Page 1 of 2

Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 9:28 pm
by Alexa9
Looking for a rack, barbell, bench, curl bar, and plates. Am I missing anything?

Mostly used for Deadlift, Squat, Bench Press, Rows, Dips, Curls, Pull-ups, Chin-ups, Overhead Press, etc. Am I missing anything?

Rogue looks very nice but you have to bolt it into the floor.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 10:11 pm
by A7las
I would look at Titan Fitness as well. They have similar squat racks and power cages to rogue at a fraction of the price. Same gauge steel etc.

The Titan X-3 does not need to be bolted down.

Check our Rep Fitness for their adjustable and flat benches.

I wouldn't go cheap on the bar, Rogue makes great bars. Just make sure you are getting the appropriate bar for the lifts you want to do Olympic lifts usually have more whip etc.

Also I highly recommend horse stall mats from tractor supply for floor covering. It reduces noise and protects your floor / equipment.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 10:22 pm
by TimeRunner
Set up a couple of sandbags. Start with 30 lbs and work up to 60. Sit on the floor and sling it over your shoulder. Now get off the floor and stand up. Repeat until you can do 100. Feel free to alternate shoulders.

Cheap and very effective. 8-)

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sat Aug 19, 2017 10:42 pm
by CFM300
Alexa9 wrote: Sat Aug 19, 2017 9:28 pm Rogue looks very nice but you have to bolt it into the floor.
Rogue has lot of half-racks that do NOT need to be bolted to the floor. The S-2 is probably their most popular. We have one and it does everything we need.

https://www.roguefitness.com/rogue-s2-squat-stand-2-0

We also have some Rogue barbells. A Rogue 2.0 men's bar and a women's Bella. Both are great all-around bars. We also have the Rogue Hi-Temp bumper plates because we do the Olympic lifts on exposed concrete. We've dropped from overhead thousands of times with no issues whatever.

I recommend Rogue highly. If you have specific questions, just ask.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 12:58 am
by 3dream3
Another slightly cheaper option is Body Solid. I have been using the following rack for a few years now and have been pretty happy with it. There is an optional lat attachment but I actually went with the separate lat machine... so that's another thing you might want to consider if you want to add more variety of exercises.

https://www.fitnessfactory.com/home/ite ... r2BuG.dpbs

I would have liked to either get a Titan, Rogue, or even Powertec rack but wanted to keep overall costs down. Plus, something to keep in mind is the ceiling height if you want to get a full rack.

I bought my rack, lat machine and some dumbbells from Fitness Factory as well since they're reasonably priced. I also have a Body Solid weight tree and dumbbell rack which I got off of Craigslist so you can slowly outfit your home gym by waiting for someone to sell their equipment. I did buy an olympic weight set from Dick's Sporting Goods when it was on sale. It is a nice starter set but now I'm looking to upgrade the bar and get different plates too.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 3:35 am
by whodidntante
If you are new to the powerlifts, it would be better to find a gym for the first year or two. It may not be something you stick with. Some gyms cater to powerlifters and they tend to be small and cheap. Some work like a coop and only a few people use the place. And there are knowledgeable people there who will give you advice you need when asked. I've competed in powerlifting meets and I've thought about going with a home setup, but in the end I just stick with a powerlifting gym. It will let you do a variety of accessory work without turning your home into a fitness museum.

You could buy a thick sheet of plywood and bolt the rack to that for added stability. That would be better than punishing your floor for deadlifts also.

Good equipment lasts decades and used equipment is good option. After the new->used drop it depreciates slowly. You can sell used equipment for much closer to what you paid for it. You may need to look for a few months to get a complete setup. Good power racks, bars, and benches, weights, etc. do not come cheap new. The cheapest stuff is a waste of money and space and may not carry the proper weight ratings. If you are seriously looking at new Rogue equipment, I'm guessing money is not too much of a concern.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 5:20 am
by Dude2
This thread is very motivating. Thank you.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 6:12 am
by FRANK2009
I bought this a few months ago for my home gym. No complaints but it took a while to assemble.

https://www.amazon.com/Deltech-Fitness- ... ch+fitness

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 6:18 am
by rigoodma
What about the wall rack from Rogue

https://www.roguefitness.com/rogue-rml- ... nEQAvD_BwE

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 6:34 am
by carguyny
You get what you pay for and if you care about safety and want to be able to make real progress check out elitefts.com - something like this https://www.elitefts.com/3x3-rack-with- ... bar-1.html

