Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
User avatar
abuss368
Posts: 14536
Joined: Mon Aug 03, 2009 2:33 pm
Location: Where the water is warm, the drinks are cold, and I don't know the names of the players!

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by abuss368 » Tue Mar 26, 2019 10:42 pm

Mel Lindauer wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 5:24 pm
Not me. Twenty-one years now and counting. Busier now than I was when I ran a business. Have multiple new careers since "retiring" (author, columnist, elected official, forum moderator and contributor, President, The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy which puts on the annual Bogleheads Conferences, etc.) Also, play pickleball and do four-mile walks on the beach each day and golf when I have time. I think you get the picture. You can choose to do as much or as little as you want.

There's a huge difference in doing what you choose to do and being able to walk away from it if it causes you stress without it affecting your lifestyle one iota.

Life is good!
That is great Mel! Great vision for retirement.
John C. Bogle: "You simply do not need to put your money into 8 different mutual funds!"

TravelforFun
Posts: 1833
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2012 11:05 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by TravelforFun » Tue Mar 26, 2019 11:20 pm

Mel Lindauer wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 5:24 pm
Not me. Twenty-one years now and counting. Busier now than I was when I ran a business. Have multiple new careers since "retiring" (author, columnist, elected official, forum moderator and contributor, President, The John C. Bogle Center for Financial Literacy which puts on the annual Bogleheads Conferences, etc.) Also, play pickleball and do four-mile walks on the beach each day and golf when I have time. I think you get the picture. You can choose to do as much or as little as you want.

There's a huge difference in doing what you choose to do and being able to walk away from it if it causes you stress without it affecting your lifestyle one iota.

Life is good!
That sounds wonderful, especially since I'm retiring in August.

Btw, what's pickleball?

TravelforFun

zuma
Posts: 474
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2016 12:15 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by zuma » Wed Mar 27, 2019 4:40 am

The traditional notion of 'retirement' doesn't resonate with me at all. Being financially independent, on the other hand, absolutely does. Being financially independent means that I can spend my time doing what I want. This might include having a job.

User avatar
oldcomputerguy
Moderator
Posts: 5261
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2015 6:50 am
Location: In the middle of five acres of woods in East Tennessee

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by oldcomputerguy » Wed Mar 27, 2019 4:51 am

Just got back last week from Las Vegas celebrating DW's turning the Big Six-Oh.

Last year I volunteered to help out with social media for our local ESGR committee. This morning, I'm going up in a Blackhawk helicopter with the Army National Guard 230th Armored Battalion and a bunch of local employers.

I'm kinda liking retirement.

:happy
"I’ve come around to this: If you’re dumb, surround yourself with smart people; and if you’re smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you." (Aaron Sorkin)

KESP
Posts: 154
Joined: Sat May 07, 2016 8:24 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by KESP » Wed Mar 27, 2019 7:47 am

WpgGuy wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:03 am
I have a slightly tangential question, somewhat dark. I’m late 30s, but on track for a pretty early retirement if I want it (maybe 42?). I recently came across the story of a colleague who past away very young from a sudden disease after doing everything right in life (given under a year to live :/). This got me thinking, and kind of re-evaluating... perhaps feeling a tad less invincible.

So my question is this: how did you all factor in the unknown risks of “black swan” terminal health events, vs the benefits of a larger retirement nest egg? I’d feel awfully foolish if I spent 7 or 8 years working to make firecalc happier only to get unlucky health wise.

This all kinda made me really think hard when enough is enough, but not really sure how to think of this kinda thing. The temptation is to think “it won’t happen to me” (rationally I know it’s a remote event), but if it ever did I’d at least like to think I lived my life to its fullest. For those who elected to work more, were you at peace with the possibility (however remote) that you may never get a “retirement” by rolling the dice?

Right now the “sabbatical” idea (to test drive retirement) sounds quite good when I hit 42...

Thoughts?
I have struggled with this as well. My father died at 59, before he could retire. He did not earn a lot of money and so the option to retire early was never there. My mother retired at 65, and had 5 healthy years before dealing with another 5 years of cancer with a serious car accident mixed in and then she too passed away. This has always been in the back of my mind. I changed careers in my 40's and work in a school, albeit a low paying district. It did give me the gift of more time, but financially not so much. My husband has Parkinson's disease and I see a future of him needing me a lot. Since I discovered Bogleheads late in life, I have an OK retirement account, but not enough to retire now. My plan is to work 2 more years to get the minimum number of years for a pension, pay COBRA for the next year until I turn 65. In the meantime, I have traveled as much as possible with family and try to do as many things as I would in retirement now. I realize I have a school schedule which gives me more time off than most. My advice is to try and find a happy medium so that you live as much as possible now, but don't go through all your money should you be fortunate enough to live a long and healthy life.

Dontwasteit
Posts: 117
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2017 6:52 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Dontwasteit » Wed Mar 27, 2019 7:53 am

I love doing as close to nothing all day long! :beer

GlennK
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Mar 26, 2019 7:20 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by GlennK » Wed Mar 27, 2019 11:09 am

TravelforFun wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 11:20 pm

Btw, what's pickleball?

TravelforFun
A slow person's tennis. Actually, it is similar to tennis but played on about half the size of a court and with hard paddles. It is growing immensely in popularity but here (midwest) and in the retirement communities.

22twain
Posts: 1956
Joined: Thu May 10, 2012 5:42 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by 22twain » Wed Mar 27, 2019 4:23 pm

GlennK wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 11:09 am
[Pickleball] is growing immensely in popularity but here (midwest) and in the retirement communities.
Last year while I was driving through central Florida on a road trip, straight down the middle of the peninsula via US-27, I saw a huge electronic billboard advertising a new indoor pickleball facility. I thought, I must be coming up on The Villages, and sure enough, I was!
My investing princiPLEs do not include absolutely preserving princiPAL.

