Non-fiction bucket list

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Nectarineman
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Non-fiction bucket list

Post by Nectarineman » Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:26 pm

While I feel I have received a solid education, I somehow feel I have missed reading many life changing Non Fiction books.

As I hit 50 I wish I had read more great books in college and beyond and am now looking for suggestions from bogleheads on books that were extraordinary. Non fiction suggestions strongly preferred.

What GREAT non fiction should be on my bucket list?

DomDangelina
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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by DomDangelina » Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:31 pm

The Gulag Archipelago, by Alexander Solzhenitsyn
"Often the remedy causes the disease. It is by no means the least of life's rules: to let things alone." | Baltasar Gracián, S.J., The Art of Worldly Wisdom, Maxim 121

remomnyc
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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by remomnyc » Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:39 pm

Path to Power series and The Power Broker by Robert A. Caro
Sea Biscuit and Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
Truman by David McCullough
Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt
Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer
Freakanomics by Steven Levitt
Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell

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climber2020
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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by climber2020 » Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:41 pm

DomDangelina wrote:
Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:31 pm
The Gulag Archipelago, by Alexander Solzhenitsyn
Abridged or unabridged?

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by AlohaJoe » Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:41 pm

FWIW, I think that fiction is more "life changing" than non-fiction.

But to answer your actual question, here are some I've liked a lot

Democracy for Realists
In Cold Blood
A Room of One's Own
The Gulag Archipelago
The Better Angels of Our Nature
No Logo
What It Is Like To Go To War
We Wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families
Wild Swans
Hiroshima

DomDangelina
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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by DomDangelina » Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:45 pm

climber2020 wrote:
Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:41 pm
DomDangelina wrote:
Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:31 pm
The Gulag Archipelago, by Alexander Solzhenitsyn
Abridged or unabridged?
Preferably un.

As a warmup he can absorb S's famous and devastating 1978 Harvard Commencement Speech: http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeche ... arvard.htm
"Often the remedy causes the disease. It is by no means the least of life's rules: to let things alone." | Baltasar Gracián, S.J., The Art of Worldly Wisdom, Maxim 121

DomDangelina
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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by DomDangelina » Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:49 pm

I also strongly recommended this golden book:

Another Sort of Learning: Selected Contrary Essays on How Finally to Acquire an Education While Still in College or Anywhere Else: Containing Some Belated Advice about How to Employ Your Leisure Time When Ultimate Questions Remain Perplexing in Spite of Your Highest Earned Academic Degree, Together with Sundry Book Lists Nowhere Else in Captivity to Be Found, by James V. Schall
"Often the remedy causes the disease. It is by no means the least of life's rules: to let things alone." | Baltasar Gracián, S.J., The Art of Worldly Wisdom, Maxim 121

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by LadyGeek » Thu Aug 17, 2017 9:13 pm

This thread is now in the Personal Consumer Issues forum (book).

Update: Guidelines for acceptable topics in this forum can be found here: Personal Consumer Issues
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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by azurekep » Thu Aug 17, 2017 9:22 pm

The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben

You'll never look at a forest the same again.

Dottie57
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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by Dottie57 » Thu Aug 17, 2017 9:33 pm

I don't remeber the name but the author.

Shelby Foote wrote a three part history on th U.S. Civil War.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by ccieemeritus » Thu Aug 17, 2017 9:59 pm

If you are into military history, there's no substitute for the 6-volume "The Second World War" by Winston Churchill. It's also interesting from an "executive management / political history" perspective. How do you manage a major nation state during a world war?

Needless to say, it's not written by a "disinterested" party. And 6 volumes is hard to get through if you don't find the subject matter interesting.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by Emilyjane » Thu Aug 17, 2017 10:06 pm

"Guns, Germs and Steel: the Fates of Human Societies", Jared Diamond

Fascinating investigation of why world ended up looking like it does.
"Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance", Confucius

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by btenny » Thu Aug 17, 2017 10:33 pm

Talking Straight by Lee Iaccoca -- https://www.amazon.com/dp/0553052705

Just Do It by Donald Katz -- https://www.amazon.com/Just-Do-Donald-K ... merReviews

Where have all the leaders Gone by Lee Iaccoca -- https://www.amazon.com/Where-Have-All-L ... 3R0A6VBES2

Asset Allocation by Roger Gibson -- https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/asset-all ... diq=715081

Good Luck...