I've had mine for 9 years and other than some paint scratches it's still the same.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 7:06 am
by Smurf
I agree with the Titan Fitness recommendation. You get essentially the same rack as Rogue for 1/2 the price. I've had a T-3 for several years and love it. You will however need to bolt it to the floor or plywood to keep it from shifting. You can build a simple 8x8 platform with 4 sheets of OSB board ($40) and cover those with stall mats. Depending on the amount of weight you are lifting a simple stand alone rack from Craigslist will also work. Get what you want (not need) the first time and you'll never have to upgrade. With weight racks it's a true buy it for life item. Much smarter to over buy and love it, than buy a crappy rack and hate using it which will impact your desire to lift. In other words if you want the Rogue, buy the Rogue, don't settle.

I would start with:

Rack
Olympic barbell---Skip the curl bar
Set of bumper plates (expensive but so much better than steel and worth every penny).
Quick release collars
Horse stall mats for floor
Fan/Heater if in garage
Stereo
Motivation!

Once you're out there consistently you'll know what (if any) add on accessories you'll need.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 8:07 am
by afan
Remember that as a home gym the equipment will not be used for hours on end, day after day, by people who will abuse it. Gym-quality equipment has to stand up to this. If you lift an hour a day, that is only 7 hours a week. You don't need commercial equipment for that level of use. You can get by with something much lighter and cheaper. I went with BodySolid years ago and it is still in great condition. I use it every single day, but I am the only user.

Went with a Smith machine rather than a power rack. Not bolted to the floor, but perfectly stable.

If I were squatting with a power rack instead, where it were possible to get far off balance and perhaps knock it over, I would want it bolted.

Keep in mind that you will be alone, so forget about any exercises that need a spotter. Not even those that assume there will be someone around to notice if you get in trouble.

A good gym is great, but you are tied to it's hours and location. At home you don't have to worry about any of that. Always available.

I don't think the OP indicated and interest in powerlifting. That I would not do at home since squats and bench presses at maximum weights really require spotters. The variety of exercises mentioned sounds more like general fitness goals than powerlifting.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 10:06 am
by stoptothink
carguyny wrote: Sun Aug 20, 2017 6:34 am You get what you pay for and if you care about safety and want to be able to make real progress check out elitefts.com - something like this https://www.elitefts.com/3x3-rack-with- ... bar-1.html

I've had mine for 9 years and other than some paint scratches it's still the same.
A rack is a series of welded pieces of steel, it isn't complex. I've used some of the "best" (read, most expensive) equipment while working at olympic and professional training facilities: there is no functional difference and they'll all last decades for in-home use. Although I do have some high-end pieces (in total, our garage gym probably set us back more than our car), I got this https://www.fringesport.com/products/on ... ullup-rack on sale ($320 ish) a few years ago. I can squat and deadlift almost 3x bodyweight and have never had an issue. One recommendation I like is the TSC horse stall mats, they cover about half of my garage. I also prefer bumpers, but keep in mind that their width limits how much weight a bar can handle; if you intend to ever pull or squat over 500lbs., you'll need some steel.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 10:11 am
by harland
+1 on the bumper plates if you plan on deadlifting / cleaning / snatching on concrete slab. These will be pretty smelly at first so you might want to air them outdoors for a few days before bringing them indoors. I bought a set from FringeSport and they seem to be comparable to the ones from Rogue while being a little cheaper. You might also consider some fractional metal weights (1, 0.5, 0.25 lb) for micro loading. They might come in handy on the overhead press.

You also need spotter arms / rack for bench pressing. This is non-negotiable. There's no reason to lose your life over an exercise.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 10:27 am
by stan1
If you want a good deal look for lightly used equipment locally. People do buy this stuff, seldom use it, and then decide its taking up too much space in their home/garage or decide to move and figure its easier to get rid of it than move it.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 10:30 am
by TheNightsToCome
I purchased a heavy-duty, gym-quality leg extension machine, lat machine, incline and flat bench, and dumbbells in a line called Empire by Titan back in the early 90s. I'm still using them with no problems.

I purchased a Hammer Strength Iso-Lateral Incline Press (https://www.lifefitness.com/facility/pr ... line-press) and Iso-Lateral Front Lat Pulldown (https://www.lifefitness.com/facility/pr ... t-pulldown) in 2010. Great equipment. Still works good as new. I bought them because I had used them at my old gym.

