Vacation, cabin, snowmobile & keeping warm

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2comma
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Vacation, cabin, snowmobile & keeping warm

Post by 2comma » Tue Jan 02, 2018 12:40 am

Two questions.

We've been talking about spending a week in a cabin and that includes snow (we don't get much snow where we live) and a fireplace, perhaps over Christmas but at least sometime when there is a guarantee there will be snow on the ground. I thought about ski resorts but my DW hates skiing so I mentioned what about snowmobiling? She loved the idea. I've found a few interesting places on line but I'm wondering has anyone found a good place for this type of vacation. We don't need anything fancy, she would prefer to cook our own meals, just someplace relatively secluded where we can relax and enjoy some beautiful scenery. We would be traveling from Memphis but any extra cost for flights shouldn't cost that much more but we would prefer someplace where we find something relative cost effective, not crowded, don't need extra excitement/attractions, with a large airport within a few hours drive and a good chance of being able to get to our destination even if the weather isn't perfect (don't want to get snowed in arriving or departing).

Second question for those in the north who spend serious time outside in the cold. I was born in Jersey buy lived my entire life in the south and I remember freezing waiting for the bus in southern Georgia in the winter. You couldn't find good warm clothing back then in our area. I inherited an LL Bean winter coat from my FIL and man what a difference. Down filled, water resistant, wind resistant, a drawstring to keep the wind out, keeps my core body warm (he was living in Montana at the time). But even here when it's in the 20's my nose freezes, I use a hoodie to keep my ears warm, my fingers freeze and my toes get cold. I bought a ski mask but I wear glasses and they stay fogged up due to respiration. I walk the dogs every day for an hour so I'd like to find a way to keep warm at least down into the 20's even if it is windy. To tie this into the snowmobile vacation I think most places rent one piece snowmobile suits but I'm guessing I'll still need good clothing to keep the extremities warm like a mask, boots, socks, gloves or mittens. I think I've heard there are some heated suits snowmobilers wear (but I haven't found anyplace that rents them)? What's your best advice for cold weather clothing? Even though I won't get much use out of it on a one week vacation I'd like to find some stuff that does double duty and lets me walk the dogs in the winter here so I hope I can get some extra use out of them.

Funny story, I worked at Yellowstone Park with a guy from North Dakota and he had snowmobiled in the park. He said it was fantastic but it was 40 below and it was cold. I'd love to do that someday (I don't think there are cabins in West Yellowstone and I think you have to take a tour and we'd like to strike out on our own the first time) but when someone from North Dakota says it was cold it scares heck out of me and I'm pretty sure he knew how to dress warm. He told me about watching his breath freeze in North Dakota, what's up with that?
Last edited by 2comma on Tue Jan 02, 2018 1:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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bubbadog
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by bubbadog » Tue Jan 02, 2018 1:11 am

I am in West Yellowstone right now on a 4 day Snowmobile trip. Two days in the park with a guide and two days on our own outside of Yellowstone in the adjacent national forest. Hundreds of miles of groomed trails outside the park. The snowmobile outfitters will provide all of the outerwear (gloves, boots, snow suit, helmet, balaclava). You just need to bring warm under clothing.

It was -3 degrees when we entered the park this morning and with all of my gear on, I was comfortable.

2comma
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by 2comma » Tue Jan 02, 2018 1:33 am

Great info, I didn't know about the National Forest trails at all. Were you able to reach any of the attractions in the park? I managed to see most of the park the summer I was there but my wife has never seen Yellowstone. Any ideas of where we could fly into, Bozeman or something, and do most people just rent a car to get to West Yellowstone? We passed thru there on the way heading west and I only saw a few small motels, are you staying in a motel in town? I had to look up what a balaclava was, you just don't see them down here.
If I am stupid I will pay.

Shallowpockets
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by Shallowpockets » Tue Jan 02, 2018 8:03 am

To OP. You should do an organized trip for snowmobiling. It is not uncommon for snowmobiles to get lost, overnight. Unless you have maps, and can find your way through a forest, the chances of getting lost are possible. Lost with your snowmobile in the woods means cold, cold. Even dressed well, the cold will creep in.
In some areas avalanche is another possibility.
So, an organized trip is the better choice.
Last edited by Shallowpockets on Tue Jan 02, 2018 8:24 am, edited 1 time in total.

thatme
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by thatme » Tue Jan 02, 2018 8:17 am

If you’re looking for a more off the beaten path type of place, look up the Albany Lodge in Albany, WY. They have cabin and gear rentals, it’s about a 2.5 hour drive from the Denver airport, and there is a guarantee of snow for several more months. Many of their trails are groomed and will decrease the chances of getting lost (though the point above is a good one generally).