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by jebmke » Fri Aug 18, 2017 7:37 am

To Begin the World Anew: The Genius and Ambiguities of the American Founders, Bernard Bailyn
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by lightheir » Fri Aug 18, 2017 7:47 am

I never considered myself a history buff by a long stretch, but I've somehow managed to be inspired and read enough history nonfiction books in the past decade to be actually judge some.

Fatal Shore - History of Australia, one of the most entertaining yet scholarly histories I've ever read despite my otherwise lack of interest in the subject. Worth reading just to see how an outstanding history book can be done.

Civilization of the Middle Ages - Normal Cantor - Great synopsis of Middle Age history with lots of insights about why and how, not just a listing of historical events, used in some 2-year colleges as a primer, sets you up well to read anything else in the Middle Ages.

Guns, Germs and Steel - Dispels lots of racial myths and explains a lot of how luck and geography had to do with the West's political and military supremacy over time as opposed to racial supremacy

The Guns of August - Barbara Tuchman - Considered one of the best if not the best account of the start of WWI. This it the kind of book that isn't written anymore, meaning it doesn't pander downwards for audience accessibility. The numerous characters and players are thrown in immediately over the world stage, and if you're new to WWI, you'll struggle to keep up, but it's one of the rare books that improves with every re-read as a result. Widely cited by many politicians and even military leaders as required reading.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by jebmke » Fri Aug 18, 2017 7:57 am

lightheir wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 7:47 am
The Guns of August - Barbara Tuchman - Considered one of the best if not the best account of the start of WWI. This it the kind of book that isn't written anymore, meaning it doesn't pander downwards for audience accessibility. The numerous characters and players are thrown in immediately over the world stage, and if you're new to WWI, you'll struggle to keep up, but it's one of the rare books that improves with every re-read as a result. Widely cited by many politicians and even military leaders as required reading.
I have not read this one but Margaret MacMillan wrote an excellent book on the history of the pre-WW1 period and the runup to the war. She also wrote (ironically, before the pre-war book) an excellent book about the negotiations of the Treaty of Versaille.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by Raybo » Fri Aug 18, 2017 8:09 am

When I retired, I set myself the goal of reading The Story of Civilization by Will and Ariel Durant. It is 11 volumes of the entire sweep of history, up through Napoleon. Wonderful writing, deep research, great insights. About 10,000 pages. The best history lesson one can have. It took me several years to complete.

These books are readily available at libraries and now in audio. I bought them as a asset for $120.
No matter how long the hill, if you keep pedaling you'll eventually get up to the top.

lightheir
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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by lightheir » Fri Aug 18, 2017 8:12 am

I posted above already but wanted to add just as a personal preference -

I also would highly recommend reading a book about the Russian Revolution.

I recently read "October" by China Mievelle which is a recent retelling of it in historical novel form - I actually wouldn't recommend it (despite me truly enjoying it) as it's dense and hard to follow unless you're already well familiar with the cast of characters (of mannnny players).

However, in today's political climate, it's amazing to re-read about the idealism and democratic urges that a real people's rebellion against a king (tsar), and also a dark reminder of how even the best-intentioned can end up so far from their ideal at the end of their revolution.

Amongst the things that were championed in the early heady days of that revolution - women's suffrage, minimum pay, fair working conditions, minority rights, and many, many other things we hold dear in the US. It was truly shocking for me to see how hard the people tried at that time to achieve these things but how quickly it all unraveled in the course of world events beyond their country's control (WWII) and the onset of POPULIST leaders who quickly claimed power and then quickly managed to steer their base to the far extremist viewpoint, to the point of civil war then one of the worst despot regimes known to history (Lenin / Stalin.)

