What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

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bhsince87
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by bhsince87 » Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:08 pm

letsgobobby wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:43 pm
Between early middle age and middle old age, travel seems to be the most common bucket list item.

Any others?

Travel is actually low on my list. Yes, more trips to the beach, some fishing or photography expeditions will be expected. But travelling for the sake of travelling has little appeal to my wife or me.

I'm hoping to build a large "dream" workshop, and spend a lot of time there tinkering and making things. Hopefully sell some things online. We've done some craft shows in the past, but I didn't care for that too much.

Also hoping to dedicate enough time to banjo playing to get good enough to join a band!
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VictoriaF
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by VictoriaF » Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:21 pm

Watty wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 10:49 pm
Several people have mentioned wanting to do things before they have health limitations, but for a couple you also need to consider that if your spouse had health limitations that will impact your ability to do things like travel. The odds for both spouses in a couple of making it to be 65 or 70 without one of them developing health issues are not great.
If you assume spouses' physiology to be independent variables, then the probability of both of them being in good health at an advanced age is relatively low. However, the health of family members is correlated and can be quit good when common factors include healthy diet, active lifestyle, loving relationship, and sufficient sleep.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

flyingaway
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:42 pm

letsgobobby wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:43 pm
Between early middle age and middle old age, travel seems to be the most common bucket list item.

Any others?
What else do they want to do, when they have both money and time?

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JDCarpenter
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by JDCarpenter » Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:49 pm

flyingaway wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:42 pm
letsgobobby wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:43 pm
Between early middle age and middle old age, travel seems to be the most common bucket list item.

Any others?
What else do they want to do, when they have both money and time?
Although I am one of the "challenging travel" people in this thread, we also still have all of the things we loved to do before retirement on the list: reading, cooking, hiking locally, concerts, bars, reading, restaurants, etc. (Did I mention reading?!).

I answered with an eye to these particular years, and to the things that we couldn't have done without stopping our particular jobs/work.... (Although, for DW, pleasure reading is something that she never really was able to do when working--just a few books a year; she is striving to make up for that now, but that should continue well past 65 too.)
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AlwaysBeClimbing
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by AlwaysBeClimbing » Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:24 pm

Maintaining health and avoiding serious injury are tops on my list. Everything flows from that; poor health = no fun. I’m inspired by those who've made it to their 90’s with fuel left in the tank (Jack LaLanne comes readily to mind). Having recently crossed the threshold of 'six oh', I feel as good as I did at 20(I was in very good physical condition then as well).



Putting on years doesn't need to equate with slowing down:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/11/your ... shape.html

letsgobobby
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by letsgobobby » Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:42 pm

Graduate school, foreign languages, becoming certified in a new skill, becoming proficient in a musical instrument are other things that come to mind and would be harder after early middle age.

TravelforFun
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by TravelforFun » Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:44 pm

flyingaway wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:42 pm
letsgobobby wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:43 pm
Between early middle age and middle old age, travel seems to be the most common bucket list item.

Any others?
What else do they want to do, when they have both money and time?
Not everyone can travel. To travel and enjoy the traveling, you have to have four things: time, money, a good health, and a desire to travel.

TravelforFun

JDTHOOSIER
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by JDTHOOSIER » Wed Nov 22, 2017 8:03 pm

Theseus wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:02 pm
flyingaway wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:50 am
Theseus wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 10:21 am
flyingaway wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 8:06 pm
Exactly same for me. I'm 59 and at the top of this list are:

What is the excitement to the Nepal? Are you talking about climbing the highest mountain peak in the world? That would be very challenging. I am not sure if I can do it now.
There are a few things that are very attractive for Nepal.

1. Fairly inexpensive once you are there. This includes a guide and a porter, food, night stay etc. Like $50/ day.
2. Don’t have to spend nights in a tent if you aren’t inclined to do so. They have tea houses that give you a room, bed, bathroom, toilet and cooked meals. Everything is basic but it makes it a lot easier.
3 The views I have seen in two of my treks are just in believable. I still get gooosebumps thinking about them.
4. You don’t have to climb or summit a peak. No technical climbing necessary. Both my treks ABC and EBC were just strenuous hikes.
4. You can take your own time if you want to go slow. I have seen Japanese and Korean retired groups in their late 60s and 70s doing the same trek I did. It would take me 9 days. They may take 15 days since there is no need for predetermined destination to reach each night.
5. Very happy people. It is amazing how little they have but how much happier they are. They make great company.
6. You can do it in a group, solo with your own guide, make a group as you go along.
7. Generally safe. I saw several female solo hikers. But I had heard of an attack couple of years ago. But that seems to be rare.
This would be really challenging to me, as I have some breath problem at high altitude. But if I could convince my wife to give up her European fantasy, I might do that with an oxygen tank. (We will do some climbing next May in Peru).
There are many treks in Nepal that are considered low to moderate difficulty level. So you have many choices and you can customize.

