How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

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climber2020
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by climber2020 » Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:40 pm

We got lucky and had nice clear skies in eastern Tennessee. Definitely worth the drive and overnight stay to see this interesting event. We even saw a big group of birds go crazy and fly directly overhead when totality hit (photo here if anyone is interested: https://www.liteadventurer.com/great-am ... ipse-2017/)

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Nicolas
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by Nicolas » Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:48 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 6:51 pm
Nicolas wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 5:08 pm
...
The moon started its bite at the 1 o'clock position on the sun, but when it left the sun it did so at the 9 o'clock position. You would think it would've exited at 7 o'clock but it did not. Probably because the earth moved in its rotation during occlusion (?)

I'm ready for 2024!
Nothing changed due to occlusion. The moon moves as it always does. It's all in the geometry.

First, your perception of how you see the moon and the sun standing on the surface of the earth: Coincidence that sun and moon seem same size? | Space | EarthSky

Next, the moon's orbital plane is not aligned with the earth. From Wikipedia: Orbit of the Moon
There's an offset, so it doesn't cut through the sun in a straight line. Additionally, everything is moving in circles. It's not a line, but an arc.

Image
Thanks LadyGeek for the explanation. The movement of heavenly bodies can seem most mysterious and confusing to the casual observer like me. That's why they locked up Galileo.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by Dendritic Tree » Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:30 pm

We made a medium-length drive to the mountains of western North Carolina to see totality. A hot and sunny day... until the hour before and after the eclipse, when a thunderstorm popped up and blotted out the sky at precisely the wrong moment. I was so excited to see the sun's usually hidden magnetic field become obvious to the naked eye. It did get very dark, birds flew home to roost, and crickets and frogs chirped during totality, but we missed the main event in the sky thanks to the cloud cover. We did get to see some of the crescent both before and after with our eclipse glasses, but missed the diamond ring, Bailey's Beads, and of course the main attraction: the corona. We will definitely travel for the one in 2024! AT least we got in some great hiking and saw some amazing waterfalls while we were staying there.

oxothuk
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by oxothuk » Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:33 pm

We drove 250 miles to Wyoming to see it. 3.75 hours to get there, 8 hours (including lunch stop) to get back.

Well worth it.

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Nestegg_User
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by Nestegg_User » Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:54 pm

Hmmm... there's still traffic getting out of the area-- over 9 hours later :twisted:

We've got so much smoke from the local fires that the setting sun was red :? Thanks everyone for coming to the area (and not being crazy)... please drop your cash at the state line... to offset the costs of holding the event

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by rocket354 » Mon Aug 21, 2017 10:30 pm

Before today's Eclipse, I'd have probably said 30 miles or so. Luckily, I was in the path of totality, and just had to walk out front. After seeing that spectacle (total eclipse is a completely different animal than any partial, even high-90s), and even getting a pretty intense shadow band show on the ground for ~30sec before and after, I can say that unless I'm in the ground, I will be at the next total eclipse in the US (2024).

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by Miriam2 » Tue Aug 22, 2017 2:11 am

climber2020 wrote: We got lucky and had nice clear skies in eastern Tennessee. Definitely worth the drive and overnight stay to see this interesting event. We even saw a big group of birds go crazy and fly directly overhead when totality hit (photo here if anyone is interested: https://www.liteadventurer.com/great-am ... ipse-2017/)
Climber2020 - did you take that photo? It's quite incredible, beautiful, thanks for posting :happy

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Tamarind
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by Tamarind » Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:06 am

I saw it in Clemson. Some patchy clouds but nothing that interrupted the show. The corona is absolutely astonishing. I think I'll be traveling further to get another look at it in future. Bailey's beads are less visually impressive, but very cool if you know you are seeing light filtering through the topography of the Moon.

A lot of the most interesting effects, it turns out, aren't captured by photography.
- About 5 minutes before totality we were looking around all feeling strange, and realized our brains could not compute the drop in light levels with it being a sunny mid-day. Everything looked strange and washed out, but the shadows were crisp. The subjective experience is really odd.
- We saw crescent shadows under trees starting at around 25%, and I was expecting them. But it hadn't occurred to me that they would reverse shape after totality. :o
- The last 2 minutes before totality started, all the cicadas suddenly started yelling like mad, then quit during totality, then started up again for a minute as the light returned.