User avatar
Topic Author
tennisplyr
Posts: 2267
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 1:53 pm
Location: Sarasota, FL

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by tennisplyr » Wed Mar 27, 2019 5:48 pm

GlennK wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 11:09 am
TravelforFun wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 11:20 pm

Btw, what's pickleball?

TravelforFun
A slow person's tennis. Actually, it is similar to tennis but played on about half the size of a court and with hard paddles. It is growing immensely in popularity but here (midwest) and in the retirement communities.
It's a cross between tennis and ping pong. There putting some courts in here soon...can't wait. Here's a video on some guys playing.

https://youtu.be/n-z1pzCDu_M
Those who move forward with a happy spirit will find that things always work out.

protagonist
Posts: 5860
Joined: Sun Dec 26, 2010 12:47 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by protagonist » Wed Mar 27, 2019 11:53 pm

WpgGuy wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:03 am

So my question is this: how did you all factor in the unknown risks of “black swan” terminal health events, vs the benefits of a larger retirement nest egg? I’d feel awfully foolish if I spent 7 or 8 years working to make firecalc happier only to get unlucky health wise.

I'm happy you bring that up. I keep saying that "risk" is a double-edged sword. Many here seem to focus only on one edge....the risk of running out of money. They fail to see the other side. I will share with you a post of mine from 4 years ago:

by protagonist » Thu Jul 30, 2015 10:39 am:

I'm 63. Last week I had a heart attack on the way to the airport to play music abroad.

I'm 6'1" and I weigh 162. I work out regularly (rode 30 miles on my bike the day before the incident). My blood pressure has never been above 110/70. My total cholesterol is 190 with a high HDL fraction, which puts me in the low risk category. No significant family history. I never smoked. No diabetes, substance abuse, or other medical problems. Nobody I know would call me a "Type A personality". My doctor told me I have the body of a 35 year old. My only risk factor (not at all insignificant) is being male.

I was fortunate (for a healthy 63 y o guy who has a heart attack)....it was a relatively minor incident, I got prompt care and now have a stent in my circumflex artery.

Though my profession was inherently stressful (physician), I have always approached my work on my own terms, and never compromised my lifestyle for the sake of making more money, working jobs or moving places I did not enjoy, or for empty titles/prestige. My priorities were my family, living where I want to live, having enough time off to pursue my other interests, enjoying my work, and creating my own schedule. This did not come without risks (comical compared to the risks that others have just by virtue of their birthright), but in the long run, the risks were worth it, as I feel like I have lived a very rich life. I was never drawn to an extravagant lifestyle (fancy cars, clothes, whatever), but I lived well, and never felt wanting of anything I did not have. I made enough money. I could have made a lot more if I was willing to compromise my day-to-day life, but I didn't need any more.

My most valuable possession (other than my lovely "middle class" 1885 Victorian home in a very cool college town) is my tenor saxophone. I bought it about 10 years ago for $7000. It's probably worth close to $20K today, Even at $7K it would be my most valuable possession. It's worth a lot more than my car.

(By American standards, I have always been under-insured. I figured that the chances of my kids inheriting more money was greater that way, and I am pretty sure I was right.)

I was fortunate to be born in the mid-20th century as a relatively intelligent white American male during one of the greatest growth periods in the history of civilization, so, despite not having affluent parents and living a hippie lifestyle throughout the late 60s and 70s with no concern whatsoever for money, and putting myself through med school later in life, I did OK. In my demographic it was hard not to do OK.

I made money. Money didn't make me.

I retired in 2008 at 55, right before the crash. The crash (and divorce) took a big hit out of my savings, which caused me some worry about the future, but (as was reinforced yet again last week), the future is chaotic, so I figured what would happen would happen anyway. My savings came back with the market. I'm not filthy rich, but I'm comfortable, and I am not worried about money. I don't budget but I don't spend all that much and I live well. I probably won't run out, but anything can happen to any of us.

I could have panicked in 2008 and went back to work, delaying retirement until 65 or later. I would then be more secure about my money not running out when I hit 95. The last thing I ever thought would happen to me was a heart attack at 63. I could just as easily have died with all my toys unused last week. When I asked my cardiologist how often he sees people in my shape in their 40s, 50s and 60s have heart attacks, he said it is "much more common than you think". 25% or so present in cardiac arrest.

Why am I sharing this with this community? I feel like I might be able to help some folks out there with my story.

I'm usually a rather private person (other than here, only a few of my closest friends know what happened to me). But, in the time that I have frequented this forum, I feel that there is a significant segment of people who post here who, IMHO, are overly obsessed with making money and planning for a future that they cannot control. You can spend your life from age 18 predominantly dedicated to making sure you don't run out of money when you are 100. You can postpone joy indefinitely and just hope you are healthy enough down the road to enjoy your bundle. Or you can live the way you want to live today, staying well within your means, try to save if you can, enjoy your life, just not sweat it....knowing you might run out of money at 95, but on the other hand you might die at 40 or 50 or 60 or tomorrow, and some things just cannot be controlled.

You can do everything possible to avoid the inevitable or you can just live and take your chances. You might not realize it, but either way, you are gambling. Which gamble is more enjoyable?

Paddygirl
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2018 7:09 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Paddygirl » Thu Mar 28, 2019 7:08 am

Retired at 58. I would have to say its marvelous. No stress, no driving, no getting dressed up and I can wake up and decide what I want to do for the day while also planning trips to other places. There are NO crowded fishing spots during the week! The only thing I can't figure out is why Walmart is crowded every day of the week???

robphoto
Posts: 108
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2018 12:42 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by robphoto » Thu Mar 28, 2019 7:39 am

Seeing people asking how to balance present living and choice of retirement time with saving for tomorrow reminds me of this Shaker saying,

"Do your work as if you had a thousand years to live, and as if you were to die tomorrow."

Or I might say, live your life as if...

Do the things that are important in the now, with family, work, etc., and prudently accumulate and plan for a future of unknown length and circumstance. You don't know what that will be, so try for reasonably good decisions, and pray!

