Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

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aceoperations
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Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by aceoperations » Mon Mar 13, 2017 6:21 pm

Hello Bogleheads!

I was wondering what strategies people use to save time (most likely at a cost), when there are one or more kids in the household - especially the littler ones who demand constant attention. DW and I have full time jobs, and often fall behind on our household chores because we are already tired when our 1.5 year old goes to bed.

Here's our time saving tactics:

1) Wash the lunch container as soon as you are done eating at work. That way, we are not left with a large pile of dishes at the end of the week.
2) Cut veggies and fridge them during the weekend, so that food preparation is much easier during the week.

What are yours?

BashDash
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by BashDash » Mon Mar 13, 2017 7:43 pm

Make my lunches for the week on Sunday

Dress our 2 year old for bed in the shirt he will wear the next day too We are out the door with smiles on our faces at 5:50am :)

livesoft
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by livesoft » Mon Mar 13, 2017 7:49 pm

Thanks for asking. Here is my suggestion from an older thread:
livesoft wrote:For the kids, don't bother with pajamas. After their baths, just get them dressed in whatever they want to wear for the next day. Thus, no dressing in the next morning. They simply wake up and are ready to go.

Also, minimal number of clothes for them. They are either wearing the clothes, the clothes are in the dryer, or the clothes are on the floor in the bedroom. Always easy to find.

Washing clothes: Buy only clothes that can be washed in hot water which is pretty much all clothes nowadays and put in the dryer. Just put clothes directly in washer (no hampers). Turn on washer when cooking dinner. Move clothes to dryer. Store clothes in dryer (no folding), so you just pull 'em out and put 'em on. Anyways, washing/drying clothes overlaps with anything else, so takes no time whatsoever.

Food prep/cooking: Always put stuff away as you use it. Do NOT leave it on the counter top. Example: When making cookies, measure out flour, salt, baking soda and put these items away. Measure out sugars and put the sugar away. Measure vanilla extract and put it away.

Always think about reducing number of dishes used. Example: Make oatmeal in big glass bowl in microwave. Eat out of that bowl. When measuring oatmeal, just use a glass (not a measuring cup) and use same glass to measure the water, milk or Dr Pepper used to cook the oatmeal. Use same glass for milk for drinking with the oatmeal.

When eating at table, do not have any serving dishes to clean-up. Simply serve from the stove or food prep area.

Get a dishwasher that is quiet and needs no rinsing of dishes. Do not unload dishwasher, but just use dishes directly from it when eating. There is no shame in running the dishwasher every day and even re-washing the dishes you didn't unload along with dirty dishes.
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JimmyD
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by JimmyD » Mon Mar 13, 2017 8:24 pm

My wife convinced me to shell out $125/month to have our house professionally cleaned and as someone who greatly values a clean home, this was life-changing.

ThankYouJack
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by ThankYouJack » Mon Mar 13, 2017 8:29 pm

Reduce work as much as possible
Telecommute and work a flexible schedule as much as possible
Maximize vacation time (instead of one 2 week vacation, take 20 half days) and take unpaid time off if allowed
Hire additional help

Buy pre-made meals
Have a weekly meal schedule and do curbside pickup if your grocery store has it
Cook 3x the number of servings and eat the same thing for 3 meals in a row (or freeze)

When your child is a bit older have them help with chores

livesoft wrote: Get a dishwasher that is quiet and needs no rinsing of dishes. Do not unload dishwasher, but just use dishes directly from it when eating. There is no shame in running the dishwasher every day and even re-washing the dishes you didn't unload along with dirty dishes.
[/quote]

I'm going trying this as I despise unloading and loading dishes daily (sometimes multiple times a day). Will see if it works for us- our dishes vary quite a bit from bottles and pumping gear, to pots, pans, Tupperware, and especially when we have people over. I guess we could hand wash some of the bigger stuff if we don't have space.

123
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by 123 » Mon Mar 13, 2017 8:39 pm

Leftover components from our large Sunday night dinner often become key ingredients in subsequent meals during the week. For example cooking a large tri-tip roast on Sunday provides enough leftover beef to be added to simple stir-fry dishes on a couple of days during the week. Menu planning has to consider the creation of enough leftovers for another evening that can be reheated without drying out. We try to avoid cooking an original dinner that doesn't create a "payoff" of some kind for another evening. If we do Chinese take-out during the week we get a variety of dishes that will do two dinners.
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livesoft
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by livesoft » Mon Mar 13, 2017 8:42 pm

^I've stopped using the plasticware that is "deep" which is most gladware and tupperware and gone to using the shallow black plastic "dish" from Chinese take-out instead. It may appear that things don't fit in these smaller covered plastic dishes, but if I have too much leftovers*, I just divide up into more of them. I only need to remove one for a meal leaving the others in the fridge for another meal. These dishes fit better in a dishwasher, too. Plus if I don't want to wash it, I can toss it in the garbage.