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climber2020
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by climber2020 » Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:09 am

Miriam2 wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 2:11 am
climber2020 wrote: We got lucky and had nice clear skies in eastern Tennessee. Definitely worth the drive and overnight stay to see this interesting event. We even saw a big group of birds go crazy and fly directly overhead when totality hit (photo here if anyone is interested: https://www.liteadventurer.com/great-am ... ipse-2017/)
Climber2020 - did you take that photo? It's quite incredible, beautiful, thanks for posting :happy
I did - thank you for the compliment! I'm a big photo guy, but I promised myself I would spend no more than a total of 15 seconds taking pictures so I wouldn't deprive myself of the moment. I shot off 4 quick snaps, put the camera in my pocket, and enjoyed the show.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse? ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

Post by Sheepdog » Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:13 am

The eclipse viewing was starting out promising. It was supposed to reach 95% coverage here. As I viewed it with my pin hole viewer, the coverage reached about 75% when the grey clouds rolled in....disappointing. As time progressed it got darker though....crickets chirped, a flock of blackbirds flew overhead and our yard birds and squirrels left for their nests, I guess, as they were not in sight.
About an hour and a half later...about 4 to 4:30 pm or so... I took my Old English Sheepdog for a walk in the neighborhood. She is a strange one in that she shows no interest in other dogs or people. (She is a rescue dog, a back yard breeder victim, which never learned to socialize. She is friendly, though, to other people and animals, but just not demonstrative.) Well, as we walked along, a strange happening occurred. A very young raccoon, only about 10 inches long, not including the fluffy tail, was walking in a house front yard toward us. A raccoon that young would normally be with their mother, but this one wasn't. It was very bright outside then. Why would a raccoon, a nocturnal animal, be walking out then? Well, I stopped and watched. The little guy kept coming toward us. I couldn't believe it. He walked out into the street, came up to my Sheepie, who had no interest in the whole thing, smelled her leg, turned and walked away briskly, but not running, down the street toward another house's lawn.
I can only surmise the little guy got separated from it's mother and possible siblings, during the eclipse, was trying to find her and thought my Sheepie could be her. What a surprise, but a special moment when a wild animal would come up to a human being and dog with no fear. And, my OES could not have cared less as she wouldn't even look at it. :shock:
It's not what you gather, but what you scatter which tells what kind of life you have lived---Helen Walton

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by scooterdog » Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:36 am

catdude wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 1:09 pm
itstoomuch wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 1:02 pm
It is worth it.
Salem OR.
+100
+100

The boys and I made the 660-mile trip from Maryland to Nashville Tennessee on Sunday. (Yes, we did something of a 'power trip' by leaving around 4am, and not stopping for long along the way. Pulled in around 2pm, a 10h ride.)
Yesterday we hung out at the Triple Creek State Park in Gallatin TN, about 45 minutes NE of Nashville, where there was a music stage and a few thousand on hand to witness the eclipse.
Hard to capture the corona, the professional photographs online even do not do it justice. Here's a short clip, the best my iPhone 6 could do. https://dyuzuki.wistia.com/medias/q4c861guy4

Totality was not as dark as I expected. It was glowing orange/red on the horizon.

But the surface of the moon was straight out of a Sci-Fi movie. Think of the rippled surface of the moon being illuminated from the side - with a glorious corona all around it. Hard to describe and photos cannot capture it (IMHO it is the brightness of the corona and the very dark surface effect on the inside.) And gasps and shouts from people all around. Some people wept.

It was like the moon was going to explode - like it was boiling. You could not help but stare and gasp. And just like that, the 'diamond ring' appears, and then a moment later the arc of the sun appears again (and the glasses come back on).

Totally worth all the work and effort getting here. A long slog getting out of Eastern TN but so it goes, it took something like 7.5h to get to where we wanted to travel for the evening, which normally would have been 3.5h. Pulled in late and yes everybody was pretty tired but still completely worth it.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by gailwinters » Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:39 am

Tamarind wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:06 am
I saw it in Clemson. Some patchy clouds but nothing that interrupted the show. The corona is absolutely astonishing. I think I'll be traveling further to get another look at it in future. Bailey's beads are less visually impressive, but very cool if you know you are seeing light filtering through the topography of the Moon.

A lot of the most interesting effects, it turns out, aren't captured by photography.
- About 5 minutes before totality we were looking around all feeling strange, and realized our brains could not compute the drop in light levels with it being a sunny mid-day. Everything looked strange and washed out, but the shadows were crisp. The subjective experience is really odd.
- We saw crescent shadows under trees starting at around 25%, and I was expecting them. But it hadn't occurred to me that they would reverse shape after totality. :o
- The last 2 minutes before totality started, all the cicadas suddenly started yelling like mad, then quit during totality, then started up again for a minute as the light returned.
Our experience in Dayton, TN was the same as yours, right down to the cicadas, although we had zero clouds. Our darkness level at totality was similar to late twilight.

