blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Post Reply
seashell
Posts: 106
Joined: Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:40 pm

blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by seashell » Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:16 pm

I would like to purchase an at home blood pressure monitor. Can you recommend a reliable/accurate one I can buy?

Thanks

PS Any doctors here to chime in? Also all opinions welcome from patients/consumers too.

nordsteve
Posts: 565
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 9:23 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by nordsteve » Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:17 pm

I have the Withings wireless blood pressure monitor and really like it. Can't tell you how it compares to others as it's the first one I've bought.

livesoft
Posts: 57156
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:00 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by livesoft » Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:21 pm

As noted in several other bogleheads.org threads, most are made by the same company and have the same internal parts. My son bought one at Walmart to use in a science fair project: Omron aka ReliOn with LCD readout and a arm cuff. Follow the directions.

I think a lot of incorrect readings come from improper use. I get the most improper use at a dentist office, so even so-called medical professionals don't always use one correctly.
This signature message sponsored by sscritic: Learn to fish.

gkaplan
Posts: 7034
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by gkaplan » Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:32 pm

Omron BP786N Blood Pressure Monitor:


https://www.consumerreports.org/product ... overview/
Gordon

David S
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Apr 02, 2016 10:10 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by David S » Thu Sep 14, 2017 8:38 pm

Omron BP652. It's compact and I've found it very simple to use and is consistently accurate (I took it to my last check-up to compare). Utilizes a wrist cuff, and mine came with its own hard, compact case.

User avatar
dwickenh
Posts: 818
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2015 9:45 pm
Location: Illinois

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by dwickenh » Thu Sep 14, 2017 10:05 pm

gkaplan wrote:
Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:32 pm
Omron BP786N Blood Pressure Monitor:


https://www.consumerreports.org/product ... overview/
It did not review well, maybe they were all wrong though.

Dan
The market is the most efficient mechanism anywhere in the world for transferring wealth from impatient people to patient people.” | — Warren Buffett

sport
Posts: 6122
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 3:26 pm
Location: Cleveland, OH

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by sport » Thu Sep 14, 2017 10:12 pm

I suggest asking your medical insurance if they will pay for a bp monitor. It may require a Dr.'s prescription. If the insurance covers it, they may specify the brand and/or the vendor. When you do get one, take it with you to your next Dr. appointment and check it against the unit the Dr. uses. If accuracy is really important, I would suggest calibrating it this way once a year. This is standard practice for laboratory instrumentation.

daveydoo
Posts: 951
Joined: Sun May 15, 2016 1:53 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by daveydoo » Thu Sep 14, 2017 11:26 pm

David S wrote:
Thu Sep 14, 2017 8:38 pm
...Utilizes a wrist cuff...
As a general rule, avoid wrist cuff. It may "work well" and may even be accurate in "normals," but many older folks with high blood pressure and/or diabetes have significant blood vessel disease and may get a much lower blood pressure reading (read: false sense of security) in their wrists (and ankles) than they would on a vessel closer to their core. This is not medical advice.

gkaplan
Posts: 7034
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by gkaplan » Thu Sep 14, 2017 11:33 pm

dwickenh wrote:
Thu Sep 14, 2017 10:05 pm
gkaplan wrote:
Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:32 pm
Omron BP786N Blood Pressure Monitor:


https://www.consumerreports.org/product ... overview/
It did not review well, maybe they were all wrong though.

Dan

I like it a lot. Why didn't they like it. I bought on the advice of my brother, who really liked it.
Gordon

carolinaman
Posts: 2646
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2011 9:56 am
Location: North Carolina

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by carolinaman » Fri Sep 15, 2017 7:37 am

Omron HEM 637. It is pretty accurate. I get comparable readings from it as I do at doctors' offices.

magneto
Posts: 895
Joined: Sun Dec 19, 2010 10:57 am
Location: On Chesil Beach

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by magneto » Fri Sep 15, 2017 9:24 am

livesoft wrote:
Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:21 pm
I think a lot of incorrect readings come from improper use. I get the most improper use at a dentist office, so even so-called medical professionals don't always use one correctly.
Beware of 'white coat syndrome'.
Blood pressure can rise significantly in the presence of medical staff.

