Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

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FelixTheCat
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Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by FelixTheCat » Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:12 pm

I did years of C#, ASP.NET. I took a temp six month contract in PHP which turned into four years. Now my C#, ASP.NET is rusty.

I'm in between jobs right now and wondering where to focus my studies. PHP is a small portion of jobs in my town. ASP.NET is approximately 80%

I started focusing on ASP.NET MVC coding again. One day I talked to my local ASP.NET meetup group and the leader suggested getting away from this world and going to JavaScript only development. Now, I am confused.

I've tried searching jobs on Dice.com and it seems jobs are all over the place. Does anyone know what the current trends are? Is there a website where I can discuss my career path?
Felix is a wonderful, wonderful cat.

killjoy2012
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by killjoy2012 » Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:27 pm

I think it depends on the type of work/apps that you desire to work on, but all I see at my MegaCorp lately is Go, node.js, Python, Ruby, and C++. Maybe a bit of Java on legacy stuff.

MittensMoney
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by MittensMoney » Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:36 pm

I work at a startup and our team considers our stack to be 'modern'. We develop an App for all mobile devices alongside the website.

For front-end we're using: Javascript, React, Angular2, Backbone.js, and D3.

Back-end we use: Java, MySQL, Spring, Hibernate, REST web services, and AWS

This seems to be a common stack within Silicon Valley, but we generally won't consider candidates without years of experience in these specifically. So, your best bet may be to search specifically for a firm using the tech you're familiar with and hopefully they'll have opportunities to work on projects with new technologies/tools/languages along the way.

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FelixTheCat
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by FelixTheCat » Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:10 pm

Thanks guys
Felix is a wonderful, wonderful cat.

MWormwood
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by MWormwood » Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:20 pm

You might find https://insights.stackoverflow.com/surv ... echnology interesting.

I think there's a trade-off. On the one hand, you're more likely to maintain your compensation level if you find a company that values the experience you have. On the other hand, developing expertise in new technology may pay off in the long-term, although you might need to take a pay/seniority cut as you learn the ropes.

That said, given that you estimate that 80% of jobs in your area are in ASP.NET and you have prior experience, I'd say probably say refreshing your skills in that arena would be the safer option.

Good luck!

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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by samsoes » Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:26 pm

COBOL85?
TAL (Transaction Application Language)?
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randomizer
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by randomizer » Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:31 pm

JavaScript is a great bet for the next 5 years or so, but I wouldn't want to be starting from scratch on it. Lots of language/framework/library churn. Lots of it.
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Watty
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by Watty » Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:04 pm

A big question is how much longer you want to work.

When I was going through my 50s I found that my company specific and industry specific knowledge was a lot more important than my heads down programming skills. I stayed with the same company and I still had a software developer job title but about 75% of my work was more conversions and support and only about 25%, if that, was actually programming. I ended up retiring just before I turned 59 but my position was relatively secure since the legacy systems I was supporting were not going to be replaced in the near future.

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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by kellyfj » Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:44 pm

45 yo Software Engineer here based out of Boston

I'd suggest Java for the current number of jobs and Python for the growth

Ruby seems to be shrinking (replaced by Python it seems)
Scala seems to have flatlined
Golang is not clear
JavaScript is still popular but doesn't seem to be growing (and it's mostly front-end work)

I'd run a few of the languages through https://www.indeed.com/ based on your local area and see what you find

-Frank

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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by oldcomputerguy » Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:48 pm

samsoes wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:26 pm
COBOL85?
TAL (Transaction Application Language)?
FORTRAN IV!!
It’s taken me a lot of years, but I’ve come around to this: If you’re dumb, surround yourself with smart people. And if you’re smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you.

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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by Dottie57 » Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:50 pm

MittensMoney wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:36 pm
I work at a startup and our team considers our stack to be 'modern'. We develop an App for all mobile devices alongside the website.

For front-end we're using: Javascript, React, Angular2, Backbone.js, and D3.

Back-end we use: Java, MySQL, Spring, Hibernate, REST web services, and AWS

This seems to be a common stack within Silicon Valley, but we generally won't consider candidates without years of experience in these specifically. So, your best bet may be to search specifically for a firm using the tech you're familiar with and hopefully they'll have opportunities to work on projects with new technologies/tools/languages along the way.
Back end is same at my mega corp employer.

FraggleRock
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Language, yes

Post by FraggleRock » Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:05 pm

Euskara - it will stretch your brain. SOV language.