User avatar
220volt
Posts: 121
Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2018 10:33 pm
Location: USA

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by 220volt » Thu Mar 28, 2019 3:08 pm

Isn't there an old saying "the work makes a man. But the leisure makes a gentlemen"
"If I had only followed the advice of financial analysts in 2008, I'd have a million dollars today, provided I started with a hundred million dollars" - Jon Stewart

Bronko
Posts: 35
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:17 pm
Location: No matter where you go, there you are.....

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Bronko » Thu Mar 28, 2019 3:26 pm

protagonist wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 11:53 pm
WpgGuy wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:03 am

So my question is this: how did you all factor in the unknown risks of “black swan” terminal health events, vs the benefits of a larger retirement nest egg? I’d feel awfully foolish if I spent 7 or 8 years working to make firecalc happier only to get unlucky health wise.

I'm happy you bring that up. I keep saying that "risk" is a double-edged sword. Many here seem to focus only on one edge....the risk of running out of money. They fail to see the other side. I will share with you a post of mine from 4 years ago:

by protagonist » Thu Jul 30, 2015 10:39 am:

I'm 63. Last week I had a heart attack on the way to the airport to play music abroad.

I'm 6'1" and I weigh 162. I work out regularly (rode 30 miles on my bike the day before the incident). My blood pressure has never been above 110/70. My total cholesterol is 190 with a high HDL fraction, which puts me in the low risk category. No significant family history. I never smoked. No diabetes, substance abuse, or other medical problems. Nobody I know would call me a "Type A personality". My doctor told me I have the body of a 35 year old. My only risk factor (not at all insignificant) is being male.

I was fortunate (for a healthy 63 y o guy who has a heart attack)....it was a relatively minor incident, I got prompt care and now have a stent in my circumflex artery.

Though my profession was inherently stressful (physician), I have always approached my work on my own terms, and never compromised my lifestyle for the sake of making more money, working jobs or moving places I did not enjoy, or for empty titles/prestige. My priorities were my family, living where I want to live, having enough time off to pursue my other interests, enjoying my work, and creating my own schedule. This did not come without risks (comical compared to the risks that others have just by virtue of their birthright), but in the long run, the risks were worth it, as I feel like I have lived a very rich life. I was never drawn to an extravagant lifestyle (fancy cars, clothes, whatever), but I lived well, and never felt wanting of anything I did not have. I made enough money. I could have made a lot more if I was willing to compromise my day-to-day life, but I didn't need any more.

My most valuable possession (other than my lovely "middle class" 1885 Victorian home in a very cool college town) is my tenor saxophone. I bought it about 10 years ago for $7000. It's probably worth close to $20K today, Even at $7K it would be my most valuable possession. It's worth a lot more than my car.

(By American standards, I have always been under-insured. I figured that the chances of my kids inheriting more money was greater that way, and I am pretty sure I was right.)

I was fortunate to be born in the mid-20th century as a relatively intelligent white American male during one of the greatest growth periods in the history of civilization, so, despite not having affluent parents and living a hippie lifestyle throughout the late 60s and 70s with no concern whatsoever for money, and putting myself through med school later in life, I did OK. In my demographic it was hard not to do OK.

I made money. Money didn't make me.

I retired in 2008 at 55, right before the crash. The crash (and divorce) took a big hit out of my savings, which caused me some worry about the future, but (as was reinforced yet again last week), the future is chaotic, so I figured what would happen would happen anyway. My savings came back with the market. I'm not filthy rich, but I'm comfortable, and I am not worried about money. I don't budget but I don't spend all that much and I live well. I probably won't run out, but anything can happen to any of us.

I could have panicked in 2008 and went back to work, delaying retirement until 65 or later. I would then be more secure about my money not running out when I hit 95. The last thing I ever thought would happen to me was a heart attack at 63. I could just as easily have died with all my toys unused last week. When I asked my cardiologist how often he sees people in my shape in their 40s, 50s and 60s have heart attacks, he said it is "much more common than you think". 25% or so present in cardiac arrest.

Why am I sharing this with this community? I feel like I might be able to help some folks out there with my story.

I'm usually a rather private person (other than here, only a few of my closest friends know what happened to me). But, in the time that I have frequented this forum, I feel that there is a significant segment of people who post here who, IMHO, are overly obsessed with making money and planning for a future that they cannot control. You can spend your life from age 18 predominantly dedicated to making sure you don't run out of money when you are 100. You can postpone joy indefinitely and just hope you are healthy enough down the road to enjoy your bundle. Or you can live the way you want to live today, staying well within your means, try to save if you can, enjoy your life, just not sweat it....knowing you might run out of money at 95, but on the other hand you might die at 40 or 50 or 60 or tomorrow, and some things just cannot be controlled.

You can do everything possible to avoid the inevitable or you can just live and take your chances. You might not realize it, but either way, you are gambling. Which gamble is more enjoyable?
Thank you for sharing this insight. Sage words.
Never let a little bit of money get in the way of a real good time.

User avatar
beyou
Posts: 2707
Joined: Sat Feb 27, 2010 3:57 pm
Location: Northeastern US

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by beyou » Thu Mar 28, 2019 6:23 pm

zuma wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 4:40 am
The traditional notion of 'retirement' doesn't resonate with me at all. Being financially independent, on the other hand, absolutely does. Being financially independent means that I can spend my time doing what I want. This might include having a job.
+1 People have a tough time understand why I say I'll keep working "if I find a job I would enjoy".
How is that possible, maybe not, but just not being forced to take a job can make it more enjoyable.

Jeep4Life
Posts: 64
Joined: Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:04 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Jeep4Life » Thu Mar 28, 2019 9:12 pm

After 15 months retired, a former coworker called and emailed with a job offer with a different company. After listening to the project description, I agreed to the idea of going back to work as a part time consultant, but only after they made me an offer I couldn't refuse. Today was the last day of my work week this week, so far so good. Challenging job with a lot of payback, I'm funded through the end of the fiscal year so we'll so how it goes...