The corona really is astonishing, and the diamond ring was incredible. I am so glad I had the opportunity to experience such an amazing event.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by bertilak » Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:12 pm

I'm in a 75% (approx) location. I figured that was enough fun so my travel was limited to stepping out onto the driveway. It was an interesting thing to see. Two surprises:
  • Even at 75% blockage the outdoors was still blazingly bright. My thought was, we have a lot more sun than we really need!
  • The newspaper had a long complicated procedure for using azimuth and elevation to locate the position of the sun for viewing. WHAT! people can't find the sun without help? Those same simpletons can follow that complex discussion? Makes me wonder if I'm the one who doesn't understand. Anyway, I was able to find the sun -- even ignoring those instructions and with those super-dark glasses.
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by Miriam2 » Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:25 pm

Tamarind wrote: A lot of the most interesting effects, it turns out, aren't captured by photography.
- About 5 minutes before totality we were looking around all feeling strange, and realized our brains could not compute the drop in light levels with it being a sunny mid-day. Everything looked strange and washed out, but the shadows were crisp. The subjective experience is really odd.
- We saw crescent shadows under trees starting at around 25%, and I was expecting them. But it hadn't occurred to me that they would reverse shape after totality. :o
South Florida here 8-)
I noticed the same effects all around that Tamarind described. I didn't look at the sun (no protective glasses), but between 2:00-3:00 pm my garden was strangely ethereal. The light was yellow and the air was heavy, no breeze, no sounds, no birds. Never got very dark, more like twilight.

And the shadows of oak leaves and palm fronds were very different from normal shadows. Normal shadows are big splotches of dark on light ground, but these shadows were striking - each individual oak leaf, each little branch, each flower, each feather of a palm frond outlined clearly in dark on the light ground and driveway. It was quite different, I felt instinctively a bit apprehensive.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by an_asker » Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:28 pm

LadyGeek wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 6:51 pm
Nicolas wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 5:08 pm
...
The moon started its bite at the 1 o'clock position on the sun, but when it left the sun it did so at the 9 o'clock position. You would think it would've exited at 7 o'clock but it did not. Probably because the earth moved in its rotation during occlusion (?)

I'm ready for 2024!
Nothing changed due to occlusion. The moon moves as it always does. It's all in the geometry.

First, your perception of how you see the moon and the sun standing on the surface of the earth: Coincidence that sun and moon seem same size? | Space | EarthSky

Next, the moon's orbital plane is not aligned with the earth. From Wikipedia: Orbit of the Moon
There's an offset, so it doesn't cut through the sun in a straight line. Additionally, everything is moving in circles. It's not a line, but an arc.

Image
Though I'm pretty good in 2D geometry, I'm bad with spatial geometry :-( So, you might need to explain this multiple times for me to get it. The earth rotates towards the East. Once every 24 hours. The moon tames 27 days to go around the earth, so there is no way, whichever direction it revolves around the earth, that it can overtake the earth's rotation. Then how come the eclipse starts in the west and ends in the east?

PS: In response to OP's query, this time my answer is about 600 miles (give or take a few) - from Central Florida to Clemson, SC! Though it was underwhelming (I didn't see even one star or planet during totality and the sky was just about like twilight), it was still fun.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by an_asker » Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:34 pm

bertilak wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:12 pm
I'm in a 75% (approx) location. I figured that was enough fun so my travel was limited to stepping out onto the driveway. It was an interesting thing to see. Two surprises:
  • Even at 75% blockage the outdoors was still blazingly bright. My thought was, we have a lot more sun than we really need!
  • The newspaper had a long complicated procedure for using azimuth and elevation to locate the position of the sun for viewing. WHAT! people can't find the sun without help? Those same simpletons can follow that complex discussion? Makes me wonder if I'm the one who doesn't understand. Anyway, I was able to find the sun -- even ignoring those instructions and with those super-dark glasses.
Re: Item #1: That is so true!

In Clemson, I saw a graphic about what an eclipsed sun is equivalent to. Let me explain (with made up numbers - I didn't note down the numbers from the graphic): for instance, 50% eclipsed sun = typical normal sun in Jupiter, 25% eclipsed sun = typical normal sun in Saturn, etc. Anyone have the correct number info? I would love to see them.

Re: item #2: That was probably for folks with telescopes (I'm not one of them, so cannot confirm!) - for the modern types, that information is helpful I would think.

PS: 75% is not enough. If time and money are not a factor, you need to make the trip to totality!

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by bertilak » Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:43 pm

an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:34 pm
PS: 75% is not enough. If time and money are not a factor, you need to make the trip to totality!
You are right. If I hadn't known ahead of time I might not have noticed anything.
May neither drought nor rain nor blizzard disturb the joy juice in your gizzard. -- Squire Omar Barker, the Cowboy Poet

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by an_asker » Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:53 pm

scooterdog wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:36 am
catdude wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 1:09 pm
itstoomuch wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 1:02 pm
It is worth it.
Salem OR.
+100
+100

The boys and I made the 660-mile trip from Maryland to Nashville Tennessee on Sunday. (Yes, we did something of a 'power trip' by leaving around 4am, and not stopping for long along the way. Pulled in around 2pm, a 10h ride.)
Yesterday we hung out at the Triple Creek State Park in Gallatin TN, about 45 minutes NE of Nashville, where there was a music stage and a few thousand on hand to witness the eclipse.
Hard to capture the corona, the professional photographs online even do not do it justice. Here's a short clip, the best my iPhone 6 could do. https://dyuzuki.wistia.com/medias/q4c861guy4

Totality was not as dark as I expected. It was glowing orange/red on the horizon.

