Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Theseus
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Theseus » Wed Jan 17, 2018 2:44 pm

Working2notWork wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:50 pm
Hey all -

As I'm reading through all the replies, it seems as though many are staying busy with their daily, non working, lives. As I think about early retirement, would you mind shedding some light on what exactly keeps you busy all day long?

Thanks,

Working (for now)
I retired last June. I had no plan as to what I will do in retirement. First 2-3 months were stressful as I felt pretty useless. But I LOVE my life now - more than ever before.


On a daily basis I am a the gym for 2-3 hours.
I became a SCORE mentor. So I am volunteering two days a week there.
I got myself elected to our HOA board (I might regret that) to give back to my community.
Began planning for a philanthropic activity in a third world country. I was already doing it ad hoc. Now it will be a lot more organized.
My passion is Travel. So went to Europe twice last year. I have five trips coming up between now and June.
Joined a local Angel Investing group. That is a lot of fun.
Took Golf lessons and will be playing some golf.
I am sure there is a ton more I am forgetting :-)

Life is fun!!

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Taylor Larimore
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement? -- Not me.

Post by Taylor Larimore » Wed Jan 17, 2018 3:10 pm

tennisplyr wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 4:52 pm
Just hit 7 years in retirement and things seem to be going fast, but well for me. Was wondering if anyone has been disappointed with retirement and maybe went back to work, and went did that hit?
tennisplyr:

I retired 36 years ago at the age of 57. Unquestionably one of the best decisions of my life.

What's not to like when I can wake up each morning at any time I want, to do to do whatever I want, including conversations with my Boglehead friends such as this.

It's a beautiful life. . .

Best wishes.
Taylor
"Simplicity is the master key to financial success." -- Jack Bogle

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tennisplyr
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement? -- Not me.

Post by tennisplyr » Wed Jan 17, 2018 6:42 pm

Taylor Larimore wrote:
Wed Jan 17, 2018 3:10 pm
tennisplyr wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 4:52 pm
Just hit 7 years in retirement and things seem to be going fast, but well for me. Was wondering if anyone has been disappointed with retirement and maybe went back to work, and went did that hit?
tennisplyr:

I retired 36 years ago at the age of 57. Unquestionably one of the best decisions of my life.

What's not to like when I can wake up each morning at any time I want, to do to do whatever I want, including conversations with my Boglehead friends such as this.

It's a beautiful life. . .

Best wishes.
Taylor
Well said Taylor :thumbsup
Those who move forward with a happy spirit will find that things always work out.

visualguy
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by visualguy » Wed Jan 17, 2018 7:16 pm

I was considering early retirement at 50, but wasn't sure, so I took a 1-year "sabbatical" to see how it goes. I went back to work after that.

I found that I was becoming too lazy, and wasn't really doing more interesting or fun activities with my time than when I was working. Also, I missed the social interaction, and felt detached from the world.

There was also a sense of waste of abilities, and lack of satisfaction from a purely hedonistic/consumerist type of existence. I could have volunteered, but then why not do what I'm really good at and trained for, and go back to contributing through work?

I do have a job that gives me some enjoyment and satisfaction, and I realize that this doesn't apply to everyone, and if it stopped applying to me, then I would try to find another such job, or create it, or retire if I failed.

My expectation is that I will be more inclined to retire and actually stick to it in my late 50s, but who knows. There are so many people out there who could easily retire from a financial perspective, but they don't, and they work hard to keep their careers going, so I'm not sure, but I think I'm not as committed as they are...

mak1277
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by mak1277 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 9:34 am

visualguy wrote:
Wed Jan 17, 2018 7:16 pm

There was also a sense of waste of abilities, and lack of satisfaction from a purely hedonistic/consumerist type of existence. I could have volunteered, but then why not do what I'm really good at and trained for, and go back to contributing through work?
I think this is a very interesting question. Do you work at a non-profit or for-profit entity? Do you believe the mission of your employer is inherently good?