WildBill
Posts: 478
Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2016 10:47 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by WildBill » Thu Mar 28, 2019 9:31 pm

Image

Howdy

My retirement.

Bliss.

W B
"Through chances various, through all vicissitudes, we make our way." Virgil, The Aeneid

bhsince87
Posts: 2433
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 1:08 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by bhsince87 » Thu Mar 28, 2019 9:38 pm

When this thread first posted, I read it with great interest. I was working then.

But now I've been retired for 3 months, at age 53. I can offer some insight!

The first few weeks were awesome. Like a long vacation. But then I started to have some concerns.

Of course, that time corresponded to the worst of winter here, and I always get depressed then.

It WAS nice that I didn't have to worry about going out in the snow and cold.

And wow, did I ever get some reading done!

Now the weather is getting nice, and I'm liking it more and more.

The thing I appreciate most is the total lack of caring about time. I'm a big DIYer. I used to hurry through stuff, just "get er done". Now I take my time, and do everything "right".

I also am so much more relaxed when I'm out and about. I can shop and travel during non-rush hour times.

But even if I do hit peak traffic, what do I care? I don't have to be anywhere according to some one else's schedule. I think that's one of the greatest benefits so far.

So I'm liking it!

My biggest downside so far is that I am having a hard time spending money. I was planning on a 3% withdrawal rate, with a $9-10k monthly budget. So far, I'm averaging about $2k per month. Not a bad problem to have, but I need to figure out how to get over the $ hoarding mentality!
"If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace." Samuel Adams

technovelist
Posts: 2918
Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 9:02 pm
Contact:

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by technovelist » Mon Aug 19, 2019 9:33 pm

I've been "retired" now for several years, in that my last job where I had to go anywhere for work was in 2015.

I've been working as much or more now than I was then, but only on projects I'm interested in. My current project is developing software that takes advantage of the performance of the newly released (very fast) "persistent memory" storage devices. They are the coolest computer storage (or memory) invention since the 1970's!
In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, they often differ.

nguy44
Posts: 160
Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2017 1:52 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by nguy44 » Mon Aug 19, 2019 10:03 pm

bhsince87 wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 9:38 pm
My biggest downside so far is that I am having a hard time spending money. I was planning on a 3% withdrawal rate, with a $9-10k monthly budget. So far, I'm averaging about $2k per month. Not a bad problem to have, but I need to figure out how to get over the $ hoarding mentality!
I am in the same position. For the first fiscal year of retirement my planned SWR had us spending about $5K monthly from my cash (the "gap" needed beyond pension and passive income before we take SS), but it averaged 1K.

I am retired for a little over a year and just love the freedom to do what I want when I want. Have had close to a dozen solicitations for jobs, but the thought of commuting again and working under someone else's deadline is no longer appealing. I do plenty of other things to keep my mind as sharp as possible.

protagonist
Posts: 5860
Joined: Sun Dec 26, 2010 12:47 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by protagonist » Tue Aug 20, 2019 12:16 pm

There are, to date, over 200 responses to this thread.

It would be interesting to know what percentage of those respondants expressed ANY significant regrets in their posts about retiring when they did, regardless of when or why they retired.

A quick skim of the responses suggests to me that very few had any significant regrets.

That also appears to be (anecdotally) true of all my friends and neighbors who retired, regardless of reason, timing, or the amount of money they had. My friends span the gamut of wealth with the exception of the very poor and the ultra-rich.

If my observation is correct, it would seem that a lot of people, at least those frequenting the Bogleheads website, worry much more about when to retire than they need to.

If somebody else cares enough to review all the responses to come up with a percentage of happy vs unhappy (sort of like Rotten Tomatoes does with movie reviews...thumbs up or thumbs down), I think the result would be interesting and illuminating. (That somebody won't be me...*giggle*)

Cody6136
Posts: 263
Joined: Tue Apr 16, 2019 10:54 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Cody6136 » Tue Aug 20, 2019 12:58 pm

renue74 wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 8:00 pm
BogleMelon wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:47 pm
This post is not for me. I still have over 2 decades to retire. Only wanted to get something out. I am sick of the rat race! I want to get out of it as soon as possible! My job is not stressful, commuting is relatively short, my boss is nice, I work on spreadsheets and I love spreadsheets! But man, I hate this alarm at 6:30 am during the winter! I am not a morning guy, and I fail to understand why they force people to work in pre set schedules! Also I hate to have to stay till 5 pm even if I am done with work at 1 pm! This doesn't make sense and I hate it!
I tried so many employers, same thing, the problem is me.. I am too fast! I can't help it! What takes them 4 days to do, with some nesting formulas and a pivot table, it takes me 1 hour..
Thanks for hearing me out!!
+1 Me too.
Me three. Which is why I am here, and why I have a side gig here too. I am too fast as well. I have stopped taking my speed and impatience out on my co-workers, who use their jobs as social channels. Life has become better since I stop judging others. I takes all kinds!

Dottie57
Posts: 6575
Joined: Thu May 19, 2016 5:43 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Dottie57 » Tue Aug 20, 2019 1:09 pm

I retired in March of 2018. I am working on building my retirement. I love not working. I don’t enjoy spending my portfolio. How silly is that!?

It has taken quite a while to decompress. The best partis sleeping until I wake up in the morning with no alarm clock.
Last edited by Dottie57 on Tue Aug 20, 2019 11:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

sport
Posts: 8193
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 3:26 pm
Location: Cleveland, OH

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by sport » Tue Aug 20, 2019 1:11 pm

When people ask me if I have any regrets over retiring, I just tell them that "work" is a four-letter word. :twisted:

Calli114
Posts: 146
Joined: Tue May 16, 2017 12:54 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Calli114 » Tue Aug 20, 2019 2:25 pm

protagonist wrote:
Tue Aug 20, 2019 12:16 pm
There are, to date, over 200 responses to this thread.

It would be interesting to know what percentage of those respondants expressed ANY significant regrets in their posts about retiring when they did, regardless of when or why they retired.


