How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

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MrJones
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How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by MrJones » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:26 pm

How difficult and how expensive would it be to convert a day 3 bed / 1 bath single family house into a 3 bed /2.5 bath house?

I don't have a particular property in mind, but in trying to buy a house in a VHCOL area, I see several 3/1 houses that I could consider only if I could increase the number of bathrooms post-purchase.

Let's assume the floor space has to be extended to accommodate the new bathrooms. Lets assume these are small houses in the 1500 square foot range.

In terms of difficulty, I'm assuming there are permits and such that need to be obtained from the city because of a change in built area? Also, I'm thinking it may not be possible because of local laws about say building too close to the edge of a property, or heritage building preservation, and such?

In terms of expense, is this typically done with the contractor? How painful is this? I've never had experience in anything like this.
Last edited by MrJones on Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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sdsailing
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by sdsailing » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:33 pm

Depends on the house. You need square footage to add two small rooms, which is what you are proposing, unless the 2.5 was an error. Or you need to do an addition. Also dopends on the plumbing. Too many variables.

pshonore
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by pshonore » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:35 pm

If the house is on septic, you may have to upgrade the system which could be very costly. OK if on sewer. When adding on you certainly have to consider setbacks, etc as well as lot coverage and other zoning regulations. Bathrooms are always expensive.

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lthenderson
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by lthenderson » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:43 pm

Generally adding a bathroom to a house is a very expensive and difficult proposition. Fitting it into an existing footprint and making it "fit" in is almost impossible without remodeling the entire area. Adding onto a house for just a bathroom will be difficult as the bathroom will be on the perimeter of your floor plan and not in the central area where most bathrooms are located. Most often people add something like a larger bedroom on the perimeter and convert an existing room into a bathroom or create a larger bathroom. Connecting the bathroom to your existing plumbing is often the key for where you can locate another bathroom.

Do you live in an area with basements? They are more easily added to a basement than just about anywhere else.

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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:47 pm

I have a bit of experience with this - if you are planning to expand your house living/usable space beyond the current building envelope, you will want the services of a certified architect. The architect will know or obtain the particular location's building code and will find what are the required setbacks from the property line and adjoining residences, if any. In my case, the original property setback was 6 feet, then the local ordinance was changed to 9.5 feet. If I wanted to build at 9 feet, I would have needed a variance which required notifying all of my neighbors within 200 feet in all directions, appearing before a zoning board, and hope they would approve it. Luckily, my architect modified my original set of plans to avoid having to go that route.

How expensive? Depends on whether you are building within the existing space, if you are building outside of it, then a foundation will need to be dug out, you'll need to go a minimum of 18 inches below the frost line, pour a foundation footing, use of reinforced concrete. You will need a permit for building, electrical, plumbing, then a final inspection by town building department. Depending on size and scope, it can get costly fast. Depending on fit and finish, costs can go up significantly.

The two words you do not want to hear from your contractor if you are breaking into existing building space is "unforseen conditions" - that is a code for "it's likley going to cost you more money because we had no way of knowing that the previous builder did not build to "code" or that existing code requires adjustments to be made. :twisted:
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dm200
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by dm200 » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:48 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:43 pm
Generally adding a bathroom to a house is a very expensive and difficult proposition. Fitting it into an existing footprint and making it "fit" in is almost impossible without remodeling the entire area. Adding onto a house for just a bathroom will be difficult as the bathroom will be on the perimeter of your floor plan and not in the central area where most bathrooms are located. Most often people add something like a larger bedroom on the perimeter and convert an existing room into a bathroom or create a larger bathroom. Connecting the bathroom to your existing plumbing is often the key for where you can locate another bathroom.
Do you live in an area with basements? They are more easily added to a basement than just about anywhere else.
I suspect that there may be some houses where adding a 1/2 bath in a certain space may not be a huge deal. I suppose that adding a whole bedroom AND full bath (where there is space, etc.) may be reasonable as well.

