Getting (young) kids interested in coding

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Watty
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by Watty » Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:24 pm

financeidiot wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 10:39 am
Any recommendations for a really old kid (adult) who wants to learn? Which language would you recommend (GF is pushing python)?
You might consider learning to program macros in Excel. That would not only give you a taste of what programming is like but with learning even the basics you could learn enough to do useful things in your normal job.

randomguy
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by randomguy » Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:57 pm

tc101 wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:39 pm
Any recommendations for a really old kid (adult) who wants to learn? Which language would you recommend (GF is pushing python)?
Check out www.freecodecamp.org

I suggest javascript but python would be a good second choice. Language choice is not as important as a good online community. Freecodecamp is the best I know.
I would figure out what you want to do first and then pick a language. Things like swift, javascript, python, and java are all fine languages to learn on and there are decent tools for all of them. But if my dream is to write an iOS app, I sure would do swift. Want some process some text files? Python.

And depending where you are coming from scratch is fine also. Visual programming languages help you learn basic concepts (variables, if then logic) that can translate into more tradition languages.

daveydoo
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by daveydoo » Tue Sep 19, 2017 10:06 pm

djpeteski wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:14 am
For the record, I would classify this as child abuse.
+1 :D . Years ago, we had a neighbor who bragged that he was having his 3-year old practice her "mousing skills" in preparation for her computer-intensive education and, presumably, career. My spouse said "Yeah, after a year of that, I bet she'll be able to mouse like a 4-year old!"

But there are some good suggestions here. My kids dabbled in some of these but fortunately nothing stuck :happy . I do wish I were better (or even OK) at this, though. The energy hill is big if you've never learned to code in any language or context in your formative years.
"I mean, it's one banana, Michael...what could it cost? Ten dollars?"

dk240t
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by dk240t » Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:16 am

Good to see Bogleheads forums still fit into the mold of society at large, where criticizing parenting choices is the national pastime.

daggerboard
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by daggerboard » Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:52 am

dk240t wrote:
Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:16 am
Good to see Bogleheads forums still fit into the mold of society at large, where criticizing parenting choices is the national pastime.
Unfortunately, +1

J G Bankerton
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by J G Bankerton » Wed Sep 20, 2017 9:22 am

Has anyone tried the programming for 5 year old links? I can't get them to work. They will never be a top video game.

NotWhoYouThink
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:16 am

randomguy wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:19 pm
keith6014 wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 5:33 pm
C++. They will love it.
Only if you want to raise spoiled kids. Fortran 66 or maybe Cobol are the only acceptable choices. To be nice we will let them use a terminal instead of punch cards........
Well back in my day, we programmed in assembly language and we liked it. Anyone who couldn't handle that might as well major in liberal arts.

Introducing kids to programming is fine, as is introducing kids to golf, tennis, literature, art, and investing. The key is staying humble enough to know that you can't control or predict what will stick. We now think we have raised a physicist and an accountant, but it might turn out that we have raised a farmer and an executive. Still too early to tell, but we're enjoying the show.

bluebolt
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by bluebolt » Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:27 am

NotWhoYouThink wrote:
Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:16 am
randomguy wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:19 pm
keith6014 wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 5:33 pm
C++. They will love it.
Only if you want to raise spoiled kids. Fortran 66 or maybe Cobol are the only acceptable choices. To be nice we will let them use a terminal instead of punch cards........
Well back in my day, we programmed in assembly language and we liked it. Anyone who couldn't handle that might as well major in liberal arts.

Introducing kids to programming is fine, as is introducing kids to golf, tennis, literature, art, and investing. The key is staying humble enough to know that you can't control or predict what will stick. We now think we have raised a physicist and an accountant, but it might turn out that we have raised a farmer and an executive. Still too early to tell, but we're enjoying the show.
You software folks are so spoiled and have it so easy. If we hardware folks make a mistake, we have to redesign things IN THE PHYSICAL WORLD. Get your 6 year old a soldering iron, VLSI design software and a fab, and then we can talk.

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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by TomatoTomahto » Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:35 am

daveydoo wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 10:06 pm
Years ago, we had a neighbor who bragged that he was having his 3-year old practice her "mousing skills" in preparation for her computer-intensive education and, presumably, career. My spouse said "Yeah, after a year of that, I bet she'll be able to mouse like a 4-year old!"
Haha! :sharebeer I like your spouse. And kudos to you for not taking credit for a really funny line.