Seriously, if you read and digest one of the books about the Russian Revolution (they're all pretty dense, just by nature of the myriad events), you will be excellently equipped to have highly intelligent discourses on the pros and cons of our modern government, when the discussion inevitably turns to "what if we people did X or Y...." - turns out many of these things were done exactly in that Revolution where they tried nearly everything to give power to the people. Learning about this revolution was far more impactful on my understanding of current world events than anything I learned/read about WW1 or WW2, or any other 20-21st century history.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by pezblanco » Fri Aug 18, 2017 8:57 am

The Last Place On Earth: Scott and Amundsen's Race To The South Pole .... one of the best books written on the general subject of Antarctic Exploration in my opinion.

Burton and Speke .... even though it is "historical novel" is follows closely the known facts regarding the explorations by the two great explorers and their (bad) relationship in the search for the headwaters of the NIle.

Annapurna ... I think one of the greatest mountain climbing books ever written ... Herzog's account of the first climb of an 8000 meter mountain.

Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage ... the story of the great Antarctic explorer ... another great story of incredible courage and resourcefulness in the face of adversity.

Someone mentioned above Jon Krakauer's Into Thin Air which is just superb. Others by him that I loved were, Into The Wild and Under The Banner of Heaven also both excellent.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by Nicolas » Fri Aug 18, 2017 9:09 am

The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by William L. Shirer
De gustibus non est disputandum.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by lthenderson » Fri Aug 18, 2017 9:09 am

I've been reading non-fiction exclusively for the last 20 years and with the number of non-fiction books I have in my to-be-read pile, I think I'm good to go for at least another 10 years.

I think it is impossible to answer your question without knowing your interests. Saying that however, there are two lists that I've been working on that have considerably changed the way I think about the world around me.

100 Greatest Adventure Books of All Time (I've read about 80% of this list)
http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com ... randt-text

Reading a biography on all of our U.S. Presidents in order (I'm about 25% through this list)

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by fishmonger » Fri Aug 18, 2017 9:36 am

Another vote for Unbroken.

One of my favorite books of all time is Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World by Mark Kurlansky. A fascinating read that might change the way you think about the New World and how/why travel from Europe was possible. If you have any interest in fishing or world history, I would read this next

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by deskjockey » Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:05 am

A World Lit Only by Fire and The Glory and the Dream, both by William Manchester. The first is a very good introduction to the Middle Ages, and the second is an excellent narrative history of mid 20th century America.

Traffic, by Tom Vanderbilt. This is a very thought-provoking overview of transportation engineering and driving.

The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich. It's an excellent history of Hitler's Germany.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by Oreamnos » Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:52 am

I'm a non-fiction junkie (drives my wife crazy, as she's a pure fiction reader).

The one easy non-fiction read that I very often recommend and give away to lots of people is A Short History of Nearly Everything, by Bill Bryson. Several of his other books are great too.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by DomDangelina » Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:08 am

Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel, which has been repeatedly recommended, has been debunked by Nicholas Wade's A Troublesome Inheritance.
Last edited by DomDangelina on Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
"Often the remedy causes the disease. It is by no means the least of life's rules: to let things alone." | Baltasar Gracián, S.J., The Art of Worldly Wisdom, Maxim 121

DomDangelina
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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by DomDangelina » Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:11 am

Fascism: The Career of a Concept, by Paul Gottfried

The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression, by Jean-Louis Panné, Andrzej Paczkowski et. al.

Witness, by Whittaker Chambers
Last edited by DomDangelina on Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
"Often the remedy causes the disease. It is by no means the least of life's rules: to let things alone." | Baltasar Gracián, S.J., The Art of Worldly Wisdom, Maxim 121

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by abner kravitz » Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:24 am

Oreamnos wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:52 am
I'm a non-fiction junkie (drives my wife crazy, as she's a pure fiction reader).