But before you embark get your doctor’s advise. And train well - especially on stair climbers.

Most important thing in higher altitude treks is marking sure you don’t climb too fast and acclimatize properly. From what I have heard and seen fit and younger people get altitude sickness more often than out of shape and older/slower people. Mostly because fit people translate their level of fitness in their ability to acclimatize. So they gain altitude much faster (e.g getting to their destination each day much faster than others) and ALS can creep in without notice. Slower altitude gain each day helps significantly with acclimatization.
As an example, consider World Expeditions, which offers a number of trips at various difficulty levels:

http://www.worldexpeditions.com.au/Nepal

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Thu Nov 23, 2017 11:56 am

TravelforFun wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:44 pm
flyingaway wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:42 pm
letsgobobby wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:43 pm
Between early middle age and middle old age, travel seems to be the most common bucket list item.

Any others?
What else do they want to do, when they have both money and time?
Not everyone can travel. To travel and enjoy the traveling, you have to have four things: time, money, a good health, and a desire to travel.

TravelforFun
At the end of the day, I will be happy with what I have, travel or not. But I want to make every efforts to do what I want to do, be travel or something else.

Have a happy Thanksgiving day!

flyingaway
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Thu Nov 23, 2017 12:22 pm

JDCarpenter wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:49 pm
flyingaway wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:42 pm
letsgobobby wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:43 pm
Between early middle age and middle old age, travel seems to be the most common bucket list item.

Any others?
What else do they want to do, when they have both money and time?
Although I am one of the "challenging travel" people in this thread, we also still have all of the things we loved to do before retirement on the list: reading, cooking, hiking locally, concerts, bars, reading, restaurants, etc. (Did I mention reading?!).

I answered with an eye to these particular years, and to the things that we couldn't have done without stopping our particular jobs/work.... (Although, for DW, pleasure reading is something that she never really was able to do when working--just a few books a year; she is striving to make up for that now, but that should continue well past 65 too.)
The last formal book that I read was the "Da Vinci Code" more than 10 years ago. I now read things online, rarely have the patience to read something very long. I know that is not good for me.

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Kitty Telltales
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by Kitty Telltales » Thu Nov 23, 2017 12:53 pm

At 45 I basically retired from public accounting and moved to Germany. While I was adjusting, I started teaching business and conversation English. Was it working again? It didn’t quite feel that way.

At 57 I’m running my own business, a little school, employing two other teachers to work with me. Now I find myself thinking about my business 12 hours a day, at least. It was a fascinating process to begin a business in another country. It’s been 2.5 years now and for perhaps the first time in my working life, I love my work. I’m wondering if the old habits of long hours in public accounting were too hard to break?

But part of me wants to slow down to enjoy the years with my recently retired husband, 67 years old. Although at the moment I can’t imagine walking away from what I have grown and especially from the contacts I’ve made. I just love the people I deal with every day.

I do regret not being in Florida more often and sailing with Taylor and family every Saturday!! I should have found Bogleheads at 45 and asked him for more advice.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by jabberwockOG » Thu Nov 23, 2017 1:39 pm

Already broke 62 yo but I am happy to say at this point I am on course to be in similar level of very fit physical shape that I was in as a 30 yo. Almost everything else that is a current primary goal in our retirement flows from our getting into and then remaining in great physical condition for as long as possible. As others have posted being very careful to avoid injury and overuse issues is much more important on our older "high miles" bodies.

flyingaway
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Thu Nov 23, 2017 1:51 pm

jabberwockOG wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 1:39 pm
Already broke 62 yo but I am happy to say at this point I am on course to be in similar level of very fit physical shape that I was in as a 30 yo. Almost everything else that is a current primary goal in our retirement flows from our getting into and then remaining in great physical condition for as long as possible. As others have posted being very careful to avoid injury and overuse issues is much more important on our older "high miles" bodies.
I guess you meant spiritually, not physically.

quantAndHold
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by quantAndHold » Thu Nov 23, 2017 2:12 pm

I have 3 objectives...

Better health: I have the time and energy now to not just do, but to enjoy doing sports and fitness activities every day. And meditate. And my stress level is so much better. I had my annual physical the other day after not working for 10 months, and I’m healthier now than I have been in years.

Long travel. We just couldn’t do the kind of travel we wanted to do in two week chunks.

Activities: I’m doing a lot of art that I didn’t have time to do before. I also found a volunteer opportunity that I really care about and really enjoy. Most of the activities are things I could do after 65, but why wait?

