After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
flyingaway
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Mon Dec 04, 2017 10:25 am

lightheir wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 10:11 am
sperry8 wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 8:22 am
I lost my motivation to "work". But that's because my sole reason for work was money. Once attained, the reason was removed and thus what was left was "work" without reason and who is motivated to do that?

For those that say they haven't lost their motivation, they likely had an alternate reason for their "work". Passion. Fun. Etc. If you're doing "work" for those reasons whether or not your are paid is less relevant to you so your motivation remains.

Thus you have the answer... go do things you find fun or are passionate about. Motivation is no problem there. Don't bother with things you were solely doing for money after you achieve FI. No point anymore, you ended the reason.
I've heard this trite saying a million times, but it's totally unrealistic for the vast majority of individuals.

And honestly, even if I did do the one thing I was totally passionate about, that thing changes, and might not be the thing I was so passionate about a few years down the road. Priorities in life change. I enjoy my job now, but for sure, there are many moments where I am glad I chose a field where the compensation or benefits or even lifestyle was good enough to ride out the rough-motivation patches where I actually did NOT want to be there.
I agree that the passionate things can change over years. When I decided to have a career in academic, I was very passionate about it, and spent endless days and nights without ever thinking about compensation. But that started to change about 10 years ago, now, I am really working for the money, even that is not very much in need as I am financially independent.

Maybe motivation is not the right word, as money can be a motivation for working. When I started this thread, I used "motivation" to mean something that you would like to do with more than making money. But it does not mean the thing you would like to do for free.

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Kenkat
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by Kenkat » Mon Dec 04, 2017 10:27 am

WildBill wrote:
Sun Dec 03, 2017 11:49 pm
flyingaway wrote:
Sun Dec 03, 2017 11:40 pm
WildBill wrote:
Sun Dec 03, 2017 11:18 pm
investing1012 wrote:
Sun Dec 03, 2017 9:20 pm
WildBill wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:16 am
Howdy

I was FI many years before I retired. I never lost any motivation for working, as the work was challenging and fulfilling.

However, my threshold for tolerating corporate and colleague BS steadily declined, to about zero at age 45 and was very negative by retirement. I was not actively resistant or expressive of this intolerance: if I did not agree with or want to participate in the various forms of BS I just ignored it.

Interestingly enough, those years of decling and negative tolerance and aggressive ignorance and non compliance were also by far my most successful professionally. Go figure.

W B
Ever watch office space
Howdy

Nope, and no clue re the reference. Educate me.

We have a TV, but we haven’t turned it on in 10 years (except for Game of Thrones CDs from Netflix.)

W B
Then what do you do after work?
Howdy.

I am retired. Pretty much the only work I do is walking out to the mailbox with the Netflix CDs.

Other than that I fish, ski, climb mountains, scuba dive, and research tax avoidance on Bogleheads, but I do not consider any of that work.

And I am too busy and lazy to research your reference. If you won’t tell me what it is we can just skip it.

W B
It is a comedy movie starring Ron Livingston and Jennifer Anniston. It is somewhat of a cult classic as much of the material resonates strongly with many who have worked in corporate office jobs.

flyingaway
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Mon Dec 04, 2017 10:27 am

WildBill wrote:
Sun Dec 03, 2017 11:49 pm
flyingaway wrote:
Sun Dec 03, 2017 11:40 pm
WildBill wrote:
Sun Dec 03, 2017 11:18 pm
investing1012 wrote:
Sun Dec 03, 2017 9:20 pm
WildBill wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:16 am
Howdy

I was FI many years before I retired. I never lost any motivation for working, as the work was challenging and fulfilling.

However, my threshold for tolerating corporate and colleague BS steadily declined, to about zero at age 45 and was very negative by retirement. I was not actively resistant or expressive of this intolerance: if I did not agree with or want to participate in the various forms of BS I just ignored it.

Interestingly enough, those years of decling and negative tolerance and aggressive ignorance and non compliance were also by far my most successful professionally. Go figure.

W B
Ever watch office space
Howdy

Nope, and no clue re the reference. Educate me.

We have a TV, but we haven’t turned it on in 10 years (except for Game of Thrones CDs from Netflix.)

W B
Then what do you do after work?
Howdy.

I am retired. Pretty much the only work I do is walking out to the mailbox with the Netflix CDs.

Other than that I fish, ski, climb mountains, scuba dive, and research tax avoidance on Bogleheads, but I do not consider any of that work.

And I am too busy and lazy to research your reference. If you won’t tell me what it is we can just skip it.

W B
I did not reference anything. That was another person.

I was just curious about what you are doing now, as you said you had lots of motivations during your working days. (I did not initially notice that you are retired).

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sperry8
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by sperry8 » Mon Dec 04, 2017 6:42 pm

lightheir wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 10:11 am
sperry8 wrote:
Fri Dec 01, 2017 8:22 am
I lost my motivation to "work". But that's because my sole reason for work was money. Once attained, the reason was removed and thus what was left was "work" without reason and who is motivated to do that?

For those that say they haven't lost their motivation, they likely had an alternate reason for their "work". Passion. Fun. Etc. If you're doing "work" for those reasons whether or not your are paid is less relevant to you so your motivation remains.

Thus you have the answer... go do things you find fun or are passionate about. Motivation is no problem there. Don't bother with things you were solely doing for money after you achieve FI. No point anymore, you ended the reason.
I've heard this trite saying a million times, but it's totally unrealistic for the vast majority of individuals.

