Gardening 2017

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MP173
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Gardening 2017

Post by MP173 » Mon Apr 10, 2017 5:32 pm

It is that time again here in NW Indiana.

My back is sore but my spirits are soaring...helped a family friend put in two raised gardens yesterday and starting to prep and plant.

Today I noticed we have our first two asparagus shoots, both popped up overnight. This is right in line with historic appearances of the first asparagus.

I planted sugar snap peas a month ago and they are just now breaking thru.

Radishes are up, as is spinach. Both were planted 3 weeks ago.

Last Sunday I planted Black Simpson seeded lettuce....it is up. Transplanted brussel sprouts and cauliflower were planted yesterday.

Garlic planted last October is looking pretty good. I have 85 plants which are about 6 inches tall.

The plan this week is to add kale and broccoli and possibly potatoes (reds and golds). I will also plant lettuce and spinach about every 2 weeks for the next month or so.

I use a modified square foot garden plan with raised beds and this year amended the beds with "Mel's mix" with compost, peat moss and vermiculite. I didnt go the 1/1/1 ratio, but instead used about 1 part of compost to 1/3 vermiculite and 1/2 peat moss.

Ed

jlcnuke
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by jlcnuke » Mon Apr 10, 2017 6:01 pm

Planted so far this year are:
5 goliath jalapenos
5 bell peppers (4 green, 1 red),
2 cherry tomato plants (Tami G)
2 indeterminate roma tomato plants (Roma III or something like that)
2 better boy tomatoes
2 early girl tomatoes
2 genovese basil
4 cilantro
10 romaine lettuce plants
2 oregano plants
Thyme
2 hybrid cayenne peppers
and 4 cucumber plants

Seeds (seedlings now) not yet in the ground, these will be going in the raised bed I framed out this weekend and will be finishing Friday:
5 determinate roma tomatoes (san marzanos)
4 other slicing tomatoes (2 different varieties)
a couple cucumbers

I'll be swapping some stuff (mostly tomatoes) with a couple friends who have their own gardens.

Jimmie
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Jimmie » Mon Apr 10, 2017 6:15 pm

Looks like you both are allocating your assets in "growth" opportunities. :D

likegarden
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by likegarden » Mon Apr 10, 2017 6:27 pm

I started my 2017 gardening on November 13, 2016, in my basement in 4 flats. I am growing hosta seedlings (a perennial), started with 1000 seeds of various cultivars and hybrids, and have now about 40 nice plants. I grow them at about 70 dgrs F under 24 hours fluorescent light. About May 15, 2017, it will be warm enough here in climate zone 5 (NY state) to bring the pots outside, and I will be planting them in soil the middle of August, 2017, after any heat is over. Otherwise my outside 2017 gardening is starting with putting bundles of pine branches and yard waste bags out at the street for pickup.
Last edited by likegarden on Mon Apr 10, 2017 6:31 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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dwickenh
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by dwickenh » Mon Apr 10, 2017 6:27 pm

My asparagus has been producing for about 2 weeks. My spinach and lettuce is up from seed and I have onion sets in the ground. I also have a new pet snake in the garden this year and am working on a name for him/her. My Grandchildren have seen the snake and still go with me to the garden so I guess the snake is part of the family now:)

I will be seeding beans, cucumber, and zucchini in the next 2 weeks.

I usually wait for 1st week of May for Tomatoes, peppers, and okra.

I am around the St Louis area.