My personal point of view is that for profit companies exist only to enrich their shareholders, and as such, the only thing I'm contributing to by working for them is to enrich shareholders and/or myself. Non-profits (good ones at least) exist to better the world. Any time or energy I give to a worthy non-profit is therefore more valuable to the world at large than any time I give to my employer.

wrongfunds
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by wrongfunds » Thu Jan 18, 2018 10:36 am

I’m in the “every night is Friday night and every day is “Saturday” mindset. Retired 8 months now.
The other side of the same coin is that there is no weekend to look forward to! If you are glass half empty kind of person, you would be lamenting losing all the "vacation" and "weekends".

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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by technovelist » Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:33 am

mak1277 wrote:
Thu Jan 18, 2018 9:34 am
visualguy wrote:
Wed Jan 17, 2018 7:16 pm

There was also a sense of waste of abilities, and lack of satisfaction from a purely hedonistic/consumerist type of existence. I could have volunteered, but then why not do what I'm really good at and trained for, and go back to contributing through work?
I think this is a very interesting question. Do you work at a non-profit or for-profit entity? Do you believe the mission of your employer is inherently good?

My personal point of view is that for profit companies exist only to enrich their shareholders, and as such, the only thing I'm contributing to by working for them is to enrich shareholders and/or myself. Non-profits (good ones at least) exist to better the world. Any time or energy I give to a worthy non-profit is therefore more valuable to the world at large than any time I give to my employer.
For-profit companies can survive only if they transform less-valuable resources into more-valuable resources. This means that they must be benefiting their customers as well as shareholders and employees.

Which is why almost everything we see around us that makes our lives better was created by for-profit companies.
In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, they often differ.

mak1277
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by mak1277 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:39 am

technovelist wrote:
Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:33 am
mak1277 wrote:
Thu Jan 18, 2018 9:34 am
visualguy wrote:
Wed Jan 17, 2018 7:16 pm

There was also a sense of waste of abilities, and lack of satisfaction from a purely hedonistic/consumerist type of existence. I could have volunteered, but then why not do what I'm really good at and trained for, and go back to contributing through work?
I think this is a very interesting question. Do you work at a non-profit or for-profit entity? Do you believe the mission of your employer is inherently good?

My personal point of view is that for profit companies exist only to enrich their shareholders, and as such, the only thing I'm contributing to by working for them is to enrich shareholders and/or myself. Non-profits (good ones at least) exist to better the world. Any time or energy I give to a worthy non-profit is therefore more valuable to the world at large than any time I give to my employer.
For-profit companies can survive only if they transform less-valuable resources into more-valuable resources. This means that they must be benefiting their customers as well as shareholders and employees.

Which is why almost everything we see around us that makes our lives better was created by for-profit companies.
I'm talking about the reason they exist though...not the ultimate result. Also I think there are numerous examples of companies that continue to exist and turn a profit that do not "benefit their customers" in a holistic sense (e.g., a cigarette company).

Also I'm not some weirdo who has a problem with capitalism or for profit entities. I'm just calling it like I see it...companies exist to make money. If the byproduct of that improves the lives of customers, that's great, but it's not the raison d'etre

2015
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by 2015 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 3:59 pm

wrongfunds wrote:
Thu Jan 18, 2018 10:36 am
I’m in the “every night is Friday night and every day is “Saturday” mindset. Retired 8 months now.
The other side of the same coin is that there is no weekend to look forward to! If you are glass half empty kind of person, you would be lamenting losing all the "vacation" and "weekends".
Who needs a weekend? In retirement, you look forward to every day. As to vacations, I have so much planned this year I've actually had to nix planned foreign travel.

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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Fallible » Thu Jan 18, 2018 9:49 pm

2015 wrote:
Thu Jan 18, 2018 3:59 pm
wrongfunds wrote:
Thu Jan 18, 2018 10:36 am
I’m in the “every night is Friday night and every day is “Saturday” mindset. Retired 8 months now.
The other side of the same coin is that there is no weekend to look forward to! If you are glass half empty kind of person, you would be lamenting losing all the "vacation" and "weekends".
Who needs a weekend? In retirement, you look forward to every day. ...
As another retiree, I agree. :sharebeer
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sil2017
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by sil2017 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:24 pm

I retired about 7 months ago at age 56 . I am loving it . Retirement is one of the best decisions I’ve made in my life. I still don’t feel like I have enough time for my interests and hobbies .