The one easy non-fiction read that I very often recommend and give away to lots of people is A Short History of Nearly Everything, by Bill Bryson. Several of his other books are great too.
I'll second Bill Bryson. A Walk in the Woods and 1927 were other good books by him. Nothing real heavy, but entertaining.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by azurekep » Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:31 am

lightheir wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 8:12 am
Seriously, if you read and digest one of the books about the Russian Revolution (they're all pretty dense, just by nature of the myriad events), you will be excellently equipped to have highly intelligent discourses on the pros and cons of our modern government, when the discussion inevitably turns to "what if we people did X or Y...." - turns out many of these things were done exactly in that Revolution where they tried nearly everything to give power to the people. Learning about this revolution was far more impactful on my understanding of current world events than anything I learned/read about WW1 or WW2, or any other 20-21st century history.
Probably a combination of these books would give one a broad perspective.

* A Russian Revolution book (as described above)
* 1984 by George Orwell and/or Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
* Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon.
* Something inspirational like Unbroken

I haven't read any of them, but they seem like good creds to have under one's belt.

I'm curious though if anyone has actually read Gibbon's book. I cited it only based on reputation.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by DomDangelina » Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:39 am

azurekep wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:31 am

* Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon.


I'm curious though if anyone has actually read Gibbon's book.
Yes. It's of course interesting. Yet its fundamental premise was preemptively refuted, in devastating fashion, in Augustine's The City of God.
"Often the remedy causes the disease. It is by no means the least of life's rules: to let things alone." | Baltasar Gracián, S.J., The Art of Worldly Wisdom, Maxim 121

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by tj218 » Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:53 am

Any book by Robert Massie is enjoyable and a great page-turning read, he is focused mostly on Russian history but did a good one on the Naval Arms race and background to WWI as well. I would read that before Tuchman's Guns of August as you need to have some background to fully grasp her work.

Sticking with the Russia theme, Gulag by Anne Applebaum is a good thorough history of the Soviet Gulag system.

Erik Larson has some great non-fiction books. Dead Wake on the sinking of the Lusitania was his most recent.

Command and Control by Eric Schlosser is a gripping account of a near nuclear disaster during the Cold War. The Dead Hand (can't remember the author off the top of my head) is a chilling account about the systems in place to ensure nuclear destruction during the Cold War. This one will give you nightmares. For spy stuff during the Cold War The Million Dollar Man by David Hoffman goes into the process of recruiting a spy and how valuable one particular disenchanted Soviet led to huge policy changes. Also the Been McIntyre book about Kim Philby A Spy Among Friends was a page turner.

For more contemporary times, I enjoyed Coming Apart by Charles Murray and also Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance.
Last edited by tj218 on Fri Aug 18, 2017 12:10 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by mancich » Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:59 am

Oreamnos wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:52 am
I'm a non-fiction junkie (drives my wife crazy, as she's a pure fiction reader).

The one easy non-fiction read that I very often recommend and give away to lots of people is A Short History of Nearly Everything, by Bill Bryson. Several of his other books are great too.
+1 Outstanding book, he is a great author.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by Seqfish » Fri Aug 18, 2017 12:48 pm

+1 for Fatal Shore

West with the Night - an autobiography of Beryl Markham's upbringing in East Africa and experiences as a pioneering aviatrix and bush pilot. She was a beautiful writer.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by themesrob » Fri Aug 18, 2017 1:10 pm

DomDangelina wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:08 am
Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel, which has been repeatedly recommended, has been debunked by Nicholas Wade's A Troublesome Inheritance.
respectfully, "debunked" might be a tad strong -- Wade and his book were widely criticized by scientists in the field for misappropriating/misrepresenting their research. (See https://cehg.stanford.edu/letter-from-p ... eneticists). (I haven't read Guns, Germs, and Steel in 15+ years, though.)

