My dad's army jacket

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dia
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My dad's army jacket

Post by dia » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:11 am

My father passed away and he treasured his Army belongings. He served in the early 1950s. I have his short wool green military jacket. I had it cleaned, the sleeves shortened and would like to wear it occasionally. I am wearing it for no other reason than it was his, held importance for him and it's a beautiful garment that has been hanging in a closet since he returned from service. I am getting mixed reactions from people that feel it would be disrespectful to wear it. I do not want to offend anyone--I have taken off the pins (keeping them in the pocket) and will be removing the patches.

I look to this group as the voice of reason: is this wrong? I didn't serve and the last thing I want to do is offend.

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lthenderson
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by lthenderson » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:15 am

I'm not a vet but if that were mine, I probably would only wear it in the privacy of my home. I would also keep all pins and patches on it intact.

mxs
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by mxs » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:25 am

I am currently serving. I would not wear this in public with patches and insignia on, or even taken off. I would keep it intact, and only wear it in your private home if you wanted.

Quick google search brought this up, I am sure there are many more like it with laws and regulations...
https://www.thebalance.com/military-uni ... ns-3356978

You may be doing something illegal if you were to wear the uniform in public. I am not an expert on this, but it doesn't feel right to me. I would not do it.

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djpeteski
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by djpeteski » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:30 am

I am a vet 4 years USMC, 6 years Army, but have not heard a shot fired in anger.

I would support you wearing the jacket, and would strongly recommend you do not remove the patches. The pins are one thing, the patches a whole different story.

Stolen Valor https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stolen_Valor_Act_of_2013 comes into play if you claim that you earned his awards. It seems to me that such is the furthest thing from your mind. If someone said to you: "thank you for your service" while wearing the jacket, I bet you would have said "it was my dad's who I lost recently, I wear it to honor him".

There are probably some exceptions to this like wearing his medal of honor, distinguished service cross, or any award with a V device (for valor). I would also tend not to wear an CIB (combat infantryman's badge) or combat jump devices. However we are talking about a field jacket here and many of those awards would not be authorized in a field uniform (exception would be the CIB and combat jump devices).

I would love to see a pic!

Thank you for your dad's service and I am sorry for your loss.

I occasionally wear my nomex jacket. It has my rank, name, unit patch, and US Army on it. Kind of like this: Image

dia
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by dia » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:38 am

mxs wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:25 am
I am currently serving. I would not wear this in public with patches and insignia on, or even taken off. I would keep it intact, and only wear it in your private home if you wanted.

Quick google search brought this up, I am sure there are many more like it with laws and regulations...
https://www.thebalance.com/military-uni ... ns-3356978

You may be doing something illegal if you were to wear the uniform in public. I am not an expert on this, but it doesn't feel right to me. I would not do it.
Thank you and I fully understand and respect the uniform and rules. So, when the army discharges you with wool coats--they would prefer that they are not used even by someone in need? I would like to donate a very warm, thick large coat that was also issued--my church is in need of winter coats. Having them sitting in a closet doesn't feel right either.
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djpeteski
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by djpeteski » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:42 am

dia wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:38 am
Thank you and I fully understand and respect the uniform and rules. So, when the army discharges you with wool coats--they would prefer that they are not used even by someone in need? I would like to donate a very warm, thick large coat that was also issued--my church is in need of winter coats. Having them sitting in a closet doesn't feel right either.
In that case, I would remove the patches and donate the coat. You can make a nice display from the patches.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by dia » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:44 am

djpeteski wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:30 am
I am a vet 4 years USMC, 6 years Army, but have not heard a shot fired in anger.

I would support you wearing the jacket, and would strongly recommend you do not remove the patches. The pins are one thing, the patches a whole different story.

Stolen Valor https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stolen_Valor_Act_of_2013 comes into play if you claim that you earned his awards. It seems to me that such is the furthest thing from your mind. If someone said to you: "thank you for your service" while wearing the jacket, I bet you would have said "it was my dad's who I lost recently, I wear it to honor him".

There are probably some exceptions to this like wearing his medal of honor, distinguished service cross, or any award with a V device (for valor). I would also tend not to wear an CIB (combat infantryman's badge) or combat jump devices. However we are talking about a field jacket here and many of those awards would not be authorized in a field uniform (exception would be the CIB and combat jump devices).

I would love to see a pic!

Thank you for your dad's service and I am sorry for your loss.

