Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
SGM
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by SGM » Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:10 pm

I keep up with recent advances by going up to the hospital twice a month for continuous medical education and see old friends too, but I have met the challenge of medicine and am going on to other things..Last month two docs were asking me to come back to the nursing facility I once worked at and I politely declined. I am too busy and on to other challenges.

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fishandgolf
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by fishandgolf » Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:30 pm

Back to work...........Hell no! I've got enough stress in my life trying to figure out this darn....and very frustrating......game of golf! :sharebeer

LarryAllen
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by LarryAllen » Tue Jan 09, 2018 1:14 pm

I am not there yet but counting the days. Other than missing a big pay check I am super excited to have less responsibility in life and more time to do whatever I want.

Capsu78
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Capsu78 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 2:11 pm

One of my "retirement" jobs is putting my granddaughter on the bus 3 days a week. This morning she asked "What are you doing today Papa?" I had to think for a bit, but replied "I have to stop by Village Hall and get my new vehicle stickers and stop by my chiropractor to pay off a bill... about 20 minutes total effort end to end but she was no longer curious about my busy day!

FootballFan5548
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by FootballFan5548 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 2:44 pm

I'm 34, have a 3 year old, and a 1 year old, and obviously a very long way to go.... but

I.... CAN.... NOT..... WAIT!

I dont' want to wish away my life. And my job is certainly not overly hard or complex, it's actually a great gig.... but I can't wait to have freedom.

azanon
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by azanon » Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:03 pm

htdrag11 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:56 pm
When I was with the government, I also hated to leave at 5 pm. :oops:

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

GL.
This part is fixed, at least where I work, and probably most other places (I'm a fed). Telework is all the rage these days, so you can just work from home (all of my employees have at least situational telework policies in place), and also flexible or variable work week schedules are permitted where I'm at now (your schedule can change daily). Granted, you still have to "work" 80hrs in a pay period though.

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Meaty
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Meaty » Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:07 pm

azanon wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:03 pm
htdrag11 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:56 pm
When I was with the government, I also hated to leave at 5 pm. :oops:

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

GL.
This part is fixed, at least where I work, and probably most other places (I'm a fed). Telework is all the rage these days, so you can just work from home (all of my employees have at least situational telework policies in place), and also flexible or variable work week schedules are permitted where I'm at now (your schedule can change daily). Granted, you still have to "work" 80hrs in a pay period though.
How does one get a fed job. I’ve had zero luck
"Discipline equals Freedom" - Jocko Willink

azanon
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by azanon » Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:15 pm

Meaty wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:07 pm
azanon wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:03 pm
htdrag11 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:56 pm
When I was with the government, I also hated to leave at 5 pm. :oops:

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

GL.
This part is fixed, at least where I work, and probably most other places (I'm a fed). Telework is all the rage these days, so you can just work from home (all of my employees have at least situational telework policies in place), and also flexible or variable work week schedules are permitted where I'm at now (your schedule can change daily). Granted, you still have to "work" 80hrs in a pay period though.
How does one get a fed job. I’ve had zero luck
USA Jobs. Let me guess, you're not an "expert" on most items listed in the questionnaire? That's all I'm saying.... :wink:

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BTDT
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by BTDT » Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:21 pm

My major disappointment and sole disenchantment is how fast time is flying :oops:
If past history was all that is needed to play the game of money, the richest people would be librarians.

Working2notWork
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Working2notWork » Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:50 pm

Hey all -

As I'm reading through all the replies, it seems as though many are staying busy with their daily, non working, lives. As I think about early retirement, would you mind shedding some light on what exactly keeps you busy all day long?