And honestly, even if I did do the one thing I was totally passionate about, that thing changes, and might not be the thing I was so passionate about a few years down the road. Priorities in life change. I enjoy my job now, but for sure, there are many moments where I am glad I chose a field where the compensation or benefits or even lifestyle was good enough to ride out the rough-motivation patches where I actually did NOT want to be there.
I did not suggest the statement you bolded for most individuals. I suggested it for individuals who have achieved FI as the OP queried. That said, I do find the vast majority of individuals to be unfulfilled and would question their life choices in regards to how they achieve happiness. One possible "fix" would be to do something you're passionate about. While you may be correct that these things change, sometimes they do not. My musician and artist friends can attest to that.
Humbling BH contest results: 2017: #516 of 647 | 2016: #121 of 610 | 2015: #18 of 552 | 2014: #225 of 503 | 2013: #383 of 433 | 2012: #366 of 410 | 2011: #113 of 369 | 2010: #53 of 282

GCD
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by GCD » Mon Dec 04, 2017 10:51 pm

I would say yes because I immediately retired upon hitting FI. If you are lucky, and I was, one can make work out of something they would do as a hobby. Almost any hobby can be work. You turn a hobby into work by using it to generate income and by adding administrative BS, schedule obligations and office/client politics to it. I still do aspects of my old job for fun and for free. Along with the pay, I ditched all the un-fun collateral stuff. The time I spent on the un-fun collateral stuff I now spend on my family, more exercise, healthier eating and returned to grad school for fun with no employment end game. Ditching the un-fun parts of work for new interesting things was a no brainer for me.

YMMV.

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Fletch
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by Fletch » Tue Dec 05, 2017 7:24 am

Interesting question. For me, I almost always enjoyed my work from the time I entered the work force until the last day; I was blessed to have many challenging positions throughout my career. I greatly enjoyed the last position I had prior to pulling the plug; I pretty much did what I thought best, traveled where and when I thought I should go, was paid well and had a great boss. So, I'd say I was motivated even when financially independent for the last several years I worked. Then one day my company offered a "package"; I told my boss I would like to take advantage of it if possible and a couple months later I retired. Literally, the day after I retired I had zero motivation to ever work again for pay ... so far so good. I've been retired for over 16 years and have never looked back. I trust myself to figure out how to not be bored; that was true when I was working and is true in retirement from a paid position.
“Meaningless! Meaningless!” says the Teacher. Whoever loves money never has enough; whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with their income. This too is meaningless.

squirm
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by squirm » Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:14 am

I know people who have no motivation to work without being financially independent, I'm sure it can the other way too.

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TheTimeLord
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by TheTimeLord » Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:31 am

Maybe some people are motivated by their work and others motivated to earn a living. For those who are motivated to earn a living it would seem that Financial Independence would significantly reduce that motivation. So maybe nothing actually changes you just have 2 groups in the workplace because of different motivations.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]

jlcnuke
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by jlcnuke » Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:32 am

My primary motivation to go to work is because I want the paycheck. All other motivational reasons to go to work can be achieved without working. As such, when I achieve FI, I don't plan on going to work anymore.

flyingaway
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:53 am

jlcnuke wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:32 am
My primary motivation to go to work is because I want the paycheck. All other motivational reasons to go to work can be achieved without working. As such, when I achieve FI, I don't plan on going to work anymore.
For many people, paycheck is the most important motivation to go to work, in my opinion. Similarly, for many kids, future employment (paycheck) is the primary motivation for them to go to school. The latter statement may not be correct, as most of them are forced to go to school by the parents (or by society). They may prefer to play games at home all day if possible.

flyingaway
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:57 am

GCD wrote:
Mon Dec 04, 2017 10:51 pm
I would say yes because I immediately retired upon hitting FI. If you are lucky, and I was, one can make work out of something they would do as a hobby. Almost any hobby can be work. You turn a hobby into work by using it to generate income and by adding administrative BS, schedule obligations and office/client politics to it. I still do aspects of my old job for fun and for free. Along with the pay, I ditched all the un-fun collateral stuff. The time I spent on the un-fun collateral stuff I now spend on my family, more exercise, healthier eating and returned to grad school for fun with no employment end game. Ditching the un-fun parts of work for new interesting things was a no brainer for me.

YMMV.
Although I believe that I hit FI in theory already recently, I am not sure that I have enough. If I can be assured that I have enough money for the rest of my life with a reasonable living standard, I will quit immediately.

flyingaway
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:01 am

TheTimeLord wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:31 am
Maybe some people are motivated by their work and others motivated to earn a living. For those who are motivated to earn a living it would seem that Financial Independence would significantly reduce that motivation. So maybe nothing actually changes you just have 2 groups in the workplace because of different motivations.
You are right. People are different and they have the right to be different. I just want to know if I am not out of the ordinary people when I find myself losing motivation for the work that I used to consider as part of my life.

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Hayden
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by Hayden » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:03 am

I enjoy trying and learning new things, so I am still working but I am pivoting my company to do something new. If it doesn't work out, no matter, so I don't have to stress about it.

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TheTimeLord
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by TheTimeLord » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:15 am

flyingaway wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:01 am
TheTimeLord wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:31 am
Maybe some people are motivated by their work and others motivated to earn a living. For those who are motivated to earn a living it would seem that Financial Independence would significantly reduce that motivation. So maybe nothing actually changes you just have 2 groups in the workplace because of different motivations.
You are right. People are different and they have the right to be different. I just want to know if I am not out of the ordinary people when I find myself losing motivation for the work that I used to consider as part of my life.
From what I can tell the majority people seem almost eager to swap the potential for greater security or creature comforts for not having to work. Also as we get older we can get more rigid in our thinking and I believe office politics can start weighing very heavily on some, especially those who see no reason to change because we have done it this way for 20 years and it worked fine. But I still think the greatest predictor of if someone wants to continue to work or not is how much control they perceive they have of their work environment. If you think you control things then assumably you set them up in a way you prefer so you should find your work environment more pleasant than someone who feels things are constantly being shoved down their throats. While I know lots of people who talk about wanting to perhaps slowdown, in my circle I meet very view who for whatever reason seem to target retiring in their 50s. And in discussions with friends in the workplace, none seem to have any clue what they would do with themselves with that much time on their hands but maybe they keep themselves too busy to consider alternatives. I do have one fairly recently retired friend who seems to be doing alright but their spouse isn't ready to retire and that is really limiting their opportunities to do things. Wouldn't surprise me to see them rejoin the workforce in the next 12 months, they have crazy good skills.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]