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dm200
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by dm200 » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:51 pm

MrJones wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:26 pm
How difficult and how expensive would it be to convert a day 3 bed / 1 bath single family house into a 3 /2.5 house?
I don't have a particular property in mind, but in trying to buy a house in a VHCOL area, I see several 3/1 houses that I could consider only if I could increase the number of bathrooms post-purchase.
Let's assume the floor space has to be extended to accommodate the new bathrooms.
In terms of difficulty, I'm assuming there are permits and such that need to be obtained from the city because of a change in built area? Also, I'm thinking it may not be possible because of local laws about say building too close to the edge of a property, or heritage building preservation, and such?
In terms of expense, is this typically done with the contractor? How painful is this? I've never had experience in anything like this.
Check with an experienced real estate agent that knows the area and houses very well. Since you see several 3/1 houses - chances are that there are folks who have upgraded/enlarged to do this. Then check with them as to how things worked out.

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Sandtrap
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by Sandtrap » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:52 pm

The most inexpensive (still not cheap) way to add a bathroom to an existing dwelling is:
1 within the existing building lines.
2 adjacent to or, ideally, sharing the same back to back plumbing wall/chase as an existing bathroom
3 adjacent to or, ideally sharing the same back to back plumbing wall.chase of an existing kitchen or utility room with a laundry machine and wash sink.
4 on the ground floor of a building with a basement or crawl space

Your buildable envelope is whatever zoning in your area there is for front, side and rear setbacks. The setbacks may change on the ground floor vs the 2nd floor. IE: subdivision zoning setback, 10 feet on both sides, 20 feet in front, 20 feet in back. Like that.

A home addition outside of the existing building footprint is far more involved as it's constructed from dirt to roof and also the "tie in" to the existing home. Done well, it looks like the building was always that way. Done horribly, looks like a cut and paste job and does not increase the home value as well as the former. A home addition is a lot more than just adding interior space as it can enhance the entire building architecturally. This is definitely where you want a professional licensed architect to make you some proposals. Meet with an architect. Show him your sketches and lists of ideas. Ask him if he can make you a variety of designs for consideration. At that point the architect can handle the whole thing or you can just pay him for plans and specs, then do it as an "owner builder" , run your own permits, and bid out and hire your own subcontractors for each phase of the project. If you are familiar with all of it.
Last edited by Sandtrap on Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

MrJones
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by MrJones » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:53 pm

I see, thanks to everyone for exposing some of the issues here.

lthenderson, I unfortunately don't live in an with basements, though there seem to be exceptions.

However, this is a VHCOL area, which I hope means that the cost of the addition might not be much compared to the cost of the house. Say such a house is $1.4 million. Given that, would someone know the ballpark price for what lthenderson suggested? I.e., the pessimistic scenario where one has to add a new room on the perimeter and convert an existing room in the interior of the house to a bathroom? Or the cost for an optimistic scenario where new floor space does not need to be added?

I know there is probably a huge variance here that depends on the specifics of the house, but I'm just looking for a vague ballpark first, just to see if this is a non-starter or a possibility to explore further.

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dm200
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by dm200 » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:59 pm

However, this is a VHCOL area, which I hope means that the cost of the addition might not be much compared to the cost of the house. Say such a house is $1.4 million. Given that, would someone know the ballpark price for what lthenderson suggested? I.e., the pessimistic scenario where one has to add a new room on the perimeter and convert an existing room in the interior of the house to a bathroom? Or the cost for an optimistic scenario where new floor space does not need to be added?
Some friends, years ago, added a kitchen/dining room AND (small) full bath to their older home. I don't recall the details of cost, but my guess is that it was reasonable. I would think that (space permitting) - adding (all new construction) the room and bath together might be more cost effective.