Thanks,

Working (for now)

Loik098
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Loik098 » Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:31 pm

2015 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:50 pm
Coming up on three years and it's hard to think about a time when I would get up every day and go sacrifice so much of my life. Enchantment is when you're lost in your favorite non-fiction business book at your favorite cafe, glancing up every now and then to stare at the beauty of ......the drizzle and grey day outside. Then you amble home face up in the drizzle, using the umbrella only to shelter your books.
I thought this was going to go in a different direction, but no, you kept it clean :D

Lynette
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Lynette » Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:48 pm

I don't want to go back to work but I was getting bored in the past month. I've been retired for a year and fixed up my house and garden. My new driveway is wonderful in the winter - no more slipping and sliding as on the old uneven one. I was taking Spanish classes at a community college but there wasn't one scheduled in the fall so I worked on my finances and taxes. Now my classes have started again and I attended a photographic one this afternoon. For my assignment I've been wondering taking photographs of snowy scenes - it's cold! I have to download Photoshop as I'm not good at it. Tomorrow I have another Spanish class. I enjoy the interaction with the young people in the class. I'm good at Spanish but not photography so this will keep me busy for the next few months. So I'm enjoying this phase of retirement.

flyingaway
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by flyingaway » Tue Jan 09, 2018 7:01 pm

2comma wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 2:38 am
I envy the "love my work" people, wish I was one of them but I'm not. Had no great plan for retirement either but I have had some of life's best experiences without much of a plan. Four years in and absolutely no regrets. I've had money and no time, I've had time and no money, now I have both.
This looks like me, although I am not fully retired.

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nisiprius
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by nisiprius » Tue Jan 09, 2018 7:04 pm

No. I was worried about this when I was planning for retirement, but it has not been a problem. My wife said "Retirement is what I thought being an adult would be like, when I was a kid."
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

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munemaker
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by munemaker » Tue Jan 09, 2018 8:26 pm

Working2notWork wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:50 pm
As I think about early retirement, would you mind shedding some light on what exactly keeps you busy all day long?
Kind of like the old BTO song:
I love to work at nothing all day.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCIUf8eYPqA

Thatthatisis
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Thatthatisis » Tue Jan 09, 2018 8:38 pm

I retired 2 years ago this month. I'm just as busy as when I worked, but I decide 100 % when I do what, so there's no stress of having to worry about other people's calendars; and I'm working on goals I want to accomplish, which is extremely satisfying. I could not be happier.

Sometimes my spouse (retired 3 months after me) and I sit at breakfast, and just smile. *blissful*.

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GerryL
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by GerryL » Tue Jan 09, 2018 10:19 pm

nisiprius wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 7:04 pm
... My wife said "Retirement is what I thought being an adult would be like, when I was a kid."
YES! This is it! (Edit: Should put this on a t-shirt.)

dh
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by dh » Tue Jan 09, 2018 10:57 pm

aspirit wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:38 pm
I've a friend who's 84 still working for state.gov.,because he likes it.
Interesting -- the people who work into their 70s and 80s like it. Those who retire like it. To me, it sounds like people are making really great decisions based on their own preferences. Nothing better than that! :sharebeer

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DWesterb2iz2
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by DWesterb2iz2 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:02 am

I saw this headstone that said "Work" on it, and took a photo of it. It is an emblem of retirement for me.

https://imgur.com/a/BKWtI

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midareff
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by midareff » Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:02 am

Six years in and I've been so busy traveling and doing my own photography, catching up on music albums, movies and such I don't know how I ever had the time to go to work. Being retired is like being released from prison.

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tennisplyr
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by tennisplyr » Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:17 am

Working2notWork wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:50 pm
Hey all -

As I'm reading through all the replies, it seems as though many are staying busy with their daily, non working, lives. As I think about early retirement, would you mind shedding some light on what exactly keeps you busy all day long?

Thanks,

Working (for now)

Whatever you want!
Those who move forward with a happy spirit will find that things always work out.

montanagirl
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by montanagirl » Wed Jan 10, 2018 9:32 am

I think it would have been a lot more fun had I been able to retire in my 50s. As it was, I did a lot of things then and got kinda burnt out on them. Like distance bike riding, skiing, political volunteering, volunteering, and other stuff. Everything gets old after awhile. At least we went to Hawaii when we were still able to walk a lot. I still play piano and study Spanish but am in a rut with those.

Now at nearly 69 I enjoy the quiet time at home, but the afternoons do drag on. So I take on temporary or part time jobs, and then pray for them to end. It's like I do it for the misery, because it feels so good when it's over. :wink:

The bottom line is, I don't really want to commit to any obligation or schedule, and work, classes and volunteering all require that. And how long can you sit in a coffee shop surfing the net and taking up space?