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runner9
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by runner9 » Tue Jan 02, 2018 8:25 am

You might benefit from retitling this. I saw the title and my first though was a nice picture. Something about a winter outdoor vacation and/or winter clothing might steer some people to your thread.

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lthenderson
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by lthenderson » Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:06 am

2comma wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 12:40 am
Second question for those in the north who spend serious time outside in the cold. I was born in Jersey buy lived my entire life in the south and I remember freezing waiting for the bus in southern Georgia in the winter. You couldn't find good warm clothing back then in our area. I inherited an LL Bean winter coat from my FIL and man what a difference. Down filled, water resistant, wind resistant, a drawstring to keep the wind out, keeps my core body warm (he was living in Montana at the time). But even here when it's in the 20's my nose freezes, I use a hoodie to keep my ears warm, my fingers freeze and my toes get cold. I bought a ski mask but I wear glasses and they stay fogged up due to respiration. I walk the dogs every day for an hour so I'd like to find a way to keep warm at least down into the 20's even if it is windy. To tie this into the snowmobile vacation I think most places rent one piece snowmobile suits but I'm guessing I'll still need good clothing to keep the extremities warm like a mask, boots, socks, gloves or mittens. I think I've heard there are some heated suits snowmobilers wear (but I haven't found anyplace that rents them)? What's your best advice for cold weather clothing? Even though I won't get much use out of it on a one week vacation I'd like to find some stuff that does double duty and lets me walk the dogs in the winter here so I hope I can get some extra use out of them.
Over the last 60 hour period, the low has been -21F and the high -2F. What everyone who stays outside for any length of time does to stay warm is to dress in layers. It really isn't about finding that one article of clothing that keeps you warm enough but is about controlling your perspiration. If you start warming up while exercising, you remove a layer. If you start getting cool again, you put a layer back on. If you sweat and then get cold, it is not only dangerous but very hard to get warmed back up. I generally wear four layers on top on days like today when it is brutally cold and I know I will be exerting myself outside.

This might not be obvious, but when wearing a ski mask, put your glasses on the outside of the mask to allow it to seal up any gaps and prevent your glasses from fogging up. Still, ski masks can be finicky with glasses. I prefer to go without a ski mask and either use a scarf to keep the lower half of your face warm or grow a beard.

Some people just run colder than others and it is hard to keep their fingers and toes warm no matter what. For those people, they make chemical warmers that you can bend to activate and then stick in your boots or gloves and they will keep them toasty warm for a couple hours or more.

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jainn
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by jainn » Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:54 am

For a great time with a cabin in the snow, I recommend Lapland Lake in NY. It is a lakeside forest bordering Adirondack Park. http://www.laplandlake.com/winter-accommodations.htm

http://www.laplandlake.com/cross_country_ski_.htm

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fizxman
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by fizxman » Tue Jan 02, 2018 11:31 am

I'm going snowmobiling in Old Forge, NY in Adirondack State Park the first weekend in February. We've gone the past few years with friends and have a blast. We rent a house from my brother-in-law's parents so I can't help you regarding where to stay but I'm sure there are other houses to rent up there. Last year we rented two 2-person sleds for the weekend (from Clark's Marina) which cost about $1000 total which is expensive but we split it up amongst six people. You can rent single-person sleds which would save you a few bucks. The trails there are groomed constantly so they are always in good shape and you can ride all day or for just a couple of hours depending on how you feel. The trails are marked very well and you can get maps so you don't get lost.

Two years ago we went up the first weekend of February and there wasn't enough snow to go out but last year they got about two feet of snow the weekend before we went up and we had a great time. There's currently about a 10" base layer so it's good there now but hopefully, it will be better in a month when we go up.

This is something DW and I enjoyed so much we actually just bought two snowmobiles from my brother-in-law's parents and we've talked about buying our own place up there so we could go whenever we want (that would be something well in the future though).

You can check the webcams up in Old Forge to see the snow. Be sure to check the trail cam and picture yourself riding through there, it's something else!

http://www.oldforgeny.com/web.html

2comma
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by 2comma » Tue Jan 02, 2018 1:51 pm

runner9 wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 8:25 am
You might benefit from retitling this. I saw the title and my first though was a nice picture. Something about a winter outdoor vacation and/or winter clothing might steer some people to your thread.
Yes, I wasn't happy with the title either so will try this title.
If I am stupid I will pay.