But the surface of the moon was straight out of a Sci-Fi movie. Think of the rippled surface of the moon being illuminated from the side - with a glorious corona all around it. Hard to describe and photos cannot capture it (IMHO it is the brightness of the corona and the very dark surface effect on the inside.) And gasps and shouts from people all around. Some people wept.

It was like the moon was going to explode - like it was boiling. You could not help but stare and gasp. And just like that, the 'diamond ring' appears, and then a moment later the arc of the sun appears again (and the glasses come back on).

Totally worth all the work and effort getting here. A long slog getting out of Eastern TN but so it goes, it took something like 7.5h to get to where we wanted to travel for the evening, which normally would have been 3.5h. Pulled in late and yes everybody was pretty tired but still completely worth it.
I think the main advantage of the iPhone is, in this case, its main disadvantage - its ability to take good photos at low lighting conditions! Here are three photos I took in sequence (yes, the one with the white ball is actually the Sun in totality!!). The sun is so bright that unless you zoom in close, the camera (Canon SX510, which does not fare as well as the iPhone in low-light conditions) is unable to figure out that it is being blocked by the moon.

Image

Image

Image

One thing is for sure - the talk about how dark it gets during totality is still overblown. I, for one, didn't see the stars I was expecting to see, just like in a normal night sky which is what I'd been given to understand.

As for my travel times - I took the backroads to go up to Spartanburg and it took me about 10 hours. On 20th, I left at 4:45 am and reached at 2:30 pm. The time that I took was not because of traffic, but because of the speed limit on roads and because I did not hurry more than I should. On the return, it took us about two hours from Clemson to the Spartanburg suburbs where I was staying with my host friend. I left Spartanburg at about 7:00 pm and reached Central Florida by abou 3:15 am. On I-26 and I-95 throughout, with minimal stops. Would've been even faster by about 30 minutes had I not encountered stop and go traffic 40 miles north of the Georgia border in SC. Once the road became three lanes upon entering GA, traffic was smooth once more, in spite of the occasional Kings of the Road who go slower than the speed limit on the left lane, and the parallelers who occupy each lane, going at identical speeds!

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by bertilak » Tue Aug 22, 2017 2:13 pm

an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:53 pm
... Kings of the Road who go slower than the speed limit on the left lane, and the parallelers who occupy each lane, going at identical speeds!
They are making sure you drive safely. Who set those dangerously high speed limits anyway?

It's for your own good but mostly for the good of the community. If they let you go whizzing by it will set a bad example for everybody else. Think of the children.

You shouldn't need to be told. :happy
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by artthomp » Tue Aug 22, 2017 2:13 pm

We watched the eclipse from our front yard - totality lasted about 1.5 minutes!
Art

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by mega317 » Tue Aug 22, 2017 3:55 pm

an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:28 pm
Then how come the eclipse starts in the west and ends in the east?
The sun "moves" east to west, the moon "moves" west to east, so the moon first touches the western edge of the sun and exits the eastern edge. (The motion is relative to spinning observers. If the earth stopped spinning you would appreciate the moon moving west to east slowly across the truly stationary sun.)
Edited for clarify (hopefully!)
Last edited by mega317 on Tue Aug 22, 2017 4:02 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by 123 » Tue Aug 22, 2017 3:59 pm

Due to extensive cloud cover near the California coast Monday morning (8/21/17) we had to drive 50 miles inland to find clear skies for an eclipse view with above 75% coverage. It was worth the mileage.
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Tue Aug 22, 2017 4:02 pm

artthomp wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 2:13 pm
We watched the eclipse from our front yard - totality lasted about 1.5 minutes!
I wasn't far from you, visiting family in Kirkwood, about a 30-minute drive for me. The weather forecast had been pretty rough the previous night, it was really clear where we were.

Also about 1:30 totality. Really amazing, more so than I thought. A very nice corona. Those who think it's the same watching on TV, no.
This week's fortune cookie: "Your financial life will be secure and beneficial." So I got that going for me, which is nice.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by bertilak » Tue Aug 22, 2017 4:03 pm

mega317 wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 3:55 pm
an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:28 pm
Then how come the eclipse starts in the west and ends in the east?
The sun "moves" east to west, the moon "moves" west to east (but very very slowly so you can ignore it for purposes of understanding if you want), so the moon first touches the western edge of the sun and exits the eastern. But really the sun is "moving" east to west behind a nearly "stationary" moon. (All motion relative to spinning observers. If the earth stopped spinning you would indeed appreciate the moon moving west to east slowly across the moon.)
Exactly. But perhaps one should add that as the sun "moves" east to west he shadow will move in the opposite direction. You can try it (or imagine it) using a flashlight (sun) and your fist (moon). Use the flashlight to make a shadow of your fist on a wall (earth) then move the flashlight to the left. The shadow will move to the right.
May neither drought nor rain nor blizzard disturb the joy juice in your gizzard. -- Squire Omar Barker, the Cowboy Poet

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by bs010101 » Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:01 pm

Drove about 1500 miles round trip. We were rewarded with perfectly clear skies outside Greenville, SC. Totally worth it!