Good luck to all gardeners,

Dan
The market is the most efficient mechanism anywhere in the world for transferring wealth from impatient people to patient people.” | — Warren Buffett

Loik098
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Loik098 » Mon Apr 10, 2017 10:17 pm

MP173 wrote: I use a modified square foot garden plan with raised beds and this year amended the beds with "Mel's mix" with compost, peat moss and vermiculite. I didnt go the 1/1/1 ratio, but instead used about 1 part of compost to 1/3 vermiculite and 1/2 peat moss.
You just can't go wrong with Mel's mix. We too cut way back on the vermiculite, mostly because it's so darned expensive.

perl
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by perl » Mon Apr 10, 2017 10:24 pm

Loik098 wrote:
MP173 wrote: I use a modified square foot garden plan with raised beds and this year amended the beds with "Mel's mix" with compost, peat moss and vermiculite. I didnt go the 1/1/1 ratio, but instead used about 1 part of compost to 1/3 vermiculite and 1/2 peat moss.
You just can't go wrong with Mel's mix. We too cut way back on the vermiculite, mostly because it's so darned expensive.
The perfect topic for us! We are trying square foot gardening for the first time this year and are debating the Mel's mix. Is it worth the trouble to make it instead of using our own soil and adding compost? We are thinking we'll try and see. And if we do make it, how much will it matter if we tweak the recipe?

Loik098
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Loik098 » Mon Apr 10, 2017 10:31 pm

perl wrote:
Loik098 wrote:
MP173 wrote: I use a modified square foot garden plan with raised beds and this year amended the beds with "Mel's mix" with compost, peat moss and vermiculite. I didnt go the 1/1/1 ratio, but instead used about 1 part of compost to 1/3 vermiculite and 1/2 peat moss.
You just can't go wrong with Mel's mix. We too cut way back on the vermiculite, mostly because it's so darned expensive.
The perfect topic for us! We are trying square foot gardening for the first time this year and are debating the Mel's mix. Is it worth the trouble to make it instead of using our own soil and adding compost? We are thinking we'll try and see. And if we do make it, how much will it matter if we tweak the recipe?
We did the same as you're suggesting, and did about half and half the first year to see if it really made a difference (half our dirt, half Mel's mix). We believe it did make a big difference....mostly in the way the soil absorbed and retained water. If you do go Mel's route, I would definitely suggest taking it easy on the vermiculite, as if you put too much in, the soil will just sink away over time from all of the extra space/air. You could get away with a 1:1:0.25 mix if you really wanted to. We also vary what sort of manure we use (earthworm castings, cow, chicken, etc).

We really noticed the difference in the quality of soil before planting in year 2. The soil is so light, fluffy and maleable, compared to our regular soil/compost mixture that really hardens up over the winter months and needs quite a bit of aeration. I also think you'll find if you rotate your crops appropriately, you won't have to add much mix to your boxes from year to year. This means you make a bigger investment in year 1 and then just touch it up from year to year for awhile after that for a few years.

perl
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by perl » Mon Apr 10, 2017 10:45 pm

Loki098, thanks. When you say 1:1:.25, does that mean one part compost, one part part, .25 part vermiculite?

Dottie57
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Dottie57 » Mon Apr 10, 2017 11:51 pm

You make me sad. My dad was a big gardener until it became too hard. I miss tomatoes especially along with fresh raspberries. I live in a condo, facing north. No plantings for me.

MP173
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by MP173 » Tue Apr 11, 2017 7:08 am

Mel's mix consists of (as he recommended):
1 part compost
1 part Peet Moss (bagged dry stuff)
1 part Vermiculite

I have a friend who is a Master Gardener (an Indiana program thru Purdue University...the agricultural school of the state) who invested heavily in his raised beds three years ago and swears by it. I helped him with a neighbor's beds recently and he went 1:1:1.

When I purchased the goods, the Vermiculite was the big ticket item and I made the bogelhead decision to cut back on it. My beds have been in for a week and have received over two inches of rain. The beds are very light and have drained well. The beds which are compost/top soil packed down. I actually modified three of my beds by removing some of the existing soil and replacing/mixing in the modified Mels mix.

A great on line resource for raised beds/square foot gardening is mysquarefootgarden.net. Lots of great info.

Dottie - I have great memories of my father gardening ( and me pulling weeds). It took until I was 55 before I "got it". Have you looked at community gardens in your town?

dwickenh - I grew up east of St. Louis in Illinois and you are quite a bit ahead of us. I check this morning and no more asparagus overnight. We never had asparagus in the garden, but mom had a spot in town where it grew and she would go pick it.