2comma
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by 2comma » Tue Jan 02, 2018 2:19 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:06 am
2comma wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 12:40 am
Second question for those in the north who spend serious time outside in the cold. I was born in Jersey buy lived my entire life in the south and I remember freezing waiting for the bus in southern Georgia in the winter. You couldn't find good warm clothing back then in our area. I inherited an LL Bean winter coat from my FIL and man what a difference. Down filled, water resistant, wind resistant, a drawstring to keep the wind out, keeps my core body warm (he was living in Montana at the time). But even here when it's in the 20's my nose freezes, I use a hoodie to keep my ears warm, my fingers freeze and my toes get cold. I bought a ski mask but I wear glasses and they stay fogged up due to respiration. I walk the dogs every day for an hour so I'd like to find a way to keep warm at least down into the 20's even if it is windy. To tie this into the snowmobile vacation I think most places rent one piece snowmobile suits but I'm guessing I'll still need good clothing to keep the extremities warm like a mask, boots, socks, gloves or mittens. I think I've heard there are some heated suits snowmobilers wear (but I haven't found anyplace that rents them)? What's your best advice for cold weather clothing? Even though I won't get much use out of it on a one week vacation I'd like to find some stuff that does double duty and lets me walk the dogs in the winter here so I hope I can get some extra use out of them.
Over the last 60 hour period, the low has been -21F and the high -2F. What everyone who stays outside for any length of time does to stay warm is to dress in layers. It really isn't about finding that one article of clothing that keeps you warm enough but is about controlling your perspiration. If you start warming up while exercising, you remove a layer. If you start getting cool again, you put a layer back on. If you sweat and then get cold, it is not only dangerous but very hard to get warmed back up. I generally wear four layers on top on days like today when it is brutally cold and I know I will be exerting myself outside.

This might not be obvious, but when wearing a ski mask, put your glasses on the outside of the mask to allow it to seal up any gaps and prevent your glasses from fogging up. Still, ski masks can be finicky with glasses. I prefer to go without a ski mask and either use a scarf to keep the lower half of your face warm or grow a beard.

Some people just run colder than others and it is hard to keep their fingers and toes warm no matter what. For those people, they make chemical warmers that you can bend to activate and then stick in your boots or gloves and they will keep them toasty warm for a couple hours or more.
I understand about the layering and ventilating before you start to sweat. I wasn't expecting any magic garment (except a balaclava made for people with glasses) more along the lines of things I learned about snow skiing. We easterners are usually dealing with wet snow so as beginners we had jeans with thermal under ware, rental boots, cheap gloves. After falling down and rolling around in the snow a few times your bottom gets wet (we saw a lot of blue snow). I learned that a ski bibs kept you dry. Then I read mittens are warmer than gloves so I got a good dry pair and skiing was a lot more comfortable. Still, even with my own boots my toes got cold, my feet may have been sweating or maybe I should have bought wool socks. Oh, and it was usually cloudy but the first time the sun showed up I was bind because I was too dumb to know you need sun glasses. Just looking for hints on stuff like that. I'm thinking Packer fans watching a Green Bay game must know a lot of stuff about keeping warm that I never learned.
If I am stupid I will pay.

2comma
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Re: Vacation, cabin, snowmobile & keeping warm

Post by 2comma » Tue Jan 02, 2018 2:33 pm

Thanks for all of the resort ideas so far. I'm in research mode now. Keep em coming!

We don't need anything fancy, my wife would prefer to cook so we don't even care if there are no restaurants, tv's, phones and such. Just some good snow, no crowds and some firewood and we'll be happy.
If I am stupid I will pay.

BashDash
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Re: Vacation, cabin, snowmobile & keeping warm

Post by BashDash » Tue Jan 02, 2018 2:37 pm

Not a cabin but could be a cozy winter retreat. One hour and change from NYC. Pricy but could be a splurge.


https://www.mohonk.com/

whomever
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Re: Vacation, cabin, snowmobile & keeping warm

Post by whomever » Tue Jan 02, 2018 2:58 pm

Something like this might work better than a balaclava:

https://www.amazon.com/ZANheadgear-Blac ... B000LVZVNE

Another option is a 'snorkel' coat. The idea is that the rim around the hood creates a dead air pocket in front of your face.

https://ssli.ebayimg.com/images/g/vw4AA ... s-l640.jpg

They actually offer a lot of protection even with the hood looser:

http://go-armynavy.com/images/stories/v ... t/3767.jpg

I've spent a lot of quality time shoveling snow in the Wyoming wind. Even with the coat completely unzipped having the hood flopped up keeps your face warm unless you're facing straight upwind.