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Alexa9
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Alexa9 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:00 am

I would continue to work part time with more vacation if possible. Working keeps your mind active and keeps you social.

mak1277
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by mak1277 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:12 am

Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:00 am
I would continue to work part time with more vacation if possible. Working keeps your mind active and keeps you social.
I certainly hope there are other ways of keeping your mind active besides working. Personally, I like the idea of (re-)reading the canon of Western Literature once I'm retired. I imagine I'll be able to get a lot more out of it now than when I read some of these books in high school.

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Alexa9
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Alexa9 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:03 am

mak1277 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:12 am
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:00 am
I would continue to work part time with more vacation if possible. Working keeps your mind active and keeps you social.
I certainly hope there are other ways of keeping your mind active besides working. Personally, I like the idea of (re-)reading the canon of Western Literature once I'm retired. I imagine I'll be able to get a lot more out of it now than when I read some of these books in high school.
Studies say to keep working as long as possible to stay young/sharp mentally and not start digging into retirement savings. That is, if you like your job. Reading books is great for the mind but it's not the same as handling the tasks of a job and interacting with coworkers. Cutting back hours is ideal if your job allows it. If not, volunteering is good too. I know of several smart, bored, retirees that zone out when they retire and get lazy and watch a bunch of television and drink. But if your retirement dream is to read, more power to you! :beer

mak1277
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by mak1277 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:25 am

Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:03 am
I know of several smart, bored, retirees that zone out when they retire and get lazy and watch a bunch of television and drink.
This is a personal choice that each of those people make, though. It's not an immutable law. If a person cares about staying sharp, there are a million ways to do it that don't require working a job.

pennywise
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by pennywise » Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:36 am

nisiprius wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 7:04 pm
"Retirement is what I thought being an adult would be like, when I was a kid."

Yes!

I'm not retired yet but hope to be within a year or two, and as far as keeping busy I agree that paid work interferes with the adult work we all have to do--I can definitely see that just taking care of one's personal and domestic life will fill up time quite nicely.

It's becoming increasingly annoying to have to squeeze errands into snips of time during the work day, or after work or on the weekends. As a working wife and mother I feel like I've been doing 2-3-more jobs for many years.

I want to live your wife's definition real soon and hope to be another who will be puzzled that I ever had time to go to work :D .

technovelist
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by technovelist » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:03 pm

Not me.

On the other hand, I've worked harder at some points in retirement than I ever did while working for an employer.

The difference is that I've worked on what I wanted to work on.
In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, they often differ.

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Alexa9
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Alexa9 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:12 pm

mak1277 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:25 am
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:03 am
I know of several smart, bored, retirees that zone out when they retire and get lazy and watch a bunch of television and drink.
This is a personal choice that each of those people make, though. It's not an immutable law. If a person cares about staying sharp, there are a million ways to do it that don't require working a job.
Yes but having a job forces you to do it. This is not my idea. It is from several articles I've read. The later you retire, the less likely you are to get dementia/Alzheimer's/die early.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nat ... a/2517851/

p14175
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by p14175 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:31 pm

I was forced into retirement at 52 in 2012 due to health issues. But after working for 35 years and investing I don't feel bad about it. It's kind of nice not having to wake up to an alarm clock. Anyway, last year I started getting bored so I started a software development company. Because it's just me I keep my own hours but maintain a plan to keep me on schedule. The big thing is is that it keeps me out of trouble.

2015
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by 2015 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:37 pm

Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:12 pm
mak1277 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:25 am
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:03 am
I know of several smart, bored, retirees that zone out when they retire and get lazy and watch a bunch of television and drink.
This is a personal choice that each of those people make, though. It's not an immutable law. If a person cares about staying sharp, there are a million ways to do it that don't require working a job.
Yes but having a job forces you to do it. This is not my idea. It is from several articles I've read. The later you retire, the less likely you are to get dementia/Alzheimer's/die early.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nat ... a/2517851/
Typical usatoday nonsense. The only thing "a job" forces one to do is to expend one's life energy on something other than oneself.