Now...if only I had some morel mushrooms right now!

ed

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Tue Apr 11, 2017 2:52 pm

Also in the St. Louis area. I prepped the bed in early March. In-ground for me, but that plot has been greatly amended and worked over the years. Added a new layer of compost from the winter's efforts. Snow peas went in at that time, and the first plant has poked through. I will start looking at tomato and pepper plants soon.
This week's fortune cookie: "You will do well to expand your horizons." Ow. Passive-aggressive and vaguely ominous.

HongKonger
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by HongKonger » Tue Apr 11, 2017 3:10 pm

Started sowing in modules 2 weeks ago:
2 varieties sweet peppers
4 varieties heirloom toms
Aubergine
Cucumber
Broad beans
Canellini beans
Greek Gigante beans
Zucchini
Butternut squash
3 types of pumpkin
Radicchio
Broccoli
Pak Choi
Root Parsley

This week is prepping beds to direct sow: carrots, beets, spinach, kale, chard, more beans, more pak choi, more lettuce.
Onions are already coming up a treat and been harvesting rhubarb weekly for 3 weeks. Planted 10 new raspberries and blackberries, and 6 blueberries.

Still feel terribly behind!

Loik098
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Loik098 » Tue Apr 11, 2017 3:12 pm

perl wrote:Loki098, thanks. When you say 1:1:.25, does that mean one part compost, one part part, .25 part vermiculite?
Yes. One part peat moss, one part compost (manure), 1/4 part vermiculite.

guitarguy
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by guitarguy » Tue Apr 11, 2017 4:13 pm

Anyone have any suggestions for things to plant in large pots? This would be for 2 people who are about as far away from being green thumbs as you can get, but would like something "easy" and rather low maintenance to start with.

We planted tomatoes last year with excellent results, along with cucumbers and green bell peppers with poor results. We tried our best to lattice all 3 to grow vertically. It worked for the tomatoes.

The pots are located beside our patio in an area that gets a LOT of sun. We're in the Midwest.

Would appreciate some suggestions!

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Tue Apr 11, 2017 5:00 pm

I'm surprised the peppers didn't work well. The plants don't really get that large.
This week's fortune cookie: "You will do well to expand your horizons." Ow. Passive-aggressive and vaguely ominous.

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Tamarind
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Tamarind » Tue Apr 11, 2017 5:14 pm

No annual edibles this year as we are lazily building a raised bed and it's still under construction. But the figs are leafing and the blueberries nearly done blooming in central NC.

Very excited for the plant order I just placed for 78 starts of assorted local species of prairie grasses and forbs for my test patch of "passively managed" yard. Should grow to 3 feet tall and require only annual rebalancing, um, I mean cutting. :D

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Tamarind
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Tamarind » Tue Apr 11, 2017 5:25 pm

guitarguy wrote:Anyone have any suggestions for things to plant in large pots? This would be for 2 people who are about as far away from being green thumbs as you can get, but would like something "easy" and rather low maintenance to start with.
My favorite plants for pots are strong flavorings which require little to no care as I'm prone to forgetting about them. Consider a hot pepper if you like those as I've found them less delicate than bell peppers. Horseradish and mint are also great. Both are invasive in the ground but a big pot contains them perfectly. Horseradish will take a couple of years to pay off but fresh home grown is so delicious and the young leaves are peppery salad additions in the meantime. We have a 10 year old spearmint named Mojito in a wine barrel planter the previous owner left behind. Requires no care and lives up to its name.

Dottie57
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Dottie57 » Tue Apr 11, 2017 6:04 pm

guitarguy wrote:Anyone have any suggestions for things to plant in large pots? This would be for 2 people who are about as far away from being green thumbs as you can get, but would like something "easy" and rather low maintenance to start with.

We planted tomatoes last year with excellent results, along with cucumbers and green bell peppers with poor results. We tried our best to lattice all 3 to grow vertically. It worked for the tomatoes.

