Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

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Sandtrap
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Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by Sandtrap » Mon Oct 02, 2017 9:57 pm

Queries on travel camera and "point n shoot" advice often come up.
Perhaps a comparison review of what we use specifically for travel and why would help others.

Question: What is your favorite travel camera(s) and why did you choose it?


I have a Canon G5x and am trying out a Sony DSC RX100 V because of it's fast focus time for street shooting.

For fun, this is a Iphone 7+ taking a picture of a Sony RX100V and a Canon 5d setup.
Interesting size and weight comparison.
Image
Last edited by Sandtrap on Mon Oct 02, 2017 11:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by stimulacra » Mon Oct 02, 2017 10:35 pm

FujiFilm X100T (purchased in 2014)
35 mm equivalent f/2 lens
I bought it because it was compact, had a nice retro rangefinder look and all primary controls were mechanical in nature (had a nice tactile feel). There's a decent amount of third party accessories to help customize the camera to your specific needs. I added a metallic lens hood and thumb grip to improve handling.

For me it's the perfect travel camera and eventually came to replace the Canon dSLR set up I usually took with me when traveling (freeing up a personal bag when flying). Early on the camera largely went unnoticed, people thought it was just another old mechanical camera. Lately people seem to recognize it as a FujiFilm camera or mistake it as a Leica rangefinder.

When traveling I bring a MeFOTO aluminum tripod.

I shoot everything in RAW format which gives me a lot more latitude when editing.

My iPhone serves as a backup camera.

I still keep the dSLR for more studio style or portrait photography.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by iamlucky13 » Tue Oct 03, 2017 12:59 am

Depending on whether I will have time to use it, I like having my Nikon D7000 along on trips, but my lightweight travel camera is a Canon Powershot S110.

At 5 years since it was introduced, there's no doubt room for significant improvement if anybody actually still produced 1/1.8" sensor cameras, but it's still pretty decent in most situations, and it was a big upgrade over the older Elph series camera I had before.

The Sony RX100 series or Canon G7X haven't quite pulled me in to upgrade due to a combination of cost and being less easily pocketable. The Canon G9X is very, very close in size, but there's so many times I've needed the 24mm equivalent wide angle on my current camera to capture what I want that I think I would regret skipping it.

So for the time being, I continue with the S110 and keep a casual eye out for new developments.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by supalong52 » Tue Oct 03, 2017 1:07 am

We did some long-term travel last year and I bought an Olympus OM-D E-M1 for the trip. I only brought one lens, a 17 mm F1.8 prime to keep weight down. I was pretty happy with it although at times I wished I had shorter and longer focal lengths. Now my travel kit also includes a 12 mm F 2.0 and a 45-150 F4.5-6.7 zoom, but those add a little more weight. I think any larger format and the lenses would weigh too much for me to want to lug around.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by Cruise » Tue Oct 03, 2017 2:05 am


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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by lthenderson » Tue Oct 03, 2017 8:32 am

My favorite travel camera is my iphone. It is discreet and doesn't scream tourist. It also is lightweight and I can back up photos almost as I take them. It's also one less thing I have to worry about getting stolen from my luggage since it is on my body at all times. My canon similar to yours mostly collects dust in my basement these days unless I need a telephoto lens. For those that don't think an iphone can take good enough pictures, they should check out what this fellow did:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... -life.html

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by Nicolas » Tue Oct 03, 2017 10:20 am

I've been using a Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-HX100V since 2011 as my travel camera. My main requirements are GPS, electronic viewfinder, reticulating screen, but most importantly super-zoom. This one has all these features, its optical zoom is 30X. I paid $400 at Best Buy in 2011.

It's been a great camera but we got it sort of wet once and now we can only use scene-mode and not auto anymore as it won't stay on that selection. It still works and takes good pictures, but we won't travel with a sort-of broken camera.