If somebody else cares enough to review all the responses to come up with a percentage of happy vs unhappy (sort of like Rotten Tomatoes does with movie reviews...thumbs up or thumbs down), I think the result would be interesting and illuminating. (That somebody won't be me...*giggle*)
Um, that sounds like WORK! 8-)

User avatar
Topic Author
tennisplyr
Posts: 2267
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 1:53 pm
Location: Sarasota, FL

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by tennisplyr » Tue Aug 20, 2019 2:34 pm

Glad to see my thread is alive and well. I'll be 70 later this year and life is flying by...lost some dear friends over the past few years but had my first grandson :happy . Retirement is still great but I still have difficulty indulging on things for myself...can't imagine ever going back to the grind.
Those who move forward with a happy spirit will find that things always work out.

oldmotos
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:37 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by oldmotos » Tue Aug 20, 2019 9:04 pm

I retired 4 months ago at age 64. No regrets - wish now I would have done it at 62 as I originally planned but I enjoyed my job and worked mostly from home with a lot of freedom. Still very busy with two part time businesses, home improvements, grandkids and managing our real estate. Paying for health insurance has not been as painful as I thought it might be. We have lots of travel planned which would not have been possible with the job.

jacksonm
Posts: 172
Joined: Tue Oct 16, 2018 11:48 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by jacksonm » Tue Aug 20, 2019 9:15 pm

Retired 3 years. The only thing I really miss is, being good at what I did, I don't have anything to stroke my ego. But I'm learning to cope with that.

User avatar
White Coat Investor
Posts: 14090
Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2007 9:11 pm
Location: Greatest Snow On Earth

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by White Coat Investor » Tue Aug 20, 2019 10:14 pm

BogleMelon wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:47 pm
This post is not for me. I still have over 2 decades to retire. Only wanted to get something out. I am sick of the rat race! I want to get out of it as soon as possible! My job is not stressful, commuting is relatively short, my boss is nice, I work on spreadsheets and I love spreadsheets! But man, I hate this alarm at 6:30 am during the winter! I am not a morning guy, and I fail to understand why they force people to work in pre set schedules! Also I hate to have to stay till 5 pm even if I am done with work at 1 pm! This doesn't make sense and I hate it!
I tried so many employers, same thing, the problem is me.. I am too fast! I can't help it! What takes them 4 days to do, with some nesting formulas and a pivot table, it takes me 1 hour..
Thanks for hearing me out!!
You need to become self employed. It solves everything you hate about work.
1) Invest you must 2) Time is your friend 3) Impulse is your enemy | 4) Basic arithmetic works 5) Stick to simplicity 6) Stay the course

User avatar
Fletch
Posts: 720
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 1:25 pm
Location: USA

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Fletch » Wed Aug 21, 2019 6:03 am

In answer to the topic question - No. I retired in 2001.

Now I'll speculate. I suspect that the type of person who is relatively self-reliant, self-motivated and enjoys freedom will have no trouble with retirement; they will almost always come up with activities that are productive, fun, and enjoyable both in the short-term and/or long-term. I also suspect the type of person who needs structure and/or goals that are set by others may have a bit more trouble with retirement. I further suspect there are more of the first type on this forum than the latter. :sharebeer
“Meaningless! Meaningless!” says the Teacher. Whoever loves money never has enough; whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with their income. This too is meaningless.

BogleMelon
Posts: 1924
Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2016 11:49 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by BogleMelon » Wed Aug 21, 2019 6:18 am

White Coat Investor wrote:
Tue Aug 20, 2019 10:14 pm
BogleMelon wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:47 pm
This post is not for me. I still have over 2 decades to retire. Only wanted to get something out. I am sick of the rat race! I want to get out of it as soon as possible! My job is not stressful, commuting is relatively short, my boss is nice, I work on spreadsheets and I love spreadsheets! But man, I hate this alarm at 6:30 am during the winter! I am not a morning guy, and I fail to understand why they force people to work in pre set schedules! Also I hate to have to stay till 5 pm even if I am done with work at 1 pm! This doesn't make sense and I hate it!
I tried so many employers, same thing, the problem is me.. I am too fast! I can't help it! What takes them 4 days to do, with some nesting formulas and a pivot table, it takes me 1 hour..
Thanks for hearing me out!!
You need to become self employed. It solves everything you hate about work.
I agree. But not sure if it is doable. I can't afford the risk. Also no idea what can i do on my own. But thanks for suggesting anyways.. may be one day..
"One of the funny things about stock market, every time one is buying another is selling, and both think they are astute" - William Feather

User avatar
jimmyq
Posts: 172
Joined: Wed Apr 17, 2013 6:34 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by jimmyq » Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:10 am

When this thread first started, I was working full time. But after a fortuitous lay-off (with a reasonable severence package) two months ago, I now consider myself retired at 52. I am hedging my bets by updating my resume and have also investigated working as an engineering consultant. I did this because I was (am) worried about retiring so early and not finding enough to keep my mind occupied. But so far this has not been a problem at all as I really enjoy DIY and have lots of projects to work on. Odds are looking slimmer that I will ever return full-time to the workforce, but I'm still new to this retirement thing, so I'm still figuring this all out.

smitcat
Posts: 3782
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2016 10:51 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by smitcat » Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:39 am

White Coat Investor wrote:
Tue Aug 20, 2019 10:14 pm
BogleMelon wrote:
Mon Jan 08, 2018 7:47 pm
This post is not for me. I still have over 2 decades to retire. Only wanted to get something out. I am sick of the rat race! I want to get out of it as soon as possible! My job is not stressful, commuting is relatively short, my boss is nice, I work on spreadsheets and I love spreadsheets! But man, I hate this alarm at 6:30 am during the winter! I am not a morning guy, and I fail to understand why they force people to work in pre set schedules! Also I hate to have to stay till 5 pm even if I am done with work at 1 pm! This doesn't make sense and I hate it!
I tried so many employers, same thing, the problem is me.. I am too fast! I can't help it! What takes them 4 days to do, with some nesting formulas and a pivot table, it takes me 1 hour..
Thanks for hearing me out!!
You need to become self employed. It solves everything you hate about work.
Well put - that's what we did. Hard to tell whether we fall into the category of working retired sometimes.
Very hard to understand so many folks saying hat they 'hate' work and want to retire so soon as well.