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by an_asker » Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:15 pm

mega317 wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 3:55 pm
an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:28 pm
Then how come the eclipse starts in the west and ends in the east?
The sun "moves" east to west, the moon "moves" west to east, so the moon first touches the western edge of the sun and exits the eastern edge. (The motion is relative to spinning observers. If the earth stopped spinning you would appreciate the moon moving west to east slowly across the truly stationary sun.)
Edited for clarify (hopefully!)
I'm sorry my question was not clear. Why/how did folks on the west coast see the eclipse before folks on the east coast did?

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by an_asker » Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:20 pm

bertilak wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 4:03 pm
mega317 wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 3:55 pm
an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:28 pm
Then how come the eclipse starts in the west and ends in the east?
The sun "moves" east to west, the moon "moves" west to east (but very very slowly so you can ignore it for purposes of understanding if you want), so the moon first touches the western edge of the sun and exits the eastern. But really the sun is "moving" east to west behind a nearly "stationary" moon. (All motion relative to spinning observers. If the earth stopped spinning you would indeed appreciate the moon moving west to east slowly across the moon.)
Exactly. But perhaps one should add that as the sun "moves" east to west he shadow will move in the opposite direction. You can try it (or imagine it) using a flashlight (sun) and your fist (moon). Use the flashlight to make a shadow of your fist on a wall (earth) then move the flashlight to the left. The shadow will move to the right.
OK, here is why it does not make sense to me. Keep the flashlight (sun) is stationery. Hold a volleyball some distance away so that the flashlight shines on it. Set a small ball to represent the moon some distance between those two. Now, rotate the volleyball in one direction. Won't the direction that the ball is rotating toward get the shadow first? I'm assuming that relative to the rotation of the earth, the revolution of the moon around the earth and that of the earth around the sun are insignificant enough to ignore those motions.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by jimmyq » Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:28 pm

Well, not everyone can be a winner. I drove 300 miles to get in the path of totality, only to see clouds roll in before the eclipse. I caught a glimpse of the sun twice when it peaked through clouds before totality, but then the clouds filled up the sky and started leaking. I still think it was worth the effort and I will try again in 2024, but it just wasn't in the cards for me this time around.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by bertilak » Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:26 pm

an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:20 pm
OK, here is why it does not make sense to me. Keep the flashlight (sun) is stationery. Hold a volleyball some distance away so that the flashlight shines on it. Set a small ball to represent the moon some distance between those two. Now, rotate the volleyball in one direction. Won't the direction that the ball is rotating toward get the shadow first? I'm assuming that relative to the rotation of the earth, the revolution of the moon around the earth and that of the earth around the sun are insignificant enough to ignore those motions.
Well, now you're making me wonder! My analogy fails because moving the flashlight moves it with respect to both the large and the small balls, but in actuality the relative motion is only (well, primarily) between the sun and the spinning earth. So yes! The universe is messed up! the shadow should move from east to west but moves in the opposite direction! Call Rod Serling!
May neither drought nor rain nor blizzard disturb the joy juice in your gizzard. -- Squire Omar Barker, the Cowboy Poet

letsgobobby
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by letsgobobby » Tue Aug 22, 2017 7:36 pm

an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:15 pm
mega317 wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 3:55 pm
an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:28 pm
Then how come the eclipse starts in the west and ends in the east?
The sun "moves" east to west, the moon "moves" west to east, so the moon first touches the western edge of the sun and exits the eastern edge. (The motion is relative to spinning observers. If the earth stopped spinning you would appreciate the moon moving west to east slowly across the truly stationary sun.)
Edited for clarify (hopefully!)
I'm sorry my question was not clear. Why/how did folks on the west coast see the eclipse before folks on the east coast did?
I'm no expert but the answer may be more easily understood if you imagine yourself at an altitude of, say, 50,000 feet. From that altitude, what you'll see is a relatively small shadow cast by the moon on the earth. The precise location of the shadow changes depending on the precise location of the moon and sun. In this case, the moon was in such a place that it first cast its shadow on Oregon. The location of the shadow is not static because the locations of both the sun and the moon are changing constantly. In this case the shadow traveled west to east. In some cases it travels north to sound, or in a sweeping curve. There's no reason at all that a total eclipse should start on the east coast and travel west.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by LeeMKE » Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:03 pm