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Steelersfan
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by Steelersfan » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:28 am

FI didn't change my motivation to work. I continued to love what I did even though I was clearly FI. But management changed at the place I worked and work wasn't enjoyable any more. FI made is easy for me to say good-bye.

soccerdad12
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by soccerdad12 » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:36 am

WildBill wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:16 am
Howdy

I was FI many years before I retired. I never lost any motivation for working, as the work was challenging and fulfilling.

However, my threshold for tolerating corporate and colleague BS steadily declined, to about zero at age 45 and was very negative by retirement. I was not actively resistant or expressive of this intolerance: if I did not agree with or want to participate in the various forms of BS I just ignored it.

Interestingly enough, those years of decling and negative tolerance and aggressive ignorance and non compliance were also by far my most successful professionally. Go figure.

W B
That was the exact same experience that my father-in-law had. He worked for mega corp and after his retirement was secured with 30+ years there he became much more vocal about real business issues and subsequently earned a couple of substantial promotions for it and became an executive. He said he wasn't scared to do the right thing for the company no matter the politics, b/c the worst case scenario was that he retired. I remember him saying, "What are they going to do? Fire me?" It's funny how those things work out.

harvestbook
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by harvestbook » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:40 am

I work for myself and have no need to ever retire (creative field), yet I hate my boss.
I'm not smart enough to know, and I can't afford to guess.

flyingaway
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:53 am

TheTimeLord wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:15 am
flyingaway wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:01 am
TheTimeLord wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:31 am
Maybe some people are motivated by their work and others motivated to earn a living. For those who are motivated to earn a living it would seem that Financial Independence would significantly reduce that motivation. So maybe nothing actually changes you just have 2 groups in the workplace because of different motivations.
You are right. People are different and they have the right to be different. I just want to know if I am not out of the ordinary people when I find myself losing motivation for the work that I used to consider as part of my life.
From what I can tell the majority people seem almost eager to swap the potential for greater security or creature comforts for not having to work. Also as we get older we can get more rigid in our thinking and I believe office politics can start weighing very heavily on some, especially those who see no reason to change because we have done it this way for 20 years and it worked fine. But I still think the greatest predictor of if someone wants to continue to work or not is how much control they perceive they have of their work environment. If you think you control things then assumably you set them up in a way you prefer so you should find your work environment more pleasant than someone who feels things are constantly being shoved down their throats. While I know lots of people who talk about wanting to perhaps slowdown, in my circle I meet very view who for whatever reason seem to target retiring in their 50s. And in discussions with friends in the workplace, none seem to have any clue what they would do with themselves with that much time on their hands but maybe they keep themselves too busy to consider alternatives. I do have one fairly recently retired friend who seems to be doing alright but their spouse isn't ready to retire and that is really limiting their opportunities to do things. Wouldn't surprise me to see them rejoin the workforce in the next 12 months, they have crazy good skills.
I may not have a problem with initial retirement. Last night (and many nights before) I was watching travel videos by other people, many of them are very young and seemed enjoy their life out there. I was asking myself what I am doing here and why I am not there.

However, I know I could not do that kind of things right now and for the next 20 years with my current SWR and family obligations. But those things are seriously reducing my work motivation.

wrongfunds
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by wrongfunds » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:59 am

If I can be assured that I have enough money for the rest of my life with a reasonable living standard, I will quit immediately.
Nobody in the world can give you that guarantee. You are the only person who can decide how much and when enough is enough. As long as you do not know how long is your "rest of life" and as long as living standard itself depends upon the available assets, such a guarantee is mathematically not possible,

flyingaway
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Tue Dec 05, 2017 11:15 am

wrongfunds wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:59 am
If I can be assured that I have enough money for the rest of my life with a reasonable living standard, I will quit immediately.
Nobody in the world can give you that guarantee. You are the only person who can decide how much and when enough is enough. As long as you do not know how long is your "rest of life" and as long as living standard itself depends upon the available assets, such a guarantee is mathematically not possible,
I can run some risk with my own life, but I would like to minimize risk for my family. Once my children are out of college and have stable jobs, I will be in a better position to make my choices.

truenorth418
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by truenorth418 » Tue Dec 05, 2017 11:42 am

I was sick of my career so I stepped off as soon as I was financially independent.

I looked into some other career tracks to see if there was something more interesting to me where I could continue making money, but for the most part potential new employers weren't interested in taking a chance on someone who came from an unrelated field - especially someone like me who had walked away so easily from another job.

So I decided to stop looking for something new and just enjoy my freedom - and so far it has worked out well.

gotester2000
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by gotester2000 » Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:08 pm

For guys who have retired prior to age 50 with FI - How do you handle questions from family, relatives and acquaintances about why you are not working?

Do your spouse and kids accept it? Are you really at peace with it yourself?

Do you tell people that you are retired at 45?

KlangFool
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by KlangFool » Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:28 pm

gotester2000 wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:08 pm
For guys who have retired prior to age 50 with FI - How do you handle questions from family, relatives and acquaintances about why you are not working?

Do your spouse and kids accept it? Are you really at peace with it yourself?