Recommendation is usually to take best/lowest of three readings at home, mornng and evening, over several days.
'There is a tide in the affairs of men ...', Brutus (Market Timer)

Rupert
Posts: 2712
Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2012 12:01 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by Rupert » Fri Sep 15, 2017 9:37 am

magneto wrote:
Fri Sep 15, 2017 9:24 am
livesoft wrote:
Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:21 pm
I think a lot of incorrect readings come from improper use. I get the most improper use at a dentist office, so even so-called medical professionals don't always use one correctly.
Beware of 'white coat syndrome'.
Blood pressure can rise significantly in the presence of medical staff.

Recommendation is usually to take best/lowest of three readings at home, mornng and evening, over several days.
Yes, "white coat syndrome" or "white coat hypertension" is definitely a real thing. It doesn't help that the person who takes your pressure usually does so with an improperly-sized cuff after you've chased her at a trot down a long hallway and while she's actively questioning you about why you're in to see the doctor today. I get the best readings at the cardiologist's office, where they take the pressure in both arms after I've been sitting still for a few minutes.

As for the at-home models, I get accurate results with a generic model I bought at CVS 10 years or so ago. It cost about $50. The key is to place the cuff on your arm in the proper place and to have the machine resting on a table at approximately heart level while you're sitting with your feet flat on the floor.

livesoft
Posts: 57156
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:00 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by livesoft » Fri Sep 15, 2017 9:41 am

magneto wrote:
Fri Sep 15, 2017 9:24 am
Beware of 'white coat syndrome'.
Blood pressure can rise significantly in the presence of medical staff.

Recommendation is usually to take best/lowest of three readings at home, mornng and evening, over several days.
All true, but I used to have a job taking blood pressures for every patient in a hospital, so I'm writing about how staff placed a cuff and other things. OTOH, many people believe a reading is more accurate and precise than it really is or even can be.
This signature message sponsored by sscritic: Learn to fish.

GuitarXM
Posts: 398
Joined: Sat Jun 18, 2016 12:09 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by GuitarXM » Fri Sep 15, 2017 9:47 am

I'm a pharmacist.
Mercury meters are the gold standard which are most accurate.

Omron is a pretty popular company which is fairly accurate.
Just don't get the one that measures the wrist. Wrist is the least accurate of all.

ResearchMed
Posts: 5470
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2008 11:25 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by ResearchMed » Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:06 am

Rupert wrote:
Fri Sep 15, 2017 9:37 am
magneto wrote:
Fri Sep 15, 2017 9:24 am
livesoft wrote:
Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:21 pm
I think a lot of incorrect readings come from improper use. I get the most improper use at a dentist office, so even so-called medical professionals don't always use one correctly.
Beware of 'white coat syndrome'.
Blood pressure can rise significantly in the presence of medical staff.

Recommendation is usually to take best/lowest of three readings at home, mornng and evening, over several days.
Yes, "white coat syndrome" or "white coat hypertension" is definitely a real thing. It doesn't help that the person who takes your pressure usually does so with an improperly-sized cuff after you've chased her at a trot down a long hallway and while she's actively questioning you about why you're in to see the doctor today. I get the best readings at the cardiologist's office, where they take the pressure in both arms after I've been sitting still for a few minutes.

As for the at-home models, I get accurate results with a generic model I bought at CVS 10 years or so ago. It cost about $50. The key is to place the cuff on your arm in the proper place and to have the machine resting on a table at approximately heart level while you're sitting with your feet flat on the floor.
http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fu ... le/2653029

Only 1 out of 159 medical student did all 11 elements of taking BP correctly.
Sure, they were med *students*.

But read the article, and think... were all of these things carefully done when you are at the medical facility?

Very few are done correctly, and the same incorrect things keep happening.
Not waiting after we've trotted down the hall.
Having patient talk/answer questions while taking BP.
Having arm in wrong position...
That's just for starters.
And we are at a major (top) teaching hospital, and it doesn't matter if it's the assistant, the physician, in the regular clinic or the ER.