I occasionally wear my nomex jacket. It has my rank, name, unit patch, and US Army on it. Kind of like this: Image
There is a pic on my original post--is it not appearing? Thank you for your service and I appreciate your thoughts. I didn't want anyone to think I was wearing it as a fashion statement or to take credit for serving, so I thought it best to remove the patches and pins (But would like to keep them with the jacket in the pockets). There are no special awards or anything just the basic two pins and I think 3 patches. I feel its a nice tribute to my dad--I only wish I would have asked his opinion on this subject while I could of. I do know he treasured his army things.
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mxs
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by mxs » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:47 am

dia wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:38 am
mxs wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:25 am
I am currently serving. I would not wear this in public with patches and insignia on, or even taken off. I would keep it intact, and only wear it in your private home if you wanted.

Quick google search brought this up, I am sure there are many more like it with laws and regulations...
https://www.thebalance.com/military-uni ... ns-3356978

You may be doing something illegal if you were to wear the uniform in public. I am not an expert on this, but it doesn't feel right to me. I would not do it.
Thank you and I fully understand and respect the uniform and rules. So, when the army discharges you with wool coats--they would prefer that they are not used even by someone in need? I would like to donate a very warm, thick large coat that was also issued--my church is in need of winter coats. Having them sitting in a closet doesn't feel right either.
I looked at your original post from the angle of wearing something from a family member that you cherish. From that approach, I would keep the item in original condition and hold onto it and the memory of them.

If you are looking at doing something with items that you no longer want, then I would remove the insignia and patches and donate as you have described. I would not do this with dress uniforms however. Dress uniforms seem different to me and along with not being particularly warm, would look odd without insignia and patches. Utility uniforms and over coats seem fine for this purpose.

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Kitty Telltales
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by Kitty Telltales » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:49 am

How do you think your father would feel about it? Would he feel proud of his child wearing his jacket? I think wearing it occasionally could lead to many nice conversations about your father and his service.

My father passed last spring and his naval uniforms and hats were divided up amongst the siblings. I received his chief’s cap and original Crackerjack cap from WWII. I wouldn’t normally wear it in public, but I was invited to the birthday party of a dear friend who was a career East German navy sailor. The theme of the party was of course naval, so I wore my father’s caps with honor. My friend’s father, a retired East German navy admiral in his 80’s, soluted me. I felt humbled.

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JMacDonald
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by JMacDonald » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:02 am

One possibly is to have it framed and hung in your home with all the insignia and patches.
Best Wishes, | Joe

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mhc
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by mhc » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:09 am

I am a vet. I would say it is fine to wear the jacket as long as there are no unit patches, rank, medals, or such on it. When I first got out, I remember seeing people wearing things like that, and it bothered me.

With that said, I would rather see a homeless person wearing a jacket with everything on it instead of shivering in the cold with no jacket.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by rooms222 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:10 am

I was able to wear my Father's late 1950's jacket with Second Army patch and his nametag in the 80's while he was alive. He gave it to me and was happy that I wore it. Wearing one piece of a uniform is not trying to pass yourself off as a member of the military, unless you make statements to the contrary. In the 80''s, these jackets were commonplace at surplus stores. When Banana Republic first started, they were selling jackets with patches from a variety of militaries. I would never wear the pins outside of your home. I wish I had that jacket now.

I edit this to take note of mhc's comment that it may bother some veterans/active duty personnel to wear it. The one thing I would not do is take off the patches and wear it without them. I has some Navy items from my time in ROTC that had no patches or nametags on them that were declared surplus and had no problems wearing them after I was no longer in ROTC, but had I had them, I would not have wanted to wear the items of my own with my nametag on them, out of uniform. It was different for my father's item.
Last edited by rooms222 on Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:17 am, edited 1 time in total.

dia
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by dia » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:15 am

rooms222 wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:10 am
I was able to wear my Father's late 1950's jacket with Second Army patch and his nametag in the 80's while he was alive. He gave it to me and was happy that I wore it. Wearing one piece of a uniform is not trying to pass yourself off as a member of the military, unless you make statements to the contrary. In the 80''s, these jackets were commonplace at surplus stores. When Banana Republic first started, they were selling jackets with patches from a variety of militaries. I would never wear the pins outside of your home. I wish I had that jacket now.
I was recently in a military surplus-type store while visiting Gettysburg--this store had all kinds of old uniform coats, caps, etc available to purchase. That's why I am confused about this. It's almost as if it's ok to have/wear as long as it was never issued to anybody, perhaps.
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bottlecap
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by bottlecap » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:18 am

It’s very unlikely that someone will mistake you for a 1950’s veteran for wearing just the jacket.