mak1277
Posts: 1087
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:26 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by mak1277 » Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:58 am

smitcat wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:39 am

Very hard to understand so many folks saying hat they 'hate' work and want to retire so soon as well.
What about this is hard to understand? Freedom beats obligation every day of the week and twice on Sunday.

lostdog
Posts: 1857
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2016 2:15 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by lostdog » Wed Aug 21, 2019 9:05 am

Having fun biking to the gym in nice weather. Having fun with meditation and improving my mental health. Having fun hanging out with my wife and frinds doing fun activities. I have no time to dedicate to an employer. I'm 43. My wife works part time (28 hours) just for the insurance coverage.
VT/VTWAX+BNDW

smitcat
Posts: 3782
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2016 10:51 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by smitcat » Wed Aug 21, 2019 9:17 am

mak1277 wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:58 am
smitcat wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:39 am

Very hard to understand so many folks saying hat they 'hate' work and want to retire so soon as well.
What about this is hard to understand? Freedom beats obligation every day of the week and twice on Sunday.
OK - I guess. I have had 'hard' jobs at times in the past but never hated them. Now we work in a flexible situation where we mostly like whet we do, sure does have a lot of freedom.
It seems reading that So many folks fairly young, pretty well off, not doing terrible things yet they already are 'burned out' and hate their jobs.

mak1277
Posts: 1087
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:26 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by mak1277 » Wed Aug 21, 2019 9:21 am

smitcat wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 9:17 am
mak1277 wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:58 am
smitcat wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:39 am

Very hard to understand so many folks saying hat they 'hate' work and want to retire so soon as well.
What about this is hard to understand? Freedom beats obligation every day of the week and twice on Sunday.
OK - I guess. I have had 'hard' jobs at times in the past but never hated them. Now we work in a flexible situation where we mostly like whet we do, sure does have a lot of freedom.
It seems reading that So many folks fairly young, pretty well off, not doing terrible things yet they already are 'burned out' and hate their jobs.
My job is not hard. My job is not bad. I have a ton of autonomy and discretion to lead my department the way I want to.

I don't hate my job...I hate work. If I took my favorite hobby and was told "you have to do this 8-10 hours a day, 5 days a week, no matter what" then I would quickly grow to hate that hobby and want to quit doing it. For me this has nothing to do with having a hard or bad job. It has everything to do with wanting absolute freedom to do whatever the heck I want.

Dave55
Posts: 486
Joined: Tue Sep 03, 2013 2:51 pm
Location: Colorado

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Dave55 » Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:01 am

I do very little, but I don't start that until noon. Getting it just right is of utmost importance.

Now seriously, the business I owned for 22 years came to an end in 2010 when the niche we serviced completely collapsed. I was 52. I took a year off, bought a new house & remodeled it. I went to work in commercial real estate and that lasted about 3 years. Did some personal coaching on and off for a few years. Now more or less on heavy cruise mode. I just do what I want, when I want. Unless my first wife of 32 years has different plans :D
Of course, she can be overrode.
Dave

wm631
Posts: 69
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 5:37 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by wm631 » Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:14 am

I don't know how to say it any more clearly than this: everyday is Saturday.

My nephew groans; whimpers small animal noises, grinds his teeth whenever I mention that.

Seriously - if you can't accept that philosophy - reality! - don't retire. You've found your Nirvana, in your job. The rest of us will continue on to the rest of our lives with our happy bucket lists.

flyingaway
Posts: 2325
Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2014 10:19 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by flyingaway » Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:48 am

If money is really not a problem, I don't think anyone will hate retirement.
Most people are in some kind of uncertain situations, finance, health insurance, etc.
For me, I really have an easy teaching job that does not require me to show up every day.
But I still like to be in retirement and do not report to work on any day. The reason that I am not fully retired is still: MONEY, MONEY, MONEY.
Do I really have enough?
If I had 10 million dollars, I would be on a beach, not on campus. Wait, is $10M enough for a private jet to take me to any beaches?
Can I say: MONEY, MONEY, MONEY. More money brings higher expectations, which says never enough and keep working.

mptfan
Posts: 5337
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:58 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by mptfan » Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:49 am

oldmotos wrote:
Tue Aug 20, 2019 9:04 pm
I retired 4 months ago at age 64. ... Still very busy with two part time businesses ... and managing our real estate.
I don't get how some people claim to be retired while still working. If you are running two businesses and managing real estate, you are not retired.

There is a distinction between being retired from a particular occupation versus being retired. For example, if you retire from being a teacher, you can be a "retired teacher" and still work at another occupation or have a part time job or run a business or do whatever you want, but if you continue to work you may be a "retired teacher" or you have "retired from teaching," but you are not "retired."
Last edited by mptfan on Wed Aug 21, 2019 3:04 pm, edited 3 times in total.

visualguy
Posts: 1466
Joined: Thu Jan 30, 2014 1:32 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by visualguy » Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:59 am

smitcat wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 9:17 am
mak1277 wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:58 am
smitcat wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:39 am

Very hard to understand so many folks saying hat they 'hate' work and want to retire so soon as well.
What about this is hard to understand? Freedom beats obligation every day of the week and twice on Sunday.
OK - I guess. I have had 'hard' jobs at times in the past but never hated them. Now we work in a flexible situation where we mostly like whet we do, sure does have a lot of freedom.
It seems reading that So many folks fairly young, pretty well off, not doing terrible things yet they already are 'burned out' and hate their jobs.
This early retirement thing isn't as common as it seems here... I don't know personally anyone who truly retired early voluntarily, for example, and this includes independently wealthy people.

