barnaclebob
Posts: 2447
Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:54 am

Re: New Brake Pads

Post by barnaclebob » Mon Jan 22, 2018 4:14 pm

AlwaysBeClimbing wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 3:33 pm
As someone else pointed out we are getting off on a tangent, so this will be my last post on the subject. Those relatively simple homeowner tasks you mentioned pale in comparison to what is involved with replacing brake pads(and perhaps rotors) on a car. Not even close, in terms of effort required, knowledge and safety issues alone. For someone who's handy and willing to learn, get hands dirty, desperate to save a few bucks, whatever... fine. Not everyone is so inclined. Beyond basic math I'm math challenged, a math "wiz" could tell me it's "easy" to learn calculus. I'd tell him to stick it. It's good to know one's limitations. It can save your life. Different strokes...
Changing brake pads is about as complicated as replacing a garbage disposal which most of this forum would advocate is an easy DIY job.

wrongfunds
Posts: 1046
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 3:55 pm

Re: New Brake Pads

Post by wrongfunds » Mon Jan 22, 2018 4:15 pm

The last straw was the infamous Honda screw on rotors. Seriously, if you are a newbie, you do NOT want to tackle that! It absolutely floored me that knowing this, OP was encouraged to go ahead and do the brake job himself. It almost borders on being as irresponsible and cruel advice and that is why I replied.

By the way, I am capable of doing lot of these jobs but having honest and trustworthy mechanic shop, I don't do any of them. I do my own diagnostics, get the parts and just hand it to the shop and they do the grunt work. Obviously, 99% of the people do NOT that have that luxury. But if you do find a honest and trustworthy shop, the best thing you can do is to STOP price shopping for a different shop. Develop relationship with that shop. Resist the urge to use the "free inspection" coupon or "$9.99 oil change special" at a place without prior relationship. Probably only 10% of the shops are honest; if you find one do stick with them and recommend it to your friends, neighbors, colleagues.

In OP's case, the dealer quote is reasonable which tells me that the place honest and there is no reason for OP to shop further.

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