Do you tell people that you are retired at 45?
gotester2000,

1) One of the options is to say that you are a consultant. You are working on some projects as it becomes available.

2) The other option is to ask is it any of their business?

3) You can answer that you had earned enough money.

KlangFool

P.S.: My older brother and older sister early retired at 49 years old.

P.S.2: I had found out early in my life that the path to happiness is to live my life without worrying about other's opinion.
Last edited by KlangFool on Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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White Coat Investor
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by White Coat Investor » Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:29 pm

mak1277 wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:03 am
TheNightsToCome wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 12:37 am
mak1277 wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:20 am
I've always viewed work as a necessity...it's only purpose in my life being to provide financial security and the ability to acquire things I need/want. As I approach FI, I definitely have lost motivation for work, since additional money is no longer a necessity. I'm an accountant, so my work is not providing any demonstrable value to society, and I can easily be replaced.
"I'm an accountant, so my work is not providing any demonstrable value to society,"

I'm not an accountant, but accountants clearly provide value to society. I'm not sure why you would think otherwise.
Saving people money on taxes is not "value to society".
Keeping a corporation's books in order is not "value to society".

I'm not saying accountants are not *necessary*, I'm just saying that nobody is going to miss my contribution if I quit my job (same goes for all other accountants in the history of time).
Absolutely disagree. That's like saying finance doesn't provide anything beneficial. The corporate structure and a transparent financial system and the work accountants do to keep it that way are largely responsible for the vast wealth of the world that has led to incredible improvements in health, the arts, science etc. You might be a small, entirely replaceable cog in a massive system. But don't think that cog isn't important and isn't making a difference.

It's a little like the housekeepers in my ER. Nobody thinks about them when you think about the staff in an ER. But wait until they're not there one day and the whole place grinds to a halt. From one point of view, all he does is sweep floors and clean beds. From another point of view, he saves lives. Sometimes we just need to step back and see the big picture to realize our work really does matter.
1) Invest you must 2) Time is your friend 3) Impulse is your enemy | 4) Basic arithmetic works 5) Stick to simplicity 6) Stay the course

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White Coat Investor
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by White Coat Investor » Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:30 pm

flyingaway wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:53 am
TheTimeLord wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:15 am
flyingaway wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:01 am
TheTimeLord wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:31 am
Maybe some people are motivated by their work and others motivated to earn a living. For those who are motivated to earn a living it would seem that Financial Independence would significantly reduce that motivation. So maybe nothing actually changes you just have 2 groups in the workplace because of different motivations.
You are right. People are different and they have the right to be different. I just want to know if I am not out of the ordinary people when I find myself losing motivation for the work that I used to consider as part of my life.
From what I can tell the majority people seem almost eager to swap the potential for greater security or creature comforts for not having to work. Also as we get older we can get more rigid in our thinking and I believe office politics can start weighing very heavily on some, especially those who see no reason to change because we have done it this way for 20 years and it worked fine. But I still think the greatest predictor of if someone wants to continue to work or not is how much control they perceive they have of their work environment. If you think you control things then assumably you set them up in a way you prefer so you should find your work environment more pleasant than someone who feels things are constantly being shoved down their throats. While I know lots of people who talk about wanting to perhaps slowdown, in my circle I meet very view who for whatever reason seem to target retiring in their 50s. And in discussions with friends in the workplace, none seem to have any clue what they would do with themselves with that much time on their hands but maybe they keep themselves too busy to consider alternatives. I do have one fairly recently retired friend who seems to be doing alright but their spouse isn't ready to retire and that is really limiting their opportunities to do things. Wouldn't surprise me to see them rejoin the workforce in the next 12 months, they have crazy good skills.
I may not have a problem with initial retirement. Last night (and many nights before) I was watching travel videos by other people, many of them are very young and seemed enjoy their life out there. I was asking myself what I am doing here and why I am not there.

However, I know I could not do that kind of things right now and for the next 20 years with my current SWR and family obligations. But those things are seriously reducing my work motivation.
Remember that Facebook and Youtube are the highlight reels of our lives.
1) Invest you must 2) Time is your friend 3) Impulse is your enemy | 4) Basic arithmetic works 5) Stick to simplicity 6) Stay the course

gotester2000
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by gotester2000 » Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:41 pm

KlangFool wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:28 pm
gotester2000 wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:08 pm
For guys who have retired prior to age 50 with FI - How do you handle questions from family, relatives and acquaintances about why you are not working?

Do your spouse and kids accept it? Are you really at peace with it yourself?

Do you tell people that you are retired at 45?
gotester2000,

1) One of the options is to say that you are a consultant. You are working on some projects as it becomes available.

2) The other option is to ask is it any of their business?

3) You can answer that you had earned enough money.

KlangFool
For point -

1) I say this and people stare at me. And I do work as consultant on available projects.
2) Never tried this reply due to fear of hurting others.
3) Despite showing spouse using different models that we have enough money , she is not ready to accept it. She is competing with whoever is in her sphere for being at the top of the pyramid.

nobleGas
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by nobleGas » Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:45 pm

I lost motivation once the investments started earning more money than I did.

KlangFool
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by KlangFool » Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:50 pm

gotester2000 wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:41 pm
KlangFool wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:28 pm
gotester2000 wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:08 pm
For guys who have retired prior to age 50 with FI - How do you handle questions from family, relatives and acquaintances about why you are not working?

Do your spouse and kids accept it? Are you really at peace with it yourself?

Do you tell people that you are retired at 45?
gotester2000,

1) One of the options is to say that you are a consultant. You are working on some projects as it becomes available.

2) The other option is to ask is it any of their business?

3) You can answer that you had earned enough money.