MrJones
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by MrJones » Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:01 pm

Could someone please share an actual number for any scenario of their choice?
Last edited by MrJones on Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

barnaclebob
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by barnaclebob » Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:05 pm

A lot of 3 bed 1 bath houses are single floor and might be a slab house with no cheap way to change the plumbing because its built into the slab.

I wouldn't be surprised if the cost could range from 20k to 100k depending on the layout of the house.

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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by Sandtrap » Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:09 pm

MrJones wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:01 pm
Could someone share an actual number for any scenario of their choice?
Too many variables and too interpretive. Slab or no slab. Rocks or soft ground. Accessibility. Logistics. for starters.
A 259k subdivision track home with a master bedroom addition with master bath and walk in closet might cost from 80k to half the cost of the home. An addition of 2 bedrooms and 1.5 baths to a 2 million dollar home might cost 400k or more if elaborate and the home looks like a mini mcmansion.

The most inexpensive way you could possibly get some ballpark figures is to sketch out what you want on graph paper, make a list of things you have in mind, then make 3 copies of all that. Get quotes from 3 licensed insured bonded general contractors in your area and also ask them for ideas. They will come back with proposals. It won't cost you anything but talking to them on site will give you a lot of ideas and options as well as the cost range in your area.
You can get a lot of ideas and ballpark figures online but it's not the same as getting a contractor on site and walking and exchanging ideas.

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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by rkhusky » Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:11 pm

We recently added a new 700 sq ft addition to our brick house that included 3 bedrooms and 1 bath for about $70K, but had quotes up to $100K. We were originally going to just add 1 or 2 rooms, but decided that since we were breaking through the brick, we might as well add as much as we'd ever want.

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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by lthenderson » Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:20 pm

MrJones wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:01 pm
Could someone please share an actual number for any scenario of their choice?
This fall we got a $90k quote for adding 140 sq ft bumpout to our kitchen for a pantry and to expand our kitchen area slightly. It didn't include any cabinetry, countertops or appliances. We live in a very LCOL area and despite living in the nicest part of town on one of the nicest streets, the quote was more than 50% of what we paid for the house. I could buy another house with a pantry, bigger kitchen and a host of other desired things for less than the value of our house plus the quoted addition which is why we aren't pursuing the idea right now.

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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by rkhusky » Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:41 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:20 pm
MrJones wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:01 pm
Could someone please share an actual number for any scenario of their choice?
This fall we got a $90k quote for adding 140 sq ft bumpout to our kitchen for a pantry and to expand our kitchen area slightly. It didn't include any cabinetry, countertops or appliances. We live in a very LCOL area and despite living in the nicest part of town on one of the nicest streets, the quote was more than 50% of what we paid for the house. I could buy another house with a pantry, bigger kitchen and a host of other desired things for less than the value of our house plus the quoted addition which is why we aren't pursuing the idea right now.
You should get more than 1 quote. Builders can be busy at a particular time and give over the top quotes. On the other hand, doing an addition can be more difficult than new construction.

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lthenderson
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by lthenderson » Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:45 pm

rkhusky wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:41 pm
lthenderson wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:20 pm
MrJones wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:01 pm
Could someone please share an actual number for any scenario of their choice?
This fall we got a $90k quote for adding 140 sq ft bumpout to our kitchen for a pantry and to expand our kitchen area slightly. It didn't include any cabinetry, countertops or appliances. We live in a very LCOL area and despite living in the nicest part of town on one of the nicest streets, the quote was more than 50% of what we paid for the house. I could buy another house with a pantry, bigger kitchen and a host of other desired things for less than the value of our house plus the quoted addition which is why we aren't pursuing the idea right now.
You should get more than 1 quote. Builders can be busy at a particular time and give over the top quotes. On the other hand, doing an addition can be more difficult than new construction.
I asked for five quotes and all seemed willing to do the job when they came out to my house. But for various reasons, I have only been able to get one quote back in four months of trying. Being that I live in a very rural area, if I solicit anymore quotes, it will have to be from contractors 100+ miles away.