So before our next trip I'll buy a more current model of the same camera, a Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-HX400V. This one has the same features but with improved specs including a 50X optical zoom. Currently it's priced at $448 at Amazon. I'm monitoring Camelx3, waiting for it to drop to $400 or lower before I buy. I'm hoping to get it on Black Friday. Of course there are other super-zooms that are more telescopically powerful but unfortunately without GPS and a reticulating screen. Nikon, for example, offers an 83X optical zoom, but no GPS, and etc.

As I said, a super-zoom is to me a requirement. For example I got some great closeups of the gargoyles atop Notre Dame in Paris last time we were there. Also it's useful and fun to be able to map the photos' locations via GPS.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by Niemanterry » Tue Oct 03, 2017 10:37 am

I have traveled extensively. Last count i had been to 46 different countries.
I use a “flip” camera. It shoots ultra hd video. I can use it to capture things I see on the move. Even an interesting glimpse from a train or bus. The flip can be purchased on ebay for around $150. It has a usb male plug that can be used with any computer as it has its own internal software. Many editing options in the software. Downside has poor zoom and eats aa batteries voraciously. I have one and wife has one also. Little escapes us with these simple, inexpensive,ultra hd level device.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by rgs92 » Tue Oct 03, 2017 11:02 am

I like the little Sony cameras because they have a physical one-touch button on the top for recording a video.
No fussing with menus are needed.
Also, no bulky lens sticks out (or even expands out and retracts). The lens is fixed in place. So it has a very small physical profile.

I've used one for years and it seems sturdy and has never malfunctioned and the pictures are nice and it is very small and fits in a pocket.
And the photos seem much nicer than from a phone.

The only feature I think it lacks (at least I have not figured out how to do it) is to insert a time/date stamp on the image.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by DTSC » Tue Oct 03, 2017 11:08 am

I own a Nikon D5100

I actually *use* my iPhone.

It's often just too inconvenient to lug around a somewhat fragile 1 pound device, even if it does take better pictures. Not to mention the pain of downloading the pictures, etc.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by iamlucky13 » Tue Oct 03, 2017 1:32 pm

lthenderson wrote:
Tue Oct 03, 2017 8:32 am
For those that don't think an iphone can take good enough pictures, they should check out what this fellow did:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... -life.html
"Good enough" depends on individual expectations. Those photos don't illustrate much either way beyond the fact that the iPhone has enough resolution to display nicely at around 1 MP and generally is capable of auto-exposing properly.
DTSC wrote:
Tue Oct 03, 2017 11:08 am
Not to mention the pain of downloading the pictures, etc.
???

You plug in a cable, copy and paste. It's a few seconds more work than if your device is set to transfer them automatically and wirelessly (which camera makers are finally grasping is something customers would like).

I do think camera makers convinced a lot more people to buy SLR's than really were serious enough about photography to benefit significantly from them. I also totally get not wanting to carry an extra device around, especially one that requires a substantial amount of learning to actually benefit from significantly, but I really don't see any pain in the file transfer part.
rgs92 wrote:
Tue Oct 03, 2017 11:02 am
The only feature I think it lacks (at least I have not figured out how to do it) is to insert a time/date stamp on the image.
This info is now embedded in the digital file. No bright orange numbers needed. In Windows 7, for example, you can see it by right-clicking, going to "properties", and selecting the "details" tab in the window that comes up. Online photo galleries often display this information, too. When you have prints made, many shops add this information to the back of the photo. Some photo editing programs, however, strip this information out.

If you need to know more, search the web for "EXIF data". Some photo editing programs even allow you to add this information to scanned photos manually.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by dbr » Tue Oct 03, 2017 4:31 pm

iamlucky13 wrote:
Tue Oct 03, 2017 1:32 pm

DTSC wrote:
Tue Oct 03, 2017 11:08 am
Not to mention the pain of downloading the pictures, etc.
???