I spend the morning reading and learning on the computer with my 2 cups of coffee . I go to the gym to work out or go for a run 4 to 5 times per week.

I have time to walk my dogs , go out for a leisure lunch, watch a movie , go for a massage,read about traveling ..... all and everything at my own pace.

No more driving in rush hour or supervisor telling me what to do. I have time to plan my international travels . I am looking forward to my East African Trip ..... Mt . Kilimanjaro , Safari and relaxation in Zanzibar.


My only regret is not retiring one year earlier.

jojay
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by jojay » Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:54 am

Disenchanted? No, three years in and it is still a very, very enchanting lifestyle.

Yesterday I:
Got up at 615 to see the previous night's beautiful snowfall at sunrise. Never would have seen it while commuting to work in the dark.
Read some bogleheads, cnn, looked at email, looked at email from post-retirement, work at part time job ( teach part time at local college). Had a coffee. Made some cinnamon rolls.
Went to older daughter's house. Installed baby safety gate for her new puppy, played with the puppy for an hour, "installed" some carbon monoxide detectors, shoveled off a deck and came home.
Had lunch, went to school at 3pm to teach a brief class about my career (at $65 / hour), then had to go to a local Innovation event night in town and saw some interesting applications of entrepreneurship. Went with 2 colleagues to a local bar for 2 beers and took an interesting beer glass home to add to my collection - a new, post retirement hobby.
Came home. Missed the Bruins game on TV - darn!!

This morning I:
Got up at 615 - wife still works academic calendar. Snow fall still looks wondrously beautiful - even enchanting.
Watched the Bruins game - wife recorded it for me. Only took 90 minutes.
Am typing this while having a coffee, not stressing about any meetings, listening to my 14 year old puppy snore.
At 1130, taking a class at the Apple store to learn more about my phone - IF YOU HAVE NOT DONE THIS, YOU SHOULD - AMAZING WHAT YOU CAN LEARN.
Learned how to make really good pork ribs and will be making more today for when we meet with my son and daughters tomorrow. Better that the ribs sit for a day after being cooked btw.
Then installing a curtain rod that normally I would be doing at 8pm if I were still working. If I don't do it today... there is always tomorrow.
Going to a Mexican restaurant tonight. New place for us. Hope they have good beer glasses.

Tomorrow...:
Disenchanted? It is what i worked 45 years for. Remember the phrase "living the dream?"

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BTDT
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by BTDT » Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:05 am

From my humble personal experience, retirement is not having nothing to do, but rather doing what you want to do, when you want to do it.

That said, I have led what I consider a very full life, including retirement at age 42 (military officer), retirement again at age 56 (business owner), and a third try at retirement as a corporate executive officer at age 67. I have traveled the world, lost buddies beside me in combat, found the love-of-my-life in my better-half, criss-crossed North America in an RV, and God forbid, even owned a "for profit" business (not cigarette related) :oops:

I still have a pretty much endless list of things to do; including more international travel, volunteer work, hobbies, home improvement, honey-do's etc. , but I will get to them when, and if, I want to. As a long-time indexer and practicing LBYM Boglehead I have more money than I need, and life in retirement is GOOD! :sharebeer
If past history was all that is needed to play the game of money, the richest people would be librarians.

brennok
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by brennok » Fri Jan 19, 2018 10:55 pm

I think my biggest fear for retirement is spending. I keep running the calculations and firecalc shows I could retire safely even overestimating my yearly expenses. I worry that because I will be retired my spending will increase. I don’t know if I will ever get over the fear of spending without a salary. The whole don’t spend what you don’t earn is too built into me. I guess though when the job drives me crazy enough I may just welcome it.

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akblizzard
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by akblizzard » Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:19 am

wrongfunds wrote:
Thu Jan 18, 2018 10:36 am
I’m in the “every night is Friday night and every day is “Saturday” mindset. Retired 8 months now.
The other side of the same coin is that there is no weekend to look forward to! If you are glass half empty kind of person, you would be lamenting losing all the "vacation" and "weekends".
Good grief. Really? It’s all vacation and weekends!

visualguy
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by visualguy » Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:11 am

BTDT wrote:
Fri Jan 19, 2018 11:05 am
From my humble personal experience, retirement is not having nothing to do, but rather doing what you want to do, when you want to do it.