Some of us since retirement have markedly increased what may be classified as "sharp" (or dare I say, intelligent) as a result of markedly increasing focus on that which is important at the expense of markedly decreasing focus on that which is unimportant.

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Jazztonight
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Jazztonight » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:50 pm

Working2notWork wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:50 pm
Hey all -

As I'm reading through all the replies, it seems as though many are staying busy with their daily, non working, lives. As I think about early retirement, would you mind shedding some light on what exactly keeps you busy all day long?

Thanks,

Working (for now)
As you can see from many of the responses, most Bogleheads appear to be satisfied in retirement. But I also get the impression that the activities that occupy us in retirement vary greatly. This is a good thing.

My experience leaving an employer of 30 years was similar to others. I’d had enough and was looking forward to not spending any more time in the office seeing patients after I turned 66. Two days before my last day I was asked to fill in for someone the following week. I laughed and said, “You gotta be kidding!” I kept getting requests to work and after a while I “retired” my license—the best excuse of all!

How one fills each day or week as a retired person is up to you. I lead a fairly self-structured retired life—exercise on MWF, 3-mile walks most days, music gigs 2-3 times a week, Spanish study, reading projects, discussion groups, participation in my religious community, flute practice, concert band rehearsal, work on a writing project, dinner and some mindless TV with DW, and thinking about future plans and projects.

My own belief is that the key to successful retirement—and, perhaps, life itself—is to maintain a balance of physical, mental/intellectual, health/diet, social, spiritual, and other stimulating activities in your life. Retirement can be “hard work,” but the more you put into it, the more it pays off. YMMV

For what it’s worth, I’m writing this from a vacation spot on a beach near Puerto Vallarta, having already walked on the beach for an hour, done a Burpees workout and a Duolingo session, and getting ready for lunch. Some may fault me for maintaining “structure” on vacation, but it works for me. 8-)

jazztonight
"What does not destroy me, makes me stronger." Nietzsche

sport
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by sport » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:56 pm

2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:37 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:12 pm
mak1277 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:25 am
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:03 am
I know of several smart, bored, retirees that zone out when they retire and get lazy and watch a bunch of television and drink.
This is a personal choice that each of those people make, though. It's not an immutable law. If a person cares about staying sharp, there are a million ways to do it that don't require working a job.
Yes but having a job forces you to do it. This is not my idea. It is from several articles I've read. The later you retire, the less likely you are to get dementia/Alzheimer's/die early.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nat ... a/2517851/
Typical usatoday nonsense. The only thing "a job" forces one to do is to expend one's life energy on something other than oneself.

Some of us since retirement have markedly increased what may be classified as "sharp" (or dare I say, intelligent) as a result of markedly increasing focus on that which is important at the expense of markedly decreasing focus on that which is unimportant.
In addition to that, work generally comes with some level of stress. Stress is harmful both physically and mentally. I have found that stress has mostly disappeared in retirement. Some examples are:
Getting up to an alarm clock when you feel like sleeping further.
Commuting in bad weather.
Commuting in good weather.
Commuting in the dark.
Deadlines.
Disagreeable boss, coworkers, and/or customers.
Multiple assignments that conflict with each other.
Not enough vacation.
Lack of freedom to do what you want, when you want.
Working overtime (perhaps unpaid).
etc.

carolinaman
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by carolinaman » Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:04 pm

I was an IT director with a lot of responsibility and decision making latitude in my job. I still miss the good parts of the job, but then I think about all the politics, BS, problem customers and employees and stress and I no longer miss any of it.

The key for me is to engage in productive and useful activities in retirement. This is mostly volunteer work of various sorts for charities and faith based organizations. I enjoy leisure activities but need more than to be satisfied with my life. I need to stay busy.

lws
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by lws » Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:43 pm

I retired five years ago. I have no regrets. Life is good.

