contributing to friend's non-profit?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Post Reply
gips
Posts: 328
Joined: Mon May 13, 2013 5:42 pm

contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by gips » Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:39 pm

I have a long-time friend who is extremely bright but, for various reasons, his career has moved sideways. Now in his late 50s, he's struggled to land a ft role and instead, has had a string of consulting assignments. I'm not sure of his financial position...he may be quite wealthy or may be struggling.

In any case, he sent me a form email to let me know he's started a nonprofit and asked me to attend a dinner "gala" which I'm sure will be a fundraiser. The nonprofit is well-intended and it's hard to disagree with the stated goals. I'm guessing a percentage of money raised will be used for his comp. I'm ambivalent about this notion, on one hand, it's not fair to expect people to run nonprofits and not be compensated. On the other hand, I feel as if our friendship is being monetized. A contributing factor to my feeling is the receipt of the impersonal, form email.

In my shoes, would you contribute to the nonprofit?

thanks,

WhyNotUs
Posts: 1237
Joined: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:38 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by WhyNotUs » Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:47 pm

Depends whether I though what the NPO proposed to do was important, whether they had a reasonable chance of success, and whether my friend seemed suited to the job.

Often the answer is yes, but sometimes no. The number of NPOs is mind boggling these days so I am always struggling with larger gifts to fewer organizations or many small gifts. Trying to focus more as am in a better position to make a larger gift.

For instance, in CO in 2006 there were 4,168 charities and by 2016 that number was 13,663. Sometimes it seems like everyone who loses their job starts a NPO.
I own the next hot stock- VTSAX

AlohaJoe
Posts: 3075
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 2:00 pm
Location: Saigon, Vietnam

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by AlohaJoe » Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:52 pm

gips wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:39 pm
In my shoes, would you contribute to the nonprofit?
If your shoes, I would beg off going to the gala -- some excuse on how that day won't work. But the refusal to attend is a phone call/email/whatever -- a persona outreach along with a "hey, let's go to lunch sometime this month and you can tell me all about it". If he's a personal friend then you have an opportunity to learn more about the details of the charity before you decide to give.

In the past I've had a defined "giving plan". How much I would give each year and to which charities. It made it easier for me to say "no" to random requests. I reevaluated every year or so, which was the time when I'd add/remove charities. If you have something like that, it also makes it easier to defer/say no.

User avatar
CaliJim
Posts: 2800
Joined: Sun Feb 28, 2010 8:47 pm
Location: California, near the beach

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by CaliJim » Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:55 pm

He is your friend. I think you should attend.

Pay/donate whatever you think the cost of dinner might be, celebrate this new adventure with your friend, and defer any larger donations until you have a better feel for things.

Often larger donors will make donations contingent on meeting certain fund raising goals. (You raise $x from others, I'll donate $y). For example, if he can't raise enough such that the NP's administrative overhead will be less than, say 20% of funds received, then I'd pass. This is why people often pledge, pay over time, instead of writing big checks.
-calijim- | | For more info, click this Wiki

User avatar
StevieG72
Posts: 718
Joined: Wed Feb 05, 2014 9:00 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by StevieG72 » Sun Oct 15, 2017 10:07 pm

I would skip the fundraising event.

If this person is a friend worth keeping, declining to contribute to this venture will have no impact.

Often times giving once to any particular charity gets you on the list to be contacted for future donations.

I have experienced the same thing, and feel the same way about the friendship being monetized.
Fools think their own way is right, but the wise listen to others.

123
Posts: 3098
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 3:55 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by 123 » Sun Oct 15, 2017 10:29 pm

If you weren't invited to the gala would you be miffed that he didn't think highly enough of you? Invites probably went to everyone on the friend's email list, standard practice if you need to "make rain".
The closest helping hand is at the end of your own arm.

sixty40
Posts: 173
Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2014 11:53 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by sixty40 » Mon Oct 16, 2017 12:43 am

I would attend and contribute if it was a close friend in my "inner circle" of friends, no questions asked, they would do the same for me. Outside of that it would depend on many factors, and I would not have a problem saying no thank you if the cause is something I am not passionate about.

I would be more inclined to contribute to a local organization or cause than a national or worldwide cause.

User avatar
Pajamas
Posts: 4697
Joined: Sun Jun 03, 2012 6:32 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by Pajamas » Mon Oct 16, 2017 12:55 am

gips wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:39 pm
I'm ambivalent about this notion, on one hand, it's not fair to expect people to run nonprofits and not be compensated. On the other hand, I feel as if our friendship is being monetized. A contributing factor to my feeling is the receipt of the impersonal, form email.