You plug in a cable, copy and paste. It's a few seconds more work than if your device is set to transfer them automatically and wirelessly (which camera makers are finally grasping is something customers would like).
Well, on the iPhone the pictures are just there in Photos. For a lot of people there is no longer a process of "putting" one's pictures somewhere. Me, I am not comfortable until I can see pictures as files in a folder on a device, but I am a dinosaur.

Disclaimer: I compute on a Windows desktop, I carry a not-smart flip phone that does not have a camera in my pocket, I own an iPhone and sometimes take pictures with it, I own an old iPad 2 and a new iPad mini and sometimes take pictures with them, we have an iMAC, and we have a Canon Elph camera and take a lot of pictures on that. Those pictures end up on both the iMac in Photos and on the Windows machine.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by spitty » Wed Oct 04, 2017 7:26 am

Just saw this flash drive for iphone/ipad which looks interesting. Reviews of the new iphone 8+ camera are very good...

https://www.amazon.com/Kingston-Digital ... B072WPBV7Z

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by PhysicianOnFIRE » Wed Oct 04, 2017 7:40 am

I travel with an Olympus micro four thirds mirrorless setup.

I've got 2 EM-10 bodies and a few prime and zoom lenses. I used to have a Nikon DSLR system, but it was all so heavy and bulky. I'm very happy with my current Oly system and I get some great photos with it. Having 2 bodies keeps me from having to switch lenses often. I prefer prime lenses over zoom lenses for the sharpness and better performance in natural / low light due to the wider apertures.

:beer
-PoF

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by midareff » Wed Oct 04, 2017 7:52 am

spitty wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 7:26 am
Just saw this flash drive for iphone/ipad which looks interesting. Reviews of the new iphone 8+ camera are very good...

https://www.amazon.com/Kingston-Digital ... B072WPBV7Z
I see DxO rated the Samsung new Note the same as the iPhone except still photos better on the Samsung, movie better on the i. My Galaxy S7 Edge takes a 256 gb micro SD card so tons of memory.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by DaftInvestor » Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:00 am

Samsung Galaxy S8 is my camera of choice (since its always with me) if I'm not carrying my Nikon D7100.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by takeshi » Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:15 am

Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Oct 02, 2017 9:57 pm
What is your favorite travel camera(s) and why did you choose it?
iPhone 7 Plus. It's always with me and doesn't require me to pack additional accessories. Photos are geotagged and in the cloud/other devices with no effort on my part. We used to travel with a Nikon point & shoot and a Canon DSLR and it was just not worth the hassle for us -- especially as smartphone cameras continued to improve. The optics will obviously never reach what a DSLR can do or even a really good P&S but the gain is not worth the added hassle for us.
iamlucky13 wrote:
Tue Oct 03, 2017 1:32 pm
I really don't see any pain in the file transfer part.
Pain depends on individual expectations as well. There are certainly plenty that don't mind. I'm fine with certain manual (and even labor intensive though that doesn't apply here) tasks but manually transferring photos isn't among those.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by Alexa9 » Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:07 am

iPhone 7 - it's "good enough" and it's always on me. Photos backed up online instantly. Can send/edit them easily.
Hard to justify a budget for smartphone and a DSLR+lenses for an amateur hobbyist.
Gave up the DSLR and Point and Shoots years ago.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by an_asker » Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:45 am

PhysicianOnFIRE wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 7:40 am
I travel with an Olympus micro four thirds mirrorless setup.

I've got 2 EM-10 bodies and a few prime and zoom lenses. I used to have a Nikon DSLR system, but it was all so heavy and bulky. I'm very happy with my current Oly system and I get some great photos with it. Having 2 bodies keeps me from having to switch lenses often. I prefer prime lenses over zoom lenses for the sharpness and better performance in natural / low light due to the wider apertures.

:beer
-PoF
Could you please give me a two-minute elevator speech on what a "mirrorless camera" is and why it is better? I've had friends talk about these cameras but don't get the concept.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by Sandtrap » Wed Oct 04, 2017 11:15 am

an_asker wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:45 am
PhysicianOnFIRE wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 7:40 am
I travel with an Olympus micro four thirds mirrorless setup.