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Alexa9
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Alexa9 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:21 pm

2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:37 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:12 pm
mak1277 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:25 am
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:03 am
I know of several smart, bored, retirees that zone out when they retire and get lazy and watch a bunch of television and drink.
This is a personal choice that each of those people make, though. It's not an immutable law. If a person cares about staying sharp, there are a million ways to do it that don't require working a job.
Yes but having a job forces you to do it. This is not my idea. It is from several articles I've read. The later you retire, the less likely you are to get dementia/Alzheimer's/die early.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nat ... a/2517851/
Typical usatoday nonsense. The only thing "a job" forces one to do is to expend one's life energy on something other than oneself.

Some of us since retirement have markedly increased what may be classified as "sharp" (or dare I say, intelligent) as a result of markedly increasing focus on that which is important at the expense of markedly decreasing focus on that which is unimportant.
Whatever helps you cope! Show me your peer reviewed longitudinal study and maybe I'll buy it.

Billionaire
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Billionaire » Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:47 pm

Six days for me and I am bored out of my mind. HEEEELLLLPPPPPP!!!!!!!!

snowox
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by snowox » Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:07 pm

Going on 3 years and I tried a job a year in once and walked. Was very interesting watching everyone working for their 2 day weekend and realized heck I had 7 days a week off. No thanks!

DrGoogle2017
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:11 pm

azanon wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:03 pm
htdrag11 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:56 pm
When I was with the government, I also hated to leave at 5 pm. :oops:

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

GL.
This part is fixed, at least where I work, and probably most other places (I'm a fed). Telework is all the rage these days, so you can just work from home (all of my employees have at least situational telework policies in place), and also flexible or variable work week schedules are permitted where I'm at now (your schedule can change daily). Granted, you still have to "work" 80hrs in a pay period though.
Not true, it depends on the bosses. My husband used to work at the Fed. My friend just retired from there recently too.

2015
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by 2015 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:21 pm

Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:21 pm
2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:37 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:12 pm
mak1277 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:25 am
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:03 am
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nat ... a/2517851/
Typical usatoday nonsense. The only thing "a job" forces one to do is to expend one's life energy on something other than oneself.

Some of us since retirement have markedly increased what may be classified as "sharp" (or dare I say, intelligent) as a result of markedly increasing focus on that which is important at the expense of markedly decreasing focus on that which is unimportant.
Whatever helps you cope! Show me your peer reviewed longitudinal study and maybe I'll buy it.
Ugh. You missed the point entirely. Who referenced anything about "coping" (except, perhaps, those who are still working)? Some of us don't need useless click bait in usatoday, a "peer reviewed longitudinal study", or other such nonsense to design our lives. Were I interested (and I most certainly am not), I'd ask you to show me the sources of your "studies" (peer reviewed or otherwise), who their sponsors are, and what "publications" these so-called "studies" show up in (it's in the interest of financial and certain other publications to keep you on hamster wheels of various types).

Escaping the cesspool of "conflict resolution", politicking, game playing, position protecting, organizational jockeying, and the rest of the morass inherent in working in organizations enables some who retiree to be more efficient, effective, and productive than every were while working, if only due to the lack of friction. Some of us are simply, highly self-generative.

[Edited to add: OTOH, I do agree there are those who should never retire, if only because it doesn't suit their personality.]

azanon
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by azanon » Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:26 pm

DrGoogle2017 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:11 pm
azanon wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:03 pm
htdrag11 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:56 pm
When I was with the government, I also hated to leave at 5 pm. :oops:

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

GL.
This part is fixed, at least where I work, and probably most other places (I'm a fed). Telework is all the rage these days, so you can just work from home (all of my employees have at least situational telework policies in place), and also flexible or variable work week schedules are permitted where I'm at now (your schedule can change daily). Granted, you still have to "work" 80hrs in a pay period though.
Not true, it depends on the bosses. My husband used to work at the Fed. My friend just retired from there recently too.
As a federal employee and a boss, I can confirm that telework practices and support for it has spread nationwide. As I already stated, there are still some exceptions. That your husband's boss was one of them, simply confirms something I already stated. I will add, the primary reason for this change was the passage of the Telework Enhancement Act of 2010. You can read more about that here: https://www.telework.gov/guidance-legis ... ement-act/ There are bad bosses out there, including in the feds. Sounds like your husband might have had one of those, if he/she wasn't abiding by the aforementioned act.