The Hammer Strength equipment comes in sections that are bolted together. This makes it easy to move if you buy a new house. The Empire by Titan is welded and the pieces are difficult to maneuver through doors when moving.

Equipment like this will outlive you, so it makes sense to purchase used if you have that option.

Buying these pieces new was similar to buying a car; I negotiated with the salesmen. The sticker price is not necessarily the price you have to pay. I didn't.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 10:39 am
by timmy
deleted

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 10:42 am
by timmy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1oCcXvhujs

Jocko (ex Navy Seal) of the Jocko Podcast on outfitting home gyms. GO GET SOME! :twisted:

Someone mentioned above ... If you are new, try a gym for a year or two. I've been deadlifting and standing overhead dumbbell pressing for two years. I am looking (over the winter) to purchase home equipment so this is interesting.

Good luck.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:03 am
by timmy
If you are newer, you may question how much weight you should buy. Here is good site that shows what you can expect from each lift based on experience.

http://www.exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifti ... dards.html

These are averages. So if you are already yoked :beer

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:30 am
by afan
Hammer Strength equipment is great and I love using it if a gym employed when traveling has it. I would never get it for home use:

Very expensive. Maybe you could get a good price used if a gym is closing down. But even used, it is pretty expensive.

Takes up a lot of space.

Each piece let's you do only one exercise.

Get a rack or Smith machine with a pulley attachment and you have a large variety of exercises in far less space and much less money.

If you are not already doing consistent weight lifting at a gym I would not buy equipment for home. You run a high risk of spending a lot of cash and getting stuff you will not use. Only consider outfitting a home gym if you have been training at gyms for years and know the exercises you will do. Then you should also know how much weight you do with each exercise.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:39 am
by Alexa9
Thanks for the replies. I've also checked out https://forum.bodybuilding.com/ for more info. It is quite entertaining and informative. They have several different programs for increasing your lifts.
I'm not interested in bodybuilding but am interested in lifting for strength and health and find it much more enjoyable than jogging and I'm more likely to stick with it. I also would would much rather have a home gym than go to the gym.
Pros
-I'd use it more - can work out twice a day
-Can crank up the music
-No waiting, no driving to gym
-Just my family's germs
-Has almost everything I want/need
Cons
-There are a few machines at the gym I like that I'm not going to buy like the leg press.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 12:56 pm
by CFM300
The Hi-Temp bumper plates (which you can buy from Rogue and many other companies) do not smell at all, even when new. They are made in Alabama from recycled tires. They're indestructible. However, they are quite wide and as stoptothink said, you will not be able to load much more than 300# on the bar without using some metal. But metal plates are cheap and can be found on Craigslist, at Play It Again Sports, etc. Other bumper plates (like competition plates used in the Olympics) are thinner and have less bounce, but I wouldn't want to drop them on rough concrete.

If you're squatting and deadlifting, you have no need for a leg press. Squatting and deadlifting load your spine (a good thing) and require balance (another good thing). Leg presses do neither.

If you're just getting started, you could begin with nothing more than an Olympic barbell and some plates. With those, you could deadlift, clean, press, front squat, snatch, ovehead squat, row, curl, and more.

If you're new to lifting, you might consider investing in some coaching.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 1:52 pm
by tp_from_ks
Thank you for making this thread. After 2 years doing WOD / cross fit style workouts, I'm considering a home gym too. Probably will wait 2 more years given our garage is full. (So if you need to sell this stuff in the midwest, write back in 2019!)

+1 on TSC mats

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 1:54 pm
by timmy
This book offers a good approach ... "Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition"

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 2:11 pm
by Xyz214
Alexa9 wrote: Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:39 am Thanks for the replies. I've also checked out https://forum.bodybuilding.com/ for more info. It is quite entertaining and informative. They have several different programs for increasing your lifts.
I'm not interested in bodybuilding but am interested in lifting for strength and health and find it much more enjoyable than jogging and I'm more likely to stick with it. I also would would much rather have a home gym than go to the gym.
Pros
-I'd use it more - can work out twice a day
-Can crank up the music
-No waiting, no driving to gym
-Just my family's germs
-Has almost everything I want/need
Cons
-There are a few machines at the gym I like that I'm not going to buy like the leg press.
You mentioned "lifting in strength and health". But what do you want to lift? Your body or metal? I think you need to answer this first before you can decide what equipment to get.