Study co-author stated this about speaking with colleagues:

"‘If you can do a blood pressure correctly in my presence, I will buy you a dinner [at a] restaurant of your choice in Philadelphia.’ After 10 years, not a single person—resident, fellow, or student—ever could do it.”"

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

User avatar
BolderBoy
Posts: 3450
Joined: Wed Apr 07, 2010 12:16 pm
Location: Colorado

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by BolderBoy » Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:35 am

livesoft wrote:
Fri Sep 15, 2017 9:41 am
OTOH, many people believe a reading is more accurate and precise than it really is or even can be.
This is important for folks to understand. It is trends that are important and NOT isolated BP measurements.
"Never underestimate one's capacity to overestimate one's abilities" - The Dunning-Kruger Effect

User avatar
Toons
Posts: 12092
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Hills of Tennessee

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by Toons » Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:39 am

"One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity" –Bruce Lee

Jeff Albertson
Posts: 411
Joined: Sat Apr 06, 2013 7:11 pm
Location: Springfield

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by Jeff Albertson » Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:40 am

more reviews
http://thesweethome.com/reviews/best-bl ... -home-use/
Of all the models we tested, the Omron Series 10 was the most accurate, had the most comfortable cuff, and possessed the best combination of useful features—a Bluetooth connection to transmit data to your smartphone for easier health trend tracking, the ability to average three tests taken within a 10-minute window for improved accuracy, and irregular heartbeat detection. It features an easy-to use interface and was also the only monitor we tested with a backlit display.

User avatar
Earl Lemongrab
Posts: 3094
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2014 1:14 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:54 am

The Omron 10 is what I have. The doc had me bring it in and she compared its reading to hers. They were close to each other. Also confirmed some Whitecoat syndrome, as it was a good 30 points systolic higher than the reading I took before leaving home.

Technically the insurance would have paid for it, but they required getting it from one of their durable equipment suppliers. As it only cost like $50 online, I gave up trying to find a supplier after several tries and just bought it.
This week's fortune cookie: "You will do well to expand your horizons." Ow. Passive-aggressive and vaguely ominous.

dbr
Posts: 24108
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2007 9:50 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by dbr » Fri Sep 15, 2017 11:14 am

magneto wrote:
Fri Sep 15, 2017 9:24 am
livesoft wrote:
Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:21 pm
I think a lot of incorrect readings come from improper use. I get the most improper use at a dentist office, so even so-called medical professionals don't always use one correctly.
Beware of 'white coat syndrome'.
Blood pressure can rise significantly in the presence of medical staff.

Recommendation is usually to take best/lowest of three readings at home, mornng and evening, over several days.
Exactly. Far and away the most inaccurate readings we get are the one's at the doctor's office.

If you really want to know what is going on you need to take correctly made readings multiple times a day every day continuously. Then you can make a process chart of your data, find out the natural limits, detect "out of control" excursions, and observe trends. Only then can you compare to recommended upper limits that might be considered dangerous.

The same observation applies to other tests, such as blood lipids. In that case multiple times a day testing is excessive except for tri-glycerides.

The two real issues are:

1. Cost A blood pressure test at any frequency is free. Blood lipids can be tested at home but it would be expensive.

2. Test error. The real concern is systematic error where your instrument or test method is consistently offset from the actual value. I do not have the impression that home blood pressure or lipids tests have a significant problem with this, but it can be checked by seeing if a different machine or the doctor office or lab numbers run statistically outside the norm. We have definitely observed "white coat syndrome" where some office numbers are clearly outliers in the statistical sense. The actual blood pressure is indeed high at the time but not representative of that which is to be measured. As an example would be getting a systolic of 160 when the daily range is clearly 120-130.

A different issue is a poor instrument where there is large random error. The classic correction for that is to increase the number of readings so that the random error of the average is reduced. That is a problem if the test is costly.

dbr
Posts: 24108
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2007 9:50 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by dbr » Fri Sep 15, 2017 11:19 am

ResearchMed wrote:
Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:06 am
http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fu ... le/2653029

Only 1 out of 159 medical student did all 11 elements of taking BP correctly.
Sure, they were med *students*.

But read the article, and think... were all of these things carefully done when you are at the medical facility?