They must have become trendy; I see copies selling for hundreds of dollars. The gen-yoo-wine surplus ones are likely the best, and are a hundred bucks or under (one of many examples, you'll have to google to find one in stock in your size):

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/10181 ... olive-drab


The warmest footwear is lined pac-boots. Sorel is one brand. Here is another that has worked for me:

https://wolfsongwear.com/products/ranger-gallatin-suede

Another boot option is the Bunny or Mickey Mouse boots. I don't find them as comfortable to walk in as pac-boots, but they are warm. If you're ice fishing of snowmobiling you might not be walking much:

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/19186 ... ckey-boots


And for your hands, mittens, mittens, mittens. Gloves just don't compare. These are fairly good liners:

https://www.amazon.com/Fox-River-Extra- ... B00A31TKYS

Use whatever kind of shell you like.

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lthenderson
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by lthenderson » Tue Jan 02, 2018 3:04 pm

2comma wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 2:19 pm
Still, even with my own boots my toes got cold, my feet may have been sweating or maybe I should have bought wool socks.

I'm thinking Packer fans watching a Green Bay game must know a lot of stuff about keeping warm that I never learned.
For the coldest snowiest weather, I always wear my Sorel boots that come with a heavy duty removable wool liner that you can dry out when inside. There are other brands that are made similarly these days. They also have enough room in the toes for those chemical heat packs as well.

I think Packer fans rely on alcohol to stay warm but that is only a short term solution! :sharebeer

lazydavid
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by lazydavid » Tue Jan 02, 2018 4:23 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 3:04 pm
I think Packer fans rely on alcohol to stay warm but that is only a short term solution! :sharebeer
The ironic thing about alcohol is that it makes you feel warmer while it lowers your actual body temperature.

2comma
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by 2comma » Tue Jan 02, 2018 5:10 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 3:04 pm
2comma wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 2:19 pm
Still, even with my own boots my toes got cold, my feet may have been sweating or maybe I should have bought wool socks.

I'm thinking Packer fans watching a Green Bay game must know a lot of stuff about keeping warm that I never learned.
For the coldest snowiest weather, I always wear my Sorel boots that come with a heavy duty removable wool liner that you can dry out when inside. There are other brands that are made similarly these days. They also have enough room in the toes for those chemical heat packs as well.

I think Packer fans rely on alcohol to stay warm but that is only a short term solution! :sharebeer
As a lifelong Packer fan I found I drank more alcohol while Aaron Rodgers was injured but I didn't feel any warmer - now it's very cold.
Last edited by 2comma on Tue Jan 02, 2018 10:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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bubbadog
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by bubbadog » Tue Jan 02, 2018 7:59 pm

2comma wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 1:33 am
Great info, I didn't know about the National Forest trails at all. Were you able to reach any of the attractions in the park? I managed to see most of the park the summer I was there but my wife has never seen Yellowstone. Any ideas of where we could fly into, Bozeman or something, and do most people just rent a car to get to West Yellowstone? We passed thru there on the way heading west and I only saw a few small motels, are you staying in a motel in town? I had to look up what a balaclava was, you just don't see them down here.
Yes you can do two different trips in the park with a guide. Each trip is from around 9am to 5 pm. Both leave out of West Yellowstone. One goes to Old Faithful and back (60 miles round trip) and the other goes to Canyon and back (90 miles). There are about 10-12 sleds single file in each group with a guide leading the way. Multiple stops and a stop to have lunch in a heated building to warm up.

Fly in to Bozeman and take the shuttle to West Yellowstone (Karst Stage is the main shuttle operator and has daily trips all year). We got a private shuttle this time for a little more money (also from Karst Stage). Do not get a rental car as the route from Bozeman to West Yellowstone can be treacherous. It is a 90 mile trip through a canyon. You do not need a car once in West Yellowstone. Let someone else take you directly to your hotel.

We use Two Top Snowmobiles in West Yellowstone to arrange the package including hotel, snowmobiles, and winter gear (including balaclava). Tell them how many days and if you want in the park tours or out of the park on your own days (or a combo like we do) and they will give you a quote. They seem to be the biggest operator in town and have been great for us.

We are staying at a Best Western in West Yellowstone as part of the package. It is a decent hotel with a continental breakfast. There are maybe a half dozen restaurants within walking distance for dinner. We have no interest in cooking after a long day on the trails. I recommend skipping the cooking for yourself.