I've got 2 EM-10 bodies and a few prime and zoom lenses. I used to have a Nikon DSLR system, but it was all so heavy and bulky. I'm very happy with my current Oly system and I get some great photos with it. Having 2 bodies keeps me from having to switch lenses often. I prefer prime lenses over zoom lenses for the sharpness and better performance in natural / low light due to the wider apertures.

:beer
-PoF
Could you please give me a two-minute elevator speech on what a "mirrorless camera" is and why it is better? I've had friends talk about these cameras but don't get the concept.
(Ding. . . ground floor)
Old fashioned cameras had a mirror that reflected what the lens "sees" upward onto a prism and then to the viewfinder so the operator could see exactly what the lens "sees". What is seen is what was taken. The mirror had to flip up to take the picture to expose the film behind it. Instead of film we have a digital sensor. But the mirror still flips up when the shutter button is pressed. This on larger DLSR cameras.
But, enter a tiny digital screen in the viewfinder that relays the lens image that is cast onto the digital sensor (used to be film). So need for a mirror, no moving parts, no noise, no shutter wearing out.
In general, mirrorless DSLR cameras are thinner because there's no mirror and prism inside. No moving parts. Lighter. Simpler.
For example: the OP picture at the beginning of the thread is a full size DSLR "with mirror". Canon 5d full frame. Generally the largest full frame besides the even larger Canon 1d series, also mirror, not mirrorless.
Most all compact cameras and point n shoots are mirrorless. Generally mirror or mirrorless refers to DSLR (digital single lens reflex) large cameras).
Really Important Fact:
The image quality is not better or worse on a mirrorless camera. That is a function of sensor size and quality and optics, and the operator. For the most part, Optic/lens quality is the highest determinant of image quality, especially now since digital technology is so evolved across the board.
(Ding. . . 5th floor) :D
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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by an_asker » Wed Oct 04, 2017 12:57 pm

Sandtrap wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 11:15 am
an_asker wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:45 am
PhysicianOnFIRE wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 7:40 am
I travel with an Olympus micro four thirds mirrorless setup.

I've got 2 EM-10 bodies and a few prime and zoom lenses. I used to have a Nikon DSLR system, but it was all so heavy and bulky. I'm very happy with my current Oly system and I get some great photos with it. Having 2 bodies keeps me from having to switch lenses often. I prefer prime lenses over zoom lenses for the sharpness and better performance in natural / low light due to the wider apertures.

:beer
-PoF
Could you please give me a two-minute elevator speech on what a "mirrorless camera" is and why it is better? I've had friends talk about these cameras but don't get the concept.
(Ding. . . ground floor)
Old fashioned cameras had a mirror that reflected what the lens "sees" upward onto a prism and then to the viewfinder so the operator could see exactly what the lens "sees". What is seen is what was taken. The mirror had to flip up to take the picture to expose the film behind it. Instead of film we have a digital sensor. But the mirror still flips up when the shutter button is pressed. This on larger DLSR cameras.
But, enter a tiny digital screen in the viewfinder that relays the lens image that is cast onto the digital sensor (used to be film). So need for a mirror, no moving parts, no noise, no shutter wearing out.
In general, mirrorless DSLR cameras are thinner because there's no mirror and prism inside. No moving parts. Lighter. Simpler.
For example: the OP picture at the beginning of the thread is a full size DSLR "with mirror". Canon 5d full frame. Generally the largest full frame besides the even larger Canon 1d series, also mirror, not mirrorless.
Most all compact cameras and point n shoots are mirrorless. Generally mirror or mirrorless refers to DSLR (digital single lens reflex) large cameras).
Really Important Fact:
The image quality is not better or worse on a mirrorless camera. That is a function of sensor size and quality and optics, and the operator. For the most part, Optic/lens quality is the highest determinant of image quality, especially now since digital technology is so evolved across the board.
(Ding. . . 5th floor) :D
Thanks for the information. It was quite helpful indeed!