Very few are done correctly, and the same incorrect things keep happening.
Not waiting after we've trotted down the hall.
Having patient talk/answer questions while taking BP.
Having arm in wrong position...
That's just for starters.
And we are at a major (top) teaching hospital, and it doesn't matter if it's the assistant, the physician, in the regular clinic or the ER.

Study co-author stated this about speaking with colleagues:

"‘If you can do a blood pressure correctly in my presence, I will buy you a dinner [at a] restaurant of your choice in Philadelphia.’ After 10 years, not a single person—resident, fellow, or student—ever could do it.”"

RM
Yep, my wife is really pissed at her doctors, nurses actually, consistently screwing this up and then getting yelled out by the doctor for not going on blood pressure medicine, which then elevates her blood pressure every time she goes in.

We have countered that by testing at home and creating a quality control chart (that time in industrial process control has paid off) to show the doctor. There actually was a "real" response associated with weight loss, which is supposed to be how this works.

I think it is pathetic that people have to be trained statisticians and study physiology on the side just to get the medical profession straight on the basics.

seashell
Posts: 106
Joined: Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:40 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by seashell » Fri Sep 15, 2017 8:06 pm

Thanks for your helpful suggestions!

Good Listener
Posts: 400
Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2015 5:24 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by Good Listener » Fri Sep 15, 2017 8:15 pm

I use the Omron. And when I go to shoprite I use the machine by Higi. Don't. It gives me a full sense of satisfaction as the pressures are usually 20 points lower and I emailed them and they say its good. Nonsense. I beg them to recalibrate and they always say they will or did but it's nonsense. The Omron is pretty good.

seashell
Posts: 106
Joined: Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:40 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by seashell » Sat Sep 16, 2017 4:35 pm

Thanks! That's good to know.

fauxden
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2014 11:15 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by fauxden » Sat Sep 16, 2017 8:48 pm

Another pharmacist checking in. Avoid wrist cuff. I generally recommend omron.

namekevaste
Posts: 37
Joined: Fri May 05, 2017 6:12 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by namekevaste » Sat Sep 16, 2017 9:44 pm

The Qardio BP monitor is controlled using a smartphone via bluetooth and stores all the readings in the app. This is a great tool to follow blood pressure measurements serially. You should pay attention to the size of the cuff. An inappropriately sized cuff (usually one that is too small) is a common cause for inaccurate measurements.

seashell
Posts: 106
Joined: Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:40 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by seashell » Mon Sep 18, 2017 2:41 pm

Thank you!

Is there a way to determine the right cuff size? Never even knew cuff size existed. How does one determine the best cuff size?

daveydoo
Posts: 951
Joined: Sun May 15, 2016 1:53 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by daveydoo » Mon Sep 18, 2017 3:21 pm

dbr wrote:
Fri Sep 15, 2017 11:19 am

Yep, my wife is really pissed at her doctors, nurses actually, consistently screwing this up and then getting yelled out by the doctor for not going on blood pressure medicine, which then elevates her blood pressure every time she goes in.

We have countered that by testing at home and creating a quality control chart (that time in industrial process control has paid off) to show the doctor. There actually was a "real" response associated with weight loss, which is supposed to be how this works.

I think it is pathetic that people have to be trained statisticians and study physiology on the side just to get the medical profession straight on the basics.
Realistically, most of these nuances serve only to reproduce the standardized BP measurements that have been done in the largest research studies. No need to get upset; the difference is likely to be very small in absolute terms. A delta of 1 or 2 mm Hg can have a huge impact across thousands of participants in a research study (or, if real, across a whole population) but it is virtually meaningless for any one individual. And no medication changes should be based on a single in-office blood pressure measurement, no matter how accurate you or your doctor pretend that it is. And there is of course no magic threshold above which BP medication is required -- there's a risk:benefit continuum. Recommendations have been in flux for decades with no signs of unanimity any time soon. What is becoming clearer is that a one-size-fits-all BP goal makes little sense. In terms of measuring BP, as long as your arm is supported and you're comfortable and have been at rest for a few minutes, that's pretty much all you need. If you're quite large, you'll need the large cuff -- but the cuffs are almost always marked so it's easy to see if it's too small for you. Making a BP check more complicated than surgery helps no one.