I’m not sure in what context you can wear it in public, however, if you are over 30, and not look at least a little weird.

I imagine that your responses from veterans will vary. My father served in Korea as a Marine and he wouldn’t care. People buy fatigues all the time at armed/navy stores. I read the other day that the Armed Forces will start selling officially licensed gear to the public. I doubt you’ll be breaking any laws wearing an old jacket and not trying to pass yourself off as a Cold War veteran.

Whatever you do, I would keep it all in memory of my father.

JT

rooms222
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by rooms222 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:20 am

Many of the items sold by surplus stores (and Banana Republic) were used and had been declared surplus.

On a side note, Banana Republic was so cool at the beginning, they had illustrated catalogs that were really interesting. One of the founders, after being bought out by the owners of the Gap started the Republic of Tea, they use that style of illustration on all their packaging now.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by dia » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:27 am

bottlecap wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:18 am
It’s very unlikely that someone will mistake you for a 1950’s veteran for wearing just the jacket.

I’m not sure in what context you can wear it in public, however, if you are over 30, and not look at least a little weird.
I won't look weird. Promise.
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by Maverick3320 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:31 am

mhc wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:09 am
I am a vet. I would say it is fine to wear the jacket as long as there are no unit patches, rank, medals, or such on it. When I first got out, I remember seeing people wearing things like that, and it bothered me.

With that said, I would rather see a homeless person wearing a jacket with everything on it instead of shivering in the cold with no jacket.
Vet/currently serving here. +1 on the above.

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mrc
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by mrc » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:35 am

I think wearing the jacket is a nice tribute to your dad's service if:
  • it fits you and looks nice
  • you know what the patches mean and can explain his service to others, especially veterans
  • it's clear you are not suggesting his service and honors are your own
  • you leave the pins in a safe place
So, I say wear it.
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by whomever » Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:06 am

FWIW, my father was career military, WWII and Korea, retiring in the early 60's. That means he was growing up during the depression. Maybe that's why he had no objection whatsoever to us kids wearing his old issue stuff. We didn't take the patches off either. Heck, growing up, the PX sold kid's size fatigues and Mom would sew on old patches and nametags. They even sold kid's size Corcoran jump boots; I remember Dad teaching me how to spit shine them.

This was not anomalous; we lived off base in neighborhoods that were majority military, and all the other kids did the same thing.

Most of Dad's stuff wore out long ago, but I'm still cheap and buy surplus for the right price, from surplus stores or Goodwill. The tan polypro zip neck shirts are awesome for X-C skiing, for example, and cost maybe $15; that's a fraction of what REI charges for ones that aren't as good. I know a fair number of vets, and I haven't sensed any objection on their part. Several are close enough friends that I think they would say something if they objected.

I wish I could ask Dad. My sense is that the disrespect notion came from the Vietnam era, where protesters would take uniforms and spray paint peace signs or whatever on them. If you're making the statement that you despise the military, whether by wearing uniform parts or carrying a sign that says it explicitly, then people who respect the military (including me) probably aren't going to respect you.

All that said, wearing a dress uniform, as opposed to fatigues and field gear, would feel weird to me. The closest we came to that was cutting the stripe off the side of Dad's wool dress pants and wearing them skiing. Maybe that's because the wool tunic is more like a civilian suit jacket; it's not really utilitarian, so wearing it would seem like a fashion statement more than just re-using old clothes.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by Edward Joseph » Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:27 am

JMacDonald wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:02 am
One possibly is to have it framed and hung in your home with all the insignia and patches.
This was my thought. I'm not a vet and I'm not here to pass judgement about "disrespect" but I think it would be a lot more interesting to have it in your home somehow as a conversation piece with all the insignias and patches intact the way your Father left them. I think its a little odd to manipulate the jacket and change the look for your own sake. Leaving it the way your father left it would be a nice heirloom to pass down as well.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:33 am

Edward Joseph wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:27 am
JMacDonald wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:02 am
One possibly is to have it framed and hung in your home with all the insignia and patches.
This was my thought. I'm not a vet and I'm not here to pass judgement about "disrespect" but I think it would be a lot more interesting to have it in your home somehow as a conversation piece with all the pins and ribbons intact the way your Father left them. I think its a little odd to manipulate the jacket and change the look for your own sake. Leaving it the way your father left it would be a nice heirloom to pass down as well.
Well, we can all have opinions about what others have to preserve for the ages, but I'm in the camp that says that if something isn't useful to you it's ok to get rid of it. Take pictures for the memory if that helps, but there is no particular virtue in preserving someone else's old stuff for sentimental value.