That said, I have led what I consider a very full life, including retirement at age 42 (military officer), retirement again at age 56 (business owner), and a third try at retirement as a corporate executive officer at age 67. I have traveled the world, lost buddies beside me in combat, found the love-of-my-life in my better-half, criss-crossed North America in an RV, and God forbid, even owned a "for profit" business (not cigarette related) :oops:

I still have a pretty much endless list of things to do; including more international travel, volunteer work, hobbies, home improvement, honey-do's etc. , but I will get to them when, and if, I want to. As a long-time indexer and practicing LBYM Boglehead I have more money than I need, and life in retirement is GOOD! :sharebeer
You worked hard to re-invent yourself and establish new careers a couple of times, thus avoiding retiring too early (42 and 56). That's very admirable - it's not easy. I reached the same conclusion - need to keep things going on the career front until the right stage is reached, which may differ from person to person, but it's definitely not 40s or early/mid 50s for me. Maybe late 50s if I run out of steam. Retirement is great at the right time, but not prematurely in my opinion/experience (tried it at 50 and didn't like it.)

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WpgGuy
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by WpgGuy » Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:03 am

I have a slightly tangential question, somewhat dark. I’m late 30s, but on track for a pretty early retirement if I want it (maybe 42?). I recently came across the story of a colleague who past away very young from a sudden disease after doing everything right in life (given under a year to live :/). This got me thinking, and kind of re-evaluating... perhaps feeling a tad less invincible.

So my question is this: how did you all factor in the unknown risks of “black swan” terminal health events, vs the benefits of a larger retirement nest egg? I’d feel awfully foolish if I spent 7 or 8 years working to make firecalc happier only to get unlucky health wise.

This all kinda made me really think hard when enough is enough, but not really sure how to think of this kinda thing. The temptation is to think “it won’t happen to me” (rationally I know it’s a remote event), but if it ever did I’d at least like to think I lived my life to its fullest. For those who elected to work more, were you at peace with the possibility (however remote) that you may never get a “retirement” by rolling the dice?

Right now the “sabbatical” idea (to test drive retirement) sounds quite good when I hit 42...

Thoughts?

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tennisplyr
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by tennisplyr » Sat Jan 20, 2018 8:39 am

WpgGuy wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:03 am
I have a slightly tangential question, somewhat dark. I’m late 30s, but on track for a pretty early retirement if I want it (maybe 42?). I recently came across the story of a colleague who past away very young from a sudden disease after doing everything right in life (given under a year to live :/). This got me thinking, and kind of re-evaluating... perhaps feeling a tad less invincible.

So my question is this: how did you all factor in the unknown risks of “black swan” terminal health events, vs the benefits of a larger retirement nest egg? I’d feel awfully foolish if I spent 7 or 8 years working to make firecalc happier only to get unlucky health wise.

This all kinda made me really think hard when enough is enough, but not really sure how to think of this kinda thing. The temptation is to think “it won’t happen to me” (rationally I know it’s a remote event), but if it ever did I’d at least like to think I lived my life to its fullest. For those who elected to work more, were you at peace with the possibility (however remote) that you may never get a “retirement” by rolling the dice?


Right now the “sabbatical” idea (to test drive retirement) sounds quite good when I hit 42...

Thoughts?
I believed in living life when I was younger, trying to balance work/life. Retired at 61 and am enjoying life. Odds are you will live to reach retirement age. When I thought I had enough--both money and work--I pulled the trigger.
Those who move forward with a happy spirit will find that things always work out.

Shallowpockets
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Shallowpockets » Sat Jan 20, 2018 9:11 am

Retirement is where the rubber meets the road of what you really are in life, and what you do. Because it is all up to you, now.
It is where you go from the reality of life to the philosophy of life. Then make that philosphy a reality.
It is where you face, well, yourself. You have time to look in the mirror, to make that reflection of you into the dream you may have had a long long time ago. What did you think it was going to be? Will you act on it? Is there a reason to act?
You watch the sunrise, nothing on the agenda. You never watched or appreciated that sunrise for so many years due to your day dictated by business, commuting, getting ready to do the work.
Rather than an outside locus of control, now it is an inner locus. Quite a burden for some. Unusual after so many years of running down the same old slot, trying to make your way through a maze created by others.
Down to you.
This is what freedom is. If you are a BH who has made it financially, you are into the best phase of your life. Remember also, it is the last phase. So while you may watch the beautiful sun rise, you also must remember that it sets.
And you don't know when.