User avatar
Alexa9
Posts: 1392
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2016 9:41 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Alexa9 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:38 pm

2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:21 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:21 pm
2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:37 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:12 pm
mak1277 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:25 am

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nat ... a/2517851/
Typical usatoday nonsense. The only thing "a job" forces one to do is to expend one's life energy on something other than oneself.

Some of us since retirement have markedly increased what may be classified as "sharp" (or dare I say, intelligent) as a result of markedly increasing focus on that which is important at the expense of markedly decreasing focus on that which is unimportant.
Whatever helps you cope! Show me your peer reviewed longitudinal study and maybe I'll buy it.
Ugh. You missed the point entirely. Who referenced anything about "coping" (except, perhaps, those who are still working)? Some of us don't need useless click bait in usatoday, a "peer reviewed longitudinal study", or other such nonsense to design our lives. Were I interested (and I most certainly am not), I'd ask you to show me the sources of your "studies" (peer reviewed or otherwise), who their sponsors are, and what "publications" these so-called "studies" show up in (it's in the interest of financial and certain other publications to keep you on hamster wheels of various types).

Escaping the cesspool of "conflict resolution", politicking, game playing, position protecting, organizational jockeying, and the rest of the morass inherent in working in organizations enables some who retiree to be more efficient, effective, and productive than every were while working, if only due to the lack of friction. Some of us are simply, highly self-generative.

[Edited to add: OTOH, I do agree there are those who should never retire, if only because it doesn't suit their personality.]
More cope :mrgreen: Here's one of the actual studies if you're interested:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4340903/

DrGoogle2017
Posts: 1322
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2017 12:31 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:39 pm

azanon wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:26 pm
DrGoogle2017 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:11 pm
azanon wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:03 pm
htdrag11 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:56 pm
When I was with the government, I also hated to leave at 5 pm. :oops:

There is light at the end of the tunnel.

GL.
This part is fixed, at least where I work, and probably most other places (I'm a fed). Telework is all the rage these days, so you can just work from home (all of my employees have at least situational telework policies in place), and also flexible or variable work week schedules are permitted where I'm at now (your schedule can change daily). Granted, you still have to "work" 80hrs in a pay period though.
Not true, it depends on the bosses. My husband used to work at the Fed. My friend just retired from there recently too.
As a federal employee and a boss, I can confirm that telework practices and support for it has spread nationwide. As I already stated, there are still some exceptions. That your husband's boss was one of them, simply confirms something I already stated. I will add, the primary reason for this change was the passage of the Telework Enhancement Act of 2010. You can read more about that here: https://www.telework.gov/guidance-legis ... ement-act/ There are bad bosses out there, including in the feds. Sounds like your husband might have had one of those, if he/she wasn't abiding by the aforementioned act.
That’s technically on paper, not all bosses allow everybody to do it even within the same department. I wouldn’t say they are bad bosses, but the play mini God, they let their favorite employees do it and not some others. The key thing is how to be their favorite employees.

mak1277
Posts: 758
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:26 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by mak1277 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:56 pm

Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:38 pm
2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:21 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:21 pm
2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:37 pm
Typical usatoday nonsense. The only thing "a job" forces one to do is to expend one's life energy on something other than oneself.

Some of us since retirement have markedly increased what may be classified as "sharp" (or dare I say, intelligent) as a result of markedly increasing focus on that which is important at the expense of markedly decreasing focus on that which is unimportant.
Whatever helps you cope! Show me your peer reviewed longitudinal study and maybe I'll buy it.
Ugh. You missed the point entirely. Who referenced anything about "coping" (except, perhaps, those who are still working)? Some of us don't need useless click bait in usatoday, a "peer reviewed longitudinal study", or other such nonsense to design our lives. Were I interested (and I most certainly am not), I'd ask you to show me the sources of your "studies" (peer reviewed or otherwise), who their sponsors are, and what "publications" these so-called "studies" show up in (it's in the interest of financial and certain other publications to keep you on hamster wheels of various types).