Well, not everyone can be a winner. I drove 300 miles to get in the path of totality, only to see clouds roll in before the eclipse. I caught a glimpse of the sun twice when it peaked through clouds before totality, but then the clouds filled up the sky and started leaking. I still think it was worth the effort and I will try again in 2024, but it just wasn't in the cards for me this time around.
Me too. You must have been in Carbondale with me and 14,000 others who got to see double diamond rings, but no corona. Nuts.
The mightiest Oak is just a nut who stayed the course.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by bertilak » Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:10 pm

bertilak wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:26 pm
an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:20 pm
OK, here is why it does not make sense to me. Keep the flashlight (sun) is stationery. Hold a volleyball some distance away so that the flashlight shines on it. Set a small ball to represent the moon some distance between those two. Now, rotate the volleyball in one direction. Won't the direction that the ball is rotating toward get the shadow first? I'm assuming that relative to the rotation of the earth, the revolution of the moon around the earth and that of the earth around the sun are insignificant enough to ignore those motions.
Well, now you're making me wonder! My analogy fails because moving the flashlight moves it with respect to both the large and the small balls, but in actuality the relative motion is only (well, primarily) between the sun and the spinning earth. So yes! The universe is messed up! the shadow should move from east to west but moves in the opposite direction! Call Rod Serling!
OK! I think I've got it. It is a mistake to think that the Earth's rotation dominates. For the moment picture a non-rotating Earth and a stationary sun. As the Moon passes before the sun, it's shadow moves across the earth, but at a much faster rate than the Moon itself is moving! Again, picture a ball moving slowly past a stationary flashlight. Ponder that then read on ...

The Earth's surface is a long way from the Moon so the Moon's shadow moves across the earth relatively quickly, but in what direction? Well the Moon and the Earth's surface are both moving in the same west-to-east direction so the Moon's shadow also moves west to east.

Now put the Earth's rotation back in motion and the question becomes, which is moving faster -- the Earth's surface or the Moon's shadow? We could do some math but we know the answer by observation -- the Moon's shadow wins the race.

Bottom line, we need to compare the speed of the Earth's rotation (sorta fast) to the speed of the Moon's shadow (faster) not to the speed of the Moon itself (slow).
May neither drought nor rain nor blizzard disturb the joy juice in your gizzard. -- Squire Omar Barker, the Cowboy Poet

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wander
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by wander » Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:15 pm

I did not travel anywhere for the eclipse. Not interested.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by VINNY » Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:39 pm

0 miles. I'm fine with seeing pictures afterwards.

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Kenkat
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by Kenkat » Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:44 pm

Got a fantastic view of the eclipse totality. Trip ended up being about 240 miles. Clear skies in western Kentucky! Clear roads? Ummm, not so much...

InMyDreams
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by InMyDreams » Tue Aug 22, 2017 9:05 pm

scooterdog wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:36 am
catdude wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 1:09 pm
itstoomuch wrote:
Mon Aug 21, 2017 1:02 pm
It is worth it.
Salem OR.
+100
+100
+1. Idaho Falls had perfect weather. And we stayed out of the parking lot on the freeway on the return side, waiting until Tuesday.


And the temperature drop was dramatic.

On to 2024!

letsgobobby
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by letsgobobby » Tue Aug 22, 2017 9:09 pm

bertilak wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:10 pm
bertilak wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:26 pm
an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:20 pm
OK, here is why it does not make sense to me. Keep the flashlight (sun) is stationery. Hold a volleyball some distance away so that the flashlight shines on it. Set a small ball to represent the moon some distance between those two. Now, rotate the volleyball in one direction. Won't the direction that the ball is rotating toward get the shadow first? I'm assuming that relative to the rotation of the earth, the revolution of the moon around the earth and that of the earth around the sun are insignificant enough to ignore those motions.
Well, now you're making me wonder! My analogy fails because moving the flashlight moves it with respect to both the large and the small balls, but in actuality the relative motion is only (well, primarily) between the sun and the spinning earth. So yes! The universe is messed up! the shadow should move from east to west but moves in the opposite direction! Call Rod Serling!
OK! I think I've got it. It is a mistake to think that the Earth's rotation dominates. For the moment picture a non-rotating Earth and a stationary sun. As the Moon passes before the sun, it's shadow moves across the earth, but at a much faster rate than the Moon itself is moving! Again, picture a ball moving slowly past a stationary flashlight. Ponder that then read on ...

The Earth's surface is a long way from the Moon so the Moon's shadow moves across the earth relatively quickly, but in what direction? Well the Moon and the Earth's surface are both moving in the same west-to-east direction so the Moon's shadow also moves west to east.

Now put the Earth's rotation back in motion and the question becomes, which is moving faster -- the Earth's surface or the Moon's shadow? We could do some math but we know the answer by observation -- the Moon's shadow wins the race.