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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by pshonore » Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:25 pm

Did a 560 sq ft addition a few year back for about $75K in rural Connecticut. That number includes everything from start to finish including replanting the lawn (which was covered in construction material and a 50' stone wall using New England stone from the excavation. That included a 3/4 bath (with granite counter, walk in shower but no tub) I acted as GC and saved a goodly sum by doing the easy stuff (design/permitting, insulation, finish carpentry and trim, hardwood flooring, paint, cedar siding, etc. Subbed out the tough stuff (foundation, framing, dry wall, plumbing, HVAC, tile and shower.) Toughest part was the shower and tile, trying to get quotes and callbacks from all the "artisan" tile guys.

By the way, what are "bonded" contractors? No such thing here unless you're doing government work in which case the bond premium just gets added to the price of the job and nobody writes those bonds for residential contractors. There is a State "recovery" fund if your licensed contractor takes advantage of you but not quite the same.

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jabberwockOG
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by jabberwockOG » Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:26 pm

Price for built out of added square footage that requires foundation work is apprx $250 per sq foot and then add apprx $5-10k per bathroom depending on fixtures and finish.

MathWizard
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by MathWizard » Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:53 pm

I would never consider doing so.
A bathroom remodel was about $5K 15 years ago, with my wife and I doing much of the work.
This was a down to the studs & floor joists remodel.

Your biggest issue with a bathroom is that the toilet needs to be near the stack.
Normally, you need to have a relatively steep drain from your toilet to the drain stack
in your house since water and everything else does not flow uphill. This means that the bathrooms need
to be almost side by side, or you need two stacks.
An alternative is a sewage upflow pump system. Here is a Youtube video of one such installation:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tatkojgzc80


Home advisor has cost ranges for lots of projects.

https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/additi ... -addition/

euroswiss
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by euroswiss » Wed Nov 22, 2017 6:53 pm

Lots of good advice already - I'll just chime in with another thought: 1500 sqft is actually quite large for a 3 bedroom house (in my area, most are 1100-1200 and I have seen some that were under 1000. Therefore, depending on the floor plan, you may well not need to add onto the existing envelope. Maybe have a PRO look at the floor plan and see if they can come up with a good solution. If the place is a Ranch (likely for a 3bdr), then maybe you can make do with just 2 full baths instead of 2 1/2?

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Watty
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by Watty » Wed Nov 22, 2017 7:18 pm

MrJones wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:26 pm
...VHCOL area...
Any numbers from other areas are likely not that that useful since contractors in your area will be much more expensive and scarce.

sambb
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by sambb » Wed Nov 22, 2017 7:28 pm

I can see the cost being 10-15% of the cost of the home additional, at least, depending on square footage and plumbing issues. A tiny tiny half bath may be much much less

MrJones
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by MrJones » Wed Nov 22, 2017 9:09 pm

All of this is fantastic advice and knowledge. Thanks a ton to everyone for responding!

Summarizing so far, the numbers indicate this is worth at least looking into further. At $75k to $200k, it would be 5% - 15% of a $1.4M home.

Seems like the factors that could complicate or make this infeasible include:
- where the new bathroom(s) would fit with respect to the existing bathroom(s)
- zoning laws and property line setbacks
- contractor prices in the VHCOL area
- "unforseen conditions"

Things that could help:
- basement
- going with a single tiny half bath

123
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by 123 » Wed Nov 22, 2017 10:06 pm

We have a neighbor who needed more space, had a deep backyard, but couldn't really add onto the primary house due to the layout without pretty much obliterating it's current layout. He added a 1 bedroom "pool house" , without a pool, in the back corner of his yard. It has one primary room, a bedroom, and a bath. His kids, who are now teenagers, love having their own "house". He told me it cost him about $60K (MCOL area). His lot was too small for the city to allow a "guest house" but a "pool house" was okay.
The closest helping hand is at the end of your own arm.