KlangFool
For point -

1) I say this and people stare at me. And I do work as consultant on available projects.
2) Never tried this reply due to fear of hurting others.
3) Despite showing spouse using different models that we have enough money , she is not ready to accept it. She is competing with whoever is in her sphere for being at the top of the pyramid.
gotester2000,

1) That is their problem.

2) They choose to ask a stupid question. They deserve the pain.

3) So? Let her work more and make more money for you. It does not have to be you.

It is very simple.

You could either

A) Be happy and live your own life as you like it to be.

or

B) Be unhappy live according to someone's else opinion of how you should live your life.

I know my answer.

KlangFool

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:47 pm

gotester2000 wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:08 pm
For guys who have retired prior to age 50 with FI - How do you handle questions from family, relatives and acquaintances about why you are not working?

Do your spouse and kids accept it? Are you really at peace with it yourself?

Do you tell people that you are retired at 45?
I am not eligible to answer this question as I am 53 and not fully retired yet.

My son did ask me why I was not in my office but at home during work hours, especially during summer months. I answered that i have a job that does not require me to work in office all the time. I also told my son that if he wants a job with lots of flexibility, he must have desired skills for the right careers.

mak1277
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by mak1277 » Tue Dec 05, 2017 2:31 pm

gotester2000 wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:08 pm
For guys who have retired prior to age 50 with FI - How do you handle questions from family, relatives and acquaintances about why you are not working?

Do your spouse and kids accept it? Are you really at peace with it yourself?

Do you tell people that you are retired at 45?
This is a question that never gets pondered by people who are not defined by their job. If someone at a party asks me what I do, I start by listing my hobbies and things I do for enjoyment. I can't imagine ever talking about my work unless someone specifically asked.

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by mak1277 » Tue Dec 05, 2017 2:44 pm

White Coat Investor wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:29 pm
mak1277 wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:03 am
TheNightsToCome wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 12:37 am
mak1277 wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:20 am
I've always viewed work as a necessity...it's only purpose in my life being to provide financial security and the ability to acquire things I need/want. As I approach FI, I definitely have lost motivation for work, since additional money is no longer a necessity. I'm an accountant, so my work is not providing any demonstrable value to society, and I can easily be replaced.
"I'm an accountant, so my work is not providing any demonstrable value to society,"

I'm not an accountant, but accountants clearly provide value to society. I'm not sure why you would think otherwise.
Saving people money on taxes is not "value to society".
Keeping a corporation's books in order is not "value to society".

I'm not saying accountants are not *necessary*, I'm just saying that nobody is going to miss my contribution if I quit my job (same goes for all other accountants in the history of time).
Absolutely disagree. That's like saying finance doesn't provide anything beneficial. The corporate structure and a transparent financial system and the work accountants do to keep it that way are largely responsible for the vast wealth of the world that has led to incredible improvements in health, the arts, science etc. You might be a small, entirely replaceable cog in a massive system. But don't think that cog isn't important and isn't making a difference.

It's a little like the housekeepers in my ER. Nobody thinks about them when you think about the staff in an ER. But wait until they're not there one day and the whole place grinds to a halt. From one point of view, all he does is sweep floors and clean beds. From another point of view, he saves lives. Sometimes we just need to step back and see the big picture to realize our work really does matter.
I saw the CEO of Tupperware on CNBC yesterday. He made a comment about how much money his company spent (he didn't say "waste" but he meant that) on Finance and Internal Audit (in the context of accounting, tax and Sarbanes Oxley requirements), and how much more money they could spend on innovation if the regulations were relaxed. I was practically applauding my television.

Is it necessary for there to be accountants? Of course. But so much of what we do is just not value added in any way shape or form. But my comment is really meant in terms of being a cog in the machine, as you said. I don't think there are any accountants out there who couldn't be easily replaced if they just disappeared one day.

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by White Coat Investor » Tue Dec 05, 2017 3:20 pm

mak1277 wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 2:44 pm
White Coat Investor wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:29 pm
mak1277 wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 9:03 am
TheNightsToCome wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 12:37 am
mak1277 wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:20 am
I've always viewed work as a necessity...it's only purpose in my life being to provide financial security and the ability to acquire things I need/want. As I approach FI, I definitely have lost motivation for work, since additional money is no longer a necessity. I'm an accountant, so my work is not providing any demonstrable value to society, and I can easily be replaced.
"I'm an accountant, so my work is not providing any demonstrable value to society,"

I'm not an accountant, but accountants clearly provide value to society. I'm not sure why you would think otherwise.
Saving people money on taxes is not "value to society".
Keeping a corporation's books in order is not "value to society".

I'm not saying accountants are not *necessary*, I'm just saying that nobody is going to miss my contribution if I quit my job (same goes for all other accountants in the history of time).
Absolutely disagree. That's like saying finance doesn't provide anything beneficial. The corporate structure and a transparent financial system and the work accountants do to keep it that way are largely responsible for the vast wealth of the world that has led to incredible improvements in health, the arts, science etc. You might be a small, entirely replaceable cog in a massive system. But don't think that cog isn't important and isn't making a difference.

It's a little like the housekeepers in my ER. Nobody thinks about them when you think about the staff in an ER. But wait until they're not there one day and the whole place grinds to a halt. From one point of view, all he does is sweep floors and clean beds. From another point of view, he saves lives. Sometimes we just need to step back and see the big picture to realize our work really does matter.
I saw the CEO of Tupperware on CNBC yesterday. He made a comment about how much money his company spent (he didn't say "waste" but he meant that) on Finance and Internal Audit (in the context of accounting, tax and Sarbanes Oxley requirements), and how much more money they could spend on innovation if the regulations were relaxed. I was practically applauding my television.