About your first point, many people have a paradoxical hypertensive response to one or more blood pressure-lowering medications. This tends to be a class effect and rarely if ever happens across multiple drug classes. At-home BP readings are important and generally guide therapy, but know that even pure white-coat hypertension (normal at home) associates with increased cardiovascular risk.

If many doctors keep telling you or your spouse that you have elevated BP, you probably do. That said, when my spouse recently had her BP taken with her arm held fully outstretched in front of her -- like an isometric exercise -- and the nurse was about to record in her chart what would have been by far the highest blood pressure she had ever had in her life, I politely asked her to re-check it with spouse's arm supported and it was in line with all of her other readings.

livesoft
Posts: 57156
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:00 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by livesoft » Mon Sep 18, 2017 4:34 pm

seashell wrote:
Mon Sep 18, 2017 2:41 pm
Is there a way to determine the right cuff size? Never even knew cuff size existed. How does one determine the best cuff size?
I would not worry about cuff size until after you use the standard cuff that comes with all these Omron devices. One size does fit almost all people with the exception of infants, skinny-armed people, and big-thick-armed people. I think everyone knows if they are one of these folks. For instance, if you have ever had your BP measured at a physician's office and they went and got a different cuff, that might be an indication that you will need to separately order a different cuff. See the instructions.

Actually this thread is now so old that you should have already bought a BP monitor at Walmart. How is it working out for you?
This signature message sponsored by sscritic: Learn to fish.

User avatar
Earl Lemongrab
Posts: 3094
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2014 1:14 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Mon Sep 18, 2017 5:02 pm

seashell wrote:
Mon Sep 18, 2017 2:41 pm
Thank you!

Is there a way to determine the right cuff size? Never even knew cuff size existed. How does one determine the best cuff size?
The specs usually list a range of arm sizes in circumference. You can then measure yours to see. As Livesoft says, most people will be able to use the normal one.
This week's fortune cookie: "You will do well to expand your horizons." Ow. Passive-aggressive and vaguely ominous.

wrongfunds
Posts: 915
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 3:55 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by wrongfunds » Mon Sep 18, 2017 8:44 pm

Can a medical professional comment on the repeat-ability of blood pressure reading? If I were to take three successive readings (after allowing whatever the refractory period prescribed in the medical journal), what would be the variance of those three readings?

I am guessing the best physician will NOT be able to get the readings within 5 i.e. the variation would be 5 or more. Please tell me I am wrong to make me feel better.

livesoft
Posts: 57156
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 8:00 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by livesoft » Mon Sep 18, 2017 8:54 pm

^I am not a medical professional, but I have BP monitor right here and can take measurements now. How many minutes apart do you want them?

I also think the variation in both numbers will be 5 or more, but that would depend on the numbers to start with. 100/60 will prob have less change than 150/85.
This signature message sponsored by sscritic: Learn to fish.

daveydoo
Posts: 951
Joined: Sun May 15, 2016 1:53 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by daveydoo » Tue Sep 19, 2017 12:54 am

wrongfunds wrote:
Mon Sep 18, 2017 8:44 pm
Can a medical professional comment on the repeat-ability of blood pressure reading? If I were to take three successive readings (after allowing whatever the refractory period prescribed in the medical journal), what would be the variance of those three readings?

I am guessing the best physician will NOT be able to get the readings within 5 i.e. the variation would be 5 or more. Please tell me I am wrong to make me feel better.
I have some knowledge of this area. It's not like measuring a board twice before cutting; there's a lot of intrinsic variability and it's not the skill of the operator that's the major factor, imo. There's also a bit of the Heisenberg principle here -- the act of measuring can change what's being measured. People tense up and get nervous, etc. One high reading can "make" the next one even higher. So it's not that people can't take BPs accurately. Even eating a snack or drinking a glass of cold water can have a major effect on BP. There is diurnal variation in BP -- it's typically highest in the morning in the unmedicated state, but because medication half-lives vary among patients and across medications, that pattern may not be present in any given person. It is recommended that people with hypertension or suspected hypertension measure and record their BP at various times of the day. Most agree that there is no need to take it more than once per day, but after a few weeks, you should have a good idea what it is in the AM, at noon, in the evening, and at bedtime. It's even potentially important (prognostically) to know what it is while you're sleeping, but for that you'd need a 24-h ambulatory monitor.