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Hyperborea
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Hyperborea » Sat Jan 20, 2018 11:37 am

tennisplyr wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 8:39 am
WpgGuy wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:03 am
I have a slightly tangential question, somewhat dark. I’m late 30s, but on track for a pretty early retirement if I want it (maybe 42?). I recently came across the story of a colleague who past away very young from a sudden disease after doing everything right in life (given under a year to live :/). This got me thinking, and kind of re-evaluating... perhaps feeling a tad less invincible.

So my question is this: how did you all factor in the unknown risks of “black swan” terminal health events, vs the benefits of a larger retirement nest egg? I’d feel awfully foolish if I spent 7 or 8 years working to make firecalc happier only to get unlucky health wise.

This all kinda made me really think hard when enough is enough, but not really sure how to think of this kinda thing. The temptation is to think “it won’t happen to me” (rationally I know it’s a remote event), but if it ever did I’d at least like to think I lived my life to its fullest. For those who elected to work more, were you at peace with the possibility (however remote) that you may never get a “retirement” by rolling the dice?


Right now the “sabbatical” idea (to test drive retirement) sounds quite good when I hit 42...

Thoughts?
I believed in living life when I was younger, trying to balance work/life. Retired at 61 and am enjoying life. Odds are you will live to reach retirement age. When I thought I had enough--both money and work--I pulled the trigger.
100% agree with that. Take some of those trips that you want to take. Learn to play that instrument. Go to the gym. Call your distant relatives. Don't leave it all to retirement. If you do none of those before you retire then after 20,30,40 years how are you going to all of sudden change your life and start doing them?
"Plans are worthless, but planning is everything." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

jeffarvon
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by jeffarvon » Sat Jan 20, 2018 1:00 pm

visualguy: I was considering early retirement at 50, but wasn't sure, so I took a 1-year "sabbatical" to see how it goes. I went back to work after that.

I found that I was becoming too lazy, and wasn't really doing more interesting or fun activities with my time than when I was working. Also, I missed the social interaction, and felt detached from the world.

There was also a sense of waste of abilities, and lack of satisfaction from a purely hedonistic/consumerist type of existence. I could have volunteered, but then why not do what I'm really good at and trained for, and go back to contributing through work?

I do have a job that gives me some enjoyment and satisfaction, and I realize that this doesn't apply to everyone, and if it stopped applying to me, then I would try to find another such job, or create it, or retire if I failed.

My expectation is that I will be more inclined to retire and actually stick to it in my late 50s, but who knows. There are so many people out there who could easily retire from a financial perspective, but they don't, and they work hard to keep their careers going, so I'm not sure, but I think I'm not as committed as they are...
Did not plan to respond, but this struck a cord. Maybe something else for you? In my mid-50's, concurrent with my engineering job, I got a teaching degree. I then self-terminated and now into my 3rd year of teaching high school math. I will occasionally describe it as my retirement hobby. <fill in lots of positives about teaching here> There is a serious downturn in the number of college freshmen going into teaching. Look into alternate licensing paths that exist. The water is fine.
"Enough is as good as a feast" - Mary Poppins

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WpgGuy
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by WpgGuy » Sat Jan 20, 2018 1:12 pm

Hyperborea wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 11:37 am
tennisplyr wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 8:39 am
WpgGuy wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:03 am
...
This all kinda made me really think hard when enough is enough, but not really sure how to think of this kinda thing. The temptation is to think “it won’t happen to me” (rationally I know it’s a remote event), but if it ever did I’d at least like to think I lived my life to its fullest. For those who elected to work more, were you at peace with the possibility (however remote) that you may never get a “retirement” by rolling the dice?
...
I believed in living life when I was younger, trying to balance work/life. Retired at 61 and am enjoying life. Odds are you will live to reach retirement age. When I thought I had enough--both money and work--I pulled the trigger.
100% agree with that. Take some of those trips that you want to take. Learn to play that instrument. Go to the gym. Call your distant relatives. Don't leave it all to retirement. If you do none of those before you retire then after 20,30,40 years how are you going to all of sudden change your life and start doing them?
Good advice on not leaving it all to retirement. I do goto the gym, I kinda consider it an important part of the boglehead retirement plan...after all what's the point of a comfortable retirement if I'm not healthy enough to enjoy it? :D