Fwiw, my kids started coding when they felt like it, or when a class required it.

1 kid is tech-ignorant, happily so; 2 can code their way out of paper bags; 1 is exceptional at coding. Both parents worked in software development.

taguscove
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by taguscove » Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:52 am

Dottie57 wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 5:07 pm
sunny_socal wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:06 am
My parenting tips for a 6 year old:
- Turn off the TV (and yes, that includes Youtube)
- Send them outside to play
Best idea yet.
A counterpoint. I was playing over 8 hours of computer games through middle school and high school from 3-11PM daily. Didn't mix with other suburban kids and school was abysmally easy. Online html games, Starcraft, Mortal Kombat, Counterstrike, etc. Having talked with hundreds of developers in the Bay Area, NYC, and Boston, this kind of childhood seems more the norm. You can only lead a horse to water...

As a parent, I would fill bookshelves with interesting and attractive programming oriented books. I would also try to point my kids towards computer games amenable to hacks and modifications. Outdoor activity is overrated, but enough social interaction to be socialized is important.

Dottie57
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by Dottie57 » Wed Sep 20, 2017 3:16 pm

taguscove wrote:
Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:52 am
Dottie57 wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 5:07 pm
sunny_socal wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:06 am
My parenting tips for a 6 year old:
- Turn off the TV (and yes, that includes Youtube)
- Send them outside to play
Best idea yet.
A counterpoint. I was playing over 8 hours of computer games through middle school and high school from 3-11PM daily. Didn't mix with other suburban kids and school was abysmally easy. Online html games, Starcraft, Mortal Kombat, Counterstrike, etc. Having talked with hundreds of developers in the Bay Area, NYC, and Boston, this kind of childhood seems more the norm. You can only lead a horse to water...

As a parent, I would fill bookshelves with interesting and attractive programming oriented books. I would also try to point my kids towards computer games amenable to hacks and modifications. Outdoor activity is overrated, but enough social interaction to be socialized is important.

I think parents should encourage kids in a variety of interests. Coding right now is heading off shore (U.S.) and salaries wlll head down. It is becoimng a factory for those outside of major tech areas like silicon valley. It seems like coding is skating to where the puck was and not to where it will be.

Math, sciences, languages, excellent reading skills are the way to go in my estimation.

alex_686
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by alex_686 » Wed Sep 20, 2017 3:28 pm

bluebolt wrote:
Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:27 am
NotWhoYouThink wrote:
Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:16 am
randomguy wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:19 pm
keith6014 wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 5:33 pm
C++. They will love it.
Only if you want to raise spoiled kids. Fortran 66 or maybe Cobol are the only acceptable choices. To be nice we will let them use a terminal instead of punch cards........
Well back in my day, we programmed in assembly language and we liked it. Anyone who couldn't handle that might as well major in liberal arts.

Introducing kids to programming is fine, as is introducing kids to golf, tennis, literature, art, and investing. The key is staying humble enough to know that you can't control or predict what will stick. We now think we have raised a physicist and an accountant, but it might turn out that we have raised a farmer and an executive. Still too early to tell, but we're enjoying the show.
You software folks are so spoiled and have it so easy. If we hardware folks make a mistake, we have to redesign things IN THE PHYSICAL WORLD. Get your 6 year old a soldering iron, VLSI design software and a fab, and then we can talk.
Ha - you and your fancy sobering irons. Back in my day we had to build our computers out of tinker toys. Which might not be a bad idea for the OP. there are various tinker toys / Lego machines you can build. Sure we are only talking about a few logic gates, or maybe only one, but the physical manipulation might be a teaching moment.

bluebolt
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by bluebolt » Wed Sep 20, 2017 5:10 pm


Lars_2013
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by Lars_2013 » Wed Sep 20, 2017 5:34 pm

I have no idea what is available/useful these days. Here's some comparatively ancient history.

My older brother taught himself to read at age 3 in part by copying simple programs into our TI-99/4A to do things like make the screen change colors, etc. Later we both learned and used basic for simple tasks. And everyone at our school was expected to do a little bit with Logo / turtle graphics starting in about grade 3. Immediate gratification is obviously important when you're talking about young kids. I think all that helped with understanding logic, if/then statements, and the importance of syntax.