In my shoes, would you contribute to the nonprofit?
No, definitely not, and there is no need to respond to an impersonal form email like that even if a reply is requested.

I wouldn't be ambivalent about it, either, especially if one of the purposes of starting the non-profit was to be compensated by it or otherwise benefit from it. That makes it a non-profit for tax and cash-raising purposes only, but not in spirit or intent.

User avatar
celia
Posts: 7628
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:32 am
Location: SoCal

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by celia » Mon Oct 16, 2017 2:16 am

Pajamas wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 12:55 am
I wouldn't be ambivalent about it, either, especially if one of the purposes of starting the non-profit was to be compensated by it or otherwise benefit from it. That makes it a non-profit for tax and cash-raising purposes only, but not in spirit or intent.
I doubt the IRS would give them non-profit status if the organization's goals were to give jobs to certain people. Even the OP admitted the goals of the organization were hard to disagree with.

OP, why don't you do some basic research on this NPO? Does it have a website? Did the IRS give it non-profit status? Did it file incorporation papers with your state's Secretary of State? How many people are on its Board of Directors? That is the minimal I would expect from any new charity.

If you do attend, all the Board members should be there. You can see what they are like and get a feel for this being legit or not, if this is your concern. Have any of them worked on the boards of other non-profits? Are they all volunteers or paid by the organization? What will the proceeds of the gala be used for? Hopefully the email answered some of these questions.

Swansea
Posts: 541
Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2016 5:16 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by Swansea » Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:52 am

A remember that donations to a 501 c 3 are deductible, unless there is some value provided to the donor, such as the price of the dinner.

rkhusky
Posts: 5066
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2011 8:09 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by rkhusky » Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:00 am

gips wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:39 pm
On the other hand, I feel as if our friendship is being monetized. A contributing factor to my feeling is the receipt of the impersonal, form email.
Actually, I think the form email is an attempt to not monetize the friendship. He is treating you like all his other acquaintances. A personal plea for money based on an existing friendship would be less tasteful in my opinion.

drg02b
Posts: 75
Joined: Fri Dec 18, 2015 2:08 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by drg02b » Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:28 am

gips wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:39 pm
On the other hand, I feel as if our friendship is being monetized. A contributing factor to my feeling is the receipt of the impersonal, form email.
Welcome to the world of nonprofit fundraising. That's how nonprofits raise money, working through social connections.

Wellfleet
Posts: 421
Joined: Sun Jan 26, 2014 8:18 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by Wellfleet » Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:34 am

I'd probably go to show support to a friend's venture (non-profit, new business or otherwise).

On the other side of the coin, I ignore social media based charity requests daily.

User avatar
Pajamas
Posts: 4697
Joined: Sun Jun 03, 2012 6:32 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by Pajamas » Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:28 am

celia wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 2:16 am
I doubt the IRS would give them non-profit status if the organization's goals were to give jobs to certain people.
In an ideal world, that would be true, but this is not an ideal world. Non-profits created and managed for selfish rather than truly charitable purposes have even been front page news over the past couple of years. :beer

aristotelian
Posts: 3913
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:05 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by aristotelian » Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:49 am

I would definitely not attend the fundraiser. If you want to support the charity, it would be better to donate directly and save them the cost of an extra plate. Up to you if you want to do that ... but if you give to Bob, then soon enough Joe will be knocking at your door. If you do give, consider doing it anonymously so he has no incentive to engage with you personally when it comes to fundraising. And if he ever brings it up, you can say, "As a personal policy I make my donations anonymously. I will definitely consider giving."

vaught
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2017 2:00 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by vaught » Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:11 am

celia wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 2:16 am
Pajamas wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 12:55 am
I wouldn't be ambivalent about it, either, especially if one of the purposes of starting the non-profit was to be compensated by it or otherwise benefit from it. That makes it a non-profit for tax and cash-raising purposes only, but not in spirit or intent.
I doubt the IRS would give them non-profit status if the organization's goals were to give jobs to certain people. Even the OP admitted the goals of the organization were hard to disagree with.

OP, why don't you do some basic research on this NPO? Does it have a website? Did the IRS give it non-profit status? Did it file incorporation papers with your state's Secretary of State? How many people are on its Board of Directors? That is the minimal I would expect from any new charity.