If I decide to retire a bit later, it also sounds like a good compromise might be to cut back on the hours, and start favouring "life" a bit more over work (which I really enjoy too). I've cut back a bit over the last few years, but I could push it a bit more to get it right down to a more normal 40hr week and see how that feels, maybe even get a job where I purely work from home to ease into retirement; giving my investments a few more years to grow.
Last edited by WpgGuy on Sat Jan 20, 2018 1:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

2015
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by 2015 » Sat Jan 20, 2018 1:14 pm

WpgGuy wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:03 am
I have a slightly tangential question, somewhat dark. I’m late 30s, but on track for a pretty early retirement if I want it (maybe 42?). I recently came across the story of a colleague who past away very young from a sudden disease after doing everything right in life (given under a year to live :/). This got me thinking, and kind of re-evaluating... perhaps feeling a tad less invincible.

So my question is this: how did you all factor in the unknown risks of “black swan” terminal health events, vs the benefits of a larger retirement nest egg? I’d feel awfully foolish if I spent 7 or 8 years working to make firecalc happier only to get unlucky health wise.

This all kinda made me really think hard when enough is enough, but not really sure how to think of this kinda thing. The temptation is to think “it won’t happen to me” (rationally I know it’s a remote event), but if it ever did I’d at least like to think I lived my life to its fullest. For those who elected to work more, were you at peace with the possibility (however remote) that you may never get a “retirement” by rolling the dice?

Right now the “sabbatical” idea (to test drive retirement) sounds quite good when I hit 42...

Thoughts?
It probably depends on one's personality. Personally, I could never, ever be comfortable with a sabbatical from working at younger ages, particularly given the wholesale transformation taking place in the world of work. I posted before that one's 50's are referred to as the 50's mine field because statistics show people in that age group have a higher propensity for a serious health condition or job loss from which they never recover. In my early 50's, this scared me as I knew either of these two things would alter the quality of my life for the rest of my life. For this reason, I made attaining financial independence my number one goal.

Risk averse, my rational for all of the sacrificing I did was that I didn't want the chance of spending my future in the present while younger. I figured if I did all that sacrificing and came down with a terminal illness I would just chalk it up to bad luck. Alternatively, if I sacrificed, attained my goal of financial independence, retired, and didn't have a terminal illness, I'd have a very good quality of life. I will tell you the last 3 years since retirement have been the best years of my life. I've never been so fulfilled. My sole focus now and "Wildly Important Idea" (Cal Newport) is to continue on this trajectory until the end of my life (per the health calculators, current health status and health and safety practices, there's a higher than average probability that should run at least another 30 years).

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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by jginseattle » Sat Jan 20, 2018 5:56 pm

I find that in retirement it's very satisfying to spend one's time on one's own projects. I spend a lot of time on music these days.

2015
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by 2015 » Sat Jan 20, 2018 7:44 pm

Shallowpockets wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 9:11 am
Retirement is where the rubber meets the road of what you really are in life, and what you do. Because it is all up to you, now.
It is where you go from the reality of life to the philosophy of life. Then make that philosphy a reality.
It is where you face, well, yourself. You have time to look in the mirror, to make that reflection of you into the dream you may have had a long long time ago. What did you think it was going to be? Will you act on it? Is there a reason to act?
You watch the sunrise, nothing on the agenda. You never watched or appreciated that sunrise for so many years due to your day dictated by business, commuting, getting ready to do the work.
Rather than an outside locus of control, now it is an inner locus. Quite a burden for some. Unusual after so many years of running down the same old slot, trying to make your way through a maze created by others.
Down to you.
This is what freedom is. If you are a BH who has made it financially, you are into the best phase of your life. Remember also, it is the last phase. So while you may watch the beautiful sun rise, you also must remember that it sets.
And you don't know when.
What an extraordinary post. Thank you. I couldn't agree more.

zengolf2011
Posts: 89
Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2015 1:27 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement? -- Not me.