Oh, computer language.
COBOL - lots of code and lots of programmers over the age of 65 dropping out of the workforce
Last edited by FraggleRock on Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by rob » Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:14 pm

I didn't see how long you need to survive..... If it's short term then I would scrub up with the known base. If it's long term... I would take a hit now to get on a different path.
| Rob | Its a dangerous business going out your front door. - J.R.R.Tolkien

kerplunk
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by kerplunk » Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:44 pm

Hard to go wrong with Java.

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BolderBoy
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by BolderBoy » Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:51 pm

FelixTheCat wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:12 pm
I've tried searching jobs on Dice.com and it seems jobs are all over the place. Does anyone know what the current trends are?
At the Boulder Gopher meetup a couple of weeks ago one of the attendees said that his company (based in Denver) will be hiring 100+ Go programmers in 2018.

(I'm only a hobbyist and I'm learning Go for fun)
"Never underestimate one's capacity to overestimate one's abilities" - The Dunning-Kruger Effect

quantAndHold
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by quantAndHold » Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:22 am

I would suggest looking at it another way. What problem domain do you have expertise in or want to work in? Are you a subject matter expert in anything that can be transferred to another project? Do you have design skills? Problem solving skills? Can you lead a project? Mentor younger people? Worry less about the language and more about what the language is used for. What type of technology do you want to work on, and what languages are typically used for that?

Languages come and go, and can be learned on the job if need be. To get a job, focus on what you can do that employers want and need, and are having trouble getting. Use your grey hair to your advantage, rather than trying to compete with young people making half as much money as you.

Bungo
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by Bungo » Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:52 am

I would suggest Python as being nearly essential for any software engineer these days. It's easy to learn but incredibly useful for a wide variety of tasks. It's not my primary language for deliverables (that would be C++), but Python is my choice for just about everything else.

BHUser27
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by BHUser27 » Thu Nov 30, 2017 6:47 am

Python
Ruby on Rails is still relevant
If interested in Big Data, build understanding of containers, cloud, and the latest distributed database and computing frameworks...
...such as Docker, Hadoop, Cassandra, Mesos, Marathon, Spark, AWS, Google Cloud, etc.

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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by samsoes » Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:02 am

oldcomputerguy wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:48 pm
samsoes wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:26 pm
COBOL85?
TAL (Transaction Application Language)?
FORTRAN IV!!
Yes, indeed. Those were the days (long gone, I'm afraid). :(
"Happiness Is Not My Companion" - Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren. | (Avatar is the statue of Gen. Warren atop Little Round Top @ Gettysburg National Military Park.)

fulanodetal
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by fulanodetal » Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:09 am

Big Data and Cloud are the trends I'm seeing.

Javascript/nodejs is very much in vogue but I second randomizer's concern that it's difficult to start from scratch and everything seems to change every few months. It's really difficult to keep up.

On the Big Data side, I'm seeing Hadoop on the way out and Spark taking over. For Cloud, AWS is the clear leader but Microsoft Azure is starting to pick up steam and of course there's Google's platform as well.

There is still strong demand for C# skills. I see many developers that specialize in the Microsoft stack and do very well for themselves. Refreshing your C# chops might be your best bet, given that's where your background is. If you go that route, then you would want to look into learning about the Azure cloud (and possibly doing getting certifications in that arena).

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LiveSimple
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by LiveSimple » Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:24 am

If you want to be in the technical development side, with your limited skillset (?j just jump int business intelligence.

Starting from reporting tools like Tabulua, Cognos, etc. these visualizations skills are in demand and the learning do not change much after a few years.

If you want to move up, ETL! Tools like informatics.

Then higher up the chain is data warehouse or data architect

Emerging tresnd will be big data, amaltucs, using python, data lake, etc.

Another demand area is “infrastructure as a code” like chef scripts to create AWS infrastructure.

If you have people, process skills another Avenue is be one a team lead, Process owner, application owner, manger, for corporate companies.

Presales, consulting for IBM, Accenture etc.

Use all the key words above and screach for courses at
https://www.coursera.org/
https://www.edx.org
You will have learning videos as well

Enjoy

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oldcomputerguy
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by oldcomputerguy » Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:54 am

samsoes wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:02 am
oldcomputerguy wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:48 pm
samsoes wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:26 pm
COBOL85?
TAL (Transaction Application Language)?
FORTRAN IV!!
Yes, indeed. Those were the days (long gone, I'm afraid). :(
Gone but not forgotten. My very first computer book ever (Donald H. Ford's "Basic FORTRAN IV Programming", copyright 1971) still occupies a place of honor on my bookshelf, right next to Daniel D. McCracken's "A Guide to FORTRAN IV Programming".