The pots are located beside our patio in an area that gets a LOT of sun. We're in the Midwest.

Would appreciate some suggestions!

Hetbs are great if you like to cook.

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dwickenh
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by dwickenh » Tue Apr 11, 2017 10:27 pm

MP173 wrote:Mel's mix consists of (as he recommended):
1 part compost
1 part Peet Moss (bagged dry stuff)
1 part Vermiculite

I have a friend who is a Master Gardener (an Indiana program thru Purdue University...the agricultural school of the state) who invested heavily in his raised beds three years ago and swears by it. I helped him with a neighbor's beds recently and he went 1:1:1.

When I purchased the goods, the Vermiculite was the big ticket item and I made the bogelhead decision to cut back on it. My beds have been in for a week and have received over two inches of rain. The beds are very light and have drained well. The beds which are compost/top soil packed down. I actually modified three of my beds by removing some of the existing soil and replacing/mixing in the modified Mels mix.

A great on line resource for raised beds/square foot gardening is mysquarefootgarden.net. Lots of great info.

Dottie - I have great memories of my father gardening ( and me pulling weeds). It took until I was 55 before I "got it". Have you looked at community gardens in your town?

dwickenh - I grew up east of St. Louis in Illinois and you are quite a bit ahead of us. I check this morning and no more asparagus overnight. We never had asparagus in the garden, but mom had a spot in town where it grew and she would go pick it.

Now...if only I had some morel mushrooms right now!

ed
Hey MP173,

Sounds like you may have grown up in Belleville Ofallon area. I am just north of there in the Alton area.

I am with you on the Morel mushrooms, nothing makes me happier than a sack or Morels.

Dan
The market is the most efficient mechanism anywhere in the world for transferring wealth from impatient people to patient people.” | — Warren Buffett

MP173
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by MP173 » Wed Apr 12, 2017 9:24 am

Much further than Ofallon....actually about 120 miles east of StL near Olney.

Not much excitement there growing up, which in retrospect was not a bad thing. Used to listen to Harry and Jack on KMOX back in the Lou Brock/Bob Gibson/Bill White/Tim McCarver era.

Back to gardening...looking at planting carrots today...also potatoes later in the week.

Ed

Mike Scott
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Mike Scott » Wed Apr 12, 2017 9:45 am

Our garden is about ready to mow but we might have to do that from a canoe. It was a dry winter but now the heavy rains go on and on. It has brought the 3' low lake level up to normal though. Plants have been started indoors and we will put stuff into the ground as soon as it is dry enough. Due to time constraints, we only plan to plant half the garden this year and let the chickens have the other half. Taking a bit of a shift in priorities to get some more fruit trees planted and working on some rainwater diversion and water garden.

Loik098
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Loik098 » Wed Apr 12, 2017 12:55 pm

dwickenh wrote:
MP173 wrote:Mel's mix consists of (as he recommended):
1 part compost
1 part Peet Moss (bagged dry stuff)
1 part Vermiculite

I have a friend who is a Master Gardener (an Indiana program thru Purdue University...the agricultural school of the state) who invested heavily in his raised beds three years ago and swears by it. I helped him with a neighbor's beds recently and he went 1:1:1.

When I purchased the goods, the Vermiculite was the big ticket item and I made the bogelhead decision to cut back on it. My beds have been in for a week and have received over two inches of rain. The beds are very light and have drained well. The beds which are compost/top soil packed down. I actually modified three of my beds by removing some of the existing soil and replacing/mixing in the modified Mels mix.

A great on line resource for raised beds/square foot gardening is mysquarefootgarden.net. Lots of great info.

Dottie - I have great memories of my father gardening ( and me pulling weeds). It took until I was 55 before I "got it". Have you looked at community gardens in your town?

dwickenh - I grew up east of St. Louis in Illinois and you are quite a bit ahead of us. I check this morning and no more asparagus overnight. We never had asparagus in the garden, but mom had a spot in town where it grew and she would go pick it.