I personally do bodyweight (calisthenic) exercises for upper body and weight lifting for lower body. At home, I have an S2 squat rack, olympic barbell and a gymnastics ring - 3 equipments that give me a good full body workout. People always assume I go to commercial gym based on my physique.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 2:22 pm
by PFInterest
got our equipment here. so far its amazing.

https://www.fringesport.com/

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 2:59 pm
by TheNightsToCome
Alexa9 wrote: Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:39 am Thanks for the replies. I've also checked out https://forum.bodybuilding.com/ for more info. It is quite entertaining and informative. They have several different programs for increasing your lifts.
I'm not interested in bodybuilding but am interested in lifting for strength and health and find it much more enjoyable than jogging and I'm more likely to stick with it. I also would would much rather have a home gym than go to the gym.
Pros
-I'd use it more - can work out twice a day
-Can crank up the music
-No waiting, no driving to gym
-Just my family's germs
-Has almost everything I want/need
Cons
-There are a few machines at the gym I like that I'm not going to buy like the leg press.
I started doing push-ups and sit-ups at 13, and began lifting at 14. I started purchasing gym equipment at 31 because my job was so demanding I had a hard time making it to the gym. With a home gym there is no commute, no wasted time. It's also a plus to choose the music or TV channel.

Good gym equipment will last longer than you will, so the amortized cost is low, but the initial outlay can be large. If you are not already a long-term lifter, think carefully before you take the plunge. Lots of people hit the gym in January every year but disappear by February.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 3:12 pm
by TheNightsToCome
afan wrote: Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:30 am Hammer Strength equipment is great and I love using it if a gym employed when traveling has it. I would never get it for home use:

Very expensive. Maybe you could get a good price used if a gym is closing down. But even used, it is pretty expensive.

Takes up a lot of space.

Each piece let's you do only one exercise.

Get a rack or Smith machine with a pulley attachment and you have a large variety of exercises in far less space and much less money.

If you are not already doing consistent weight lifting at a gym I would not buy equipment for home. You run a high risk of spending a lot of cash and getting stuff you will not use. Only consider outfitting a home gym if you have been training at gyms for years and know the exercises you will do. Then you should also know how much weight you do with each exercise.
Correct. It's expensive, takes up space, and each piece is designed to provide one exercise.

But it's great equipment!

If lifting has been an important part of your lifelong daily routine, then you want the best equipment. You don't want a subpar home gym because then you won't be satisfied working out at home. I spent about $2500 for my Hammer Strength machines (total for the two) and I'll enjoy them for the rest of my life.

I also spent about $2500 on my Empire by Titan equipment back in 1990. The amortized cost has been $92.59 per year, but I'll be using that equipment until I keel over. It's a trivial expense if you are a lifelong lifter.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:00 pm
by monkey_business
Rogue or Titan would be my choices for a rack. You mentioned doing dips, so whatever rack you go with, make sure it has a dip attachment built for it.

In terms of bolting it down, I'd recommend building a 8x8 foot plywood/stall mat lifting platform, and simply bolting the rack down to that. Alternatively, you could get free-standing squat racks like the S series from Rogue. With a free-standing one make sure it can take a pull-up bar attachment, and that it is not too low, especially if you're planning on doing weighted chin/pull-ups as the plates might hit the ground.

After that, get a good general purpose bar. Do not get a cheap junk bar. I personally use a B&R bar from Rogue, it is about $300. I think it has the best knurling of any bar I've used. It is perfect for all the slow lifts - squats, bench, deadlifts, and presses. If you are interested in doing serious Olympic lifting, you might want to get a whippier bar eventually, without a center knurl.

Next is a good flat bench. Rogue has one. It's good. Titan has one too. Have not used Titan's, but it is cheaper.

Last is plates, and they are the least important. If you don't care to do Olympic lifts, or are not worried about sound or floor damage, cheap iron plates work just fine. If you do have some of these concerns, and you're a serious lifter, make sure to get thinner bumper plates. The cheap bumpers are over 3 inches thick, and can fill up a bar quick.

Nice to haves would be a deadlift jack and a prowler. The prowler is a fantastic conditioning tool, and mixes very well with lifting, which is not easy to achieve. It allows you to essentially do weighted sprints, but will not make you sore or kill your lifting recovery. It is about $250 from Rogue last time I checked. Make sure you have space outside to run it on pavement. You can run it on other surfaces, but it can be brutally hard.