Is it necessary for there to be accountants? Of course. But so much of what we do is just not value added in any way shape or form. But my comment is really meant in terms of being a cog in the machine, as you said. I don't think there are any accountants out there who couldn't be easily replaced if they just disappeared one day.
That's no different from my job in the ER. In retrospective, most people with chest pain and belly pain and dyspnea and altered mental status are going to be just fine if I didn't see them or they hadn't even come in to the emergency department. But there are a few times a day I can make a real difference. But there's a lot of (at least in retrospect) unnecessary health care going on which is just a drag on society. Maybe 90% of what I do in a day adds no real value, it just subtracts from society. Expensive reassurance. That's what I specialize in.

We should strive everything more efficient, from business to healthcare and everything in between. But just because we work in an imperfect system doesn't mean we're not making a difference. I felt the same way in the military. I may not have added a dime of value in four years. (Okay, a bit of an exaggeration.) But collectively, we're all very happy our military is there.
1) Invest you must 2) Time is your friend 3) Impulse is your enemy | 4) Basic arithmetic works 5) Stick to simplicity 6) Stay the course

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by hudson » Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:01 pm

flyingaway wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 10:22 am
After achieving financial independence (FI), you know you have enough, do (did) you lose motivation for work?

Even several years before FI, l lost ambitions in work. After FI, I seem to lose motivation for work. I don't care about my work anymore, although there are some changes at the school that I do not like (e.g., running a state university like a corporation).
The OP's question may not apply to retired folks...
I really liked my job, but when I figured that I could afford to retire, I retired...just after Full Retirement Age.
I could very likely go back part time, but I have no desire to disrupt my new schedule. Family stuff is now my full time job, and I work hard at it. My part time job is to hit the gym and nearby trails...every day if possible. I never have lost my motivation to do stuff; I just don't hurry from one task to another unless duty calls. I continue to make lists of things to do...and I'm very motivated to clear the list....but no hurry.

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by FRT15 » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:45 pm

I am 35 and have thought about this quite a bit. If I wanted a very modest existence I could be at FI now. I don't think about quitting because I like to be busy and am not prepared to tackle what I would do with all the extra time I would have. I do feel like I lack desire to clinb the ladder or make more based on what I have accumulated .

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by PhysicianOnFIRE » Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:59 pm

41, FI, and I have yet to experience the euphoria of working by choice.

Much of what I've read about FI says I should be enjoying my work more because it's become optional, but I find I am simply more intolerant of the nonsense that I have to put up with and more aware of the really stressful aspects of the job (anesthesiologist).

I have dropped to part-time and I do find certain aspects of the job to be rewarding, but there are too many real and potential downsides to the profession to keep me working indefinitely when money is no longer much of an issue.

:beer
-PoF

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by gotester2000 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:05 am

KlangFool
flyingaway
mak1277,

Great perspective. I think I should start enjoying my current life and stop thinking too much about what others think about me(My spouse is giving me the resentment eye these days).

FRT15
PhysicianOnFIRE,

I had similar thoughts on being busy and putting up with the stress on the job.

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by ClaycordJCA » Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:21 am

To put it simply, YES! :wink:

flyingaway
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:41 am

PhysicianOnFIRE wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:59 pm
41, FI, and I have yet to experience the euphoria of working by choice.

Much of what I've read about FI says I should be enjoying my work more because it's become optional, but I find I am simply more intolerant of the nonsense that I have to put up with and more aware of the really stressful aspects of the job (anesthesiologist).

I have dropped to part-time and I do find certain aspects of the job to be rewarding, but there are too many real and potential downsides to the profession to keep me working indefinitely when money is no longer much of an issue.

:beer
-PoF
When work becomes optional, I no longer have the motivation to argue with other people (my co-workers or superiors). I just do my work and get paid.

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by IMO » Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:44 am

TheTimeLord wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:15 am
But I still think the greatest predictor of if someone wants to continue to work or not is how much control they perceive they have of their work environment. If you think you control things then assumably you set them up in a way you prefer so you should find your work environment more pleasant than someone who feels things are constantly being shoved down their throats.
Absolutely agree with this thought.

mak1277
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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by mak1277 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:21 am

gotester2000 wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:05 am
KlangFool
flyingaway
mak1277,

Great perspective. I think I should start enjoying my current life and stop thinking too much about what others think about me(My spouse is giving me the resentment eye these days).
This is a tough one. I would say my spouse is the ONLY person whose opinion absolutely, 100% matters in terms of what I do or plan to do. That said, my personal opinion is that a married couple is either completely FI (both of them) or not FI at all. I know others view this differently, but I would never retire if my spouse couldn't also retire.

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by CyclingDuo » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:21 am

flyingaway wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 10:22 am
After achieving financial independence (FI), you know you have enough, do (did) you lose motivation for work?

Even several years before FI, l lost ambitions in work. After FI, I seem to lose motivation for work. I don't care about my work anymore, although there are some changes at the school that I do not like (e.g., running a state university like a corporation).
Come on, now. Cheer up already!

As professors we get every Summer off as it is. 8-)

Two to three months of free time every single year to do personal stuff, travel, bike, hike, paint, read, watch movies, chill, swim, run, walk, eat, socialize, kayak, canoe, camp, watch baseball, think, stare at the wall, watch the grass grow, change the oil in your car, recharge your mental battery, work on relationships, fight the weeds in your yard, swat mosquitoes, sit around the fire pit at night sipping wine - the sky is the limit. Toss in Fall Break, Spring Break, a generous holiday break in December/January - and I think there remains plenty of motivation to compare the shade of green the grass is on your side of the fence compared to the shade of green the grass is on the other side of the fence.