Now...if only I had some morel mushrooms right now!

ed
Hey MP173,

Sounds like you may have grown up in Belleville Ofallon area. I am just north of there in the Alton area.

I am with you on the Morel mushrooms, nothing makes me happier than a sack or Morels.

Dan
Assuming you hunt for your own, I have found that small children are just as good of morel hunters as many adults are. You're armed with your knowledge of geography, trees, & weather; they have the height advantage to beat the camouflage! If you don't already, consider hiring a couple of them next time you go hunting!

guitarguy
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by guitarguy » Wed Apr 12, 2017 1:35 pm

Earl Lemongrab wrote:I'm surprised the peppers didn't work well. The plants don't really get that large.
We were too. For whatever reason it just didn't take. We got like 2-3 small green peppers off there and that was about it. We got seemingly 1000 awesome tomatoes in the same time span.

Maybe we'll try again and also try some hot or mild type peppers in another pot.

guitarguy
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by guitarguy » Wed Apr 12, 2017 1:36 pm

Tamarind wrote:
guitarguy wrote:Anyone have any suggestions for things to plant in large pots? This would be for 2 people who are about as far away from being green thumbs as you can get, but would like something "easy" and rather low maintenance to start with.
My favorite plants for pots are strong flavorings which require little to no care as I'm prone to forgetting about them. Consider a hot pepper if you like those as I've found them less delicate than bell peppers. Horseradish and mint are also great. Both are invasive in the ground but a big pot contains them perfectly. Horseradish will take a couple of years to pay off but fresh home grown is so delicious and the young leaves are peppery salad additions in the meantime. We have a 10 year old spearmint named Mojito in a wine barrel planter the previous owner left behind. Requires no care and lives up to its name.
Thanks I would love to try a hot or mild type pepper. We eat a lot of them!

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Wed Apr 12, 2017 1:52 pm

I have grown jalapenos and other hot peppers in the regular garden. Again, the plants aren't that large but I have generally gotten very good production. If you like hot peppers, then that would be a good thing to try. The ones in the supermarket are usually expensive and not that hot.
This week's fortune cookie: "You will do well to expand your horizons." Ow. Passive-aggressive and vaguely ominous.

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Elsebet
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Location: Washington state

Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Elsebet » Wed Apr 12, 2017 2:33 pm

All I have right now is 12 tomato seedlings (6 cherry, 6 brandywine) growing nicely under a lamp in my indoor greenhouse. I'm east of Seattle and the beds are still far too wet to work. Overnight temps are in the low 30-40's this week anyway.

We hopefully are getting a well drilled soon and the well location is right in the middle of both of my beds, so I'm not sure if/where I can safely plant anything yet. Thus I am not planning too many seedlings - I may start 3 squash and 3 pumpkins, but that will probably be it until the well business is done.

I feel out of sorts not having a solid garden plan this year but I have plenty of landscaping projects on our acreage. I am clearing old Himalayan blackberry canes and discovering all sorts of beautiful formerly hidden areas.

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Sat Apr 15, 2017 2:50 pm

Bought tomato plants the other day. I usually get a four-pack, but decided to splurge a little and get individual "2 inch" pots. That allowed four different plants: Good old Better Boy (my usual), some yellow slicing type, an early variety, and San Marzano.
This week's fortune cookie: "You will do well to expand your horizons." Ow. Passive-aggressive and vaguely ominous.

mouses
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by mouses » Sat Apr 15, 2017 2:56 pm

Dottie57 wrote:You make me sad. My dad was a big gardener until it became too hard. I miss tomatoes especially along with fresh raspberries. I live in a condo, facing north. No plantings for me.
Do you have a balcony? If so, go for it. Try Stupice, a very prolific early tomato with fruits the size of about three cherry tomatoes but with a real tomato taste.