Bottom line, we need to compare the speed of the Earth's rotation (sorta fast) to the speed of the Moon's shadow (faster) not to the speed of the Moon itself (slow).
I think that's right. The eclipse (that is, the shadow of the moon) moved at 1500 mph west to east across the US. Since the earth is rotating with that grain, that really means the moon's shadow was moving 1500 mph faster than the speed of the earth's surface in the same direction.

Ron
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by Ron » Tue Aug 22, 2017 9:16 pm

I'll be able to see it from my back yard on May 1, 2079.

Unfortunately, I'll be 131 years old :mrgreen: ...
I guess I'll just skip it.

- Ron

skjoldur
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by skjoldur » Tue Aug 22, 2017 9:51 pm

650 miles each way. Clear sky, no clouds. That was definitely cool.

So, who's up for Argentina/Chile 2019? Should be about 9,000 miles each way.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by itstoomuch » Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:17 pm

Salem OR.
The show was worth it.
Makes you realized that we are Not the masters-of-the-universe. We are just observers on a small world.
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by an_asker » Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:00 am

skjoldur wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 9:51 pm
650 miles each way. Clear sky, no clouds. That was definitely cool.

So, who's up for Argentina/Chile 2019? Should be about 9,000 miles each way.
Throw in a vacation to either or both countries, and we might have a deal! ;-)

PS: July 2nd is in the middle of summer hols, so that works out for sure.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:54 am

Plan A was to travel about 50 miles and watch with a few family members, but the forecast was pretty iffy. So we invented plan B, which was to travel 350 miles and watch with different family members. Turned out perfect, because Plan B involved gathering with a few hundred kindred spirits at a soccer field in White House, TN, north of Nashville. Lots of families, van loads of college students from OSU, dozens of tripods with big camera lenses and equatorial mounts so you could point it at the sun and leave it alone to let it track the sun's movement throughout the event, different kinds of viewers, etc. Plus knowledgeable observers to shout out locations of planets during totality. Kind of a festival atmosphere, although we skipped the fried Oreos.

The drive there was a breeze, but with everyone leaving the region on the same 2 hour window the drive home would have been a long slog, so we stayed an extra night and had a nice visit. Now we are planning for 2024.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by an_asker » Wed Aug 23, 2017 11:46 am

letsgobobby wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 9:09 pm
bertilak wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:10 pm
bertilak wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:26 pm
an_asker wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:20 pm
OK, here is why it does not make sense to me. Keep the flashlight (sun) is stationery. Hold a volleyball some distance away so that the flashlight shines on it. Set a small ball to represent the moon some distance between those two. Now, rotate the volleyball in one direction. Won't the direction that the ball is rotating toward get the shadow first? I'm assuming that relative to the rotation of the earth, the revolution of the moon around the earth and that of the earth around the sun are insignificant enough to ignore those motions.
Well, now you're making me wonder! My analogy fails because moving the flashlight moves it with respect to both the large and the small balls, but in actuality the relative motion is only (well, primarily) between the sun and the spinning earth. So yes! The universe is messed up! the shadow should move from east to west but moves in the opposite direction! Call Rod Serling!
OK! I think I've got it. It is a mistake to think that the Earth's rotation dominates. For the moment picture a non-rotating Earth and a stationary sun. As the Moon passes before the sun, it's shadow moves across the earth, but at a much faster rate than the Moon itself is moving! Again, picture a ball moving slowly past a stationary flashlight. Ponder that then read on ...

The Earth's surface is a long way from the Moon so the Moon's shadow moves across the earth relatively quickly, but in what direction? Well the Moon and the Earth's surface are both moving in the same west-to-east direction so the Moon's shadow also moves west to east.

Now put the Earth's rotation back in motion and the question becomes, which is moving faster -- the Earth's surface or the Moon's shadow? We could do some math but we know the answer by observation -- the Moon's shadow wins the race.

Bottom line, we need to compare the speed of the Earth's rotation (sorta fast) to the speed of the Moon's shadow (faster) not to the speed of the Moon itself (slow).
I think that's right. The eclipse (that is, the shadow of the moon) moved at 1500 mph west to east across the US. Since the earth is rotating with that grain, that really means the moon's shadow was moving 1500 mph faster than the speed of the earth's surface in the same direction.
Nice! When I commuted to work this morning, I had not read either of these answers - however, I got the same thought while driving. Because of the distance from the moon to the earth (and the curvature of the earth), the shadow moves faster than the moon itself moves! In other words, the speed of moon's shadow is faster than the earth's rotation, which in turn is faster than the moon's revolution.

Also, as a result, and this did not come well in the graphics, the shape of the totality shadow at any one point in time is not really the same as the shape of the moon, but more of an oblong ... except where the totality hit at noon - not GMT minus X, not noon daylight saving time, but real noon where the sun and the moon were overhead - at this spot, the shadow would be a perfect representation of the moon's shape (i.e., the best circle). This, then, is the reason that the length of totality would be the least at that location as well!