Whether wearing the jacket in public would offend veterans or active duty military is an interesting and valid topic for discussion, but what to do with the jacket if you decide it's inappropriate to wear is up to you. Every thing ever valued by any person who once lived but has now died does not need to be saved forever by the survivors.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by Spirit Rider » Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:39 am

Actually, it is only the dress uniform that is allowed to worn by veterans and retired service members. Even then they are only supposed to wear the uniform for formal functions, national holidays, parades, military funerals and weddings and other military occasions. Technically, there is even a U.S. code section that limits who, what and where military uniforms can be worn. It is routinely ignored.

As a disabled veteran, the son of a late veteran and the brother of two late veterans, I would be honored for you to wear your father's uniform. Sometimes, honor is about more than following the rules.

I am going to invoke the law of competing harms respect. Sometimes the respect shown to one's father outweighs an unintended disrespect.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by BogleBoogie » Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:41 am

dia wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:11 am
My father passed away and he treasured his Army belongings. He served in the early 1950s. I have his short wool green military jacket. I had it cleaned, the sleeves shortened and would like to wear it occasionally. I am wearing it for no other reason than it was his, held importance for him and it's a beautiful garment that has been hanging in a closet since he returned from service. I am getting mixed reactions from people that feel it would be disrespectful to wear it. I do not want to offend anyone--I have taken off the pins (keeping them in the pocket) and will be removing the patches.

I look to this group as the voice of reason: is this wrong? I didn't serve and the last thing I want to do is offend.

Image
Just a thought...but another option may be to frame it and put it on display in your home. I would think with a nice accent light on it, that would be something that would bring you pleasant memories and comfort every time you look at it.

TIAX
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by TIAX » Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:45 am

mxs wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:25 am
You may be doing something illegal if you were to wear the uniform in public. I am not an expert on this, but it doesn't feel right to me. I would not do it.
This isn't illegal. It's your jacket, wear it if you like.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by SueG5123 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:46 am

Retired Navy officer here, and I'm unaware of anything explicitly forbidding the wear of a former uniform article (unless you are the recipient of a bad paper discharge, in which case your uniforms were probably collected before you were shown to the gate). In the Navy, certain uniform items -- for example, dungarees, "poopy suits," or flight jackets -- are discouraged from being re-purposed to civilian attire. But once particular uniform articles are available at surplus stores or online, they really can't be regulated.

That said, however, I agree with the others -- I think it might look sort of oddball to wear the jacket. It can't be very practical (ugh, that boiled wool) or in keeping with contemporary style. And wearing it may be mis-perceived as disrespectful or "stolen valor." If it holds such sentimental value, I concur with putting it in a shadowbox in your home.

p0nyboy
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by p0nyboy » Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:58 am

Who cares what the social justice keyboard warriors tell you. Its your jacket...you want to honor your father...wear it proudly wherever you want!

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by mouses » Fri Nov 17, 2017 1:30 pm

I wouldn't take the patches off. I would wear it at home, including perhaps out in the yard. I think you ought to be able to wear it, but not "in public."

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SkierMom
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by SkierMom » Fri Nov 17, 2017 2:12 pm

I wear my father-in-law's (who passed away in 2010) original wool navy ensign peacoat from the mid 1950's Korean War era.

It literally weighs a ton, but I absolutely love it with a pretty scarf. FIL had three sons, all of whom out-grew him by a foot in height and several pounds, so it never fit any of them. I saw it hanging in a closet in their home and asked about it. He gave it to me on the spot and was very proud when he saw me with it on.

I feel proud when I wear it, and I remember FIL fondly.

What would be possibly wrong about wearing your father's jacket?