MrJones
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by MrJones » Wed Nov 22, 2017 10:15 pm

Reg "pool house": interesting suggestion. Was it $60k including all the plumbing and electric work that needed to be done?

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ClevrChico
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by ClevrChico » Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:13 pm

We looked into having a bath installed in the basement, but couldn't find a contractor that was interested. We decided it would probably be cost effective to simply buy a house with the additional bath, than to have one installed here.

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Watty
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by Watty » Thu Nov 23, 2017 9:55 am

MrJones wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 9:09 pm
All of this is fantastic advice and knowledge. Thanks a ton to everyone for responding!

Summarizing so far, the numbers indicate this is worth at least looking into further. At $75k to $200k, it would be 5% - 15% of a $1.4M home.

Seems like the factors that could complicate or make this infeasible include:
- where the new bathroom(s) would fit with respect to the existing bathroom(s)
- zoning laws and property line setbacks
- contractor prices in the VHCOL area
- "unforseen conditions"

Things that could help:
- basement
- going with a single tiny half bath
One configuration for a bathroom that I have seen is to separate it into three rooms. On one side the toilet, on the other side the shower, and in the middle a double sink. That way the toilet is not blocked for 20 minutes while someone is taking a shower. This might eliminate the need for an extra half bath.

In a VHCOL area the vast majority of of a house's value for a 1500 square foot house is likely in the lot and not the building. At $200K you are likely getting into the price range where doing a teardown and building a new house would make sense if the house is not great to start with.

You also need to consider how long the work will take. You might not be able to live in the house while the work is being done and even if you can then you would be living in a construction zone for a long time. With an older house you could also be dealing with things like lead paint and asbestos which not only would add cost but if you have kids not having them exposed to that would be even more important.

I suspect that if you are looking a house where adding the bathroom was easy and affordable that you will be bidding against a flipper that knows the ins and outs of the process. Unless you can do a lot of the work yourself I would not be optimistic that you would save that much compared to just buying a more expensive house that has the extra bathrooms.

donall
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by donall » Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:21 am

The larger the addition the less cost per square foot. If you are adding only a bathroom, then price per square foot is very high. If you are adding a bathroom, perhaps you can also add more square footage to add to value of house.

MrJones
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by MrJones » Thu Nov 23, 2017 11:32 am

donall wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 10:21 am
The larger the addition the less cost per square foot. If you are adding only a bathroom, then price per square foot is very high. If you are adding a bathroom, perhaps you can also add more square footage to add to value of house.
Point well taken, will keep this in mind.

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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by MrJones » Thu Nov 23, 2017 11:38 am

Watty wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 9:55 am
In a VHCOL area the vast majority of of a house's value for a 1500 square foot house is likely in the lot and not the building. At $200K you are likely getting into the price range where doing a teardown and building a new house would make sense if the house is not great to start with.

You also need to consider how long the work will take.
All excellent and very relevant points.

To your point above, I was just starting to think the same. Indeed, many property options seem to fall under the "house not great to start with" category. As I consider various properties, what is the most efficient way to quickly assess and determine a ballpark figure on how much a complete teardown and rebuild would cost? This would allow me to determine if I should be interested in the property or not.

Also, are lenders typically willing to finance a complete teardown and rebuild if an assessment shows that they would increase the property value significantly?

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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by CurlyDave » Fri Nov 24, 2017 3:02 am

MrJones wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 11:38 am
... are lenders typically willing to finance a complete teardown and rebuild if an assessment shows that they would increase the property value significantly?
I did exactly this about 30 years ago, and the answer at that time was "yes, but..."

**WARNING** You must have your financing in place before you do any modifications to the house.

I started the reconstruction project using savings thinking that I could get financing when I had done about half of the job. Bad mistake -- almost sank myself financially. The financing is the most important part of the job, and no one would lend on a half-done project.

You will need preliminary plans to talk to lenders, but after that, it is really no different than a construction loan.