[updated to add]: That does not appear to be true either. For instance, Salem had totality for less than two minutes at 9:25 am, whereas in South Carolina, we had totality for about 2:30 at 1 pm or so. So my theory is that this is because of the curvature of the earth, and the shadow sweeps through the curved face of the earth faster in the morning and evening rather than in the middle of the day.

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Nicolas
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by Nicolas » Wed Aug 23, 2017 8:47 pm

skjoldur wrote:
Tue Aug 22, 2017 9:51 pm
650 miles each way. Clear sky, no clouds. That was definitely cool.

So, who's up for Argentina/Chile 2019? Should be about 9,000 miles each way.
I'm thinking about Argentina or Chile in 2019. I've never been to either of those two countries so I could get some sightseeing in too.

There will be a total eclipse on December 4, 2021 in Antarctica though that might be quite a bit harder to get to. But I imagine it would be quite an experience. It's summer then.

Real umbraphiles will book passage on ships to view them from mid-ocean, for eclipses inaccessible from land.

The total eclipse of August 12, 2026 also looks enticing as it will be at maximum eclipse over Iceland, perhaps directly over Reykjavik though I can't tell for sure based on the Wikipedia map.

I've been to Iceland and it's already an other-worldly place during normal times. Could you imagine watching the eclipse from a lava field or perhaps atop a glacier in Iceland? Maybe the northern lights would be visible during totality, is it possible? (The elves that are said to inhabit those parts might come out and join you).

It's not hard to go to Iceland, it's only six hours from Mpls, for example, and the people speak English and are friendly.

Here's a list of all eclipses this century:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of ... st_century

bmelissa545
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by bmelissa545 » Sun Aug 27, 2017 11:11 am

So did anyone get eye damage from refusing to pay a ridiculous amount for the glasses?! hahaha

finjour
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by finjour » Sun Aug 27, 2017 11:30 am

I thought about traveling to see the totality, and I'd be willing to drive for about a day or fly to see it. Unfortunately, that didn't happen.

Thankfully, on April 8, 2024 another totality will come across Texas. I plan to travel to Austin to see it. Really looking forward to it. I might have traveled for this one if the next one wasn't so close to me.

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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by oxothuk » Sun Aug 27, 2017 5:02 pm

Nicolas wrote:
Wed Aug 23, 2017 8:47 pm

The total eclipse of August 12, 2026 also looks enticing as it will be at maximum eclipse over Iceland, perhaps directly over Reykjavik though I can't tell for sure based on the Wikipedia map.
I've been to Iceland 5 times, and there were almost always lots of clouds around.

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Nicolas
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by Nicolas » Sun Aug 27, 2017 5:16 pm

oxothuk wrote:
Sun Aug 27, 2017 5:02 pm
Nicolas wrote:
Wed Aug 23, 2017 8:47 pm

The total eclipse of August 12, 2026 also looks enticing as it will be at maximum eclipse over Iceland, perhaps directly over Reykjavik though I can't tell for sure based on the Wikipedia map.
I've been to Iceland 5 times, and there were almost always lots of clouds around.
I would still go on the off-chance it would peek through the clouds. I can use it as an excuse to visit Iceland again, it will be summer. If it's cloud-covered, so be it, I will still be enjoying myself there. The same eclipse will be visible in Greenland, a place I've never been to. Though it may not be over an inhabited area.
BTW I visited Iceland in early September 2011. It was hot and sunny then, the natives told me it was unusually so.
Last edited by Nicolas on Sun Aug 27, 2017 6:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

neilpilot
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by neilpilot » Sun Aug 27, 2017 6:31 pm

Nicolas wrote:
Wed Aug 23, 2017 8:47 pm

The total eclipse of August 12, 2026 also looks enticing as it will be at maximum eclipse over Iceland, perhaps directly over Reykjavik though I can't tell for sure based on the Wikipedia map.
The area of totality barely intersects Iceland. You'd be lucky to experience more than 30 seconds of totality. Check out the NASA map.
https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/ ... oogle.html

ResearchMed
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Re: How far would you travel to see The Eclipse?

Post by ResearchMed » Sun Aug 27, 2017 6:37 pm

neilpilot wrote:
Sun Aug 27, 2017 6:31 pm
Nicolas wrote:
Wed Aug 23, 2017 8:47 pm

The total eclipse of August 12, 2026 also looks enticing as it will be at maximum eclipse over Iceland, perhaps directly over Reykjavik though I can't tell for sure based on the Wikipedia map.
The area of totality barely intersects Iceland. You'd be lucky to experience more than 30 seconds of totality. Check out the NASA map.
https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/ ... oogle.html
This seems to indicate that the 2026 total eclipse will pass over parts of Spain?

RM
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