Hypertension causes harm in two big ways. Transient spikes can (rarely) cause or contribute to sudden blood vessel damage (strokes, dissection, burst aneurysm); however, most hypertension-related trouble is more a function of the "area under the curve" -- i.e., how many hours you've spent with elevated BP and how high it's been for each of those hours. That's where I think some people fool themselves. Just because you can achieve Zen-like calm thinking of unicorns and rainbows and thereby eek out a single "normal" BP reading, that may not be reflective of the rest of your 16 waking hours when you're stuck in traffic or berating subordinates :D .

This is not specific medical advice; I'm addressing a general question about measuring BP, and these are merely facts about blood pressure.

wrongfunds
Posts: 915
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 3:55 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by wrongfunds » Tue Sep 19, 2017 12:12 pm

Thanks for your detailed answer! It is my understanding that back to back blood pressure measurements are not allowed i.e. to say the immediate next measurement will be incorrect.

But even if taken after say couple of minutes, the next reading is off by at least 5 from the previous one. Is that accepted error band for the measurement?

What is the expected confidence interval for a typical blood pressure measurement when done when it is done "correctly"? 5? 10? 15? mm of Hg or in percentage of the "expected" reading?

daveydoo
Posts: 951
Joined: Sun May 15, 2016 1:53 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by daveydoo » Tue Sep 19, 2017 12:25 pm

wrongfunds wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 12:12 pm

What is the expected confidence interval for a typical blood pressure measurement when done when it is done "correctly"? 5? 10? 15? mm of Hg or in percentage of the "expected" reading?
I don't know the answer to this. I don't think there is an answer -- there is enormous inter-individual variability. Most would say "wait five minutes and re-check." That seems reasonable to me. So what was your "real" blood pressure? Who knows. It's better if it comes down after 5 minutes than if it doesn't. If you have to take it over and over to finally get a number you like, well, that's not so good, imo.

Again, it's not helpful to be too quantitative when doing this because it's not necessarily the measuring that is the source of the variation. Did you ever get on a super-accurate scale and see how your weight fluctuates with every heart beat? So how much do you weigh, to the nearest ounce? Who cares -- it's greater precision than is actionable. Watch your pulse rate go up and down as you watch your favorite TV show, all while relaxed and seated comfortably.

User avatar
mrc
Posts: 1019
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2016 6:39 am
Location: right here

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by mrc » Tue Sep 19, 2017 12:32 pm

+1 on the Heisenberg mention above.

My Omron can measure three times in a row, with 15 or 30 seconds between readings. Then it averages the results.


Edited: Removed text for getting too close to medical discussion
Last edited by mrc on Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
A great challenge of life: Knowing enough to think you're doing it right, but not enough to know you're doing it wrong. — Neil deGrasse Tyson

User avatar
Earl Lemongrab
Posts: 3094
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2014 1:14 am

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:00 pm

I would caution against discussing medical aspects as it is against the forum rules and could get this locked. I'd stick to features of the devices.
This week's fortune cookie: "You will do well to expand your horizons." Ow. Passive-aggressive and vaguely ominous.

User avatar
mrc
Posts: 1019
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2016 6:39 am
Location: right here

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by mrc » Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:05 pm

Earl Lemongrab wrote:
Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:00 pm
I would caution against discussing medical aspects as it is against the forum rules and could get this locked. I'd stick to features of the devices.
Agreed and I edited the above post.

To the OP: Any recent Omron arm cuff model is good. The wrist models are not reliable IMHO.
A great challenge of life: Knowing enough to think you're doing it right, but not enough to know you're doing it wrong. — Neil deGrasse Tyson

seashell
Posts: 106
Joined: Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:40 pm

Re: blood pressure monitor recommendations?

Post by seashell » Tue Sep 19, 2017 11:22 pm

Thanks to everyone who replied! Much appreciated.

Post Reply