A friend retired at 55 to do art full time. Now at 64, he has a popular YouTube channel, makes more money from his art than he ever did working, and is having the time of his life. You never know how things are going to turn out.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by Theseus » Thu Nov 23, 2017 2:24 pm

JDTHOOSIER wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 8:03 pm
Theseus wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:02 pm
flyingaway wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:50 am
Theseus wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 10:21 am
flyingaway wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 8:06 pm
Exactly same for me. I'm 59 and at the top of this list are:

What is the excitement to the Nepal? Are you talking about climbing the highest mountain peak in the world? That would be very challenging. I am not sure if I can do it now.
There are a few things that are very attractive for Nepal.

1. Fairly inexpensive once you are there. This includes a guide and a porter, food, night stay etc. Like $50/ day.
2. Don’t have to spend nights in a tent if you aren’t inclined to do so. They have tea houses that give you a room, bed, bathroom, toilet and cooked meals. Everything is basic but it makes it a lot easier.
3 The views I have seen in two of my treks are just in believable. I still get gooosebumps thinking about them.
4. You don’t have to climb or summit a peak. No technical climbing necessary. Both my treks ABC and EBC were just strenuous hikes.
4. You can take your own time if you want to go slow. I have seen Japanese and Korean retired groups in their late 60s and 70s doing the same trek I did. It would take me 9 days. They may take 15 days since there is no need for predetermined destination to reach each night.
5. Very happy people. It is amazing how little they have but how much happier they are. They make great company.
6. You can do it in a group, solo with your own guide, make a group as you go along.
7. Generally safe. I saw several female solo hikers. But I had heard of an attack couple of years ago. But that seems to be rare.
This would be really challenging to me, as I have some breath problem at high altitude. But if I could convince my wife to give up her European fantasy, I might do that with an oxygen tank. (We will do some climbing next May in Peru).
There are many treks in Nepal that are considered low to moderate difficulty level. So you have many choices and you can customize.

But before you embark get your doctor’s advise. And train well - especially on stair climbers.

Most important thing in higher altitude treks is marking sure you don’t climb too fast and acclimatize properly. From what I have heard and seen fit and younger people get altitude sickness more often than out of shape and older/slower people. Mostly because fit people translate their level of fitness in their ability to acclimatize. So they gain altitude much faster (e.g getting to their destination each day much faster than others) and ALS can creep in without notice. Slower altitude gain each day helps significantly with acclimatization.
As an example, consider World Expeditions, which offers a number of trips at various difficulty levels:

http://www.worldexpeditions.com.au/Nepal
There are numerous local Nepal based travel companies. Most of them can communicate effectively in english and can provide an english speaking guide. All foreign travel agent/companies contract with them. I would just go directly with a Nepal based company. You will save a LOT and won't make any difference in the service level.

My first trek in Nepal, I went without any plan. Flew into Nepal and then flew to Pokara. Spent a night there. Many travel companies on the main street. Talked to several of them and narrowed down to the one I was comfortable with. Talked to their guide (sort of an interview) and next morning we were on the trek to Annapurna Base Camp. Our itinerary was loosely defined. We would trek as much as we could each day and then find a tea house to stay overnight. We changed our itinerary in the middle of the trek - we ended up shortening it by a day and my friend had to split on the 7th day due to a family emergency. I continued on.

I am sure you are not going shoot from the hip like us but the point is that it's not that difficult in Nepal.

Also if you go, I highly recommend a shoulder season to avoid the crowds - especially if can handle colder weather.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:20 pm

Theseus wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 2:24 pm
There are numerous local Nepal based travel companies. Most of them can communicate effectively in english and can provide an english speaking guide. All foreign travel agent/companies contract with them. I would just go directly with a Nepal based company. You will save a LOT and won't make any difference in the service level.

My first trek in Nepal, I went without any plan. Flew into Nepal and then flew to Pokara. Spent a night there. Many travel companies on the main street. Talked to several of them and narrowed down to the one I was comfortable with. Talked to their guide (sort of an interview) and next morning we were on the trek to Annapurna Base Camp. Our itinerary was loosely defined. We would trek as much as we could each day and then find a tea house to stay overnight. We changed our itinerary in the middle of the trek - we ended up shortening it by a day and my friend had to split on the 7th day due to a family emergency. I continued on.

I am sure you are not going shoot from the hip like us but the point is that it's not that difficult in Nepal.

Also if you go, I highly recommend a shoulder season to avoid the crowds - especially if can handle colder weather.
Would it be possible to do some trek without a guide, i.e., I just hike as much as I like, as slow as I want, stay at any tea house I find in the evening? If I don't feel good, I just go back.

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VictoriaF
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by VictoriaF » Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:57 pm

flyingaway wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:20 pm
Theseus wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 2:24 pm
There are numerous local Nepal based travel companies. Most of them can communicate effectively in english and can provide an english speaking guide. All foreign travel agent/companies contract with them. I would just go directly with a Nepal based company. You will save a LOT and won't make any difference in the service level.