I tend toward the narrative history genre. Two of my favorite recent ones:
Valiant Ambition -- Nathaniel Philbrick's most recent book, on Benedict Arnold. I thought I knew a fair amount about the American Revolution, but I learned a lot. Philbrick is a remarkable writer.
Conquerors: How Portugal Forged the First Global Empire -- Roger Crowley. A fast read, which really brought to life how a tiny country was able to have such an incredible reach

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by jdb » Fri Aug 18, 2017 1:48 pm

Interesting thread, lots of good recommendations, many of which I have enjoyed reading. And suggestions which I will be following up, already have ordered the Mungo Park book on his Africa exploration in 1790's and will be ordering the Kim Philby book, Spy among Friends. But for me the best books are those which I have read more than once for pleasure, and although have re- read lots of fiction there is a very short list of non-fiction and all written long ago. Herodotus, The Histories, Landmark Edition. And of course part of his observations turned out to be fiction but to his credit he acknowledged that he was passing on observations of others when could not verify facts. The History of the Decline and Fall of The Roman Empire by Gibbon, for me an 8 volume set, I like to peruse different volumes randomly from time to time, if for no other reason than to enjoy the footnotes and his digressions. And Francis Parkman, The Oregon Trail. You feel like you are accompanying the young Bostonian in his explorations of the Western frontier in the 1840's.
Last edited by jdb on Fri Aug 18, 2017 2:11 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by DomDangelina » Fri Aug 18, 2017 1:56 pm

In payment of a debt of gratitude to him, I must also recommend a new book by one of my former professors which is garnering rave reviews:

The Political Theory of the American Founding, by Thomas G. West

Related, here's an interview of him discussing a previous book:

https://www.c-span.org/video/?91741-1/v ... g-founders
"Often the remedy causes the disease. It is by no means the least of life's rules: to let things alone." | Baltasar Gracián, S.J., The Art of Worldly Wisdom, Maxim 121

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by celia » Fri Aug 18, 2017 2:01 pm

The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch and Jeffrey Zaslow.

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by wageoghe » Fri Aug 18, 2017 2:07 pm

deskjockey wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:05 am
A World Lit Only by Fire and The Glory and the Dream, both by William Manchester. The first is a very good introduction to the Middle Ages, and the second is an excellent narrative history of mid 20th century America.
I'm sure that A World Lit Only by Fire is very interesting and enjoyable, but much of its portrayal of the middle ages is considered outdated. I don't really have better suggestion for the middle ages, but I think it is useful to be aware of whether a history text is generally considered accurate or not.

The Arms of Krupp by Manchester is excellent.
The Emperor of All Maladies
Empire of the Summer Moon
Salt
Longitude
The Hunt for Vulcan
The Johnstown Flood - David McCullough
The Path Between the Seas - David McCullough
Atomic Accidents
In the Heart of the Sea
William Tecumseh Sherman - James Lee McDonough

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by ILnative » Fri Aug 18, 2017 2:40 pm

Two recent reads both by Nick Bilton

American Kingpin (about the Silk Road guy) - could.not.put.this.down very good

Hatching Twitter - also good, but not quite as compelling as American Kingpin

deskjockey
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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by deskjockey » Fri Aug 18, 2017 3:28 pm

wageoghe wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 2:07 pm
deskjockey wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:05 am
A World Lit Only by Fire and The Glory and the Dream, both by William Manchester. The first is a very good introduction to the Middle Ages, and the second is an excellent narrative history of mid 20th century America.
I'm sure that A World Lit Only by Fire is very interesting and enjoyable, but much of its portrayal of the middle ages is considered outdated. I don't really have better suggestion for the middle ages, but I think it is useful to be aware of whether a history text is generally considered accurate or not.