If you do attend, all the Board members should be there. You can see what they are like and get a feel for this being legit or not, if this is your concern. Have any of them worked on the boards of other non-profits? Are they all volunteers or paid by the organization? What will the proceeds of the gala be used for? Hopefully the email answered some of these questions.
I don't believe obtaining "non-profit" status is difficult at all. But obtaining the additional 501(c)(3) status has a lot more hoops to jump through since that is what allows the donors the ability to deduct their contribution.

stoptothink
Posts: 4023
Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2010 9:53 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by stoptothink » Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:17 am

Pajamas wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 10:28 am
celia wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 2:16 am
I doubt the IRS would give them non-profit status if the organization's goals were to give jobs to certain people.
In an ideal world, that would be true, but this is not an ideal world. Non-profits created and managed for selfish rather than truly charitable purposes have even been front page news over the past couple of years. :beer
I worked for two of them. I refuse to work in the NPO world anymore strictly for this purpose. Even if they start out with good intentions, my 8yrs of experience in the field suggests that it changes.

User avatar
Pajamas
Posts: 4697
Joined: Sun Jun 03, 2012 6:32 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by Pajamas » Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:21 am

stoptothink wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:17 am
I worked for two of them. I refuse to work in the NPO world anymore strictly for this purpose. Even if they start out with good intentions, my 8yrs of experience in the field suggests that it changes.
"NO MARGIN, NO MISSION!!!!"

User avatar
BolderBoy
Posts: 3863
Joined: Wed Apr 07, 2010 12:16 pm
Location: Colorado

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by BolderBoy » Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:56 am

gips wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:39 pm
In my shoes, would you contribute to the nonprofit?
Not A Chance.
"Never underestimate one's capacity to overestimate one's abilities" - The Dunning-Kruger Effect

staythecourse
Posts: 5536
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 9:40 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by staythecourse » Mon Oct 16, 2017 12:05 pm

If you want to give money because of friendship go ahead.

If you want to give due to the charity then I would not give a dollar without doing some research. I would look at giving only to those that you can verify where the money goes. How much money goes to the "programs" vs. "admin costs"? For example, I believe the CEO of Susan B. Komen took some flack as she make something like 600k several years ago. That is insane and is definitely taking away some of money that could be used for the various charitable programs. I believe the CEO of Red Cross which has A LOT more money then the former makes half of that. I would use Charity navigator or other resources.

There is nothing WORSE then giving your hard earned money to a company thinking you are helping the programs but instead you are helping the admins pockets.

Good luck.
"The stock market [fluctuation], therefore, is noise. A giant distraction from the business of investing.” | -Jack Bogle

User avatar
akblizzard
Posts: 131
Joined: Mon May 05, 2014 4:25 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by akblizzard » Mon Oct 16, 2017 12:10 pm

If it was me, I'd break out my 10-foot pole. You know, so I couldn't touch this with same.

User avatar
Flobes
Posts: 936
Joined: Tue Feb 16, 2010 12:40 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by Flobes » Mon Oct 16, 2017 1:22 pm

gips wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:39 pm
The nonprofit is well-intended and it's hard to disagree with the stated goals.
You support the mission, but reasonably feel queasy about financial support at this time. Nonprofits, especially start-ups, need all three of The Three Ts: time, talent, treasure. You might offer to volunteer as he deems needed (aka Time), or you can offer to pro bono share your expertise, i.e. financial skills (aka Talent). It's a gift of support both to your friend and to the organization. If declined, that's certainly a red flag.
gips wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:39 pm
... he sent me a form email ...and asked me to attend a dinner "gala" which I'm sure will be a fundraiser... In my shoes, would you contribute to the nonprofit?
I would not pay to attend the gala. I would not give any financial donation. I would volunteer. (Suggestion: volunteer to work the registration desk at the gala, to meet and greet and chat up all attendees and donors.) I'd decline the (inevitable) invitation to serve on the Board Of Directors bcz of the potential conflicts of prior personal relationship.
celia wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 2:16 am
Did the IRS give it non-profit status? Did it file incorporation papers with your state's Secretary of State? That is the minimal I would expect from any new charity.
New charities may successfully launch as they await receiving tax-exempt status. Some launch, aiming at their mission, before incorporating. This may or may not indicate competence or malfeasance.

Rules for incorporating a nonprofit corporation vary, and state law determines if the organization is properly created as a nonprofit. In my state, application to Secy of State requires a board of directors, a name, articles of incorporation, specific bylaws, etc.

The IRS does not "give nonprofit status." It grants tax-exempt status to some nonprofit corporations and associations that meet explicit guidelines and compete an application process. Tax-exempt status means the organization does not pay federal income taxes for revenues tied to their mission and gifts from donors are eligible for tax deductions.