My first trek in Nepal, I went without any plan. Flew into Nepal and then flew to Pokara. Spent a night there. Many travel companies on the main street. Talked to several of them and narrowed down to the one I was comfortable with. Talked to their guide (sort of an interview) and next morning we were on the trek to Annapurna Base Camp. Our itinerary was loosely defined. We would trek as much as we could each day and then find a tea house to stay overnight. We changed our itinerary in the middle of the trek - we ended up shortening it by a day and my friend had to split on the 7th day due to a family emergency. I continued on.

I am sure you are not going shoot from the hip like us but the point is that it's not that difficult in Nepal.

Also if you go, I highly recommend a shoulder season to avoid the crowds - especially if can handle colder weather.
Would it be possible to do some trek without a guide, i.e., I just hike as much as I like, as slow as I want, stay at any tea house I find in the evening? If I don't feel good, I just go back.
If you have a private guide you can do what you want. If you don't feel like trekking on a given day, you stay in the village and rest.

I trekked in Nepal two times: in 1996 to the Everest Base Camp and in 1997 on the Annapurna Circuit, including Annapurna Base Camp. In 1996, I went with a group. In 1997, I arrived to Kathmandu and hired a private guide and a porter. The private trek was much cheaper and much more satisfying.

When I was with a group in 1996, we were a self contained expedition. We had many support people (and yaks at higher altitudes) who carried our stuff as well as tents, food, and kitchen things. When we were arriving to a night stop, they would put up our tents, a kitchen tent, a dining tent, and toilet tents. They would cook meals for us. And in the morning they would fold everything up and move to the next location. The problem was that we had to follow a strict schedule which was rather fast and did not provide enough time to get adjusted to the altitude. On the day when we had to reach the Everest Base Camp itself, there was a heavy snow, and trekking became unsafe because crevices were not visible and we did not have ropes and other safety equipment. I would be happy to wait for a few days until the weather had improved, but the group had a strict schedule and we turned back. I still feel dissatisfaction of trekking to the Everest Based Camp and never reaching the Everest Base Camp through no fault of my own.

In 1997, I hired a private guide and a porter for a fraction of what I paid in 1996, and it was a much more rewarding experience. We stayed at tea houses instead of private tents, and every night I was meeting new people. Instead of getting privately cooked meals, I ate dal bhat three times a day, which was fine with me. I allowed a lot of time in my schedule for possible avalanches and other weather delays. Ironically, none of these events have happened, and I had a lot of free time when I returned to Kathmandu.

The guide was pretty useless. His main function was to translate our plans to the porter. Otherwise, the path of the trek was so obvious that it was virtually impossible to get lost. I'd say that going alone is feasible, provided your backpack is very light. The pack should be lighter than what you would normally carry, because the altitude makes you weaker.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Thu Nov 23, 2017 8:15 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:57 pm

If you have a private guide you can do what you want. If you don't feel like trekking on a given day, you stay in the village and rest.

I trekked in Nepal two times: in 1996 to the Everest Base Camp and in 1997 on the Annapurna Circuit, including Annapurna Base Camp. In 1996, I went with a group. In 1997, I arrived to Kathmandu and hired a private guide and a porter. The private trek was much cheaper and much more satisfying.

When I was with a group in 1996, we were a self contained expedition. We had many support people (and yaks at higher altitudes) who carried our stuff as well as tents, food, and kitchen things. When we were arriving to a night stop, they would put up our tents, a kitchen tent, a dining tent, and toilet tents. They would cook meals for us. And in the morning they would fold everything up and move to the next location. The problem was that we had to follow a strict schedule which was rather fast and did not provide enough time to get adjusted to the altitude. On the day when we had to reach the Everest Base Camp itself, there was a heavy snow, and trekking became unsafe because crevices were not visible and we did not have ropes and other safety equipment. I would be happy to wait for a few days until the weather had improved, but the group had a strict schedule and we turned back. I still feel dissatisfaction of trekking to the Everest Based Camp and never reaching the Everest Base Camp through no fault of my own.

In 1997, I hired a private guide and a porter for a fraction of what I paid in 1996, and it was a much more rewarding experience. We stayed at tea houses instead of private tents, and every night I was meeting new people. Instead of getting privately cooked meals, I ate dal bhat three times a day, which was fine with me. I allowed a lot of time in my schedule for possible avalanches and other weather delays. Ironically, none of these events have happened, and I had a lot of free time when I returned to Kathmandu.

The guide was pretty useless. His main function was to translate our plans to the porter. Otherwise, the path of the trek was so obvious that it was virtually impossible to get lost. I'd say that going alone is feasible, provided your backpack is very light. The pack should be lighter than what you would normally carry, because the altitude makes you weaker.

Victoria
Vow! That makes the camino de Santiago less challenging.

Do they have beds and plankets at the tea houses? How long did it take for the Nepal treks?

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by VictoriaF » Thu Nov 23, 2017 8:35 pm

flyingaway wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 8:15 pm
Vow! That makes the camino de Santiago less challenging.