The Arms of Krupp by Manchester is excellent.
Since Manchester wrote A World Lit Only by Fire as a direct riposte to the prevailing trends in Medieval scholarship (which, to grossly oversimplify, take a far more favorable view of the Middle Ages and reject the value judgments about the era that Manchester makes), it is not surprising that his book has been fiercely criticized by academics. It does have some factual inaccuracies, but he succeeds in giving readers a taste of how life in Medieval Europe was nasty, brutish, and short, much like the inhabitants. It is this value judgment that most rankles Medieval academics, from what I remember from college. Their opposition to his views often degrades to personal attacks and a wholesale dismissal of his argument based on small errors (e.g.--"he claims peasants often were naked in the summer, which is not true for the region of Verona in 1123 [cites primary source indicating a peasant wore clothes during that summer], so the whole book is trash!"). To me, these criticisms read like some of the denunciations of indexing we're seeing from active fund managers these days--hyperbolic at best.

And thanks for pointing out The Arms of Krupp--it's a great read!

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by MichaelRpdx » Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:24 pm

Personal Favorites:
  • Practical Ethics - Peter Singer Try refuting his arguments for lots of mental exercise
  • A Pattern Language - Alexander et.al. musings on architecture in small bites
  • 1491 - Charles C. Mann Life in the Americas pre-Columbus
  • The Year 1000 - Robert Lacy and Danny Danziger life at the turn of the first millenia
  • A People's History of the United States - Leonard Zinn
  • The Stars - H. A. Rey
What comes to mind when pondering the question:
  • The Story of Civilization - Will Durant - 11 volume set. Western Civ foundation
  • All the Plato and Aristotle you can handle, perhaps from http://www.openculture.com/free_ebooks
  • Hero With 1000 Faces - Joseph Cambell
  • A text on geometry and trigonometry - which I did about 10 years ago, doesn't rank as a favorite though :)
  • An introduction to physical geography
  • Mythology collections - perhaps start with https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/search ... =mythology
  • A biography of a historical person you find interesting, Eddie Rickenbacher and Benjamin Franklin fascinated me in childhood.
That's a bit of a start. :D
and a "Yes! Yes!" echo to The Emperor of All Maladies
Be Appropriate && Follow Your Curiosity

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by Pranav » Fri Aug 18, 2017 5:05 pm

The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg
https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki

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Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by woof755 » Fri Aug 18, 2017 8:15 pm

Erik Larson's In The Garden of Beasts (1930s Nazi Germany from the perspective of the US ambassador to Germany), or Devil in the White City (serial killer at the World's Fair in Chicago)
"By singing in harmony from the same page of the same investing hymnal, the Diehards drown out market noise." | | --Jason Zweig, quoted in The Bogleheads' Guide to Investing

Oreamnos
Posts: 39
Joined: Tue Jan 07, 2014 1:27 pm

Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by Oreamnos » Sat Aug 19, 2017 12:33 am

MichaelRpdx wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:24 pm
Personal Favorites:

.
.
.
[*]A People's History of the United States - Leonard Zinn
[*]The Stars - H. A. Rey[/list]

LOL. Both of these are on my bedside table. Maybe it's a Portland thing...

iamlucky13
Posts: 1002
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2017 5:28 pm
Location: Western Washington

Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by iamlucky13 » Sat Aug 19, 2017 2:57 am

A few I'd like to add, not necessarily as priorities, but all worth reading:

* Undaunted Courage - Stephen Ambrose (about the Lewis and Clark Expedition)
* Lost Moon - Jim Lovell (usually sold as Apollo 13 after the movie came out)
* A Brief History of Time - Stephen Hawking
* Dave Barry Slept Here: A Sort of History of the United States - Dave Barry

Ok, I'm joking about the last one. It actually is a priority, but you could also substitute Jim Gaffigan's Food: A Love Story.

Either one offers a perspective on the United States no other author would attempt.