Sorry for the delay in responding as we just got back to our hotel.

It really is a unique and fun trip.

Good luck and best wishes.

2comma
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Re: Vacation, cabin, snowmobile & keeping warm

Post by 2comma » Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:06 pm

Wow, that sounds fantastic and I had no idea people did 60 or 90 miles on snowmobiles. Even if I can't talk DW out of the cabin idea this sounds like a bucket list item for me! Thanks!
If I am stupid I will pay.

2comma
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Re: Vacation, cabin, snowmobile & keeping warm

Post by 2comma » Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:13 pm

whomever wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 2:58 pm
Something like this might work better than a balaclava:

https://www.amazon.com/ZANheadgear-Blac ... B000LVZVNE

Another option is a 'snorkel' coat. The idea is that the rim around the hood creates a dead air pocket in front of your face.

https://ssli.ebayimg.com/images/g/vw4AA ... s-l640.jpg

They actually offer a lot of protection even with the hood looser:

http://go-armynavy.com/images/stories/v ... t/3767.jpg

I've spent a lot of quality time shoveling snow in the Wyoming wind. Even with the coat completely unzipped having the hood flopped up keeps your face warm unless you're facing straight upwind.

They must have become trendy; I see copies selling for hundreds of dollars. The gen-yoo-wine surplus ones are likely the best, and are a hundred bucks or under (one of many examples, you'll have to google to find one in stock in your size):

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/10181 ... olive-drab


The warmest footwear is lined pac-boots. Sorel is one brand. Here is another that has worked for me:

https://wolfsongwear.com/products/ranger-gallatin-suede

Another boot option is the Bunny or Mickey Mouse boots. I don't find them as comfortable to walk in as pac-boots, but they are warm. If you're ice fishing of snowmobiling you might not be walking much:

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/19186 ... ckey-boots


And for your hands, mittens, mittens, mittens. Gloves just don't compare. These are fairly good liners:

https://www.amazon.com/Fox-River-Extra- ... B00A31TKYS

Use whatever kind of shell you like.
Thanks for all the links! If it good enough for shoveling snow in Wyoming on a windy day it's good enough for me.
If I am stupid I will pay.

Carter3
Posts: 176
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Re: Vacation, cabin, snowmobile & keeping warm

Post by Carter3 » Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:30 pm

2comma wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 12:40 am
Two questions.

We've been talking about spending a week in a cabin and that includes snow (we don't get much snow where we live) and a fireplace, perhaps over Christmas but at least sometime when there is a guarantee there will be snow on the ground. I thought about ski resorts but my DW hates skiing so I mentioned what about snowmobiling? She loved the idea. I've found a few interesting places on line but I'm wondering has anyone found a good place for this type of vacation. We don't need anything fancy, she would prefer to cook our own meals, just someplace relatively secluded where we can relax and enjoy some beautiful scenery. We would be traveling from Memphis but any extra cost for flights shouldn't cost that much more but we would prefer someplace where we find something relative cost effective, not crowded, don't need extra excitement/attractions, with a large airport within a few hours drive and a good chance of being able to get to our destination even if the weather isn't perfect (don't want to get snowed in arriving or departing).

Second question for those in the north who spend serious time outside in the cold. I was born in Jersey buy lived my entire life in the south and I remember freezing waiting for the bus in southern Georgia in the winter. You couldn't find good warm clothing back then in our area. I inherited an LL Bean winter coat from my FIL and man what a difference. Down filled, water resistant, wind resistant, a drawstring to keep the wind out, keeps my core body warm (he was living in Montana at the time). But even here when it's in the 20's my nose freezes, I use a hoodie to keep my ears warm, my fingers freeze and my toes get cold. I bought a ski mask but I wear glasses and they stay fogged up due to respiration. I walk the dogs every day for an hour so I'd like to find a way to keep warm at least down into the 20's even if it is windy. To tie this into the snowmobile vacation I think most places rent one piece snowmobile suits but I'm guessing I'll still need good clothing to keep the extremities warm like a mask, boots, socks, gloves or mittens. I think I've heard there are some heated suits snowmobilers wear (but I haven't found anyplace that rents them)? What's your best advice for cold weather clothing? Even though I won't get much use out of it on a one week vacation I'd like to find some stuff that does double duty and lets me walk the dogs in the winter here so I hope I can get some extra use out of them.