Dottie57
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Dottie57 » Sat Apr 15, 2017 3:10 pm

mouses wrote:
Dottie57 wrote:You make me sad. My dad was a big gardener until it became too hard. I miss tomatoes especially along with fresh raspberries. I live in a condo, facing north. No plantings for me.
Do you have a balcony? If so, go for it. Try Stupice, a very prolific early tomato with fruits the size of about three cherry tomatoes but with a real tomato taste.
If I had any sunshine on my patio I would do so. But I have total shade .. no sun at all. Great for relaxation, easting meals outside. Not great for veggies or herbs.

roamin survivor
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by roamin survivor » Sat Apr 15, 2017 8:00 pm

Just finished up planting Japanese cucumber seedlings and starting on corn for first attempt at the Three Sisters. Others are haricot vert and butternut squash.

Any advice for trying to do Three Sisters?

MP173
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by MP173 » Sun Apr 16, 2017 9:40 pm

I now have 9 asparagus shoots growing...four sprouted this afternoon (yes, I check frequently).

Planted 36 seed potatoes this weekend. Also Bloomsdale spinach, buttercrunch lettuce, and sprouting onions.

Spring is coming on quickly now.

Ed

Nearly A Moose
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Nearly A Moose » Mon Apr 17, 2017 8:49 am

Lettuce, chard, kale, spinach, carrots, and bok choy in our raised bed in DC as of two weekends ago. Just started coming up a few days ago. Going to add the next round of greens next weekend, and will fill out the rest of the bed with carrots (realized last year I didn't have the time to keep up with our tomato vines :( ). As soon as the drip irrigation gets rebuilt, the herbs are going in pots just outside the kitchen.

Love the Mel's mix. I just suck it up and buy the prebagged stuff - a lot quicker.
Pardon typos, I'm probably using my fat thumbs on a tiny phone.

MichaelM
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by MichaelM » Mon Apr 17, 2017 10:21 am

Houston has had a nice easy and early Spring with no late cold. Garden went in at least two weeks early. Planted half doz varieties of tomato (some heirlooms), 12 doz 1015 onion in Jan, two varieties squash, cucumber, Blue Lake pole beans, oriental egg plant, peppers. I am drifting off from the veggies by taking more space for various perennial flowers. The garden looks fantastic, already nice green tomato on, pole beans are blooming should get first yellow squash this week. I really think what worked best this year was me retiring on 12/31 and spending so much time around the garden. Now if the Summer heat is slow arriving I will get fat on this garden! Hope everyone has a great day.

TSR
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by TSR » Mon Apr 17, 2017 11:25 am

Planting my first ever vegetable garden. I was too lazy for raised beds this year and everything just went right into the ground -- mostly from seed. So far it's growing great. I'm in the southeast, so it's not too hard to grow things here. Can anyone advise regarding good rabbit-control methods besides a fully-fenced garden? (There are certain obstacles that would prevent adequate fencing.) They have already eaten all of my broccolini. I have considered a .22 pellet rifle, but I don't know if I have what it takes to become a merciless rabbit killer, and it's not technically legal in town.

jebmke
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by jebmke » Mon Apr 17, 2017 11:33 am

We have never been able to win against rabbits or squirrels without some kind of fence. We even have a pretty good stable of predators (hawks, owls and snakes). Snakes are probably the most effective - they can go down the rabbit holes and climb trees to get to the squirrels nests. But both rabbits and squirrels reproduce at rates required to fill the void.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

TSR
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by TSR » Mon Apr 17, 2017 12:41 pm

jebmke wrote:We have never been able to win against rabbits or squirrels without some kind of fence. We even have a pretty good stable of predators (hawks, owls and snakes). Snakes are probably the most effective - they can go down the rabbit holes and climb trees to get to the squirrels nests. But both rabbits and squirrels reproduce at rates required to fill the void.
We have a strong owl/hawk population, but I haven't seen too many snakes around. The rabbits are so fearless that I think it'd be easy to pick 'em off one by one, but again, I'm no hunter and that just seems like a somewhat aggressive thing to do for loosing a little kale every now and again.