Do they have beds and plankets at the tea houses? How long did it take for the Nepal treks?
El Camino de Santiago is less challenging and, for me, more rewarding. On the Camino, you don't have any altitude-related issues and if you go during a shoulder seasons, i.e., Spring or Fall, you don't deal with extreme weather. The most difficult day on Camino Frances is when you cross the Pyrenees, and if you are not up to it for whatever reason, you have many other options.

When I trekked in Nepal, there were always beds and blankets in tea houses. I also had a sleeping bag. The main problem was with outdoor toilets. When you have to go in the middle of the night, you have to get out of a warm bag, put on the boots, put on your headlamp, and walk a few feet in freezing cold to the outhouse. And then you have to try to fall back asleep. Note that trekking with a group has the same problem.

Why a midnight toilet trip was necessary? When you walk at altitude, you need to drink more fluids than usual. But when you are on the trail, toilets (and bushes) can be scarce. And so I'd let myself get dehydrated during the day and compensate with a lot of tea at dinner. In the middle of the night, the tea wanted to break out free.

I must note that there is a critical difference between women and men. It is easier for men to circulate fluids during the day, all they have to do is to turn their backs to the trail. This is considered antisocial at home but is acceptable when no better options exist.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Thu Nov 23, 2017 8:55 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 8:35 pm
flyingaway wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 8:15 pm
Vow! That makes the camino de Santiago less challenging.

Do they have beds and plankets at the tea houses? How long did it take for the Nepal treks?
El Camino de Santiago is less challenging and, for me, more rewarding. On the Camino, you don't have any altitude-related issues and if you go during a shoulder seasons, i.e., Spring or Fall, you don't deal with extreme weather. The most difficult day on Camino Frances is when you cross the Pyrenees, and if you are not up to it for whatever reason, you have many other options.

When I trekked in Nepal, there were always beds and blankets in tea houses. I also had a sleeping bag. The main problem was with outdoor toilets. When you have to go in the middle of the night, you have to get out of a warm bag, put on the boots, put on your headlamp, and walk a few feet in freezing cold to the outhouse. And then you have to try to fall back asleep. Note that trekking with a group has the same problem.

Why a midnight toilet trip was necessary? When you walk at altitude, you need to drink more fluids than usual. But when you are on the trail, toilets (and bushes) can be scarce. And so I'd let myself get dehydrated during the day and compensate with a lot of tea at dinner. In the middle of the night, the tea wanted to break out free.

I must note that there is a critical difference between women and men. It is easier for men to circulate fluids during the day, all they have to do is to turn their backs to the trail. This is considered antisocial at home but is acceptable when no better options exist.

Victoria
Yes. I saw that in the movie on Camino de Santiago (The Way).

Thanks for the information.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by Theseus » Fri Nov 24, 2017 4:52 am

VictoriaF wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:57 pm
On the day when we had to reach the Everest Base Camp itself, there was a heavy snow, and trekking became unsafe because crevices were not visible and we did not have ropes and other safety equipment. I would be happy to wait for a few days until the weather had improved, but the group had a strict schedule and we turned back. I still feel dissatisfaction of trekking to the Everest Based Camp and never reaching the Everest Base Camp through no fault of my own.
We got snowed on the last day too. And my knee was a mess. So we decided to turn back. I regret that to this day. Most likely I will go back in 2018 October-November and if we run into any snag, i will just wait it out.
VictoriaF wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:57 pm
The guide was pretty useless. His main function was to translate our plans to the porter. Otherwise, the path of the trek was so obvious that it was virtually impossible to get lost. I'd say that going alone is feasible, provided your backpack is very light. The pack should be lighter than what you would normally carry, because the altitude makes you weaker.
Another option is to take a Porter-Guide. This is one person that carries your backpack and is training to be a guide. They speak some english. We did this for our Annapurna Base Camp trek. The money we saved for the guide - we paid to the porters for the tip. They were so happy.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Fri Nov 24, 2017 11:46 am

Theseus wrote:
Fri Nov 24, 2017 4:52 am
VictoriaF wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:57 pm
On the day when we had to reach the Everest Base Camp itself, there was a heavy snow, and trekking became unsafe because crevices were not visible and we did not have ropes and other safety equipment. I would be happy to wait for a few days until the weather had improved, but the group had a strict schedule and we turned back. I still feel dissatisfaction of trekking to the Everest Based Camp and never reaching the Everest Base Camp through no fault of my own.
We got snowed on the last day too. And my knee was a mess. So we decided to turn back. I regret that to this day. Most likely I will go back in 2018 October-November and if we run into any snag, i will just wait it out.
VictoriaF wrote:
Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:57 pm
The guide was pretty useless. His main function was to translate our plans to the porter. Otherwise, the path of the trek was so obvious that it was virtually impossible to get lost. I'd say that going alone is feasible, provided your backpack is very light. The pack should be lighter than what you would normally carry, because the altitude makes you weaker.
Another option is to take a Porter-Guide. This is one person that carries your backpack and is training to be a guide. They speak some english. We did this for our Annapurna Base Camp trek. The money we saved for the guide - we paid to the porters for the tip. They were so happy.
Please keep us posted about your possible 2018 trek. At this time, I still enjoy more in Bangkok or Bali.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by reggiesimpson » Fri Nov 24, 2017 1:16 pm

I did it when i was 62....raced in the Baja 1000. Now i can die in peace!