I also second the recommendation to read Mark Rippetoe's Starting Strength. Don't just look at random cites, get and read the actual book. It has the best material on the main lifts that I'm aware of.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 7:42 am
by Jamieson22
I got the Fitness Reality 810XLT power rack from Amazon for about $150 (goes on sale a LOT).
Bought a 300lb Olympic weight set from Dick's Sporting Goods for $179 (45lb bar + 255lb weights).
Replace bar from set with a CAP Beast bar from Amazon for $140.
XMark EZ curl bar for $80 from Amazon.
Have the Fitness Reality -X-Class adjustable bench which was $190 from Amazon. This bench is a tad too high for me on bench press so ordered a Titan flat bench for $110 direct from them.
Four 4x6 stall mats from Tractor Supply for $150.

Been doing Strong Lifts 5x5 for 3 months or so, started as complete novice. Bought app upgrade for $10.

This is a "budget" friendly way into lifting but certainly don't feel my equipment is lacking in any way. Will likely add some Black Diamond Prop bumps from Wal-Mart soon. Have heard they are made in same factory as Rogue Echo bumpers but are < $1/lb.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:26 am
by alfaspider
I have a setup from Get RXD that I like quite a bit.

http://www.getrxd.com/

The quality and design is along the lines of Rouge, though not U.S. made. Since they are local to me, it was almost half the price for a full setup- no heavy freight charges. I have the "Goliath" cage, which is good enough for my brother in law who competes in strongman competitions- though I only have ~400lbs of plates for him. No need to bolt it down. The optional removable dip attachment works quite well.

Another vote for bumper plates. They are so much nicer for deadlifts or olympic lifts. Only downside is they take up more space on the bar. Some people find the wider weight distribution makes it harder to hit PRs compared to standard plates. Also- if you are he-man, you can't physically fit more than about 400lbs of bumper plates on a standard bar.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:11 am
by simplesimon
I am so pleasantly surprised at the number of Bogleheads that lift with barbells!

+1 million with the Starting Strength recommendation. If you're not strong in the squat, deadlift, or press (standing/overhead press) then doing other exercises is a waste of time if your goal is to be a stronger and more useful individual. www.startingstrength.com

Plates: If you have time and patience, check Craigslist for iron. They likely won't be very accurate (weights can vary by a few pounds from the stated weight unless they've been calibrated during manufacturing). Otherwise https://www.adamantbarbell.com/ offers great value with their Troy calibrated plates. If you're looking for bumpers, then Rogue's fine. I don't think bumpers are worth it unless you're dropping the barbell from above your head or if you're not working on a platform.

Barbell: Rogue offers the best value here for the quality.

Rack: The Titan X-3 won't need to be bolted as it weighs something like 300lbs. But if you have a platform to lift on, bolt a smaller rack like the T-3 to the platform. The only benefit I see with a rack using 3x3 tubing vs 2x3 tubing is stability for fast pullups. It's unlikely you'll need to bail a squat from the top because you're smart enough to learn to use safety spotters or pin safeties appropriately. A stable, cheaper rack from Amazon will likely suffice, but if you think you'll want to upgrade in the future anyways, then Titan or Rogue.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:39 am
by stoptothink
alfaspider wrote: Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:26 am Another vote for bumper plates. They are so much nicer for deadlifts or olympic lifts. Only downside is they take up more space on the bar. Some people find the wider weight distribution makes it harder to hit PRs compared to standard plates. Also- if you are he-man, you can't physically fit more than about 400lbs of bumper plates on a standard bar.
The width of bumper plates does vary by manufacturer. Mine are from Fringe and I can load 455 (4 45s and a pair of 25s on each side) with a spring clip, but I did have to pick up some steel plates so I can get a decent pulling workout. FWIW, Fringe's wonder bar (which you can get on sale for ~$150), can handle well over 500lbs. for repeated usage (mine has), and it is still decent for olympic lifts.