Since you said non-fiction preferred, but apparently not required, I might add War and Peace, which is fiction but expends a fair amount of effort on the historical and cultural context of the story.

iamlucky13
Posts: 1002
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2017 5:28 pm
Location: Western Washington

Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by iamlucky13 » Sat Aug 19, 2017 3:06 am

MichaelRpdx wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:24 pm
[*]Mythology collections - perhaps start with https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/search ... =mythology
It only scratches the surface, but my dad more less made me read a book on Greek Mythology in middle school, geared toward that age and illustrated. It might be a simple approach, but a surprising amount of it stuck with me.

I just tried to figure out what it was, and when I tried searching for "Greek Mythology" on Amazon, instantly recognized the 2nd hit. It's apparently still very popular and very well rated:
https://www.amazon.com/DAulaires-Greek- ... +mythology

It could be a good one to share with one's own children while refreshing yourself.

I see D'Aulaires also wrote one on Norse mythology.

gamboolman
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:32 am

Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by gamboolman » Sat Aug 19, 2017 12:15 pm

With The Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa
By E. B. Sledge

The Federalist Papers

Six Years with the Texas Rangers, 1875 to 1881
By James B. Gillett

Two Years Before The Mast
By Richard Henry Dana

A Rifleman Went To War
By: Herbert W. Mcbride

sherwink
Posts: 203
Joined: Mon May 28, 2007 9:48 am

Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by sherwink » Sat Aug 19, 2017 12:32 pm

Wedding of the Water
A Splendid Exchange
The Ascent of Money
Nothing Like it in the World

DomDangelina
Posts: 180
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Location: California refugee

Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by DomDangelina » Sat Aug 19, 2017 12:53 pm

Oreamnos wrote:
Sat Aug 19, 2017 12:33 am
MichaelRpdx wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:24 pm
Personal Favorites:

.
.
.
[*]A People's History of the United States - Leonard Zinn
[*]The Stars - H. A. Rey[/list]

LOL. Both of these are on my bedside table. Maybe it's a Portland thing...
Zinn's fashionable opus horribilis has been debunked. See, e.g.,

Zinn's influential history textbook has problems, says Stanford education expert http://news.stanford.edu/news/2012/dece ... 22012.html

Agit-Prof: Howard Zinn's influential mutilations of American history
https://newrepublic.com/article/112574/ ... an-history

Much, much more could be provided.
"Often the remedy causes the disease. It is by no means the least of life's rules: to let things alone." | Baltasar Gracián, S.J., The Art of Worldly Wisdom, Maxim 121

mountaingoatcos
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Aug 19, 2017 5:11 pm

Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by mountaingoatcos » Sat Aug 19, 2017 5:17 pm

2 books that changed my life are Feeling Good by David Burns and Forgive for Good by Fred luskin. Both of these books were very helpful to me to help reorder my thinking, and I think their ideas are important for anyone to master at any time, but the earlier the age the better.

It really helped me see that happiness is possible wherever I am with whatever I have. Hurts and grudges serves no useful purpose. Both books were helpful with doing exercises to help with my thinking.

Although neither is investing related, they are also very helpful for being able to stay the course and not feeling bad when the market goes down or you make a bad decision.

Oreamnos
Posts: 39
Joined: Tue Jan 07, 2014 1:27 pm

Re: Non-fiction bucket list

Post by Oreamnos » Sat Aug 19, 2017 10:22 pm

DomDangelina wrote:
Sat Aug 19, 2017 12:53 pm
Oreamnos wrote:
Sat Aug 19, 2017 12:33 am
MichaelRpdx wrote:
Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:24 pm
Personal Favorites:

.
.
.
[*]A People's History of the United States - Leonard Zinn
[*]The Stars - H. A. Rey[/list]

LOL. Both of these are on my bedside table. Maybe it's a Portland thing...
Zinn's fashionable opus horribilis has been debunked. See, e.g.,

Zinn's influential history textbook has problems, says Stanford education expert http://news.stanford.edu/news/2012/dece ... 22012.html

Agit-Prof: Howard Zinn's influential mutilations of American history
https://newrepublic.com/article/112574/ ... an-history

Much, much more could be provided.


Yup, read it with full awareness.

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