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flamesabers
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by flamesabers » Fri Nov 17, 2017 2:52 pm

As a service member I find it distasteful to wear someone else's unit patches/awards, even if they belonged to an immediate family member. My late father also served in the army during the cold war. Even though I also have served in the army, I wouldn't feel comfortable wearing any of his patches/awards. He earned the right to wear those particular items, not me.
JMacDonald wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:02 am
One possibly is to have it framed and hung in your home with all the insignia and patches.
+1. This would also be an excellent way to keep the jacket in mint condition.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by TSR » Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:12 pm

Not a service member. I think it's a very cute jacket and I think you should wear it and tell everyone who asks all about your dad. Others have given advice about the patches, and I'd respect their thoughts more than mine. I'd guess that 98% of jackets like these have ended up in the garbage. I think it's astonishing that anyone would think that loving reuse of an item would be disrespectful, especially as compared to a landfill. Wool is warm, only made warmer by the memories of your father. I hope you wear the jacket.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:27 pm

flamesabers wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 2:52 pm
As a service member I find it distasteful to wear someone else's unit patches/awards, even if they belonged to an immediate family member. My late father also served in the army during the cold war. Even though I also have served in the army, I wouldn't feel comfortable wearing any of his patches/awards. He earned the right to wear those particular items, not me.
JMacDonald wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:02 am
One possibly is to have it framed and hung in your home with all the insignia and patches.
+1. This would also be an excellent way to keep the jacket in mint condition.
What is the point of keeping something in mint condition but never using it? It is like leaving the tags on the Beanie Babies. Or having living room furniture no one is allowed to sit on. I hope no one feels obliged to maintain a NotWhoYouThink museum display of my stuff after I am gone.

I have no sense of style, so can't comment on what the fashion police would say about the jacket. But if you think of your father when you wear it and aren't trying to fool anyone I don't see the problem.

Wricha
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by Wricha » Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:40 pm

Vet here (which means absolutely nothing). Wear it if you like I don’t understand the problem.

dia
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by dia » Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:45 pm

Wricha wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:40 pm
Vet here (which means absolutely nothing).
Means something. Absolutely. Thank you.
What, Me Worry? --Alfred E. Neuman

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by flamesabers » Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:47 pm

TSR wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:12 pm
I think it's astonishing that anyone would think that loving reuse of an item would be disrespectful, especially as compared to a landfill.
My answer to this statement is I consider a veteran's patches/awards to be different from other family heirlooms such as a grandmother's wedding ring, a father's prized watch, unique handcrafted items, etc. The former is something that is earned, the latter is something that is given away freely to anyone else.
NotWhoYouThink wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:27 pm
What is the point of keeping something in mint condition but never using it? It is like leaving the tags on the Beanie Babies. Or having living room furniture no one is allowed to sit on.
The point of keeping the jacket in mint condition is to preserve a symbol of a veteran's military service. You can't buy a symbol of a veteran's military service like you can a beanie baby or a piece of furniture. :oops:

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by chevca » Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:54 pm

Another vet here.... You are fine to wear the jacket if you want to. It's one uniform piece, not like you're wearing everything from hat to shoes. It's certainly not "illegal". :oops: This particular item hasn't been issued in ages. No one will mistake you as a current service member wearing it. If anyone asks about it, just say it was your late father's and you wear it in memory of him. Leave the patches on, but know what they mean so you can tell what rank and unit.

It's certainly not disrespectful to honor your late father.

What's with the advice to only wear it in the house?? Why the heck would one wear a wool jacket in the house???

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by TravelGeek » Fri Nov 17, 2017 4:05 pm

p0nyboy wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:58 am
Who cares what the social justice keyboard warriors tell you. Its your jacket...you want to honor your father...wear it proudly wherever you want!
(bolding added)

The OP, apparently, which is why he took the time to share his plan and ask for advice and feedback.

Why do you have to insult other members who simply expressed their opinion as requested by the OP?

I have seen lots of people wear surplus uniform items. I don’t question them. I like the suggestion of displaying the jacket, though.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by jdb » Fri Nov 17, 2017 4:15 pm

Wear it if it is meaningful to you. I have been wearing my father’s dog tags issued in 1942 which he wore through almost 4 years of jungle combat in New Guinea and the Pacific Islands and Philippines, found them in his cigar box with Army medals etc after he passed. He never spoke of his experience, though when I was a teenager and asked him why we didn’t go deer hunting when school was out in northern Wisconsin he said that he felt bad for me and my brothers, that when he was my age his dad had gone hunting with him, but that he had hunted for several years but not for deer, and every time he looked through a rifle sight saw a Japanese soldier (he actually used a much cruder term) and he would never hunt again. I wear it as a talisman, figure no matter how hard my day may be it cannot compare to what my father experienced while wearing the tags, and wear it to honor the millions of other men and women who sacrificed so much many years ago. Good luck.

dekecarver
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by dekecarver » Fri Nov 17, 2017 4:58 pm

I don't understand or know about any issue that prohibits you from wearing the jacket as you like.