Summer 2018 will be our 33rd "mini-retirement" 3 month vacation. :sharebeer

It's too bad you don't care about your work anymore. I would dig as deep as possible to uncover the reasoning for that conclusion to make sure all medical and mental aspects have been thoroughly explored. Would a job change to another institution help? Would taking on teaching a Summer program in Europe, Australia, Britain help? What about developing some new courses that both interest you as well as the students that fit your curriculum? What about volunteering or getting involved in some form of community service? Do you have any hobbies that energize your outlook and motivation? Something to spruce up your motivation so it at least ebbs and flows, rather than just getting stuck in the ebb.

College students are very impressionable by our actions, mentoring, and advising. It's hard to hide anything from them with regard to our on the job attitude. Certainly, it seems plausible that students - not to mention other faculty members - would pick up on any signs that show a lack of motivation. For that reason, I would search for ways to light a fire under your motivation if you are going to continue teaching.

If you are FI, and seriously have lost all ambition to work - perhaps it is time to do yourself, your students, and colleagues a favor by stepping down. On your own terms. Just be sure you have thoroughly examined all angles of your situation.

We are ages 56 and 59 - both still jacked to be working in our respective subjects/teaching. Hey, finals week is next week and then 3 1/2 weeks of free time! :mrgreen:

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by snowox » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:26 am

Having been self employed and being FI quite a bit before I retired I loved working and was motivated to work. I didn't lose my motivation until I hated what I was doing so thats when I decided to retire. It would be fair that there is a part of that that I do miss being excited about building/expanding a business , but not enough to get back into the rat race.

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by flyingaway » Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:19 am

CyclingDuo wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:21 am
flyingaway wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 10:22 am
After achieving financial independence (FI), you know you have enough, do (did) you lose motivation for work?

Even several years before FI, l lost ambitions in work. After FI, I seem to lose motivation for work. I don't care about my work anymore, although there are some changes at the school that I do not like (e.g., running a state university like a corporation).
Come on, now. Cheer up already!

As professors we get every Summer off as it is. 8-)

Two to three months of free time every single year to do personal stuff, travel, bike, hike, paint, read, watch movies, chill, swim, run, walk, eat, socialize, kayak, canoe, camp, watch baseball, think, stare at the wall, watch the grass grow, change the oil in your car, recharge your mental battery, work on relationships, fight the weeds in your yard, swat mosquitoes, sit around the fire pit at night sipping wine - the sky is the limit. Toss in Fall Break, Spring Break, a generous holiday break in December/January - and I think there remains plenty of motivation to compare the shade of green the grass is on your side of the fence compared to the shade of green the grass is on the other side of the fence.

Summer 2018 will be our 33rd "mini-retirement" 3 month vacation. :sharebeer

It's too bad you don't care about your work anymore. I would dig as deep as possible to uncover the reasoning for that conclusion to make sure all medical and mental aspects have been thoroughly explored. Would a job change to another institution help? Would taking on teaching a Summer program in Europe, Australia, Britain help? What about developing some new courses that both interest you as well as the students that fit your curriculum? What about volunteering or getting involved in some form of community service? Do you have any hobbies that energize your outlook and motivation? Something to spruce up your motivation so it at least ebbs and flows, rather than just getting stuck in the ebb.

College students are very impressionable by our actions, mentoring, and advising. It's hard to hide anything from them with regard to our on the job attitude. Certainly, it seems plausible that students - not to mention other faculty members - would pick up on any signs that show a lack of motivation. For that reason, I would search for ways to light a fire under your motivation if you are going to continue teaching.

If you are FI, and seriously have lost all ambition to work - perhaps it is time to do yourself, your students, and colleagues a favor by stepping down. On your own terms. Just be sure you have thoroughly examined all angles of your situation.

We are ages 56 and 59 - both still jacked to be working in our respective subjects/teaching. Hey, finals week is next week and then 3 1/2 weeks of free time! :mrgreen:
I am glad that you like your academic job. As I said before, I do not hate my job and I am doing my job satisfactorily. But, it is difficult to get motivated when (1) In the last 10 years, the presidents' salary quadrupled, excluding the bonus, while my salary rised 4.5% in total. (2) Each new president came with bigger goals (top national ranking) with no chance of success, just pushed faculty beyond the limit to get their fat paychecks. (3) We are told to keep increasing enrollment when the state population does not increase. So a state university is eager to recruit foreign students. (4) For my classes, the number of students almost trippled and the amount of support decreased. (5) We used to have one president, two vice presidents. Now we have one president, one executive vice president, a provost, a few vice presients, a few associate vice presidents, a few assistant vice presidents, a lot of directors, and fewer faulty members.

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by GCD » Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:30 am

flyingaway wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:41 am
PhysicianOnFIRE wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:59 pm
I find I am simply more intolerant of the nonsense that I have to put up with
I no longer have the motivation to argue with other people (my co-workers or superiors).
+1000. FI eliminated all tolerance for nonsense. Which, for me, meant pursuing certain aspects of work as hobbies.

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by GCD » Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:35 am

KlangFool wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:50 pm
gotester2000 wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:41 pm
KlangFool wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:28 pm
gotester2000 wrote:
Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:08 pm
For guys who have retired prior to age 50 with FI - How do you handle questions from family, relatives and acquaintances about why you are not working?

Do your spouse and kids accept it? Are you really at peace with it yourself?

Do you tell people that you are retired at 45?
gotester2000,

1) One of the options is to say that you are a consultant. You are working on some projects as it becomes available.

2) The other option is to ask is it any of their business?

3) You can answer that you had earned enough money.

KlangFool
For point -

1) I say this and people stare at me. And I do work as consultant on available projects.
2) Never tried this reply due to fear of hurting others.
3) Despite showing spouse using different models that we have enough money , she is not ready to accept it. She is competing with whoever is in her sphere for being at the top of the pyramid.
gotester2000,

1) That is their problem.

2) They choose to ask a stupid question. They deserve the pain.