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Mon Apr 17, 2017 12:53 pm

jebmke wrote:We have never been able to win against rabbits or squirrels without some kind of fence.
I have a relatively small plot. My defense system is chicken-wire fencing around it, buried to prevent burrowing. Then I spread bird netting over the top of the plants (held up by the tomato stakes. The netting is attached to the fence with twist-ties.
This week's fortune cookie: "You will do well to expand your horizons." Ow. Passive-aggressive and vaguely ominous.

jebmke
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by jebmke » Mon Apr 17, 2017 2:15 pm

Earl Lemongrab wrote:
jebmke wrote:We have never been able to win against rabbits or squirrels without some kind of fence.
I have a relatively small plot. My defense system is chicken-wire fencing around it, buried to prevent burrowing. Then I spread bird netting over the top of the plants (held up by the tomato stakes. The netting is attached to the fence with twist-ties.
that is what we do for the tomatoes. Squirrels were stopping by and taking one bite out of each tomato.

short fence around the herb garden keeps out the rabbits; squirrels don't care about the herbs.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

Smorgasbord
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Smorgasbord » Mon Apr 17, 2017 3:19 pm

TSR wrote:Planting my first ever vegetable garden. I was too lazy for raised beds this year and everything just went right into the ground -- mostly from seed. So far it's growing great. I'm in the southeast, so it's not too hard to grow things here. Can anyone advise regarding good rabbit-control methods besides a fully-fenced garden? (There are certain obstacles that would prevent adequate fencing.) They have already eaten all of my broccolini. I have considered a .22 pellet rifle, but I don't know if I have what it takes to become a merciless rabbit killer, and it's not technically legal in town.
My neighbors would also frown upon using a rifle in the subdivision, but rabbits are easily dealt with using traps at the right time of year. Unfortunately, that time of year (mid-to-late winter) has just passed and the rabbits now have plenty of other things to eat so catching them becomes much more difficult. Of course, only cage traps can be used when there is a chance your neighbor's cat might end up in one of them.

TerryDMillerMBA
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Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2011 8:32 pm

Re: Gardening 2017

Post by TerryDMillerMBA » Mon Apr 17, 2017 6:44 pm

Besides the physical things mentioned, there are several things rabbits (and deer) don't like the smell of. These can be placed around the perimeter of your garden.

Ivory soap, cut into slivers
Moth balls

There are others, as well.

MP173
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Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2007 6:03 pm

Re: Gardening 2017

Post by MP173 » Sat Apr 22, 2017 5:43 am

Planting onions today...about a week later than usual.

Last year I purchased bundles of onion plants and these grew much better than the onion "sets". Yesterday I purchased four bundles (each contains probably 20-30 plants)...Vidalia, Spanish White, Texas sweet, and purple.

Also purchased a couple of four sections of leeks for transplanting.

The asparagus is coming on strong and we should have spinach and lettuce in a couple of weeks.

Ed

lynneny
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by lynneny » Sat Apr 22, 2017 6:40 pm

For gardening in pots on an apartment terrace without a green thumb, we've done well with:
--Cherry tomatoes (but they do need quite a bit of sun)
--Herbs of all kinds for cooking, basil is especially easy and fast growing.
--Arugula will grow as soon as temperature is above 40 degrees, so can be planted earlier in the spring than most other plants (and if there's a really cold night, I bring the arugula pots indoors). It grows as fast as a weed, so very satisfying to watch it grow and makes envious neighbors who can see my terrace think I'm a better gardener than I am. Arugula doesn't like hot weather, so it's done by late June, when I re-plant the containers with something that likes hot weather.

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TxAg
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by TxAg » Sun Apr 23, 2017 3:14 pm

I've use Mel's mix for the last 2 years or so. This year i scrapped the veggies and went 100% wildflowers. We like to watch the bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Plus we have a lot of green Anole lizards.