Escaping the cesspool of "conflict resolution", politicking, game playing, position protecting, organizational jockeying, and the rest of the morass inherent in working in organizations enables some who retiree to be more efficient, effective, and productive than every were while working, if only due to the lack of friction. Some of us are simply, highly self-generative.

[Edited to add: OTOH, I do agree there are those who should never retire, if only because it doesn't suit their personality.]
More cope :mrgreen: Here's one of the actual studies if you're interested:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4340903/
From your link, emphasis mine:

"The present study supports that there is an association between retirement age and age at onset of AD. However, the strength of this association appears to be overestimated due to the selection bias. Moreover, the causality issue remains unresolved. Further prospective investigations are mandatory in order to correctly address this question."

User avatar
Alexa9
Posts: 1392
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2016 9:41 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Alexa9 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 4:01 pm

mak1277 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:56 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:38 pm
2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:21 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:21 pm
2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:37 pm


Typical usatoday nonsense. The only thing "a job" forces one to do is to expend one's life energy on something other than oneself.

Some of us since retirement have markedly increased what may be classified as "sharp" (or dare I say, intelligent) as a result of markedly increasing focus on that which is important at the expense of markedly decreasing focus on that which is unimportant.
Whatever helps you cope! Show me your peer reviewed longitudinal study and maybe I'll buy it.
Ugh. You missed the point entirely. Who referenced anything about "coping" (except, perhaps, those who are still working)? Some of us don't need useless click bait in usatoday, a "peer reviewed longitudinal study", or other such nonsense to design our lives. Were I interested (and I most certainly am not), I'd ask you to show me the sources of your "studies" (peer reviewed or otherwise), who their sponsors are, and what "publications" these so-called "studies" show up in (it's in the interest of financial and certain other publications to keep you on hamster wheels of various types).

Escaping the cesspool of "conflict resolution", politicking, game playing, position protecting, organizational jockeying, and the rest of the morass inherent in working in organizations enables some who retiree to be more efficient, effective, and productive than every were while working, if only due to the lack of friction. Some of us are simply, highly self-generative.

[Edited to add: OTOH, I do agree there are those who should never retire, if only because it doesn't suit their personality.]
More cope :mrgreen: Here's one of the actual studies if you're interested:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4340903/
From your link, emphasis mine:

"The present study supports that there is an association between retirement age and age at onset of AD. However, the strength of this association appears to be overestimated due to the selection bias. Moreover, the causality issue remains unresolved. Further prospective investigations are mandatory in order to correctly address this question."
Are you familiar with correlation and causation?

mak1277
Posts: 758
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:26 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by mak1277 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 4:25 pm

Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 4:01 pm
mak1277 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:56 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:38 pm
2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:21 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:21 pm


Whatever helps you cope! Show me your peer reviewed longitudinal study and maybe I'll buy it.
Ugh. You missed the point entirely. Who referenced anything about "coping" (except, perhaps, those who are still working)? Some of us don't need useless click bait in usatoday, a "peer reviewed longitudinal study", or other such nonsense to design our lives. Were I interested (and I most certainly am not), I'd ask you to show me the sources of your "studies" (peer reviewed or otherwise), who their sponsors are, and what "publications" these so-called "studies" show up in (it's in the interest of financial and certain other publications to keep you on hamster wheels of various types).

Escaping the cesspool of "conflict resolution", politicking, game playing, position protecting, organizational jockeying, and the rest of the morass inherent in working in organizations enables some who retiree to be more efficient, effective, and productive than every were while working, if only due to the lack of friction. Some of us are simply, highly self-generative.

[Edited to add: OTOH, I do agree there are those who should never retire, if only because it doesn't suit their personality.]
More cope :mrgreen: Here's one of the actual studies if you're interested:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4340903/
From your link, emphasis mine:

"The present study supports that there is an association between retirement age and age at onset of AD. However, the strength of this association appears to be overestimated due to the selection bias. Moreover, the causality issue remains unresolved. Further prospective investigations are mandatory in order to correctly address this question."
Are you familiar with correlation and causation?
Of course...I know that correlation is often just coincidence and causation is the only thing that would cause me to even consider changing my actions.