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oncorhynchus
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by oncorhynchus » Fri Nov 17, 2017 5:29 pm

Of note, that style of uniform jacket (the "Ike jacket") belongs to an Army uniform known unofficially as "pinks and greens".

Pinks and greens are being seriously considered for reintroduction to the set of current Army uniforms.

Additionally, per Wikipedia, "To this day, uniforms of the U.S. Border Patrol, along with most allied agencies within its broader, umbrella department, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency (USCBPA) and the National Park Service (NPS) have a dress jacket that is nearly identical to the Ike jacket original."

My vote is that if you desire to wear the jacket, do so without any of the insignia (pins, badges, patches, etc.)

o
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by mxs » Fri Nov 17, 2017 5:31 pm

TIAX wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:45 am
mxs wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:25 am
You may be doing something illegal if you were to wear the uniform in public. I am not an expert on this, but it doesn't feel right to me. I would not do it.
This isn't illegal. It's your jacket, wear it if you like.
I hadn't looked at the specific laws about this until now. As long as you don't try to gain a benefit or something of value by claiming one of the specific medals you are legally okay. I never thought you were trying to do that, I just didn't know the specific law.

Personally I wouldn't wear it in public except perhaps if I was in war reenactments and it was appropriate, but that is just me. I think you have the right heart about it and should do what you want to do. Knowing the meaning of the patches and your father's military service history would be great should anyone (especially WW2/Korea era veterans and their families) ask you about the jacket.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by mouses » Fri Nov 17, 2017 5:59 pm

SkierMom wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 2:12 pm
I wear my father-in-law's (who passed away in 2010) original wool navy ensign peacoat from the mid 1950's Korean War era.

It literally weighs a ton, but I absolutely love it with a pretty scarf. FIL had three sons, all of whom out-grew him by a foot in height and several pounds, so it never fit any of them. I saw it hanging in a closet in their home and asked about it. He gave it to me on the spot and was very proud when he saw me with it on.

I feel proud when I wear it, and I remember FIL fondly.

What would be possibly wrong about wearing your father's jacket?
If I remember correctly, from seeing my uncle's peacoat years ago, they have no insignia. So no one would think you were claiming to be a veteran. It's also not as recognizable as a uniform. (I actually tried it on, but you have to have thin hips :-)

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ClevrChico
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by ClevrChico » Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:36 pm

My dad was wearing an outdoor surplus camo jacket while doing outdoor labor. Not a uniform, just the jacket. It was sterile, except for two black pins that were left on it from the seller, and it was barely noticeable.

A man completely lost his cool and nearly assaulted my dad over it.

I think your jacket is pretty neat, and it's sad these live their lives in closets now. I think it's great if you can re-purpose it. You may attract crazies, though. Lots of vigilantes are out there wanting to enforce "stolen valor" whether real or not.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by Spirit Rider » Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:54 pm

SueG5123 wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:46 am
Retired Navy officer here, and I'm unaware of anything explicitly forbidding the wear of a former uniform article (unless you are the recipient of a bad paper discharge, in which case your uniforms were probably collected before you were shown to the gate).
As one ex-Navy guy to another, you asked and I did say they are not enforced, but...

United States Navy Uniform Regulations NAVPERS 15665I: Chapter One: General Uniform Regulations, Section 4: Laws, Directives. U.S. Navy Regulations pertaining to uniforms: Incorporates by reference Title 10 U.S. Code, sections 771, 771a and 772.

10 U.S. Code § 771 - Unauthorized wearing prohibited
Except as otherwise provided by law, no person except a member of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps, as the case may be, may wear—
  1. the uniform, or a distinctive part of the uniform, of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps; or
  2. a uniform any part of which is similar to a distinctive part of the uniform of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps.
10 U.S. Code § 771a - Disposition on discharge
Paraphrased for brevity—
  1. exterior articles of uniform shall be retained for military use
    1. Honorable discharge - you get to wear the uniform on your back from place of discharge to your home.
    2. Other than honorable discharge - not so much as the shirt on your back.
10 U.S. Code § 772 - When wearing by persons not on active duty authorized
The different services have regulations regarding the wearing when, where, how by honorably discharged veterans, retirees, actors portraying service members, etc...