Whether any of that was useful later in life, I'm not sure. I do think it helped me be able to quickly pick up statistical programming in college when many of my classmates were struggling with it. My brother went on to major in computer science and is now a coder.

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czeckers
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by czeckers » Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:48 pm

Lego Mindstorm got my so hooked. Daughter was never interested.
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by Spirit Rider » Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:28 pm

I find this whole movement towards promoting "coding skills" in children as totally misdirected. The last thing the IT world needs is more coders who can't think their way out of a wet paper bag. Personally, I find 75% - 80% of modern software developers as next to useless. They have non-existent critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Worrying about a young child's coding skills should not be a priority. First, can't we just let children have the opportunity to be kids. It is far more important for children to develop socialization capability, critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Give me a well rounded adult individual with a level head on their soldiers, and I can easily teach them coding skills. Coding skills are but a minor part of what it takes to develop great software.

jhurst0503
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by jhurst0503 » Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:56 pm

It may be more fun to have him go to a summer camp to meet kids around his age with similar interests. Theres's a really great summer camp called ID Tech that specifically teaches young kids how to code. They have Minecraft, robotics, etc. Check this out for next year!

randomguy
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by randomguy » Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:25 pm

Spirit Rider wrote:
Wed Sep 20, 2017 8:28 pm
I find this whole movement towards promoting "coding skills" in children as totally misdirected. The last thing the IT world needs is more coders who can't think their way out of a wet paper bag. Personally, I find 75% - 80% of modern software developers as next to useless. They have non-existent critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Worrying about a young child's coding skills should not be a priority. First, can't we just let children have the opportunity to be kids. It is far more important for children to develop socialization capability, critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Give me a well rounded adult individual with a level head on their soldiers, and I can easily teach them coding skills. Coding skills are but a minor part of what it takes to develop great software.
I bet I can send you a 100 people that are considered level headed, well rounded and smart by most people and you will find that 70% of them can't code no matter how good of teacher you are.:) Just remember those 70% who you think are horrible are the surviors. Along the way there were tons of drop outs.:)

There is a vast difference between early specialization (i.e. your program for 12 hours/day) and early exposure (you spend a couple hours/week) for most activities. In general early specialization is bad while early exposure is tends to be good.

And no you shouldn't be expecting your kid to be a software developer later in life because you taught them it at 6 years old anymore than you would expect your kid to be a concert pianist or a professional soccer player because they were doing it at 6. The kid should do it because it is fun activity.

DarthSage
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by DarthSage » Thu Sep 21, 2017 6:27 am

I don't understand the push for children coding versus developing logic skills and problem-solving ability. I'm a huge fan of toys like Legos and other things that encourage creativity. One good resource for brain-engaging toys is mindware (they have a website and catalog). They have stuff for various ages, and encourage both creativity and problem solving in a number of ways.

I also think all of us parents have to be mindful that our children are unique individuals, not our clones. My better half and I are both engineers--very big on logic, and either one of us would spend weeks with an erector set, given the chance. But of our 4 kids, only one seems to have gotten the engineering gene. We have a bilingual education teacher, chemistry major, budding lawyer, and architect. On the good side, creative problem-solving will help in all those fields. Even if it's not what we would have expected from our children.

keith6014
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by keith6014 » Fri Sep 22, 2017 6:10 pm

alex_686 wrote:
Wed Sep 20, 2017 3:28 pm
bluebolt wrote:
Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:27 am
NotWhoYouThink wrote:
Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:16 am
randomguy wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:19 pm
keith6014 wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 5:33 pm
C++. They will love it.
Only if you want to raise spoiled kids. Fortran 66 or maybe Cobol are the only acceptable choices. To be nice we will let them use a terminal instead of punch cards........
Well back in my day, we programmed in assembly language and we liked it. Anyone who couldn't handle that might as well major in liberal arts.