*Example: a pot roast leftover can be put into 3 of these black plastic take-out dishes.
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Loik098
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by Loik098 » Mon Mar 13, 2017 9:19 pm

We keep a minimum number of toys in each room that's played in, rather than having dozens of toys in one room. Helps to keep clean-up to a minimum, and keeps the total number of toys the child owns to a minimum as well (we believe less is better). Our two-year-old knows he has to clean up one room before moving to another.

aceoperations
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by aceoperations » Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:41 am

It's interesting to see that the comments circle around food and dishes. Our dishwasher has been out of operation for a while, and this is causing us major headaches. The numbers of spoons our little one pulls out for every meal is simply staggering! :D :D We did consider putting clothes on our son so that he can get out of bed and leave the house, but the process of breakfast is a rather messy one. We changed two pairs of clothes this morning after they got messy - and I mean totally messy! Our house was kept very clean before kids, but now we strive to keep it "not-dirty". Calling the floors clean would be a stretch! :beer

edited for typo

PowDay
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by PowDay » Tue Mar 14, 2017 12:24 pm

1. $200 a month house cleaner
2. Let things go
3. Monthly beers with other Dads in the neighborhood

stoptothink
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by stoptothink » Tue Mar 14, 2017 12:47 pm

Not trying to ruffle any feathers, but as a household with two full-time working professionals (and my wife is also a full-time student) and a 5 and 2 yr old, we've never really felt this crunch. Some of the suggestions (ie. constantly running the dish and clothes washers) seem like total wastes to me; those are tasks which take us literally 15-20 minutes a week to do. We do two loads of laundry a week (Saturday morning), and the actual minutes spent doing that per week can be counted on a single hand. Dishes are washed immediately after use and put into dishwasher, which is turned on every Saturday morning - maybe 2mins a day washing the dishes and then a few minutes to turn on and then unload the dishwasher once a week. When things are taken out, they are put back when they are finished being used (yes, our 2yr old even understands this concept); makes our floor-to-ceiling housecleaning on Saturday mornings take like 30min (doesn't hurt that our home is only 1500 sq. ft). As has been talked about many times on this board, 90% of our cooking for the week takes place on Sunday morning; 2hrs cooking and placing in tupperware on that one day and then it takes us maybe 5min a day during the week.

The biggest time savers are simply being clean and organized. Both the wife and I are sticklers for organization and structure, so I guess it is just second nature and we don't really need any time hacks.

Texanbybirth
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by Texanbybirth » Tue Mar 14, 2017 12:49 pm

I think the first gratuitous item we would add if we could afford it would be a professional house cleaner! OP, sounds like you should look into it based on the previous responses! :D

Btw, I think it's a rule of biology that 18 month olds are messy eaters. This will get better, and then you'll save all that time changing outfits! (Also, as gross as it is just leave the kid in their messy outfit until they're done eating. Unless they've got some rare OCD thing about being clean while eating, they won't mind.) "Clean floors" is a relative term when people have kids/larger families. Until the kids are older, the floors might not ever be as clean as they were before you had kids.

I feel like we "waste" a lot of time with our kids. (I say "feel" because I've never really timed it. However, I did just spent 15 minutes trying to get socks on the oldest.) They're 2y and 5 mos so maybe this will change as activities increase, but as long as we're all joyful, well-behaved and together I don't really consider it a bad thing. "Time Well Wasted" is an old Brad Paisley song I like. Sometimes dishes sit out for a day and the vacuuming gets neglected for a week, ah well.

arsenalfan
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by arsenalfan » Tue Mar 14, 2017 12:53 pm

If you have a bed-wetter and find yourself changing the fitted sheet at 2am:

Make the bed twice. Waterproof liner/fitted sheet/waterproof liner/fitted sheet.

At 2 am, all you have to do is pull off the top fitted sheet/liner.

But don't be lazy, repeat the setup the next day!

arsenalfan
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by arsenalfan » Tue Mar 14, 2017 12:58 pm

It has helped to have a jobs list to do at night. E.g.