If you are planning to deadlift, you'll want bumpers and mats. I absolutely do not dump weights when I pull, but even with TSC horse stall mats on my makeshift garage platform, my kids can feel and hear daddy doing "hulk smash" in the garage from their 2nd floor bedrooms.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:43 pm
by abuss368
I have a Lee Haney Gold Set all in one from years ago. Worked wonders and I moved insane weight with it in training for competition.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:45 pm
by timmy
simplesimon wrote: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:11 am I am so pleasantly surprised at the number of Bogleheads that lift with barbells!
+1

And Lee Haney ... he was a beast back in the day.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 10:10 pm
by getco
Alexa,

Many Bogleheads have mentioned Starting Strength. Mark Rippetoe has an excellent article on building out a home gym.

https://startingstrength.com/article/ho ... a-home-gym

-g

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 11:02 am
by themesrob
yet another vote for using Starting Strength as a resource. getco posted Rippetoe's article on how to build out a home gym, and it makes one of the points I was going to make -- the barbell is one of the things to spend money on. If you're looking just to have one bar, and your primary barbell movements are deadlift/squat/bench, I'd make sure it's a bar with center knurling. A lot of the olympic bars don't have it, and squatting a bar without center knurling is a bummer. The Rogue B&R (designed by, among other people, Rippetoe) or the Ohio power bar would be my choice.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 11:36 am
by c.coyle
Rippetoe is very good.

What works for me is keeping it as simple and as cheap as possible. Freeweights. An olympic bar, some olympic plates (bumpers are nice, but not necessary), a bench that can incline, a squat rack, and a lat machine. Body Solid and Fitness Factory Outlet are great economical choices. I've had their rack, bench, and lat machine for 20 years and they are like new. These simple components allow a variety of compound movements - lifts that involve multiple joints and muscles at once.

Then start with a simple, short, efficient Boglehead routine. A three compound lift routine, like a three fund portfolio: A push for your upper body, a pull for your upper body, and either squats or deadlifts for your lower body. Done. You should be out of the gym in under an hour. Do it consistently and you will slowly but steadily get stronger.

For example, bench press, lat machine pulldown, squat. Or, overhead press, low row on lat machine, deadlift. Done. You have worked your trapezoids, deltoids, biceps, triceps, pectorals, lats, and back with the two upper body moves. Squats and deadlifts, especially squats, work your quads, hammys, glutes, lower and upper back, abdominals, adductors and abductors, and all the little stabilizer muscles in your hips and torso.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:29 pm
by simplesimon
c.coyle wrote: Tue Aug 22, 2017 11:36 amThen start with a simple, short, efficient Boglehead routine. A three compound lift routine, like a three fund portfolio: A push for your upper body, a pull for your upper body, and either squats or deadlifts for your lower body. Done. You should be out of the gym in under an hour. Do it consistently and you will slowly but steadily get stronger.
My workouts take longer than an hour because of long rest periods, but the underlying point and analogy to a simple Bogleheads portfolio is a good one. I haven't done anything other than a squat, deadlift, bench press, press, or chin-up in over three years and little by little added weight to the bar. I'm bigger, stronger, and more "functional" than ever.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:55 pm
by monkey_business
simplesimon wrote: Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:29 pmMy workouts take longer than an hour because of long rest periods, but the underlying point and analogy to a simple Bogleheads portfolio is a good one. I haven't done anything other than a squat, deadlift, bench press, press, or chin-up in over three years and little by little added weight to the bar. I'm bigger, stronger, and more "functional" than ever.
Totally agree with this. The human body responds much better to heavy compound movements done through a full range of motion. Isolation and machine work are just not very effective.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:40 pm
by Triple digit golfer
I have done variations of Starting Strength and Stronglifts style workouts. The basic A-B-A, B-A-B 3 day per week full body routine, 3 exercises per day.

I have this and have been using it regularly (for the most part) for the better part of 5 years and it is awesome.

https://www.amazon.com/Powerline-PPR200 ... B000VLRVSC

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:16 am
by CFM300
themesrob wrote: Tue Aug 22, 2017 11:02 amsquatting a bar without center knurling is a bummer.
Unless you squat high-bar. In which case center knurling is irrelevant.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 2:34 am
by kellyfj
I'm shocked no-one has mentioned Kettlebells so far. I'm in love with KBs - they can really hit a nice sweet spot for cardio or work muscles in different ways from the traditional barbell/dumbell combo.