User avatar
Hyperborea
Posts: 808
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2017 10:31 am
Location: Japan

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Hyperborea » Wed Aug 21, 2019 6:06 pm

wm631 wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:14 am
I don't know how to say it any more clearly than this: everyday is Saturday.
It's better than that. It's 5 days of a mid-week day off - the stores aren't crowded, the roads are more empty, everything's slower than the rush on Saturday when those working are trying to fit in all the small tasks and errands. Those 5 days are interspersed with 2 busy weekend days where everything is crowded.

mptfan wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:49 am
I don't get how some people claim to be retired while still working. If you are running two businesses and managing real estate, you are not retired.
It's a mindset change more than anything. Retirement doesn't require that you sit in a Barcalounger watching Matlock reruns interspersed with burial insurance and catheter ads while drinking prune smoothies.

I've been retired since I was 51 for coming on 3 years now and I'm 1 year into a 2 year college course. Am I still retired? How can I be retired since I'm a full time college student? I could also see doing something that made money too if I felt it was interesting but I have no need at all financially to do so.

Does the "retired" guy working at the golf course a couple days a week for mostly the social interaction and reduced green fees stop being retired because of that? If I did a few paying gigs at a club playing music, do I stop being retired? If I wrote a book because I was interested in doing so and it was published do I stop being retired? Do I get to keep the retired moniker if the book doesn't make money or it wasn't published. Or is it the very act of writing the book?


P.S. I'm still not disenchanted.

P.P.S. Edited to fix minor typos made during my morning rush out the door to school.
Last edited by Hyperborea on Thu Aug 22, 2019 2:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
"Plans are worthless, but planning is everything." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dontwasteit
Posts: 117
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2017 6:52 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by Dontwasteit » Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:23 pm

I'm in my 7th year of retirement and I love it. I was full of anxiety, depressed and felt like an unappreciated slave for 31 years. Now I feel totally free. Even the boring days are great! I am finally at peace.
Advice to the younger... You better enjoy what you do for a living or it's going to be a long, long haul.

User avatar
billthecat
Posts: 391
Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2017 2:50 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by billthecat » Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:26 pm

Dontwasteit wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:23 pm
I'm in my 7th year of retirement and I love it. I was full of anxiety, depressed and felt like an unappreciated slave for 31 years. Now I feel totally free. Even the boring days are great! I am finally at peace.
Advice to the younger... You better enjoy what you do for a living or it's going to be a long, long haul.
This is exactly what I desperately yearn for: to be at peace, finally. I'm younger, have hated what I've been doing (the specifics don't matter - the general office environment), but I'm almost done. Oh yeah!
We cannot direct the winds but we can adjust our sails.

User avatar
billthecat
Posts: 391
Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2017 2:50 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by billthecat » Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:31 pm

protagonist wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 11:53 pm

Why am I sharing this with this community? I feel like I might be able to help some folks out there with my story.

I'm usually a rather private person (other than here, only a few of my closest friends know what happened to me). But, in the time that I have frequented this forum, I feel that there is a significant segment of people who post here who, IMHO, are overly obsessed with making money and planning for a future that they cannot control. You can spend your life from age 18 predominantly dedicated to making sure you don't run out of money when you are 100. You can postpone joy indefinitely and just hope you are healthy enough down the road to enjoy your bundle. Or you can live the way you want to live today, staying well within your means, try to save if you can, enjoy your life, just not sweat it....knowing you might run out of money at 95, but on the other hand you might die at 40 or 50 or 60 or tomorrow, and some things just cannot be controlled.

You can do everything possible to avoid the inevitable or you can just live and take your chances. You might not realize it, but either way, you are gambling. Which gamble is more enjoyable?
Hence, Rich, Broke or Dead?
We cannot direct the winds but we can adjust our sails.

User avatar
billthecat
Posts: 391
Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2017 2:50 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by billthecat » Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:43 pm

flyingaway wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:48 am
If money is really not a problem, I don't think anyone will hate retirement.
Most people are in some kind of uncertain situations, finance, health insurance, etc.
For me, I really have an easy teaching job that does not require me to show up every day.
But I still like to be in retirement and do not report to work on any day. The reason that I am not fully retired is still: MONEY, MONEY, MONEY.
Do I really have enough?
If I had 10 million dollars, I would be on a beach, not on campus. Wait, is $10M enough for a private jet to take me to any beaches?
Can I say: MONEY, MONEY, MONEY. More money brings higher expectations, which says never enough and keep working.
Image
We cannot direct the winds but we can adjust our sails.

User avatar
LilyFleur
Posts: 344
Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2018 10:36 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by LilyFleur » Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:51 pm

protagonist wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 11:53 pm
WpgGuy wrote:
Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:03 am

So my question is this: how did you all factor in the unknown risks of “black swan” terminal health events, vs the benefits of a larger retirement nest egg? I’d feel awfully foolish if I spent 7 or 8 years working to make firecalc happier only to get unlucky health wise.

I'm happy you bring that up. I keep saying that "risk" is a double-edged sword. Many here seem to focus only on one edge....the risk of running out of money. They fail to see the other side. I will share with you a post of mine from 4 years ago:

by protagonist » Thu Jul 30, 2015 10:39 am:

I'm 63. Last week I had a heart attack on the way to the airport to play music abroad.

I'm 6'1" and I weigh 162. I work out regularly (rode 30 miles on my bike the day before the incident). My blood pressure has never been above 110/70. My total cholesterol is 190 with a high HDL fraction, which puts me in the low risk category. No significant family history. I never smoked. No diabetes, substance abuse, or other medical problems. Nobody I know would call me a "Type A personality". My doctor told me I have the body of a 35 year old. My only risk factor (not at all insignificant) is being male.

I was fortunate (for a healthy 63 y o guy who has a heart attack)....it was a relatively minor incident, I got prompt care and now have a stent in my circumflex artery.