I have a Canon SX510 that I am happy with. It is a sort of point and shoot camera (as opposed to the SLR. Does that not have a mirror then? :confused

One more question: how do the lens on the DSLR (or SLR) cameras compare with the optical magnification of the point and shoots? In other words, if I see a 35-55 (or whatever numbers that come out of them) lens, how does it compare with a point and shoot with, say, 30x optical zoom? I realize that the lens will likely have better quality (why?) but what lens type will have an equivalent zoom?

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by PhysicianOnFIRE » Wed Oct 04, 2017 1:31 pm

an_asker wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 12:57 pm
Sandtrap wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 11:15 am
an_asker wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:45 am
PhysicianOnFIRE wrote:
Wed Oct 04, 2017 7:40 am
I travel with an Olympus micro four thirds mirrorless setup.

I've got 2 EM-10 bodies and a few prime and zoom lenses. I used to have a Nikon DSLR system, but it was all so heavy and bulky. I'm very happy with my current Oly system and I get some great photos with it. Having 2 bodies keeps me from having to switch lenses often. I prefer prime lenses over zoom lenses for the sharpness and better performance in natural / low light due to the wider apertures.

:beer
-PoF
Could you please give me a two-minute elevator speech on what a "mirrorless camera" is and why it is better? I've had friends talk about these cameras but don't get the concept.
(Ding. . . ground floor)
Old fashioned cameras had a mirror that reflected what the lens "sees" upward onto a prism and then to the viewfinder so the operator could see exactly what the lens "sees". What is seen is what was taken. The mirror had to flip up to take the picture to expose the film behind it. Instead of film we have a digital sensor. But the mirror still flips up when the shutter button is pressed. This on larger DLSR cameras.
But, enter a tiny digital screen in the viewfinder that relays the lens image that is cast onto the digital sensor (used to be film). So need for a mirror, no moving parts, no noise, no shutter wearing out.
In general, mirrorless DSLR cameras are thinner because there's no mirror and prism inside. No moving parts. Lighter. Simpler.
For example: the OP picture at the beginning of the thread is a full size DSLR "with mirror". Canon 5d full frame. Generally the largest full frame besides the even larger Canon 1d series, also mirror, not mirrorless.
Most all compact cameras and point n shoots are mirrorless. Generally mirror or mirrorless refers to DSLR (digital single lens reflex) large cameras).
Really Important Fact:
The image quality is not better or worse on a mirrorless camera. That is a function of sensor size and quality and optics, and the operator. For the most part, Optic/lens quality is the highest determinant of image quality, especially now since digital technology is so evolved across the board.
(Ding. . . 5th floor) :D
Thanks for the information. It was quite helpful indeed!

I have a Canon SX510 that I am happy with. It is a sort of point and shoot camera (as opposed to the SLR. Does that not have a mirror then? :confused

One more question: how do the lens on the DSLR (or SLR) cameras compare with the optical magnification of the point and shoots? In other words, if I see a 35-55 (or whatever numbers that come out of them) lens, how does it compare with a point and shoot with, say, 30x optical zoom? I realize that the lens will likely have better quality (why?) but what lens type will have an equivalent zoom?
Your Canon point and shoot has no mirror. The term "mirrorless" is usually reserved for camera bodies with interchangeable lenses, but all compact digital cameras are technically mirrorless. Explanation here.

It depends on the camera body. There are full frame mirrorless cameras (Sony comes to mind). Others will have a magnifying factor (crop factor). You have to look it up for the specific camera body. My Olympus bodies have a 2x factor, so my 45mm lens functions like a 90mm lens on a full frame camera.

The same is true for digital slr cameras. I had a Nikon D80 with a 1.5x factor, but Nikon also makes full frame bodies. I hope that helps!