Gad, I'm old... :(
It’s taken me a lot of years, but I’ve come around to this: If you’re dumb, surround yourself with smart people. And if you’re smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you.

dbr
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by dbr » Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:15 am

oldcomputerguy wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:54 am
samsoes wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:02 am
oldcomputerguy wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:48 pm
samsoes wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:26 pm
COBOL85?
TAL (Transaction Application Language)?
FORTRAN IV!!
Yes, indeed. Those were the days (long gone, I'm afraid). :(
Gone but not forgotten. My very first computer book ever (Donald H. Ford's "Basic FORTRAN IV Programming", copyright 1971) still occupies a place of honor on my bookshelf, right next to Daniel D. McCracken's "A Guide to FORTRAN IV Programming".

Gad, I'm old... :(
Old, heavens no! My graduate research was all using Fortran code. More than that it was carried around as a box of punch card to be loaded into a Univac 1110. I wish I had kept that box as an artifact of a generation of history. It was a real step up from calculating on this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marchant_calculator But the Marchant was for real men rather than the IT wimps we have today.

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djpeteski
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by djpeteski » Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:23 am

It really comes down to what people are hiring in your local area, or if interested, your target area for relocation.

Given your comments, get back into ASP.net.

Angular seems to be on the down trend, but if you wanted to pick up a new language I would look at ReactJs.

raamakoti
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by raamakoti » Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:57 am

my wife has 15 years of JAVA experience. But struggles to find a job in NE Ohio area, because most of the corporations like Progressive, Diebold, etc are looking for C# and .net type of work.
There are few exceptions once in a while like Cardinal Health, GE, they open multi year JAVA positions, but once that work is done maintenance becomes a boring task and she moves on to next programming project.
It totally depends upon in the area you live in and how flexible you are to move.

quantAndHold
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by quantAndHold » Thu Nov 30, 2017 12:45 pm

raamakoti wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:57 am
my wife has 15 years of JAVA experience. But struggles to find a job in NE Ohio area, because most of the corporations like Progressive, Diebold, etc are looking for C# and .net type of work.
There are few exceptions once in a while like Cardinal Health, GE, they open multi year JAVA positions, but once that work is done maintenance becomes a boring task and she moves on to next programming project.
It totally depends upon in the area you live in and how flexible you are to move.
This makes no sense. Someone with 15 years of Java experience should have no problem convincing a potential employer that they can be successful in C#.

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David Jay
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by David Jay » Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:48 pm

dbr wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:15 am
oldcomputerguy wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:54 am
samsoes wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:02 am
oldcomputerguy wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:48 pm
.
FORTRAN IV!!
Yes, indeed. Those were the days (long gone, I'm afraid). :(
Gone but not forgotten. My very first computer book ever (Donald H. Ford's "Basic FORTRAN IV Programming", copyright 1971) still occupies a place of honor on my bookshelf, right next to Daniel D. McCracken's "A Guide to FORTRAN IV Programming".

Gad, I'm old... :(
Old, heavens no! My graduate research was all using Fortran code. More than that it was carried around as a box of punch card to be loaded into a Univac 1110. I wish I had kept that box as an artifact of a generation of history.
I'm just a kid compared to you guys. When I took Fortran IV they made us do our first program on punch cards so the we would properly appreciate the beauty of "interactive" programming on the 33KSR.
Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future - Niels Bohr | To get the "risk premium", you really do have to take the risk - nisiprius

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Watty
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by Watty » Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:19 pm

David Jay wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:48 pm
dbr wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:15 am
oldcomputerguy wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:54 am
samsoes wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:02 am
oldcomputerguy wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:48 pm
.
FORTRAN IV!!
Yes, indeed. Those were the days (long gone, I'm afraid). :(
Gone but not forgotten. My very first computer book ever (Donald H. Ford's "Basic FORTRAN IV Programming", copyright 1971) still occupies a place of honor on my bookshelf, right next to Daniel D. McCracken's "A Guide to FORTRAN IV Programming".

Gad, I'm old... :(
Old, heavens no! My graduate research was all using Fortran code. More than that it was carried around as a box of punch card to be loaded into a Univac 1110. I wish I had kept that box as an artifact of a generation of history.
I'm just a kid compared to you guys. When I took Fortran IV they made us do our first program on punch cards so the we would properly appreciate the beauty of "interactive" programming on the 33KSR.
I hate to date myself but my list includes Assembler 370, PL/I, TAL, SCOBOL, and three flavors of RPG. I'm retired now but there are still a surprising number of shops that are still running RPG software. I still have an old PL/I program on punched cards from college.