Parent 1: Clean up kitchen/family room/mudroom. Cut veggies. Prep breakfast/lunches.
Parent 2: Put kid(s) to sleep. Answer family emails/go through school folders/projects & recycle.

Clearly defined roles get it done, and make sure each partner feels the other is pulling their weight. And rebalance the worksheet as needed.

The Mr Clean SuperBowl ad really is pretty accurate.

sls239
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by sls239 » Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:19 pm

There are ways to supervise children and get things done at the same time.

You put the little one in a safe place, put on a audio book or some reasonably kid friendly music and get to work. You can even sing to your little one. Or you can talk to your little one about what you are doing. Or you can set something up so they can mirror you - like let them wash their pretend dishes and play food (or any plastic toy) while you wash real dishes.

I think it is a big mistake to wait until the little one is in bed before starting the chores. The activities of daily living are some of the most basic lessons children learn.

stoptothink
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by stoptothink » Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:27 pm

sls239 wrote:There are ways to supervise children and get things done at the same time.

I think it is a big mistake to wait until the little one is in bed before starting the chores. The activities of daily living are some of the most basic lessons children learn.
Exactly. All the cleaning up is done right then and there; immediately. Not only do our kids see that being clean is the expectation, but they take part in the process. Makes the whole process a whole lot easier and less time consuming. Impossible with infants, but even our 2yr old understands that if he does not put his toys away after playing, then he loses specific privileges.

ianferrel
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by ianferrel » Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:33 pm

aceoperations wrote:1) Wash the lunch container as soon as you are done eating at work. That way, we are not left with a large pile of dishes at the end of the week.
2) Cut veggies and fridge them during the weekend, so that food preparation is much easier during the week.
It's interesting that one of your tips involves doing work as you go, and the other involves doing the work all at once. Generally, batching work is more efficient because each task has startup costs, so doing all the dishes at once should take less time. What's really going on with #1 is that your employer is paying you to wash your dishes ;)

For us: automate as much as possible, and resist the urge to "optimize" things that aren't time. We bought a Roomba. It doesn't do as good a job as a person vacuuming, but we can just run it more often with very little time cost. Also, the baby is entertained by it. He crawls all over the house after it and tries to pet it. Win-win!
stoptothink wrote:Dishes are washed immediately after use and put into dishwasher, which is turned on every Saturday morning - maybe 2mins a day washing the dishes and then a few minutes to turn on and then unload the dishwasher once a week.
I am confused. Do you not eat at home? Do you have really tiny dishes or a huge dishwasher? Even if we used no dishes for the baby (we do often just feed him off of our plates), we generate 4 plates and a few sets of silverware a day with breakfast and dinner. And containers for leftovers and to take food to work in. Plus, you know, the things that we cook in. We would need 20+ plates to run the dishwasher once a week (and an industrial-sized dishwasher). Something doesn't add up here. Are you perhaps reusing the clean dishes in the dishwasher, since you wash them before putting them in? Which is fine I guess, but what's the point of having a dishwasher then?

CincyGuy
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by CincyGuy » Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:36 pm

Totally agree with this. I still clean the house myself (considering a service). On Friday, I clean the upstairs level before dinner. My oldest (3.5yo) will watch me and even "help" with his broom and vacuum. After the kids go to bed, I clean the first level. In to cleaning I do laundry.

I also agree with some of the other posts. As your kids get older, it'll get easier. They'll get (less) messy while eating. They'll be independent and get themselves dressed, etc. You just have to know it might be rough for the first few years.

Outsource as much as you can afford to do. Whatever you don't personally add value to, outsource.
sls239 wrote:There are ways to supervise children and get things done at the same time.

You put the little one in a safe place, put on a audio book or some reasonably kid friendly music and get to work. You can even sing to your little one. Or you can talk to your little one about what you are doing. Or you can set something up so they can mirror you - like let them wash their pretend dishes and play food (or any plastic toy) while you wash real dishes.

I think it is a big mistake to wait until the little one is in bed before starting the chores. The activities of daily living are some of the most basic lessons children learn.

coalcracker
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by coalcracker » Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:43 pm

stoptothink wrote:Dishes are washed immediately after use and put into dishwasher, which is turned on every Saturday morning - maybe 2mins a day washing the dishes and then a few minutes to turn on and then unload the dishwasher once a week. When things are taken out, they are put back when they are finished being used (yes, our 2yr old even understands this concept); makes our floor-to-ceiling housecleaning on Saturday mornings take like 30min (doesn't hurt that our home is only 1500 sq. ft). As has been talked about many times on this board, 90% of our cooking for the week takes place on Sunday morning; 2hrs cooking and placing in tupperware on that one day and then it takes us maybe 5min a day during the week.
:shock:

I am simultaneously impressed, horrified, and curious.