Image
Last edited by PhysicianOnFIRE on Wed Oct 04, 2017 1:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by Sandtrap » Wed Oct 04, 2017 1:32 pm

No mirror as this camera has an lcd display in back with no overhead "through the lens" viewfinder.
This highly capable camera is a "bridge" camera. Between a compact/point n shoot and a full size dslr.

The optical magnification reference point is a 50mm lens on a full frame 35mm sensor dslr. This means that what is seen through the viewfinder and the image that is taken most approximates what the human eye sees naturally. The human eye does not zoom nor is it a wide angle per se.
So this is the reference point and then from there camera makers will say, for example, "The built-in Canon 30x optical zoom lens provides a 35mm-equivalent focal length range of 24-720mm".
Magnification is a function of sensor size and the lens. In general, given the same lens magnification, the smaller the sensor the greater the zoom, or magnification.
IE: A 50mm lens on a full frame dslr with a 35mm sensor is . . . . 50mm. No zoom. 1x. Just what the eye sees.
But on an APSC smaller sensor, that same 50mm lens is actually a 75mm. (add half or x 1.5 +- as in the chart) and a roughly 35mm lens is 50mm seen naturally.
This is why small compact point n shoots can have small zooms with very wide ranges.
Also, the smaller the sensor relative to the glass, the less quality the glass has to be edge to edge as mostly only the center of the lens is used.
So anyway, the "35mm focal length equivalents" is an optical/visual standard used for comparison between cameras.
Hope this helps.
POF put up an excellent diagram that shows the sensor size comparisons.

In general, the larger the sensor the higher the resolution and ability to enlarge.
Megapixel count is how many dots are squeezed into that sensor and is not the only determinant of image quality though camera makers would advertise differently. IE: a 12 megapixel full frame sensor renders higher than a zillion megapixel tiny sensor point n shoot.
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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by an_asker » Thu Oct 05, 2017 9:30 am

Thanks sandtrap and POF! I will need a few re-reads to understand and digest this information fully. But I am starting to understand ... and have more questions.

Let me first understand the sensor: it is just that part of the camera's body that is sensitive to the image and can capture the image. The larger the sensor - all else being the same - the larger will be the photo captured. Or, in other words, if sensor A is twice as wide and twice as long as sensor B, then sensor A will capture a photo four times the area of the photo captured by sensor B with the same image quality. In the graphic that POF provided, if the "Four Thirds System" is like sensor B, then the 35 mm full frame is like sensor A. Did I get that right?

BTW, is the sensor for an iPad(mini) larger than that on an iPhone?

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by an_asker » Thu Oct 05, 2017 9:57 am

Sandtrap wrote:
Mon Oct 02, 2017 9:57 pm
Queries on travel camera and "point n shoot" advice often come up.
Perhaps a comparison review of what we use specifically for travel and why would help others.

Question: What is your favorite travel camera(s) and why did you choose it?
[...]
We carry the following with us:

Me:
Canon XS510 - my main camera; I love the 30X optical zoom, but it does have issues in low light conditions
Fuji XP65 - I use this for any water photos (such as in the rain!), though it is not too good outside the water (only 5x optical zoom). Don't know if this is true, but one of the answers at Amazon (see link) says that this is a refurbished camera. Wal*Mart never informed me that it was not a new camera.
Canon Camcorder (don't have the model handy) - I use this for videos sometimes (most videos I take with the Canon camera)

DS:
Olympus SZ-12 - was my main camera for a short while. But I didn't like its performance in low light conditions when the people appeared - for lack of a better word - washed. For example, it appeared as though folks had hair slicked back and painted on to their heads (hopefully I make sense!). But no issues with normal light, sunny day photos.

DW and DD:
Both use their cell phones which, needless to say, have a big gulf in quality between them. But that's OK, as they are not too much into taking photos.

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Re: Travel camera reviews of what you own and why?