Funny story, I worked at Yellowstone Park with a guy from North Dakota and he had snowmobiled in the park. He said it was fantastic but it was 40 below and it was cold. I'd love to do that someday (I don't think there are cabins in West Yellowstone and I think you have to take a tour and we'd like to strike out on our own the first time) but when someone from North Dakota says it was cold it scares heck out of me and I'm pretty sure he knew how to dress warm. He told me about watching his breath freeze in North Dakota, what's up with that?
I'm from up north. Last night I had to load up family members cars with their holiday gifts and kids car seats. Before I did so I searched 45 minutes for my Columbia snow boarding pants and parka that I had not worn in almost 10 years. This is in Memphis and it has been quite cold these past few days, but i was quite comfortable. Understandably, It is clearly not 40 below. If the snowmobiling Outfitters are providing outer gear, I would go down to the pyramid or over to Sportsman's in Southaven and get some decent base layers. May want to get your own balaclava also.

Additionally I agree with the comment above I own those Fox River however I would not get the heavy. I would purchase the medium ones and then put a decent Chopper mitt over the top of them. That's a Secret that people don't know about here in the Mid-South.

Carter3
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Re: Vacation, cabin, snowmobile & keeping warm

Post by Carter3 » Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:41 pm

p.s. Darn Tough Socks at darntough.com . You will love me for this one.

bubbadog
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Re: Vacation, cabin, snowmobile & keeping warm

Post by bubbadog » Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:54 pm

2comma wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 9:06 pm
Wow, that sounds fantastic and I had no idea people did 60 or 90 miles on snowmobiles. Even if I can't talk DW out of the cabin idea this sounds like a bucket list item for me! Thanks!
We do it as a father/son trip each year. My wife prefers vacationing with a beach and a book. So far, she has declined to join us.

cherijoh
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Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by cherijoh » Tue Jan 02, 2018 10:27 pm

2comma wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 2:19 pm
I understand about the layering and ventilating before you start to sweat. I wasn't expecting any magic garment (except a balaclava made for people with glasses) more along the lines of things I learned about snow skiing. We easterners are usually dealing with wet snow so as beginners we had jeans with thermal under ware, rental boots, cheap gloves. After falling down and rolling around in the snow a few times your bottom gets wet (we saw a lot of blue snow). I learned that a ski bibs kept you dry. Then I read mittens are warmer than gloves so I got a good dry pair and skiing was a lot more comfortable. Still, even with my own boots my toes got cold, my feet may have been sweating or maybe I should have bought wool socks. Oh, and it was usually cloudy but the first time the sun showed up I was bind because I was too dumb to know you need sun glasses. Just looking for hints on stuff like that. I'm thinking Packer fans watching a Green Bay game must know a lot of stuff about keeping warm that I never learned.
Get a pair of polypropylene liner socks for wicking and then a good pair of wool socks. (yes - even your feet need layers!) I like SmartWool socks. I'd also go with waterproof boots.

As a middle layer on top, polyester micro fleece works well IMO. I like styles that are quarter- or half-zip to give you some extra ventilation if you start to get warm - without having to strip off an entire layer.

I would also recommend silk or rayon (sometimes listed as Modal) long underwear. I like WinterSilk and CuddlDuds. Both offer products for men and women. A bird watching friend of mine went on an expedition several years ago in search of the snowy owl - in January - in the Boundary Lakes area in northern Minnesota - with viewing in the middle of the night. I kid you not. :shock: :shock: I suggested she get some silk underwear (they do tops and bottoms) and she reported that they kept her toasty warm and that they were the envy of the rest of the group who were wearing bulky cotton waffle weave under their blue jeans.

Bacchus01
Posts: 2065
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:35 pm

Re: A cabin in the snow

Post by Bacchus01 » Tue Jan 02, 2018 11:48 pm

bubbadog wrote:
Tue Jan 02, 2018 1:11 am
I am in West Yellowstone right now on a 4 day Snowmobile trip. Two days in the park with a guide and two days on our own outside of Yellowstone in the adjacent national forest. Hundreds of miles of groomed trails outside the park. The snowmobile outfitters will provide all of the outerwear (gloves, boots, snow suit, helmet, balaclava). You just need to bring warm under clothing.

It was -3 degrees when we entered the park this morning and with all of my gear on, I was comfortable.
Thanks for info

2comma
Posts: 1241
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:37 pm

Re: Vacation, cabin, snowmobile & keeping warm

Post by 2comma » Wed Jan 03, 2018 8:25 pm

A big thanks to everyone that posted. I've been doing some serious researching thanks to the info you provided.
If I am stupid I will pay.

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