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by MandyT » Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:44 am

I have this bad habit of writing posts, deciding that they're too long/not interesting enough, and deleting them before submitting.

Anyway, in a nutshell, here are my main priorities for things to do before age 65. (I retired summer 2017 and am now 56.)

(1) Play (and sing) in musical groups. My hands, eyes, ears, and stamina/mobility are all still working, and I feel that I'm at the top of my game musically. It's nice to participate in as many groups as I want without overcommitting myself.

(2) Convert my traditional IRA's and 403(b) to Roth IRA's. I have a relatively small amount in tax-deferred so I might be able to get all of it converted in the 15% tax bracket, certainly no problem keeping it within 25%.

(3) I don't have the desire to do as much world travel as some other posters, but I'd like to tour Europe at some point, especially Vienna. I'm going to continue to take various short trips, but it's easier to find bargains when I don't have to plan around an academic schedule.

(4) I'm fairly satisfied with my current health and fitness, but I could try to make some tweaks. Mainly, though, I'm enjoying the huge reduction in stress post-retirement. University faculty jobs are sweet/cushy in some ways, but the demands of my job, and the accompanying stress, increased exponentially over my last three to five years, and it was spilling over into what should have been my personal/leisure time.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Sat Nov 25, 2017 3:07 pm

MandyT wrote:
Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:44 am
I have this bad habit of writing posts, deciding that they're too long/not interesting enough, and deleting them before submitting.

Anyway, in a nutshell, here are my main priorities for things to do before age 65. (I retired summer 2017 and am now 56.)

(1) Play (and sing) in musical groups. My hands, eyes, ears, and stamina/mobility are all still working, and I feel that I'm at the top of my game musically. It's nice to participate in as many groups as I want without overcommitting myself.

(2) Convert my traditional IRA's and 403(b) to Roth IRA's. I have a relatively small amount in tax-deferred so I might be able to get all of it converted in the 15% tax bracket, certainly no problem keeping it within 25%.

(3) I don't have the desire to do as much world travel as some other posters, but I'd like to tour Europe at some point, especially Vienna. I'm going to continue to take various short trips, but it's easier to find bargains when I don't have to plan around an academic schedule.

(4) I'm fairly satisfied with my current health and fitness, but I could try to make some tweaks. Mainly, though, I'm enjoying the huge reduction in stress post-retirement. University faculty jobs are sweet/cushy in some ways, but the demands of my job, and the accompanying stress, increased exponentially over my last three to five years, and it was spilling over into what should have been my personal/leisure time.
You have a musical hobby, that is more fun than many other alternatives.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by Caduceus » Mon Nov 27, 2017 1:03 pm

Write a couple of books, finally be able to garden seriously, do lots of travel. :D

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:27 pm

Caduceus wrote:
Mon Nov 27, 2017 1:03 pm
Write a couple of books, finally be able to garden seriously, do lots of travel. :D
Do you expect to make some money from your books?

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by Sandtrap » Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:34 pm

letsgobobby wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:43 pm
Between early middle age and middle old age, travel seems to be the most common bucket list item.

Any others?
Good question.
Definitely something to ponder.

How old is "middle old age"?. . . . "early middle age?" :shock:
For myself, I took few vacations, if at all, in my earning years (accumulation phase). So, travel and leisure activities are high on my bucket list. To quote another thread, "experiences" over "hard assets". Because I've earned enough through my career to buy things but never had the time to "experience" things too far away from work demands.
As I was not a "wage earner", I did not have assigned or paid vacations so the impetus to do so was not there.

Perhaps others were or are in the same position?
Thus, Travel is on the "bucket list".

mahalo,
j :D

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by Sandtrap » Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:38 pm

Caduceus wrote:
Mon Nov 27, 2017 1:03 pm
Write a couple of books, finally be able to garden seriously, do lots of travel. :D
Sounds wonderful.

Book authorship is much simpler nowadays.

Before digital, an average "book" was 100,000 words and 400 pages of print, and had to be accepted by a publisher for publication and sales. Self publishing was called "vanity book publishing".

Now, digital publishing has redefined "book writing". One can self publish via Amazon.com quite readily. And, a "book" can be nearly anything.

mahalo,
j :D

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by Sandtrap » Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:44 pm

MandyT wrote:
Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:44 am
I have this bad habit of writing posts, deciding that they're too long/not interesting enough, and deleting them before submitting.