3) So? Let her work more and make more money for you. It does not have to be you.

It is very simple.

You could either

A) Be happy and live your own life as you like it to be.

or

B) Be unhappy live according to someone's else opinion of how you should live your life.

I know my answer.

KlangFool
I don't always agree with Klang, but this is spot on. I've had people tell me words to the effect of "wow, you retired young, what do you do with yourself" and in a tone that implies my decision was bad. It takes me 5 minutes to tell them all the things I do in retirement and that's the executive summary version.

IMO only, people that can't conceive of a meaningful, productive life without work are sad.

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by wrongfunds » Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:23 pm

I am glad that you like your academic job. As I said before, I do not hate my job and I am doing my job satisfactorily. But, it is difficult to get motivated when (1) In the last 10 years, the presidents' salary quadrupled, excluding the bonus, while my salary rised 4.5% in total. (2) Each new president came with bigger goals (top national ranking) with no chance of success, just pushed faculty beyond the limit to get their fat paychecks. (3) We are told to keep increasing enrollment when the state population does not increase. So a state university is eager to recruit foreign students. (4) For my classes, the number of students almost trippled and the amount of support decreased. (5) We used to have one president, two vice presidents. Now we have one president, one executive vice president, a provost, a few vice presients, a few associate vice presidents, a few assistant vice presidents, a lot of directors, and fewer faulty members.
Only thing you can do is to become one of them aka climb the ladder to the top or be the one who employs them aka become their "boss". As it turns out, being tax payer of the state funded school, you *are* their boss but how do you actually exert the control so that their remuneration is within reason?

Unfortunately, you are like every other hundreds of millions of employees busting their tail off who see that the people at the top just scheme off their unfair share.

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by 1210sda » Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:36 pm

For me the magic age was 45. At that point I increased my focus on FI. I was able to quit full time employment at age 50 and worked part time for the next 9 years. By 59, I was considerably over my target for FI.

I reflect on age 45 and wonder what it was that started my initial "burn out". Don't really know or at least don't remember. Whatever it was, glad it happened.

1210

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by CyclingDuo » Wed Dec 06, 2017 2:19 pm

wrongfunds wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 12:23 pm
Only thing you can do is to become one of them aka climb the ladder to the top or be the one who employs them aka become their "boss".
Yes. Faculty could apply for administrative positions.
Unfortunately, you are like every other hundreds of millions of employees busting their tail off who see that the people at the top just scheme off their unfair share.
Bingo!

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by CyclingDuo » Wed Dec 06, 2017 2:53 pm

flyingaway wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:19 am
I am glad that you like your academic job. As I said before, I do not hate my job and I am doing my job satisfactorily. But, it is difficult to get motivated when (1) In the last 10 years, the presidents' salary quadrupled, excluding the bonus, while my salary rised 4.5% in total.
I don't think we can compare our salaries as faculty to that of administration - be it at a private college or a state university. We certainly have been through the years of salary freezes as well, and are well aware of the reality of the salary discrepancy between faculty, staff and administration. It is, what it is. I find it hard to use the excuse of administration salary growth vs. faculty salary minimal growth as a factor in career motivation. If we wanted to be motivated by salary, we would have chosen to be football coaches, and perfected our craft so well we were the ones coaching at a major university. 8-)

Don't forget to look down the chain as well, instead of just up to all of those $$$ in the ivory towers. We could be working a lot harder, for a lot longer hours, for a lot more weeks per year - and being paid a lot less in other jobs away from academia.
flyingaway wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:19 am
(2) Each new president came with bigger goals (top national ranking) with no chance of success, just pushed faculty beyond the limit to get their fat paychecks. (3) We are told to keep increasing enrollment when the state population does not increase. So a state university is eager to recruit foreign students. (4) For my classes, the number of students almost trippled and the amount of support decreased. (5) We used to have one president, two vice presidents. Now we have one president, one executive vice president, a provost, a few vice presients, a few associate vice presidents, a few assistant vice presidents, a lot of directors, and fewer faulty members.
One can choose to either let those beefs eat at you, or you can choose to ignore it and carry on. Whenever I hear the same sort of frustrations voiced from colleagues, I choose to not engage in the discussion and deflect the topic, or manage to wiggle free and walk away into a more positive space on campus. We get this journey one time, and one time only. My legacy is not going to be remembered as moaning about it.

That being said, I've got family members working in a variety of careers in technology, medical, religion, arts, sales, architecture, accounting, etc... - and everyone of them can easily come up with a full litany of frustrations such as you mention. It is not specific to academics.

You have made other posts in threads at BH wondering aloud what you should do, so it is clear you are really seeking some guidance, or opinions. I don't know if your university is with TIAA or some other plan sponsor, but sit down with the advisor and see if your FI is all set and positioned so you can do it in a legitimate way. Maybe you have already done that, I don't know.

Our campus has resources on campus, as well as in a private setting if we, as faculty need some personal counseling to work through any issues. I wouldn't hesitate to take advantage of that if I were you to discuss your frustrations, and see if professional guidance leads you to making the most informed decision about choosing FI and retirement now or later. I would want to ride off into the sunset from academia with no regrets, and happy about the decision rather than harboring any kind of frustration about how the President or Provost or Dean makes triple - quadruple my salary, drives a Hummer, and will get a six figure pension the rest of their lives when they retire. That's no way to spend the rest of your journey...

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Re: After financial independence, do you lose motivation for work?

Post by Y.A.Tittle » Wed Dec 06, 2017 3:31 pm

I just hit my number and yes, my motivation to work has waned considerably.

In my case it's not so much because I acheived financial independence, but because I don't like my job or industry anymore. I am hoping to find a sunset career or avocation after I offically retire that will stimulate my working spirits.

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