To garner tax-exempt status, the nonprofit must file a Form 1023 (Application for Recognition of Exemption Under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code). This long and detailed form asks for lots of information about the organization, including its history, finances, organizational structure, governance policies, operations, activities, and more. It can be a lengthy, non-quick, process.

Tax-exempt organizations must file an annual 990 return with the IRS, and these are public documents which can be viewed online. The 990 details sources of revenue as well as types of expenses (programs, salaries, operation, etc).

After receipt of 501(c)3 status, there may be additional state actions required:
*There's a separate application to become state tax-exempt. This spares the nonprofit from paying sales tax.
*In my state, separate registration with the Secy of State is required to receive a Charitable Solicitations License. This must be accomplished before doing any legit fundraising.
*In my state, only certain nonprofits can run Bingo or sell Raffles. Yet another application and license required via Secy of State.

User avatar
dm200
Posts: 15712
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:21 pm
Location: Washington DC area

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by dm200 » Mon Oct 16, 2017 1:50 pm

Maybe I missed it, but how much to attend the gala?

If you pay and attend, does this affirm your endorsement and future support of the entity?

[Just my personal aversion ] Do you have to really "dress up" for this gala? For me, just the thpught of wearing a tux or fancy suit would keep me away. Maybe hot dogs and beer in a neighborhood park would suit me better.

User avatar
flamesabers
Posts: 1714
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 12:05 pm
Location: Rochester, MN

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by flamesabers » Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:17 pm

gips wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 9:39 pm
I have a long-time friend who is extremely bright but, for various reasons, his career has moved sideways. Now in his late 50s, he's struggled to land a ft role and instead, has had a string of consulting assignments. I'm not sure of his financial position...he may be quite wealthy or may be struggling.

In any case, he sent me a form email to let me know he's started a nonprofit and asked me to attend a dinner "gala" which I'm sure will be a fundraiser. The nonprofit is well-intended and it's hard to disagree with the stated goals. I'm guessing a percentage of money raised will be used for his comp. I'm ambivalent about this notion, on one hand, it's not fair to expect people to run nonprofits and not be compensated. On the other hand, I feel as if our friendship is being monetized. A contributing factor to my feeling is the receipt of the impersonal, form email.

In my shoes, would you contribute to the nonprofit?
Do you normally attend fundraising events? If yes, what kind of criteria do you have when deciding whether or not to attend events like this? If no, perhaps you could tell your friend you prefer to donate anonymously or you find it more fulfilling to volunteer your time instead of your money?

If I was in your shoes, I would ask him if he could use my help with setting up the fundraiser. If he said yes, I would follow up with him and see how things turned out. I would see this as a good opportunity to learn a lot more about the organization from the inside and I wouldn't be thinking about how much of my contribution was going towards paying his salary. If he said no, I would wish him luck with his non-profit and leave it at that. I don't mind lending a helping hand to family and friends, but solicitations for money very rarely goes over well for me.

User avatar
Earl Lemongrab
Posts: 4106
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2014 1:14 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Mon Oct 16, 2017 4:53 pm

I have to say that I would be much more inclined (although not much in absolute terms) to contribute money than to volunteer and spend my time working for the organization.
This week's fortune cookie: "Your financial life will be secure and beneficial." So I got that going for me, which is nice.

Katietsu
Posts: 1318
Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2013 1:48 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by Katietsu » Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:22 pm

Your friend has handled it the same way I would handle things. I would use an impersonal form letter so that I was not putting my friends in an uncomfortable situation where they felt obligated to donate whether they wanted to or not. I would also be sending letters to everyone I thought might remotely be willing to donate. I am not sure there are a lot of alternatives short of self funding when you start a non profit.

delamer
Posts: 4181
Joined: Tue Feb 08, 2011 6:13 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by delamer » Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:26 pm

Does this new nonprofit duplicate the efforts of an existing nonprofit? My observation is that there is a lot of that going on.

I would not attend the gala if there are existing charities that fill the same need. This smacks of your friend setting up a nonprofit with the intent of supporting himself using some of the donations, but I am pretty cynical.

I just received an invitation to help launch a friend's business (not a MLM thing; it is a hobby of hers that she is trying to monetize). I know that she wants to retire from her regular job and use this new venture to supplement her income. I see zero chance that it will become a significant source of income. There is a charge to attend the event at her home. Fortunately, it is "respond only if you want to attend" so I am just going to ignore the whole thing.

deikel
Posts: 506
Joined: Sat Jan 25, 2014 7:13 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by deikel » Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:46 pm

If I liked the objective of the non-profit and would support such cause anyway, I would go and ignore the impersonal invitation

If I liked the friend (that's kind of implied in the word I guess), I would use this as a reminder to contact him and chat.