Though my profession was inherently stressful (physician), I have always approached my work on my own terms, and never compromised my lifestyle for the sake of making more money, working jobs or moving places I did not enjoy, or for empty titles/prestige. My priorities were my family, living where I want to live, having enough time off to pursue my other interests, enjoying my work, and creating my own schedule. This did not come without risks (comical compared to the risks that others have just by virtue of their birthright), but in the long run, the risks were worth it, as I feel like I have lived a very rich life. I was never drawn to an extravagant lifestyle (fancy cars, clothes, whatever), but I lived well, and never felt wanting of anything I did not have. I made enough money. I could have made a lot more if I was willing to compromise my day-to-day life, but I didn't need any more.

My most valuable possession (other than my lovely "middle class" 1885 Victorian home in a very cool college town) is my tenor saxophone. I bought it about 10 years ago for $7000. It's probably worth close to $20K today, Even at $7K it would be my most valuable possession. It's worth a lot more than my car.

(By American standards, I have always been under-insured. I figured that the chances of my kids inheriting more money was greater that way, and I am pretty sure I was right.)

I was fortunate to be born in the mid-20th century as a relatively intelligent white American male during one of the greatest growth periods in the history of civilization, so, despite not having affluent parents and living a hippie lifestyle throughout the late 60s and 70s with no concern whatsoever for money, and putting myself through med school later in life, I did OK. In my demographic it was hard not to do OK.

I made money. Money didn't make me.

I retired in 2008 at 55, right before the crash. The crash (and divorce) took a big hit out of my savings, which caused me some worry about the future, but (as was reinforced yet again last week), the future is chaotic, so I figured what would happen would happen anyway. My savings came back with the market. I'm not filthy rich, but I'm comfortable, and I am not worried about money. I don't budget but I don't spend all that much and I live well. I probably won't run out, but anything can happen to any of us.

I could have panicked in 2008 and went back to work, delaying retirement until 65 or later. I would then be more secure about my money not running out when I hit 95. The last thing I ever thought would happen to me was a heart attack at 63. I could just as easily have died with all my toys unused last week. When I asked my cardiologist how often he sees people in my shape in their 40s, 50s and 60s have heart attacks, he said it is "much more common than you think". 25% or so present in cardiac arrest.

Why am I sharing this with this community? I feel like I might be able to help some folks out there with my story.

I'm usually a rather private person (other than here, only a few of my closest friends know what happened to me). But, in the time that I have frequented this forum, I feel that there is a significant segment of people who post here who, IMHO, are overly obsessed with making money and planning for a future that they cannot control. You can spend your life from age 18 predominantly dedicated to making sure you don't run out of money when you are 100. You can postpone joy indefinitely and just hope you are healthy enough down the road to enjoy your bundle. Or you can live the way you want to live today, staying well within your means, try to save if you can, enjoy your life, just not sweat it....knowing you might run out of money at 95, but on the other hand you might die at 40 or 50 or 60 or tomorrow, and some things just cannot be controlled.

You can do everything possible to avoid the inevitable or you can just live and take your chances. You might not realize it, but either way, you are gambling. Which gamble is more enjoyable?
Thank you for sharing your story. I was diagnosed with cancer in my 50s. I have chosen joy every day since then, even when I was quite sick from the treatments. I asked my doctor why I got cancer since I didn't have any of the usual risk factors. She answered, "Well, it's kind of a crapshoot."

I am mostly retired, and currently thrilled to be almost 60. Life is good :happy

oldmotos
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:37 pm

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by oldmotos » Thu Aug 22, 2019 8:30 am

I don't get how some people claim to be retired while still working. If you are running two businesses and managing real estate, you are not retired.
For me the full time job I left was far more demanding than the part time businesses and the real estate I continue to spend time on. No boss, very few meetings, no demanding Mega Corp customers, no travel except when desired etc. I do accept I am not fully retired but I can work from anywhere and have plenty of free time. I do need to learn to say no to new opportunities which is hard for me.

mptfan
Posts: 5337
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:58 am

Re: Anyone disenchanted with retirement?

Post by mptfan » Thu Aug 22, 2019 8:31 am

Hyperborea wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 6:06 pm
mptfan wrote:
Wed Aug 21, 2019 10:49 am
I don't get how some people claim to be retired while still working. If you are running two businesses and managing real estate, you are not retired.
It's a mindset change more than anything. Retirement doesn't require that you sit in a Barcalounger watching Matlock reruns interspersed with burial insurance and catheter ads while drinking prune smoothies.

I've been retired since I was 51 for coming on 3 years now and I'm 1 year into a 2 year college course. Am I still retired? How can I be retired since I'm a full time college student? I could also see doing something that made money too if I felt it was interesting but I have no need at all financially to do so.
I guess we are going to have to agree to disagree. I don't think it's a mindset, I think it is more than that. If it was just a mindset change, then I could continue to work full time and claim that I am retired now because I changed my mindset while working full time. I just don't buy that. For the word to have any meaning it has to mean something that is more objective than whatever you think it means or whatever mindset you have at the time.

I agree that being retired does not require sitting in a lounge chair all day, but I think it does require avoiding working for pay. You can do pretty much whatever you want while being retired except work for pay. College courses are not paid work so you can take courses and still be retired, so long as you are not paid to take the courses. I also don't think that you can be retired while working full time and doing paid work that you find interesting but for which you do not need the money. By that logic anyone who continues to work full time can claim that their work is interesting and that they do not need the money and therefore claim that they are retired, and Warren Buffett is not retired and Steve Jobs was not retired while he continued to work long hours because he loved his job and found it interesting and did not need the money because he was a billionare. If that is the definition of retired, then I think the word loses its meaning.

I suppose there can be a little bit of wiggle room for someone who works very little and only for fun or something to do, like one day a week at the golf course to get reduced green fees, but as soon as I say that, someone will come along and say what about two or three days a week at the golf course? And then it quickly becomes a slippery slope. So either you are retired or you are not. If you are not, then you may be mostly retired or partially retired, but if you work for money you are not retired.

Post Reply