Post by zengolf2011 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:19 am

Taylor Larimore wrote:
Wed Jan 17, 2018 3:10 pm
tennisplyr wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 4:52 pm
Just hit 7 years in retirement and things seem to be going fast, but well for me. Was wondering if anyone has been disappointed with retirement and maybe went back to work, and went did that hit?
tennisplyr:

I retired 36 years ago at the age of 57. Unquestionably one of the best decisions of my life.

What's not to like when I can wake up each morning at any time I want, to do to do whatever I want, including conversations with my Boglehead friends such as this.

It's a beautiful life. . .

Best wishes.
Taylor
Taylor, your posts are unfailingly uplifting and always bring joy to my day! Thank you.

I retired from 30+ yrs. in health care ten years ago. I had been a man on a mission, and the mission was killing me. Started passing out at work, took heart pills every day. Made the decision to retire, and the blackouts stopped. Quit the heart pills (with the blessing of my cardiologist), haven't had a problem in ten years, have discovered lots of new (many surprising) pursuits, Love living every day. Offer this as a cautionary tale, hope it helps someone who needs to hear it.

eleighj
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by eleighj » Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:51 am

I retired on September 12, 2016, the day the new BOD met and approved the emergence from Chapter 11 (bizarre few months). Collected my severance and bonus and never looked back. No rising at 4:30 AM anymore unless my wife and I have an early morning flight! Days are spent on exercise, we travel extensively (currently putting our 2019 travel plans together), glamping in our Airstream, family especially since our grandson was born in February 2017 and deciding if we are going to downsize from our house to something requiring less work and maintenance. We are busy as our own pace.
Edward

Plymouth56
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Plymouth56 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:58 am

gasman wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:34 pm
I think the reason is that they have nothing else. Cultivated no hobbies. They are miserable, unhappy, nasty people. Invariably male.
So true..Co-worker of mine is 65 with 44 years in at our company.
He has no interests outside of work, has no plans of retiring yet does as little as possible most days work wise.
He enjoys telling co-workers he cant wait until he becomes number one in company seniority , a badge of honor he wants badly.
Truly a nasty unlikable person

squirm
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by squirm » Sun Jan 21, 2018 12:21 pm

Plymouth56 wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:58 am
gasman wrote:
Wed Jan 10, 2018 7:34 pm
I think the reason is that they have nothing else. Cultivated no hobbies. They are miserable, unhappy, nasty people. Invariably male.
So true..Co-worker of mine is 65 with 44 years in at our company.
He has no interests outside of work, has no plans of retiring yet does as little as possible most days work wise.
He enjoys telling co-workers he cant wait until he becomes number one in company seniority , a badge of honor he wants badly.
Truly a nasty unlikable person
I had a coworker like that, no outside life, no kids, etc. She liked making others life hell, so she'd feel superior.

TheNightsToCome
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by TheNightsToCome » Sun Jan 21, 2018 1:08 pm

WpgGuy wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:03 am
I have a slightly tangential question, somewhat dark. I’m late 30s, but on track for a pretty early retirement if I want it (maybe 42?). I recently came across the story of a colleague who past away very young from a sudden disease after doing everything right in life (given under a year to live :/). This got me thinking, and kind of re-evaluating... perhaps feeling a tad less invincible.

So my question is this: how did you all factor in the unknown risks of “black swan” terminal health events, vs the benefits of a larger retirement nest egg? I’d feel awfully foolish if I spent 7 or 8 years working to make firecalc happier only to get unlucky health wise.

This all kinda made me really think hard when enough is enough, but not really sure how to think of this kinda thing. The temptation is to think “it won’t happen to me” (rationally I know it’s a remote event), but if it ever did I’d at least like to think I lived my life to its fullest. For those who elected to work more, were you at peace with the possibility (however remote) that you may never get a “retirement” by rolling the dice?

Right now the “sabbatical” idea (to test drive retirement) sounds quite good when I hit 42...

Thoughts?
A sabbatical is always a great idea, but it's not a good test of retirement.

I took a year between college and med school to pursue something I loved with a community of people that I enjoyed. That was among the best years of my life.