I'm mostly curious about how you fit a week's worth of dishes in the dishwasher. Also, you "wash" your dishes and then put them in the dishwasher? I am a bit confused.

I'm also curious what kind of food you make, and how you cook it all in two hours. No offense, but reheated food 5 nights a week just wouldn't cut it for us. I guess if all you do is microwave food each night, that would cut down on the dishes.

bf0123
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by bf0123 » Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:47 pm

I like many of the tactical tips. As a father of 4 I'll step it back one level and say: the *biggest* time savings will come from saying NO to the many, many, many...many requests for your time that will come your way. Be lockstep with your spouse on what and who you care about, then say no to everything else. Simple example: parents like to invite "all the kids in class" to birthday parties when kids are in 1st grade, etc. That means 10-20 birthday parties per year -- and your kid doesn't even know half the kids well. Why do parents do that? I have no idea -- but just because you were invited doesn't mean it's a must-go.

Side benefit: I believe it builds character in kids to hear the word NO!

livesoft
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by livesoft » Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:49 pm

ianferrel wrote:Even if we used no dishes for the baby (we do often just feed him off of our plates), we generate 4 plates and a few sets of silverware a day with breakfast and dinner.
I now prepare food and eat out of the same big glass bowl if possible. The bowl serves as a sink for washing, too.

Everything I eat gets mixed up in my stomach anyways, so no problem cooking oatmeal in the above bowl, making a salad in the above bowl, or reheating leftovers in the above bowl.
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bottlecap
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by bottlecap » Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:50 pm

stoptothink wrote:The biggest time savers are simply being clean and organized. Both the wife and I are sticklers for organization and structure, so I guess it is just second nature and we don't really need any time hacks.
I have to agree here. Unfortunately, I am not THAT organized, but I keep trying.

I don't think outlandish ideas are going to save you all that much time. It's basic ideas - that are simple, but no fun - that will do the most, such as immediately handling things as they come up. This is easier said than done, but things like:

1. Put things away after using them;
2. Put trash in the trash right away;
3. Throw away junk mail immediately (if you decide you "may" need that coupon, they will send it again next month!);
4. Clean the dinner table/cookware immediately;
5. One parent loads dishwasher while other gets kids ready;
6. Do laundry while doing other chores;
7. Fold laundry while watching you favorite show or listening to radio program;
8. For non-daily jobs, make a list and cross off an item or two each day when you do them.

We sometimes prepare meals in advance on the weekends, but depending on what you're having, it's not always possible. We honestly don't use this technique that often.

It also helps if you get the kids to bed at what many might consider an "early" time. Our kids go to bed at 7:30 pm every night. It gives the kids a good night's sleep and gives us 2 to 3 hours if we need it to get other stuff done.

JT

P.S. If your children are demanding as far as attention goes, buy them an iPad. Better yet, have the grandparents buy and iPad. After 6 months old, it's amazing how entertained they will be with it while you are doing chores. Just be prepared to take it away and limit their time with it if you have to.

researcher
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by researcher » Tue Mar 14, 2017 2:08 pm

stoptothink wrote:We do two loads of laundry a week (Saturday morning),
Curious how it is possible to do only two load of laundry each week, with 2 young kids and 2 adults in the house?

Do you cram all of the clothing (whites & darks) from both adults and kids in one load, then all of the sheets/towels/rags in a second load?
and the actual minutes spent doing that per week can be counted on a single hand
You can wash & dry an entire week's worth of laundry for a family of 4, then fold & put away everything, in 5 minutes or less?

stoptothink
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by stoptothink » Tue Mar 14, 2017 2:25 pm

coalcracker wrote:
stoptothink wrote:Dishes are washed immediately after use and put into dishwasher, which is turned on every Saturday morning - maybe 2mins a day washing the dishes and then a few minutes to turn on and then unload the dishwasher once a week. When things are taken out, they are put back when they are finished being used (yes, our 2yr old even understands this concept); makes our floor-to-ceiling housecleaning on Saturday mornings take like 30min (doesn't hurt that our home is only 1500 sq. ft). As has been talked about many times on this board, 90% of our cooking for the week takes place on Sunday morning; 2hrs cooking and placing in tupperware on that one day and then it takes us maybe 5min a day during the week.
:shock:

I am simultaneously impressed, horrified, and curious.