Introducing kids to programming is fine, as is introducing kids to golf, tennis, literature, art, and investing. The key is staying humble enough to know that you can't control or predict what will stick. We now think we have raised a physicist and an accountant, but it might turn out that we have raised a farmer and an executive. Still too early to tell, but we're enjoying the show.
You software folks are so spoiled and have it so easy. If we hardware folks make a mistake, we have to redesign things IN THE PHYSICAL WORLD. Get your 6 year old a soldering iron, VLSI design software and a fab, and then we can talk.
Ha - you and your fancy sobering irons. Back in my day we had to build our computers out of tinker toys. Which might not be a bad idea for the OP. there are various tinker toys / Lego machines you can build. Sure we are only talking about a few logic gates, or maybe only one, but the physical manipulation might be a teaching moment.
I think assembler is a bit extreme. Too low level. But, I feel C/C++ is a type of language that will last forever and there are many job opportunities. Especially on Wallstreet.

keith6014
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by keith6014 » Fri Sep 22, 2017 7:20 pm

Watty wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:24 pm
financeidiot wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 10:39 am
Any recommendations for a really old kid (adult) who wants to learn? Which language would you recommend (GF is pushing python)?
You might consider learning to program macros in Excel. That would not only give you a taste of what programming is like but with learning even the basics you could learn enough to do useful things in your normal job.
what do you want to accomplish? You want to learn the nitty gritty details: C/C++. You want to play around with data: Python/Pandas. You want to learn "web": golang; js and html. Really depends what you want to do. Also excel is good too.

randomguy
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by randomguy » Fri Sep 22, 2017 8:28 pm

DarthSage wrote:
Thu Sep 21, 2017 6:27 am
I don't understand the push for children coding versus developing logic skills and problem-solving ability. I'm a huge fan of toys like Legos and other things that encourage creativity. One good resource for brain-engaging toys is mindware (they have a website and catalog). They have stuff for various ages, and encourage both creativity and problem solving in a number of ways.

I also think all of us parents have to be mindful that our children are unique individuals, not our clones. My better half and I are both engineers--very big on logic, and either one of us would spend weeks with an erector set, given the chance. But of our 4 kids, only one seems to have gotten the engineering gene. We have a bilingual education teacher, chemistry major, budding lawyer, and architect. On the good side, creative problem-solving will help in all those fields. Even if it's not what we would have expected from our children.
I can't think of many things that a kid will be doing that requires more logical thinking, planning, problem solving skill and creativity than coding. Even if the kid doesn't become a coder a lot of the logic stuff carries over to a lot of other stuff. Heck just learning the basic idea of what a variable is gets you about half way through algebra I:)

Coding if the kid enjoys it is one thing. Forcing you kid to code is another. But you could say the same about things like piano lessons. Music is great. If you kid doesn't enjoy, they are not going to get much out of it.

DrGoogle2017
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:34 pm

I'm glad I never exposed my kids to any coding when they were younger. If anything we didn't encourage them to be engineers, we let them be. Neither is my brother and his wife, both are software engineers. But one of my kids is very good in math. That's where she gets the logic from. But I did expose my CS daughter to sign up for the WTP program from MIT before her senior year in high school. After attending the program, she then realized she didn't know anything comparing to other kids there. I think she is a decent software engineer now, in fact she said in one of her summer internships, she did better than some guy who graduated from UCB for 10 years now. Only time will tell how she turns out. I think sometimes, it could be too soon to get into coding.

randomguy
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by randomguy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:00 pm

DrGoogle2017 wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:34 pm
I'm glad I never exposed my kids to any coding when they were younger. If anything we didn't encourage them to be engineers, we let them be. Neither is my brother and his wife, both are software engineers. But one of my kids is very good in math. That's where she gets the logic from. But I did expose my CS daughter to sign up for the WTP program from MIT before her senior year in high school. After attending the program, she then realized she didn't know anything comparing to other kids there. I think she is a decent software engineer now, in fact she said in one of her summer internships, she did better than some guy who graduated from UCB for 10 years now. Only time will tell how she turns out. I think sometimes, it could be too soon to get into coding.
Why? What makes coding something where early exposure is bad? Would you have the same attitude towards say a musical instrument, reading, sports, writing, or and so on? There are few bad choices( tackle football for 8 year old) but I struggle to see how coding falls in that group.

There is vast difference between telling a 6 year old they should be a coder and doing a fun activity with a 6 year old that happens to encourage problem solving, critical thinking and planning.

DrGoogle2017
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:20 pm

randomguy wrote:
Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:00 pm
DrGoogle2017 wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:34 pm
I'm glad I never exposed my kids to any coding when they were younger. If anything we didn't encourage them to be engineers, we let them be. Neither is my brother and his wife, both are software engineers. But one of my kids is very good in math. That's where she gets the logic from. But I did expose my CS daughter to sign up for the WTP program from MIT before her senior year in high school. After attending the program, she then realized she didn't know anything comparing to other kids there. I think she is a decent software engineer now, in fact she said in one of her summer internships, she did better than some guy who graduated from UCB for 10 years now. Only time will tell how she turns out. I think sometimes, it could be too soon to get into coding.
Why? What makes coding something where early exposure is bad? Would you have the same attitude towards say a musical instrument, reading, sports, writing, or and so on? There are few bad choices( tackle football for 8 year old) but I struggle to see how coding falls in that group.