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by abuss368 » Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:56 pm

Thank you for your Dad's service to our great nation!
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by jabberwockOG » Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:59 pm

I think your jacket is wonderful. And I think it is now your jacket given to you by your father. But I also think it is not your jacket to wear out in public. My own personal view is that if you did not personally serve in the uniform you should not be wearing it out in public. I'd personally find a way to display the jacket intact with pins and patches if it meant that much to me to be passed down as a family keepsake. And thank you for your dad's service to our country.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by David S » Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:19 pm

One more opinion here, from a retired Navy vet (for what it’s worth), and most of this has already been said.
• The key is to remove any rank insignia and/or medal/ribbons/awards. These are what, technically, make that jacket a “uniform.” They were earned and only the service member who earned them should wear them.
• Unit patches are okay, and in fact, olive drab is very drab without them, so keep them on. Might even be a conversation starter, as someone mentioned, so know what they represent.
• This is an “Ike” jacket and your Dad may have been one of the last people to wear one, as they were phased out about that time. So no one could accuse you of pretending to be a service member, nor should anyone be offended by it.
• To take this a step further, you might gather up those rank insignia and awards that are no longer on the jacket and put them in a shadow box. When we moved my Dad from his house to a retirement community, I found a box with his WWII medals and rank insignia, as well as his service records. I ordered the shadow box online and assembled it and was able to present it to him a few years before he passed. Now it hangs in my office.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by whomever » Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:43 pm

Spirit Rider: thanks for posting 10 USC 771. I confess I'm flabbergasted. The DoD itself sells surplus, new in the wrapper, clothing; I know because I've bought a lot of it over the years! I wonder what they think is going to happen to all that?

I took a short look through that section of the USC looking for a definition of 'uniform' without finding one. I was wondering if the definition would be limited to current issue or something, thus making surplus 'not a uniform'. It is certainly widely ignored. Heck, I've had (civilian) US government agencies issue me military surplus clothing, that they got for cheap/free when DoD tossed it.

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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by dia » Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:49 pm

whomever wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:43 pm
Spirit Rider: thanks for posting 10 USC 771. I confess I'm flabbergasted. The DoD itself sells surplus, new in the wrapper, clothing; I know because I've bought a lot of it over the years! I wonder what they think is going to happen to all that?

I took a short look through that section of the USC looking for a definition of 'uniform' without finding one. I was wondering if the definition would be limited to current issue or something, thus making surplus 'not a uniform'. It is certainly widely ignored. Heck, I've had (civilian) US government agencies issue me military surplus clothing, that they got for cheap/free when DoD tossed it.
I did find some text in a government publication (wish I would have bookmarked it because I can't find it now) that mentioned "obsolete" articles/uniforms could be worn with civilian clothes, provided the metals, etc were removed.
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by camden » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:21 pm

My father was a WWII marine. I have his dress uniform jacket, which I would never wear in public. I also have what he referred to as a "field jacket", which has no insignia, symbols of rank, or medals of any type, which I wore quite a bit while I was in school in the 1970s. Never occurred to me then that I would be offending anyone, and I know for certain that it never bothered him; he liked that I wore it.

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Raymond
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Re: My dad's army jacket

Post by Raymond » Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:27 pm

TIAX wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:45 am
mxs wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:25 am
You may be doing something illegal if you were to wear the uniform in public. I am not an expert on this, but it doesn't feel right to me. I would not do it.
This isn't illegal. It's your jacket, wear it if you like.
The 2005 law was replaced with the revised Stolen Valor Act of 2013, signed into law by President Obama.

---
oncorhynchus wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 5:29 pm
...My vote is that if you desire to wear the jacket, do so without any of the insignia (pins, badges, patches, etc.)
I agree.

The issue here is not the clothing itself, but the patches, etc., especially if the uniform item is current issue.

However, the jacket in question has not been issued in many years, and the OP is not claiming the patches are his or her own.

But if you wear it with the patches, be prepared for a few odd looks from veterans, including myself (USAF, 1987-1994).

As suggested above, if you wish to wear the jacket, I'd suggest removing the patches and place them in a shadow box.
Last edited by Raymond on Fri Nov 17, 2017 10:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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