I have a gym membership ($21 a month) and it has all the usual gear - barbells, dumbbells, squat racks etc. and cardio machines so the basement gym I am creating is to contain everything else to add a bit of variety

1) Kettlebells - just got a 25b and 35lb to start and planning many more - I highly recommend Kettlebell Kings https://www.kettlebellkings.com/
2) Gymnastic rings - great for increasing range of motion and working stabilizer muscles you can't hit with machines

Coming next
3) Trap Bar - for heavy deadlifts, shrugs
4) Schwinn Airdyne bike for snowy days I don't feel like going out
5) Super Squats hip belt for squats at home without the need for a full rack https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005IE7G1E/re ... Izb1241KAG

You can get other ideas here
http://next-level-athletics.com/garage- ... ent-guide/

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:10 am
by gimmeshelter
I've really enjoyed working out with kettle bells at home - swings, squats and get ups. And the great thing is they are very minimalist on space, time & $$'s. I have only 4 and they sit in the corner of a small room.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:18 am
by rigoodma
+1 for Starting Strength. I use that and row for endurance. Great program with a number of different profram options

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 9:01 am
by themesrob
CFM300 wrote: Wed Aug 23, 2017 12:16 am
themesrob wrote: Tue Aug 22, 2017 11:02 amsquatting a bar without center knurling is a bummer.
Unless you squat high-bar. In which case center knurling is irrelevant.
I find it helpful for high or low bar, actually, in terms of the traction. Plus in a home gym, the center knurling is helpful to keep you centered during the setup in the absence of a mirror. but ymmv

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 9:03 am
by alfaspider
themesrob wrote: Tue Aug 22, 2017 11:02 am yet another vote for using Starting Strength as a resource. getco posted Rippetoe's article on how to build out a home gym, and it makes one of the points I was going to make -- the barbell is one of the things to spend money on. If you're looking just to have one bar, and your primary barbell movements are deadlift/squat/bench, I'd make sure it's a bar with center knurling. A lot of the olympic bars don't have it, and squatting a bar without center knurling is a bummer. The Rogue B&R (designed by, among other people, Rippetoe) or the Ohio power bar would be my choice.
As an alternative to knurling, you could just wrap the center with athletic tape. That's what I did with my bar- I prefer it to knurling for squats (especially shirtless).

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 9:08 am
by Pale Horse
Take the plunge and go with Rogue. The quality is superior to just about anything else available, and if for whatever reason you have to sell it, it retains it value much better than most other stuff (you'd be lucky to be able to give away much of other brand stuff).

There are many models that don't need to be bolted down. Also, I'd suggest a couple sheets of plywood and some 1/2" rubber and make yourself a nice olympic lifting platform. Simple and cheap.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 9:52 am
by stoptothink
kellyfj wrote: Wed Aug 23, 2017 2:34 am I'm shocked no-one has mentioned Kettlebells so far. I'm in love with KBs - they can really hit a nice sweet spot for cardio or work muscles in different ways from the traditional barbell/dumbell combo.

I have a gym membership ($21 a month) and it has all the usual gear - barbells, dumbbells, squat racks etc. and cardio machines so the basement gym I am creating is to contain everything else to add a bit of variety

1) Kettlebells - just got a 25b and 35lb to start and planning many more - I highly recommend Kettlebell Kings https://www.kettlebellkings.com/
2) Gymnastic rings - great for increasing range of motion and working stabilizer muscles you can't hit with machines

Coming next
3) Trap Bar - for heavy deadlifts, shrugs
4) Schwinn Airdyne bike for snowy days I don't feel like going out
5) Super Squats hip belt for squats at home without the need for a full rack https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005IE7G1E/re ... Izb1241KAG

You can get other ideas here
http://next-level-athletics.com/garage- ... ent-guide/
CFM300 and I have actually discussed this; we don't understand the kettlebell hype at all. Their functionality is limited, especially for the cost. Other than a swing, there are better (and cheaper) implements for every single thing you do with a KB. You will quickly progress past the point where a 25lbs or 35lbs KB is sufficient to induce overload, then you've got to buy progressively bigger and bigger ones and they are expensive.

Re: Weightlifting Equipment for Home Gym

Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 10:07 am
by simplesimon
stoptothink wrote: Wed Aug 23, 2017 9:52 amCFM300 and I have actually discussed this; we don't understand the kettlebell hype at all. Their functionality is limited, especially for the cost. Other than a swing, there are better (and cheaper) implements for every single thing you do with a KB. You will quickly progress past the point where a 25lbs or 35lbs KB is sufficient to induce overload, then you've got to buy progressively bigger and bigger ones and they are expensive.
Because humans crave variety and new things. I would throw TRX in here too.