I would not be offended by impersonal emails

Both is independent of each other and I don't mix friends and business (or non-profit business in this case)
Everything you read in this post is my personal opinion. If you disagree with this disclaimer, please un-read the text immidiatly and destroy any copy or remembrance of it.

HornedToad
Posts: 720
Joined: Wed May 21, 2008 12:36 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by HornedToad » Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:11 pm

Katietsu wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 5:22 pm
Your friend has handled it the same way I would handle things. I would use an impersonal form letter so that I was not putting my friends in an uncomfortable situation where they felt obligated to donate whether they wanted to or not. I would also be sending letters to everyone I thought might remotely be willing to donate. I am not sure there are a lot of alternatives short of self funding when you start a non profit.
Agreed.

I had a friend from college that started a non-profit after college. We contributed although I was a little skeptical how well it would go. 10 years later they are going strong and have built what they planned to build in the foreign country and are helping it run and improve so it's been great.

User avatar
celia
Posts: 7628
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:32 am
Location: SoCal

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by celia » Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:31 pm

deikel wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:46 pm
Both is independent of each other and I don't mix friends and business (or non-profit business in this case)
I see nothing wrong with mixing friends and business/non-profits. I've met several friends from our common volunteerism for the same non-profit(s). Over time, it is natural to become friends as you share at least one goal. I've even considered starting a non-profit and decided against it, since the effort to form the non-profit seemed like more work than the mission of the non-profit. Since I would be concerned with the non-profit finishing up the efforts they started, I would have to keep finding new volunteers. And who would you invite to hash out the ideas of a proposed non-profit, other than friends you might be able to draw from various professional fields? (at least for the idea I had in mind)

gips
Posts: 328
Joined: Mon May 13, 2013 5:42 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by gips » Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:36 am

thank you for all the thoughtful replies. I've done a little research:
- I received information today about the cost of the gala. The minimum cost is $250/pp.
- He has established 501(c)(3) status for the non-profit
- He has a board of about fifteen members, they all seem to be smart people with accomplished careers
- While I agree with the goals of the non-profit, the execution seems pretty mundane and, as stated, I don't believe their activities will be effective or provide a measurable benefit.

I've decided to contribute the cost of two tickets and not attend the gala (I don't like galas of any sort).

thanks again, initially I was disappointed with my friend and dead set against contributing but your (varied) replies convinced me his impersonal outreach was within norms for a nonprofit.

best,

User avatar
Earl Lemongrab
Posts: 4106
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2014 1:14 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Tue Oct 17, 2017 1:07 pm

Sounds to me like you plan to waste $500 that could go to an organization that WILL be effective in accomplishing the goals. Why?
This week's fortune cookie: "Your financial life will be secure and beneficial." So I got that going for me, which is nice.

gips
Posts: 328
Joined: Mon May 13, 2013 5:42 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by gips » Tue Oct 17, 2017 1:26 pm

^Because he's been my friend for 40 years.

User avatar
dm200
Posts: 15712
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:21 pm
Location: Washington DC area

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by dm200 » Tue Oct 17, 2017 1:38 pm

I've decided to contribute the cost of two tickets and not attend the gala (I don't like galas of any sort).
You don't have to "dress up" either. :)

User avatar
Earl Lemongrab
Posts: 4106
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2014 1:14 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Tue Oct 17, 2017 1:53 pm

gips wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 1:26 pm
^Because he's been my friend for 40 years.
I mean, so? You state that he kept it on the professional level, not personal. Why do you think that blowing $500 is something that a friend needs to do in this situation? I don't understand the thinking.
This week's fortune cookie: "Your financial life will be secure and beneficial." So I got that going for me, which is nice.

gips
Posts: 328
Joined: Mon May 13, 2013 5:42 pm

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by gips » Tue Oct 17, 2017 8:31 pm

The money is being given to a charity with the expectation that it will do some good and I'm putting my trust in a friend that I've had for forty years. I don't think "blowing $500" is a fair characterization of what's at play here.

I do appreciate and understand your position (as it was mine when I wrote the op).

best,

User avatar
Earl Lemongrab
Posts: 4106
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2014 1:14 am

Re: contributing to friend's non-profit?

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Wed Oct 18, 2017 10:23 am

Ultimately it's your money. I was working off:
I don't believe their activities will be effective or provide a measurable benefit
If you have changed your mind on that, then by all means.
This week's fortune cookie: "Your financial life will be secure and beneficial." So I got that going for me, which is nice.

Post Reply