User avatar
Alexa9
Posts: 1392
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2016 9:41 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Alexa9 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 4:43 pm

mak1277 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 4:25 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 4:01 pm
mak1277 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:56 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:38 pm
2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:21 pm


Ugh. You missed the point entirely. Who referenced anything about "coping" (except, perhaps, those who are still working)? Some of us don't need useless click bait in usatoday, a "peer reviewed longitudinal study", or other such nonsense to design our lives. Were I interested (and I most certainly am not), I'd ask you to show me the sources of your "studies" (peer reviewed or otherwise), who their sponsors are, and what "publications" these so-called "studies" show up in (it's in the interest of financial and certain other publications to keep you on hamster wheels of various types).

Escaping the cesspool of "conflict resolution", politicking, game playing, position protecting, organizational jockeying, and the rest of the morass inherent in working in organizations enables some who retiree to be more efficient, effective, and productive than every were while working, if only due to the lack of friction. Some of us are simply, highly self-generative.

[Edited to add: OTOH, I do agree there are those who should never retire, if only because it doesn't suit their personality.]
More cope :mrgreen: Here's one of the actual studies if you're interested:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4340903/
From your link, emphasis mine:

"The present study supports that there is an association between retirement age and age at onset of AD. However, the strength of this association appears to be overestimated due to the selection bias. Moreover, the causality issue remains unresolved. Further prospective investigations are mandatory in order to correctly address this question."
Are you familiar with correlation and causation?
Of course...I know that correlation is often just coincidence and causation is the only thing that would cause me to even consider changing my actions.
Haha, well however you cope is fine with me. Just don't forget to do your Sudokus :mrgreen:

2015
Posts: 1701
Joined: Mon Feb 10, 2014 2:32 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by 2015 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 6:45 pm

Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:38 pm
2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:21 pm
Alexa9 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:21 pm
2015 wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:37 pm
Typical usatoday nonsense. The only thing "a job" forces one to do is to expend one's life energy on something other than oneself.

Some of us since retirement have markedly increased what may be classified as "sharp" (or dare I say, intelligent) as a result of markedly increasing focus on that which is important at the expense of markedly decreasing focus on that which is unimportant.
Whatever helps you cope! Show me your peer reviewed longitudinal study and maybe I'll buy it.
Ugh. You missed the point entirely. Who referenced anything about "coping" (except, perhaps, those who are still working)? Some of us don't need useless click bait in usatoday, a "peer reviewed longitudinal study", or other such nonsense to design our lives. Were I interested (and I most certainly am not), I'd ask you to show me the sources of your "studies" (peer reviewed or otherwise), who their sponsors are, and what "publications" these so-called "studies" show up in (it's in the interest of financial and certain other publications to keep you on hamster wheels of various types).

Escaping the cesspool of "conflict resolution", politicking, game playing, position protecting, organizational jockeying, and the rest of the morass inherent in working in organizations enables some who retiree to be more efficient, effective, and productive than every were while working, if only due to the lack of friction. Some of us are simply, highly self-generative.

[Edited to add: OTOH, I do agree there are those who should never retire, if only because it doesn't suit their personality.]
More cope :mrgreen: Here's one of the actual studies if you're interested:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4340903/
Not worth another wasted response or further hijacking of this thread. :oops:

Emilyjane
Posts: 116
Joined: Sat Jul 27, 2013 6:39 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Emilyjane » Wed Jan 10, 2018 6:47 pm

One week of retirement...so far, good!
"Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance", Confucius

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Fletch
Posts: 668
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 1:25 pm
Location: USA

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Fletch » Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:12 pm

I loved my paid work. I had a great boss. I had freedom to do what I wanted, when I wanted, where I wanted. That said:

Retired from paid work: 16+ years
Seconds missing paid work since retiring: 0

:sharebeer
“Meaningless! Meaningless!” says the Teacher. Whoever loves money never has enough; whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with their income. This too is meaningless.

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