In addition to the control languages there were probably a few others
Last edited by Watty on Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

mrgeeze
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by mrgeeze » Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:21 pm

Relational Databases!
That's right focus simply on Ted Codd's work from the 60's.
Learn forwards and backwards the principles of normality and become a true data architect.
Add some SQL so you can answer clients and developers questions.
You won't have to relearn "new" languages every 5 years.

Perhaps you will one day divorce the data layer from the domain (aka business) layer.
Then, grasshopper, you will walk the path very few have walked

And you will never want for a job for the rest of your life.
And you'll get paid good $$$ doing it. This part I know.
I quit working full time at age 45. I tried to quit entirely 3 years ago but the work chases me.
Its amazing how few people take the time to design the data layer.
Worse ,its amazing what passes for reasonable data models, even in big tech companies.

Currently I write C#. But mostly I design databases.
I started on punch cards in the late 70's
I've written assembler, C (from K&R), C++, C# PERL, Python, Java, VB, and a few others I forget. Fortran/Cobol, RPG, etc.
I learned SQL sometime in the early 80's. Still use it today
Honestly, I think the whole language craze is way overblown.
Next to SQL C# has been the most useful, mostly because it has lasted almost 15 years now.
If you like, sharpen up your C# so you can expose (and protect) your DB work (Data) to those who consume your objects.
Lesser programmers of the UI if you will.. But that's just my bias.

Normalize everything... even if they all whine about it!

music_man
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by music_man » Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:23 pm

C# is still pretty popular. Hot tech these days seems to be JavaScript based frameworks - - NodeJS, Angular and all those variants. Having a good understanding of databases (SQL Server, Oracle, etc) is also really good knowledge to have.

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telemark
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by telemark » Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:09 pm

mrgeeze wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:21 pm
Honestly, I think the whole language craze is way overblown.
I tend to agree, but making a new language, even if it's only a slight variation on some other language, is more fun than solving actual problems. And, incidentally, requires less knowledge of anything outside of the world of coding, so you see a lot of people trying it.

I got interested in Lisp in the late 90s/early 00s, and while I never did any paying work in it, it introduced me to concepts that later turned up in many nominally newer languages: objects, closures, multimethods, garbage collection, etc. But you won't impress potential employers by talking about it.

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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by Shikoku » Fri Dec 01, 2017 1:01 am

You may like to review the following IEEE Spectrum article.

The 2017 Top Programming Languages
https://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/sof ... -languages
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TravelGeek
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by TravelGeek » Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:14 am

I have Spanish on my todo list :P

Also JavaScript and various frameworks. And Ruby on Rails. Just need to find some time to dive in and do some projects.

tech_arch
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by tech_arch » Fri Dec 01, 2017 10:02 am

I haven't seen it on here, but Apex (and JavaScript) if you're interested in the Salesforce ecosystem. Salesforce developer jobs pay well and lots of remote work is available. Apex is built on Java so coming from .Net it shouldn't be a hard transition. Check out trailhead.salesforce.com if you're interested in getting started.

Yes, I'm a big fan of Salesforce; I changed career paths from .Net to SF a few years ago and couldn't be happier.

Overall, though, it depends on what kind of work you're interested in.
- Megacorp would probably lean toward SQL, Java/.Net.
- Web-based is heavy JavaScript front-end, but the popular frameworks seem to change daily.
- Mobile: Java (Android) and Swift (iOS) for Native; React for hybrid apps
- Specialties: Depends; are you interested in machine learning or AI? Big Data?
- Security: Learn about penetration testing and performing audit; white-hat hacker for checking software, etc

quantAndHold
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by quantAndHold » Fri Dec 01, 2017 10:36 am

mrgeeze wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:21 pm
Relational Databases!
That's right focus simply on Ted Codd's work from the 60's.
Learn forwards and backwards the principles of normality and become a true data architect.
Add some SQL so you can answer clients and developers questions.
You won't have to relearn "new" languages every 5 years.

The industry is slowly moving away from relational databases and SQL, so OP would be competing with people who are already relational database experts for a shrinking (or at least not expanding as fast as the industry as a whole) number of jobs.