I'm mostly curious about how you fit a week's worth of dishes in the dishwasher. Also, you "wash" your dishes and then put them in the dishwasher? I am a bit confused.

I'm also curious what kind of food you make, and how you cook it all in two hours. No offense, but reheated food 5 nights a week just wouldn't cut it for us. I guess if all you do is microwave food each night, that would cut down on the dishes.
Ummm, easy. I am always curious how much "stuff" people use. We do two loads of laundry a week, for 4 people, and it is not like we are wearing clothes multiple times. Unless we are changing multiple times a day, I don't know how we would magically create more laundry to do. Same thing with dishes, how many bowls and utensils are you using for a single meal? The dishes are washed (scrubbed with soap and water) immediately after use and put in the dishwasher, which is turned on once a week to be sanitized. Because my food is pre-cooked and put in tupperware in the refrigerator for the week, it also makes this far less complicated. How many dishes we use is cut down significantly because my wife and I both practice intermittent fasting (our first meal of the day is eaten when we get home from work ~4pm) and our kids eat 2/3 of their meals at daycare. But again, it's not like we are actively trying to use as few dishes as possible or re-using dirty dishes.

My eating habits have been detailed countless times on this board. Nutrition/exercise/health is my passion and my career (I'm the chief health and exercise scientist for a health products megacorp). I'm not a competitive bodybuilder, but I eat like one; I eat the same thing day-in-day-out (have for 15+ years) and 99% of meals are pre-planned. A lot of chicken breasts, hard-boiled eggs, fish, and mountains of steamed vegetables and leafy greens - virtually no "processed" food. My wife occasionally will get the hankering for something different and will cook something up for her and the kids, but probably 5 days a week she does the same thing I do. I am well aware that "doesn't cut it" for most people as eating is a pleasurable experience for them (I clearly eat to live), but I guarantee you it makes eating more cost and time efficient, and makes it dramatically easier to eat healthy.

I am very aware that our lifestyle habits aren't for everyone, but (for us), they deem these time hacks moot or wasteful.

stoptothink
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by stoptothink » Tue Mar 14, 2017 2:29 pm

researcher wrote:
stoptothink wrote:We do two loads of laundry a week (Saturday morning),
Curious how it is possible to do only two load of laundry each week, with 2 young kids and 2 adults in the house?

Do you cram all of the clothing (whites & darks) from both adults and kids in one load, then all of the sheets/towels/rags in a second load?
and the actual minutes spent doing that per week can be counted on a single hand
You can wash & dry an entire week's worth of laundry for a family of 4, then fold & put away everything, in 5 minutes or less?
One load of colors, another of whites. It's not rocket science, we simply don't wear multiple changes of clothes per day. Every other week we wash everybody's sheets and that makes a 3rd load.

The actual washing and drying of clothes obviously doesn't take a handful of minutes, but I'm not washing them by hand in the bathtub. How long does it take you to sort them into colors and whites and physically turn on the the washer or dryer? And yes, with the help of my wife and 5yr old daughter, it takes all of maybe 5 minutes to sort the washed clothes and put them away. So, I was being facetious, but there is no way we spend more than 20min total per week as a family doing laundry.

Texanbybirth
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by Texanbybirth » Tue Mar 14, 2017 2:38 pm

stoptothink wrote:
coalcracker wrote:
stoptothink wrote:Dishes are washed immediately after use and put into dishwasher, which is turned on every Saturday morning - maybe 2mins a day washing the dishes and then a few minutes to turn on and then unload the dishwasher once a week. When things are taken out, they are put back when they are finished being used (yes, our 2yr old even understands this concept); makes our floor-to-ceiling housecleaning on Saturday mornings take like 30min (doesn't hurt that our home is only 1500 sq. ft). As has been talked about many times on this board, 90% of our cooking for the week takes place on Sunday morning; 2hrs cooking and placing in tupperware on that one day and then it takes us maybe 5min a day during the week.
:shock:

I am simultaneously impressed, horrified, and curious.

I'm mostly curious about how you fit a week's worth of dishes in the dishwasher. Also, you "wash" your dishes and then put them in the dishwasher? I am a bit confused.