There is vast difference between telling a 6 year old they should be a coder and doing a fun activity with a 6 year old that happens to encourage problem solving, critical thinking and planning.
I didn't say it was bad, but realistically what are the chances that a 6 year old would be interested in coding. Even Zuckerberg did receive programming tutoring until he was 11, Bill Gates much later when he was teenager.
Even for musical instruments, we didn't expose my kids to musical instruments until much later than 6 year old, because at 3, one kid was only interested in playing with the teacher's cat. Also as soon as she was old enough to tell me she had no interest in playing that musical instrument, she was allowed to stop. But only after she tried playing it for a few years.

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Alexa9
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by Alexa9 » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:28 pm

I would encourage young kids to pursue reading, writing, math, and science and enjoy it. Foreign language is good too as coding is kind of a language. There are also plenty of coding for kids tutorials and classes although I think middle school is a better time to start really learning it.

Broken Man 1999
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by Broken Man 1999 » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:30 pm

J G Bankerton wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 11:13 am
runner3081 wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 10:35 am
Heck the kindergarten class has Chromebooks and computer programming is covered in elementary school.
Schools have dropped hand writing. I hope they never have a dead battery, they would not be able to communicate.
My oldest granddaughter surprised me the last time she was here. She is teaching herself cursive writing. At the least, perhaps she can use the new skill to write entries in her journal. Not sure she will have many uses for it otherwise.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven than I shall not go. " -Mark Twain

veindoc
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by veindoc » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:45 pm

I didn't ask for ideas how to pressure my kids into doing something they don't want to do.

I simply want to expose them - gently, in a way appealing to them, and on their terms - to the broader concept. "Provide the opportunity" as you say. I am not going to go all Tiger Parent on them and brute force something on them.
+1. In this board, everyone has an opinion and are so forthcoming with their thoughts. :annoyed

My husband and I are physicians. Since the arrival of our first our house was filled with toy stethoscopes and anatomical models. The three kids have all at different times played with the skeleton and listened to each other's heartbeats. Of the three kids however, I think only one may end up pursuing medicine. And that's totally fine. I would never presume to force them into anything medical, but since that is my interest, I was motivated to expose them to what drives me. This way they know what mommy and daddy are doing while we are away.

My oldest, now age 9, is very into coding by the way( I still don't even know what that is, but whatever). He has access to games on a chromebook the school provides him. In first grade, he discovered scratch and something related to turtles which introduced him to coding. Then he found a coding game on my phone called codeSpark Academy with the Foos that he really enjoyed. It has excellent ratings on the app store. It is geared toward kids age 4-9. That game is apparently on the chromebook or iPAD at school as well. That might be a good option for your kiddos too.

I'm glad he got exposed to coding at an early age. Not sure if it will lead into anything more in the future, but I don't think it hurt him to explore this. Just like I had no qualms handing my kid a stethoscope and reflex hammer at the age of 3. Or the mini wooden piano that they promptly broke in a week. I am grateful to have the resources to expose my kids to a number of activities and experiences. I would be dismayed if my child at the age of 18 told me he had no idea what he wanted to do with the rest of his life. If that happens, it won't be for a lack of exposure on our part.

J G Bankerton
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by J G Bankerton » Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:28 pm

Broken Man 1999 wrote:
Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:30 pm
My oldest granddaughter surprised me the last time she was here. She is teaching herself cursive writing. At the least, perhaps she can use the new skill to write entries in her journal. Not sure she will have many uses for it otherwise.
If one can't write cursive how do they sign their name, with an X? Back in my day the loops and tilts had to be just so. Fascinating world we have today.

randomguy
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Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by randomguy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:36 pm