* * * * * * * * * *
I am a very advanced amateur in the home improvement area, and have built two homes myself, acting as owner-builder. I have not had good experiences with most contractors. A few subcontractors, where I had a very well-defined specific job worked out well such as granite countertops, or tiling a shower I had already installed the pan and tile backer boards on, were good. But larger general contracting jobs, such as you are talking about, all seem to have a common theme of bid low to get the job, and jack up costs unmercifully as the job progresses.

The real issue with general contractors is that they know you are only a one-time customer, so once they have you hooked, they can rape and pillage on costs (and their profits) without too much fear of losing future business. There are two ways to find good quality general contractors who will want repeat business. One is through a real estate agent. Many real estate agents will have contractors who do major repairs as part of fixing up a house for sale. An agent who sells you a house you want to improve, may be able to steer you to a good contractor.

A second, and IMHO, much better way is to get a recommendation from a local bank which will finance the rebuild. A local bank will be familiar with many local contractors and, since they have their money on the line as well as yours, will have a list of favored contractors. You want to use their experience. The contractors may not do everything exactly right, but they want to have a good relationship with the bank since that is a great source of future business.

Personally, if I wanted to add 1.5 baths to an existing house, I would ignore the "rules" about having bathrooms back to back and accept the issues of adding outside the existing perimeter. Think about designs where the construction work takes place in the back or side yard while you live in the house and then there is a day or two of disruption while everything is grafted together. New plumbing and maybe even having two water heaters in different locations in the same house are very acceptable in a HCOL area if you can live at home while the work is done. The drain pipes have to emerge from under the slab to get out to the street, so you can tie in there.

Explore all of the options. A 3 BR, 1 BA house will have a hall bathroom for guests and residents. Possibly it will make more sense to add two full baths. One in a master suite, and a second for the other 2 BRs to share. Or add a master bath now and live with only 2, which is twice what the home had for a long time...

BusterMcTaco
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by BusterMcTaco » Fri Nov 24, 2017 3:58 am

I just did two bathroom renovation (not additions) to a $1.4M condo in a VHCOL. Bathroom one was gutted and redone. With designer was $45k. Second bathroom replaced a shower with tub. Then the rest was superficial, including new tile. Same contractor, no designer, way cheaper stuff (IKEA this time): $13.5k.

So it can vary widely depending on design.

MrJones
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Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by MrJones » Fri Nov 24, 2017 4:33 am

Very insightful post about contractors, their motivations, and finding good ones, CurlyDave, thank you. This explains many horrible contractor experiences I've heard about.
CurlyDave wrote:
Fri Nov 24, 2017 3:02 am
Explore all of the options. A 3 BR, 1 BA house will have a hall bathroom for guests and residents. Possibly it will make more sense to add two full baths. One in a master suite, and a second for the other 2 BRs to share. Or add a master bath now and live with only 2, which is twice what the home had for a long time...
Good point, and yes, I'm considering these already (2, 2.5, and 3 baths) depending on the floor plan and the practicalities.

denovo
Posts: 3611
Joined: Sun Oct 13, 2013 1:04 pm

Re: How difficult and expensive to add a new bathroom?

Post by denovo » Fri Nov 24, 2017 5:29 am

MrJones wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 9:09 pm
All of this is fantastic advice and knowledge. Thanks a ton to everyone for responding!

Summarizing so far, the numbers indicate this is worth at least looking into further. At $75k to $200k, it would be 5% - 15% of a $1.4M home.

Seems like the factors that could complicate or make this infeasible include:
- where the new bathroom(s) would fit with respect to the existing bathroom(s)
- zoning laws and property line setbacks
- contractor prices in the VHCOL area
- "unforseen conditions"

Things that could help:
- basement
- going with a single tiny half bath
Consider major renovations always inevitably have cost overruns and major delays. I would take a hard look at finding something that actually fits what you need/want right now unless you're already in the construction business and have some background knowledge.

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