Under the sink water filter

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AAA
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Under the sink water filter

Post by AAA » Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:43 pm

We will be replacing our kitchen sink in the near future. Currently, we use a faucet filter but are considering an under the sink filter (the activated charcoal type, not reverse osmosis) which I assume in general would be an improvement over what we currently use as the filter cartridges are bigger. Some of these filters only advertise removal of sediment, etc. and seem geared to improving taste and/or are meant for commercial use. I'm interested in one that removes most common contaminants. Of course, a search has uncovered a bewildering array of options so I would appreciate hearing about your experience and recommendations. As there are usually only two of us in the house, cost of cartridges is not as big a factor as it might otherwise be - I'm mainly interested in reliability and effectiveness. Thanks.

afan
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by afan » Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:57 pm

Our house came with an under sink filter. We used it for a while. Then we got our water tested and found there was nothing identifiable that we needed to filter out.

I never did a test of water that had been through the filter, since the tests came up with zeroes without it, there would have been nothing to see it do, except perhaps introduce something that would not have been there otherwise.

I suggest first testing your water to find out what, if anything, you need to remove. Then look for filters that remove whatever it is.
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dm200
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by dm200 » Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:00 pm

I suggest first testing your water to find out what, if anything, you need to remove. Then look for filters that remove whatever it is.
Is this municipal water?

motorcyclesarecool
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by motorcyclesarecool » Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:02 pm

Other than cost, why not reverse osmosis? Charcoal filters don’t do much more than remove sediment / improve flavor. If you’re worried about pathogens, get a UV light system to kill them.
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123
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by 123 » Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:05 pm

If your water comes from a local utility you may want to check their website to see if they've got a "water quality" test result posted. Ours has one online and I think we get a paper brochure with the bill once a year or so. Then research the numbers to see if there is something you don't like. You may still want to do a test of your local house water since even though the utility supplies a certain kind of water what comes out of your tap could be a little different due to the age of pipes and whatever along the way.
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Pranav
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by Pranav » Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:06 pm

afan wrote:
Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:57 pm
Our house came with an under sink filter. We used it for a while. Then we got our water tested and found there was nothing identifiable that we needed to filter out.

I never did a test of water that had been through the filter, since the tests came up with zeroes without it, there would have been nothing to see it do, except perhaps introduce something that would not have been there otherwise.

I suggest first testing your water to find out what, if anything, you need to remove. Then look for filters that remove whatever it is.
How did you/someone test the water?
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itstoomuch
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by itstoomuch » Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:17 pm

We used faucet filter for years. Then we had to replace kitcken faucet so we added a bar faucet that got its water from the under the sink icemaker filter. IMO the faucet filter (highest filtering) water tastes a bit better. I like the water taste uniformity of carbon filters. The chlorine taste is removed.
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fishandgolf
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by fishandgolf » Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:21 pm

motorcyclesarecool wrote:
Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:02 pm
Other than cost, why not reverse osmosis? Charcoal filters don’t do much more than remove sediment / improve flavor. If you’re worried about pathogens, get a UV light system to kill them.
Same question as dm200.........what is your source? If it's a private or shared well, you may have other issues - or potentially - other issues to contend with. If it is municipal / city you should not have any real issues...........hopefully!

If it's from private well, suggest you get it tested....and do it in spring...April time frame; that is when bacteria is likely to be present. Nitrates may also be an issue.

We live in Wisconsin with a private well. Several years ago our well (along with 20 other wells in our area) became contaminated with e coli. The well was 180 feet deep and the contamination occurred in March. Long story shore.......we ended up drilling a new well (shared well with 3 neighbors)....cost for each resident was ~$22,000.00. Had to drill down to new aquifer.....625 ft. Our well water is tested twice a year....so far...no issues and being that deep....we don't anticipate any. So for now....we no longer use a filter.........

RO system will protect against nitrates but not bacteria; UV system will protect against bacteria (e coli) but not nitrates. Again, this only applies to private well.

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AAA
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by AAA » Thu Nov 16, 2017 7:08 pm

dm200 wrote:
Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:00 pm
Is this municipal water?
Yes it is. And while they do publish test results periodically, that doesn't mean something can't change in-between tests, or, as pointed out, between their end and my faucet, so I'm interested in having some filtration. I guess better taste comes along with it, although that's not something I'm particularly attuned to - mainly just interested in maintaining a baseline safety level.

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AAA
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by AAA » Fri Nov 17, 2017 12:18 pm

But do the under sink filters that use activated charcoal actually do a better job than the faucet filters (PUR, Brita) or is it a matter of convenience - the cartridges are bigger so last longer and some have faucets dedicated for drinking.

Woodshark
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by Woodshark » Fri Nov 17, 2017 4:23 pm

Our city's water is "safe" but does not taste great. After several years of using a Brita pitcher for drinking water, I spent around $120 for a CuZn UC-200 Under Counter Water Filter. It should last 5 years. So easy to install and nothing to service. Just replace around the 5 year mark.

Years ago we had a RO filter with the three filter cartridges and the separate water faucet. It had to be hooked to not only the water supply line but needed a line to the drain also. It was a rat nest with water lines all over the place. Changing the filters was a wet messy pain in the rear. Occasionally black gunk would grow in the lines and end up in the water. You then had to take it all apart and flush it out with bleach to kill it off. I took it out and drank tap water for a long time.

Very happy with the simple one piece charcoal unit I am currently using.

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fishandgolf
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by fishandgolf » Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:21 pm

OP.......you are right about doing as much as you can....even though it's municipal sourced. A number of years ago, the city of Milwaukee, WI had a problem with cryptosporidium......I don't think any residential type filter can protect against that but might as well do whatever you can.

My in-laws used a Dupont under sink filter.....it had 2 cartridges; they were happy with it. If it actually did what it was suppose to do.....we may never know.

Best of luck!

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KlingKlang
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by KlingKlang » Fri Nov 17, 2017 6:41 pm

We have been using a 2 cartridge (fiber + charcoal filter) under the sink system for many years and are very pleased with the results. We change the cartridges once a year in the late spring when the algae starts giving the water the famous "Lake Erie Cocktail" flavor.

Cash
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by Cash » Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:39 pm

We got an Everpure under-sink chilled water system with a dedicated faucet during our reno. I love it. At first, I insisted on a refrigerator with a water filter, but was convinced that this was the better way to go.

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JMacDonald
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Re: Under the sink water filter

Post by JMacDonald » Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:48 pm

Cash wrote:
Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:39 pm
We got an Everpure under-sink chilled water system with a dedicated faucet during our reno. I love it. At first, I insisted on a refrigerator with a water filter, but was convinced that this was the better way to go.
I have been using Everpure for about 30 years. I think it works well.
Best Wishes, | Joe

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