DrGoogle2017 wrote:
Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:20 pm

I didn't say it was bad, but realistically what are the chances that a 6 year old would be interested in coding. Even Zuckerberg did receive programming tutoring until he was 11, Bill Gates much later when he was teenager.
Even for musical instruments, we didn't expose my kids to musical instruments until much later than 6 year old, because at 3, one kid was only interested in playing with the teacher's cat. Also as soon as she was old enough to tell me she had no interest in playing that musical instrument, she was allowed to stop. But only after she tried playing it for a few years.
Very high in my experience. What kid doesn't like a creative activity that lets them build something? There is a reason why things like legos are always popular. I taught logo to 3rd graders (slighlty older 8-9 year olds) for a while and most of them were very engaged. They liked watching the turtle dance.:) But ignore that. Think about your kid. Do you feel bad about forcing them to do a musical instruement for multiple years or are you happy you exposed them to something even if it didn't work out? My parenting theory has always been to expose them to everything and see what they like. Coding is just one of many activities (rock climbing, musical instruements, spanish, snowboarding, drama, soccer...) that we have done. Some stick. Others don't.

As far as your examples, think about Bill Gates. He was exposed to a computer in middle school. In 1970 or so roughly 0% of the school age population had that opportunity. Do you think that helped him versus the kid who didn't get any exposure until they were in college?:) And will Bill was a solid coder back in the days (I don't know anything about Zucks coding skills) both of them made their money off their business skills not so much coding. History is filled both with prodigies who take early exposure and rise to great hieghts, late bloomers who pick things up laster in life, and prodigies who flame out. If you are a Serena Williams or Tiger Woods, the early speciailization is credited towards your success. If on the other hand you flame out (Ty Tyrion for example), you here about too much, too soon. I have a feeling both cases are a result of giving too much credit and blame.

J G Bankerton
Posts: 41
Joined: Thu Sep 14, 2017 3:30 pm

Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by J G Bankerton » Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:45 pm

randomguy wrote:
Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:36 pm
Do you feel bad about forcing them to do a musical instruement for multiple years or are you happy you exposed them to something even if it didn't work out?
I was exposed to beets and can't stand the sight of them.

DrGoogle2017
Posts: 1322
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2017 12:31 pm

Re: Getting (young) kids interested in coding

Post by DrGoogle2017 » Sat Sep 23, 2017 4:04 pm

randomguy wrote:
Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:36 pm
DrGoogle2017 wrote:
Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:20 pm

I didn't say it was bad, but realistically what are the chances that a 6 year old would be interested in coding. Even Zuckerberg did receive programming tutoring until he was 11, Bill Gates much later when he was teenager.
Even for musical instruments, we didn't expose my kids to musical instruments until much later than 6 year old, because at 3, one kid was only interested in playing with the teacher's cat. Also as soon as she was old enough to tell me she had no interest in playing that musical instrument, she was allowed to stop. But only after she tried playing it for a few years.
Very high in my experience. What kid doesn't like a creative activity that lets them build something? There is a reason why things like legos are always popular. I taught logo to 3rd graders (slighlty older 8-9 year olds) for a while and most of them were very engaged. They liked watching the turtle dance.:) But ignore that. Think about your kid. Do you feel bad about forcing them to do a musical instruement for multiple years or are you happy you exposed them to something even if it didn't work out? My parenting theory has always been to expose them to everything and see what they like. Coding is just one of many activities (rock climbing, musical instruements, spanish, snowboarding, drama, soccer...) that we have done. Some stick. Others don't.

As far as your examples, think about Bill Gates. He was exposed to a computer in middle school. In 1970 or so roughly 0% of the school age population had that opportunity. Do you think that helped him versus the kid who didn't get any exposure until they were in college?:) And will Bill was a solid coder back in the days (I don't know anything about Zucks coding skills) both of them made their money off their business skills not so much coding. History is filled both with prodigies who take early exposure and rise to great hieghts, late bloomers who pick things up laster in life, and prodigies who flame out. If you are a Serena Williams or Tiger Woods, the early speciailization is credited towards your success. If on the other hand you flame out (Ty Tyrion for example), you here about too much, too soon. I have a feeling both cases are a result of giving too much credit and blame.
My kids had leggo sets and Connectix(if I recall the name of it), they did enjoy building it. But I don't think I can force my kids to anything. My parents couldn't force me to anything either. You know your kids best. And there are limits to everything, we can't expose our kids to everything either. I can expose to what I think they might like based on what I've experienced. Skiing yes, but not snowboarding. It turns out, one of my kids who were not exposed to snowboarding is now snowboarding and quite like it. What a concept? Or is it just life in general.

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