Anyway, in a nutshell, here are my main priorities for things to do before age 65. (I retired summer 2017 and am now 56.)

(1) Play (and sing) in musical groups. My hands, eyes, ears, and stamina/mobility are all still working, and I feel that I'm at the top of my game musically. It's nice to participate in as many groups as I want without overcommitting myself.
. . . . .
How about editing posts, several times, after submitting? :shock:
Leftover rewriting habits as a lit-journalism major. Good writing is excellent rewriting.,or vs vs.

It had been a long goal to perform in public. Finally, shortly before retirement, our Hawaiian music trio performed at various public venues and did shows at senior care facilities for about 6 years. It was wonderfully gratifying. If only to sing and play and entertain. And, yes, do it before the body gives out because, it eventually will. The verses will not come as easily, fingers fumble more on the keys, vocal range a bit shorter every year. . . . . sets feel longer. . . . :shock:

Good luck on those dreams.
j :D

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:22 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:34 pm
letsgobobby wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:43 pm
Between early middle age and middle old age, travel seems to be the most common bucket list item.

Any others?
Good question.
Definitely something to ponder.

How old is "middle old age"?. . . . "early middle age?" :shock:
For myself, I took few vacations, if at all, in my earning years (accumulation phase). So, travel and leisure activities are high on my bucket list. To quote another thread, "experiences" over "hard assets". Because I've earned enough through my career to buy things but never had the time to "experience" things too far away from work demands.
As I was not a "wage earner", I did not have assigned or paid vacations so the impetus to do so was not there.

Perhaps others were or are in the same position?
Thus, Travel is on the "bucket list".

mahalo,
j :D
I don't know if travel is on my bucket list. But if I don't do travel, I could retire a few years earlier and could not find anything that really needs me to quit my job to do.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by Carefreeap » Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:10 pm

JDTHOOSIER wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:07 pm
Theseus wrote:
Mon Nov 20, 2017 5:00 pm
I have a bucket list of hikes/treks I want to go on - most of them are fairly challenging (at least for me). Usually I can do once a year. If my knees support me I have 10 years in the best case. But most likely I have 3-5 years.
Exactly same for me. I'm 59 and at the top of this list are:

New Zealand (Milford and Routeburn tracks) - Done at age 56, 3 years ago
Grand Canyon Rim to Rim - hopefully within next few years. Challenging, so need to do it sooner than later.
Australia - Laparinta trail (at least a segment of it) - this might be my "retirement" celebration.
I did my "cheater's Rim to Rim" in 2009. We were moving to Germany and I wasn't sure whether I would be healthy enough to do the hike whenever we returned to the U.S.

A true "Rim to Rim" is doing the entire 21ish miles in a single day. That sounds challenging but then you will meet the truly insane; the Rim to Rim to Rim folks who run from one side of the canyon and back. :shock: I heard them running through my camp at Cottonwood camp at 3am.

I broke up the trip as follows; drove from the Phoenix area to the South Rim and took the shuttle to the North Rim. I spent the night at the North Rim Lodge but there is a campground near the N. Kaibab Trail. If you stay at the Lodge there's a hiker's shuttle at 5am and 6am to the Trailhead which is about a mile from the Lodge.

I camped at Cottonwood campground which is about 8 miles from the Trailhead. It's another 5 or so to Phantom Ranch. I spent two nights at Phantom Ranch and did some side hikes. Once you get off the main trail system you'll be practically alone. I ran into a family of Desert Big Horn sheep which was pretty cool to see up close and personal.

I hiked out the S. Kaibab Trail which is about a mile longer than the Bright Angel. It's not as busy (although still pretty busy) but I think the views are better. The Bright Angel (which I've hiked a couple of times) is in a side canyon so you don't get the full on views of the main canyon.

I originally thought I'd spend the night at the Miwok Lodge but I hiked out faster than I thought and felt so good I just drove home.

This trip was kind of a spur of the moment trip. All reservations were cancellations. The trip was just before Memorial Day which is a good time to hike the canyon. No snow at either rim and the bottom of the canyon wasn't going to hit 100 degrees until the afternoon I hiked out. That might have been a motivating factor in my quick hike out! :wink:

I should add that I had sprained my ankle about three weeks before so I was unable to train the way I wanted. However, going slower made me enjoy the canyon more than a power through hike.

Hope you have fun!

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by Carefreeap » Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:19 pm

For me it's getting in as much hiking I can while my knees last.

Last year for my 55th birthday I solo backpacked the John Muir Trail.

This past September I hiked the Western half of the Tahoe Rim Trail and I'm planning on hiking the other half next September.