Post by Sandtrap » Thu Oct 05, 2017 10:57 am

an_asker wrote:
Thu Oct 05, 2017 9:30 am
Thanks sandtrap and POF! I will need a few re-reads to understand and digest this information fully. But I am starting to understand ... and have more questions.

Let me first understand the sensor: it is just that part of the camera's body that is sensitive to the image and can capture the image. The larger the sensor - all else being the same - the larger will be the photo captured. Or, in other words, if sensor A is twice as wide and twice as long as sensor B, then sensor A will capture a photo four times the area of the photo captured by sensor B with the same image quality. In the graphic that POF provided, if the "Four Thirds System" is like sensor B, then the 35 mm full frame is like sensor A. Did I get that right?

BTW, is the sensor for an iPad(mini) larger than that on an iPhone?
Given the same lens equiv. magnification factor.
Tiny camera with tiny lens on tiny sensor = image A IE: Cat sitting on a window sill with sunset behind
Compact camera with small lens on small sensor = image A (same thing, not a larger photo)
Full frame DSLR with large lens on a large sensor = Image A (same thing, not a larger photo)

The difference is in image saturation and resolution.
1
The Compact and Point n shoot sensor, and cell phone, will render an image that looks great on computers, Ipod, or printed to 8x10 or maybe a bit larger at best. It will be okay zoomed in depending on the megapixels per. (how many dots are squeezed into the sensor) but not by much.
2
The full frame 35mm sensor on a large DSLR will render an image with high saturation and high resolution capable of enlarging to a wall print 3 feet across or more, much more, without degradation of image quality. One will be able to zoom into the smallest details on a computer screen. It will pickup swarms of flies on a lake not visible to the naked eye. In general, megapixel count of the sensor could be far less than a compact camera but render an image with greater quality. Though many get sucked into the megapixel comparisons.
3
Medium and large format cameras $$$$ for landscape and high end model, etc, can enlarge to billboard size. Think cover of Vogue, Esquire, high fashion, which are usually medium format which have a sensor half of a playing card or larger.

So you see that for the average consumer use for snapshots, family, and recording events, the smaller cameras are more than adequate.

How does all this information apply in an actionable way?
What does it mean to someone shopping for a camera for travel, for family photos, etc?

The question is how is the image going to be viewed when shared with others?
Then. . buy the camera to fulfill the need or end use.

If the pictures are only going to be emailed to others, and/or viewed on a digital screen like an Ipad, email, computer screen, or tv screen at best, or printed out with a home inkjet photo printer, then most any small camera, or cell phone, is more than enough. The majority of folks look at image content (cute dog, lovely child, etc) lst over image quality and composition, etc. Snapshots capture and share memories and events.

However, if the images are going to be printed out larger than 11 x 14 and hung on a wall, or especially an art gallery, then the larger the sensor the better.

Many commercial fine art sites only accept full frame 35mm sensor rendered images or better. But that is another world.
IE: Fine art and other styles are another thing altogether. Think high end model advertising in fashion magazines. Landscapes in the style of Edsel Adams. Iconic images from Time-Life.

But there are exceptions. I know many hobby photographers with expensive high end cameras and lenses that gather dust most of the year and come out occasionally to take a birthday party, quick touch up in Lightroom at best, then email the images to friends and family. For those folks, the gear is the fun. There are others who have to "own" a Leica M, just for the sake of owning it. (and paying for it$$$$$)
For other hobbyists, they might have one moderately priced all around camera and take images year round, also develop their skills with a passion. All on a budget.

So you see most modern digital cameras have capabilities that far exceed what they are used for and far exceed the capabilities of the user. But that is the fun of it. There's something for everyone and for every use.
Again, that's the whole purpose of consumer photography regardless of the camera, having fun.
:D
Shared experiences to benefit all -- not an exspurt -- per forum guidelines :) Golf score allocation 50/50 swings vs putts.

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