Every day when my 3 yr old gets home from school we go straight from the car to the flower garden and look for "bugs"

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Sat Jun 10, 2017 1:02 pm

Progress report:

Due the weather locally, tomatoes have been growing like crazy. One that I planted is an early variety and I have already picked one small one, with a few others close. These are supposed to be four-ounce fruit, but these so far are much smaller than that. About 1-1/2 inch diameter, a bit larger than a cherry. Still, home-grown tomatoes. I will be curious to see what this tastes like. I'm letting it ripen a bit more on the counter before sampling.

The snow peas only put up one plant from the initial seeding in March. I put in more seeds, and two smaller plants are going. Still, the one is providing 2-6 pods per day, which is quite a bit in aggregate. Due to the warm weather, the first plant is already showing heat stress. I might be happy that the plants are staggered in age.

The pepper plants are developing slowly.
This week's fortune cookie: "You will do well to expand your horizons." Ow. Passive-aggressive and vaguely ominous.

Miriam2
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Miriam2 » Sat Jun 10, 2017 2:13 pm

Giant 2-ft iguanas are eating all my bougainvilleas, leaves and all :(
(I mean a body 2 feet long, add another 2 feet for the tail)

The Wizard
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Location: Reading, MA

Re: Gardening 2017

Post by The Wizard » Sun Jun 11, 2017 9:40 am

Miriam2 wrote:Giant 2-ft iguanas are eating all my bougainvilleas, leaves and all :(
(I mean a body 2 feet long, add another 2 feet for the tail)
Can you bring in a Burmese Python to take care of the iguanas?
Attempted new signature...

Miriam2
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Miriam2 » Sun Jun 11, 2017 12:09 pm

The Wizard wrote:
Miriam2 wrote:Giant 2-ft iguanas are eating all my bougainvilleas, leaves and all :(
(I mean a body 2 feet long, add another 2 feet for the tail)
Can you bring in a Burmese Python to take care of the iguanas?
Yes Wizard {. . . long sighs . . .} this is the problem with exotica.
I tell dear husband "we need a predator!" but the only predators for large iguanas are long Burmese pythons, boa constrictors & big alligators :shock:

MP173
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Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2007 6:03 pm

Re: Gardening 2017

Post by MP173 » Mon Jun 12, 2017 10:37 am

I am watering the gardens about every other day now as we are in the middle of a dry, hot spell here in NW Indiana.

First planting of spinach has bolted, just about ready for 2nd batch.
Asparagus is about done. Starting to let it go to seed.
Lettuce is strong. Planted heat resistant this AM.
Broccoli - main crown and side shoots are harvesting.
Sugar snap peas - difficult with growing, but those that grew are producing.
Strawberries - small but very tasty.
Cauliflower - bundled heads with leaves and rubber bands
Potatoes - first bloom.
Onions - growing well.
Brussel Sprouts - a few leaves are being eaten, considering adding sevin.
Pole beans - latching on to poles
Tomatoes - really looking good. Still at least one month, perhaps more out.
Carrots - spotty...had difficulty perhaps birds ate seeds as there are patches of no growth.
Spaghetti Squash - growing leaps and bounds daily.
Sweet potatoes - so so...rabbits got them early.
Rutabaga - seem to be growing well...first year.
Peppers - should take off with extended hot weather.
Cabbage - forming heads
Herbs - producing well...cilantro, basil, etc.

Ed

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Earl Lemongrab
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Re: Gardening 2017

Post by Earl Lemongrab » Mon Jun 12, 2017 11:18 am

Earl Lemongrab wrote:Progress report:

Due the weather locally, tomatoes have been growing like crazy. One that I planted is an early variety and I have already picked one small one, with a few others close. These are supposed to be four-ounce fruit, but these so far are much smaller than that. About 1-1/2 inch diameter, a bit larger than a cherry. Still, home-grown tomatoes. I will be curious to see what this tastes like. I'm letting it ripen a bit more on the counter before sampling.
Juicy, a bit tart, the skin is a bit tough (internet sources mention that).
This week's fortune cookie: "You will do well to expand your horizons." Ow. Passive-aggressive and vaguely ominous.

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