Today I hiked a tiny section of the Pacific Crest Trail near our cabin in So. California. I've been mulling over hiking the first 100 miles from the Mexican Border to Idyllwild. Timing is a little tricky because of the weather differences between desert floor and 8,500' over that section of trail. Hiking the whole trail in a single go isn't really feasible. Doubt I would be still be married after spending six months on the trail. :wink: But I think I could section hike a fair amount. It's just going to take me another 10 years!

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:42 am

Carefreeap wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:19 pm
For me it's getting in as much hiking I can while my knees last.

Last year for my 55th birthday I solo backpacked the John Muir Trail.

This past September I hiked the Western half of the Tahoe Rim Trail and I'm planning on hiking the other half next September.

Today I hiked a tiny section of the Pacific Crest Trail near our cabin in So. California. I've been mulling over hiking the first 100 miles from the Mexican Border to Idyllwild. Timing is a little tricky because of the weather differences between desert floor and 8,500' over that section of trail. Hiking the whole trail in a single go isn't really feasible. Doubt I would be still be married after spending six months on the trail. :wink: But I think I could section hike a fair amount. It's just going to take me another 10 years!
Looks like these are activities that one may not be able to do in later 60s or 70s. In the previous years, we went to Cost Rica and Greece and did something that I don't think we will want to do in our later 60s. For example, climbing up a steep rock and limbing down to a volcano crater with no clear paths.

BV3273
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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by BV3273 » Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:46 am

Travel. Go fishing as much as possible. Hopefully watch my future grandkids. My DS is a toddler and I’m in my early 30s.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by Carefreeap » Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:12 am

flyingaway wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:42 am
Carefreeap wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:19 pm
For me it's getting in as much hiking I can while my knees last.

Last year for my 55th birthday I solo backpacked the John Muir Trail.

This past September I hiked the Western half of the Tahoe Rim Trail and I'm planning on hiking the other half next September.

Today I hiked a tiny section of the Pacific Crest Trail near our cabin in So. California. I've been mulling over hiking the first 100 miles from the Mexican Border to Idyllwild. Timing is a little tricky because of the weather differences between desert floor and 8,500' over that section of trail. Hiking the whole trail in a single go isn't really feasible. Doubt I would be still be married after spending six months on the trail. :wink: But I think I could section hike a fair amount. It's just going to take me another 10 years!
Looks like these are activities that one may not be able to do in later 60s or 70s. In the previous years, we went to Cost Rica and Greece and did something that I don't think we will want to do in our later 60s. For example, climbing up a steep rock and limbing down to a volcano crater with no clear paths.
Exactly. The cruises can't wait until I'm too old to hike! 8-)

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by heyyou » Wed Nov 29, 2017 1:01 pm

I salute the others who are doing adventure before dementia.

Retired at 55 and discovered that a retiree can read a book, cover to cover in a day. That is a great way to spend a day if it is a good book. Prior to R, reading was done between more active chores. I even have time to read fiction which I didn't have the time for, during my work years. I like my life of leisure.

These days, my volunteer work is backpacking to clear the fallen trees off of a trans-state hiking trail through a nearby, heavily forested, federal wilderness area, not something that I could have ever imagined doing prior to retirement. Volunteer work can feel more rewarding than compensated work. These days, I no longer wonder "When is someone going to come and fix that problem," I just start to think about how I could do it.

Since most of the other volunteers had walked the entire 800 miles of that trans-state trail, I did that in segments, twice. I didn't know about how ultra-light backpacking gear has helped retirees continue backpacking. Retirement has been a pleasant learning experience for this trans-planted refugee, originally from the treeless Great Plains.

DW and I have time to visit the mountains on weekdays to avoid the weekend crowds. In the fall, the red maples are not extensive here, so where they are thriving is appreciated even more. Having time to do that together seems more special than making some money that we might not ever need. Thank you to Jack Bogle and the Bogleheads.

For retirement age residents here, no tuition at the local community college, so retirees can take courses that meet on weekday mornings.

I hope that others find what suits them, 'cause that first decade of retirement has been the best years of my life.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by investorpeter » Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:01 pm

Visit every national park in an RV

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by WhiteMaxima » Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:11 pm

investorpeter wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:01 pm
Visit every national park in an RV
I would visit every countries on world map. 55 to 65 is a golden era. Physically fit, kids out, financial fit if you start early and invest smartly. I will delay RV travel until 65 to 75, take grand kid if you have. Enjoy life like no tomorrow.

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by Didymograptus » Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:16 pm

Practice my bass guitar, retire to England, join band and go gigging.
The best things in life aren't things

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Re: What are the things you want to do between 55 and 65?

Post by flyingaway » Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:05 pm

WhiteMaxima wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:11 pm
investorpeter wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:01 pm
Visit every national park in an RV
I would visit every countries on world map. 55 to 65 is a golden era. Physically fit, kids out, financial fit if you start early and invest smartly. I will delay RV travel until 65 to 75, take grand kid if you have. Enjoy life like no tomorrow.
That is my plan..

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