The fastest growing sub-genres in the industry right now are machine learning, AI, and big data. A Coursera class or two in these areas couldn’t hurt.

raamakoti
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by raamakoti » Fri Dec 01, 2017 10:52 am

quantAndHold wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 12:45 pm
raamakoti wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:57 am
my wife has 15 years of JAVA experience. But struggles to find a job in NE Ohio area, because most of the corporations like Progressive, Diebold, etc are looking for C# and .net type of work.
There are few exceptions once in a while like Cardinal Health, GE, they open multi year JAVA positions, but once that work is done maintenance becomes a boring task and she moves on to next programming project.
It totally depends upon in the area you live in and how flexible you are to move.
This makes no sense. Someone with 15 years of Java experience should have no problem convincing a potential employer that they can be successful in C#.
Tell me about it - Diebold rejected her saying she has to little C# experience on her resume. Manager is a human being as well, his judgement plays a big role in hiring as well

michaeljc70
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by michaeljc70 » Fri Dec 01, 2017 11:02 am

I don't have specific advice for you, but have been (and am in) the same situation. When you are at a client for long periods of time sometimes focuses shift in a direction that isn't good for your skillset/career. It can be hard getting back on track as clients apply what I believe are silly standards when hiring technical workers (who is an expert in 19 things?). People not in the industry don't really understand it. I explained to a realtor friend that it is the equivalent of someone wanting to sell their house asking for an agent that sold a house on the block that was a brick ranch within the last 6 months for $300k-$350k. Clients over focus on how current a particular skill (SQL Server 2016 vs 2014) is even if the product has barely changed in years!

The only advice I would say is parlay what skills you have into a position with a less demanding client at a lower rate if needed and use that to add more marketable skills.

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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by roflwaffle » Fri Dec 01, 2017 11:55 am

I'm a BSA, and I mostly work in Python/TSQL with some tinkering in Java, most for Drools (BRMS). My megacorp is mostly a C# shop because of our ties to MS, and in the past I would peruse the source to try to figure some stuff out.

From a practical point of view, I would start with something like Rosetta Code to get a feel for what you like and don't like, as well as differences and similarities different languages have, and from there, apply why you've learned to problems from Project Euler or some similar source.

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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by gotester2000 » Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:01 pm

I am seeking similar advice. My experience is in Java - about 14 years, coding and designing - lastly worked as an architect. I am fed up with coding and deep diving into tech. and neither interested in management.
Is there any other path that I can follow ? I am not getting head or tail of what role should I seek?

mrgeeze
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Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by mrgeeze » Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:39 pm

quantAndHold wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 10:36 am
mrgeeze wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:21 pm
Relational Databases!
That's right focus simply on Ted Codd's work from the 60's.
Learn forwards and backwards the principles of normality and become a true data architect.
Add some SQL so you can answer clients and developers questions.
You won't have to relearn "new" languages every 5 years.

The industry is slowly moving away from relational databases and SQL, so OP would be competing with people who are already relational database experts for a shrinking (or at least not expanding as fast as the industry as a whole) number of jobs.

The fastest growing sub-genres in the industry right now are machine learning, AI, and big data. A Coursera class or two in these areas couldn’t hurt.
Suppose the industry stopped building RDBMS solutions today.
That would leave 99% of all existing major tech projects within Fortune 500 and the Government RDBMS dependent.
Ok, I know I made up the 99% , but I am in the ballpark. Perhaps its only 90%.
Anything that matters runs on a RDBMS, usually Oracle or MS SQL Server.
SAP runs or Oracle. PeopleSoft is Oracle.

Truth is most of the hardcorde SQL people are grey haired folks like myself who have retired or are nearing retirement.
Last time I checked a good Oracle Systems Architect billed north of $250 hour and had all the work they could handle.
More if you're SAP or PeopleSoft expert with 10 years of experience.
You don't get that making web pages or writing SOLR apps with Python.
I'm guessing Python will be long dead before Oracle even quivers.

I do think in time the RDBMS world will fade away... Probably 30-50 years.

pretzelfisch
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu May 11, 2017 5:22 pm

Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by pretzelfisch » Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:56 pm

What I have found is that most places know Python, and that language is simple to do code challenges and whiteboard sessions with. Much less ceremony when compared to Java/C/C++/C#. For the most part if you know C# you can pick up Java after you get a gig.

sksbog
Posts: 233
Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2012 9:14 pm

Re: Older Software Engineer Advice ~ Languages?

Post by sksbog » Fri Dec 01, 2017 1:09 pm

In my experience, certifications pay a lot of dividends in IT.
whatever you choose to do, language, or cloud or both, keep certification as end goal in mind.

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