I took another 1-yr sabbatical at 34 after selling a business. It was another great year.

However, I always knew that I was going back to work during my sabbaticals. That's very different than life in retirement.

At 41 I "retired" due to extreme burnout. It didn't matter whether I was ready or not. I had to get out. I lived on about $56-57K/year (in today's dollars). Based on what I know now about safe withdrawal rates (but didn't know then), that should have been sustainable for the long-term.

I had an interesting, happy, and largely stress-free life for the next 11 years before I became seriously ill and almost died. That was a shocker -- for me and my family. I had always been fit and trim with regular exercise habits and a favorable family history of good health. Didn't matter. I was unlucky.

I am so glad that I stepped off the treadmill to look around. I wasn't ready to die at 52, but at least I believed I had done what I could to lead a full life to that point. I would have been overwhelmed with regret if I had spent my entire adult life with my head down in a desperate sprint.

***

No doubt your perspective will be different if your career is less demanding.

If your career is very stressful, and especially if you don't have dependents at risk, then I highly recommend turning life upside down with an early retirement. If you're like me, you'll find that there are many things that you can do and want to do when you are younger but not when you are older. On the other hand, when you are older you many find that work has greater appeal -- as long as it doesn't consume your life and health.

Given that you can earn enough wealth to even consider early retirement, it's likely that you are the sort of person who will have many options for a return to work later in life -- if you want it or need it. At least, that's been my experience.

zengolf2011
Posts: 89
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by zengolf2011 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:16 pm

I had a neighbor who was one of the most bitter, unpleasant people I ever had the misfortune to meet. I pitied his poor wife. He hated his pressure-packed job, which was managing a livestock slaughtering plant. One day, he decided no more and retired. The change was instant and dramatic. He became one of the happiest, most pleasant people I have ever known, he and his wonderful wife embarked on carefree adventures, we all became great friends. Retirement is a most personal decision, but fear of the future can cloud reason.

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WpgGuy
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by WpgGuy » Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:11 am

TheNightsToCome wrote:
Sun Jan 21, 2018 1:08 pm
If your career is very stressful, and especially if you don't have dependents at risk, then I highly recommend turning life upside down with an early retirement. If you're like me, you'll find that there are many things that you can do and want to do when you are younger but not when you are older. On the other hand, when you are older you many find that work has greater appeal -- as long as it doesn't consume your life and health.

Given that you can earn enough wealth to even consider early retirement, it's likely that you are the sort of person who will have many options for a return to work later in life -- if you want it or need it. At least, that's been my experience.
Thank-you for the perspective and advice, it's very insightful. I hear what you are saying about the frame of mind one might have taking a sabbatical vs. retiring outright. I have no dependents (at least not yet), I'd call my job stressful at times: as my career has progressed, the responsibility and pressure to perform has gone up along with the renumeration (which is fair). I'm in tech, so going back into the work force later in life would probably be tough; the pace of change is relentless.

Notwithstanding a stock market crash, I think the early retirement option makes pretty good sense. Like you, I'd rather look back on life and know I lived it to the fullest.

visualguy
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by visualguy » Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:39 am

jeffarvon wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 1:00 pm
Did not plan to respond, but this struck a cord. Maybe something else for you? In my mid-50's, concurrent with my engineering job, I got a teaching degree. I then self-terminated and now into my 3rd year of teaching high school math. I will occasionally describe it as my retirement hobby. <fill in lots of positives about teaching here> There is a serious downturn in the number of college freshmen going into teaching. Look into alternate licensing paths that exist. The water is fine.
Yes, agreed - teaching can be good. I would imagine that the experience can vary depending on the students you get...

I think that as long as your primary career is going happily-enough, it's best to keep doing that rather than retiring and doing some other work like volunteering or teaching. However, when it's over for whatever reason, it's better (from my perspective) to find some other work as long as health allows and as long as the age isn't too advanced.

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VictoriaF
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by VictoriaF » Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:20 pm

Retirement gives you control over your time and energy. It is the basis of your independence. The OP question is similar to whether you are disappointed with being financially independent.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

tesuzuki2002
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Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by tesuzuki2002 » Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:50 pm

the consensus seems to be NO.

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