I'm also curious what kind of food you make, and how you cook it all in two hours. No offense, but reheated food 5 nights a week just wouldn't cut it for us. I guess if all you do is microwave food each night, that would cut down on the dishes.
Ummm, easy. I am always curious how much "stuff" people use. We do two loads of laundry a week, for 4 people, and it is not like we are wearing clothes multiple times. Unless we are changing multiple times a day, I don't know how we would magically create more laundry to do. Same thing with dishes, how many bowls and utensils are you using for a single meal? The dishes are washed (scrubbed with soap and water) immediately after use and put in the dishwasher, which is turned on once a week to be sanitized. Because my food is pre-cooked and put in tupperware in the refrigerator for the week, it also makes this far less complicated. How many dishes we use is cut down significantly because my wife and I both practice intermittent fasting (our first meal of the day is eaten when we get home from work ~4pm) and our kids eat 2/3 of their meals at daycare. But again, it's not like we are actively trying to use as few dishes as possible or re-using dirty dishes.

My eating habits have been detailed countless times on this board. Nutrition/exercise/health is my passion and my career (I'm the chief health and exercise scientist for a health products megacorp). I'm not a competitive bodybuilder, but I eat like one; I eat the same thing day-in-day-out (have for 15+ years) and 99% of meals are pre-planned. A lot of chicken breasts, hard-boiled eggs, fish, and mountains of steamed vegetables and leafy greens - virtually no "processed" food. My wife occasionally will get the hankering for something different and will cook something up for her and the kids, but probably 5 days a week she does the same thing I do. I am well aware that "doesn't cut it" for most people as eating is a pleasurable experience for them (I clearly eat to live), but I guarantee you it makes eating more cost and time efficient, and makes it dramatically easier to eat healthy.

I am very aware that our lifestyle habits aren't for everyone, but (for us), they deem these time hacks moot or wasteful.
Wow, I'm impressed sir. Definitely not for everyone, but color me impressed!

Broken Man 1999
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by Broken Man 1999 » Tue Mar 14, 2017 2:43 pm

When daughters were growing up their job was to clear table and load dishwasher (just one chore, there were others). We would set a timer and do a "5" minute cleanup", with them trying to beat the clock. Their mother was the judge as to if the activities were done properly.

Sometimes today they do the same thing after family meals. Makes a game out of a task.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven than I shall not go. " -Mark Twain

aceoperations
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by aceoperations » Tue Mar 14, 2017 2:48 pm

Lots of great tips here. DW and I often joke that we should get a Roomba, or a big dog :mrgreen: , which takes care of automatic cleanup! Some of the listed tips we do, like teaching our son to help with cleaning, and putting things away. The hope is that he picks up these things, and it gets better as he gets older.
bf0123 wrote:the *biggest* time savings will come from saying NO
We do have a fair amount of social activities. I suppose we have to focus on filtering it out.
ianferrel wrote:It's interesting that one of your tips involves doing work as you go, and the other involves doing the work all at once.
Somehow this is what works for us. It's really depressing to go into the kitchen to see a huge pile of stinking dishes. Cut veggies in the fridge does not irritate quite as much.
bottlecap wrote:1. Put things away after using them;
2. Put trash in the trash right away;
This. We have been working at getting better at this. I agree it can be a huge time saver.

flyingbison
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by flyingbison » Tue Mar 14, 2017 2:52 pm

coalcracker wrote:
I'm also curious what kind of food you make, and how you cook it all in two hours. No offense, but reheated food 5 nights a week just wouldn't cut it for us. I guess if all you do is microwave food each night, that would cut down on the dishes.
I do most of our cooking for the week on Sunday, as well, but it takes me a heck of a lot longer than 2 hours!

corysold
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by corysold » Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:13 pm

The key to time saving with kids is to make them as independent as possible. With 6 kids, from the time they were all about two, we tried to make them able to do most everything for themselves if possible.

Getting them potty trained saves a lot of time from having to change diapers during the day.

We put all of their food and snacks, bowls, cups, utensils etc. in a few low drawers they could reach. We made sure nothing was breakable, but that allowed them to get all of their own snacks, water, breakfast with our permission. Really saves on food prep.

It is also super helpful for them to be able to get themselves dressed and get ready to go in the car. Teach them to put on their shoes, put on a coat and hat. All we have to do is zip up the two year old. I can open the van doors from the kitchen while I get the baby in the car carrier and all the kids can get themselves into their seats. I buckle in the two year old and we are off.

Get their toys where they can access them, but also teach them to put them away. Teach a 4-5 year old and up how to use the remote to turn on a show.

It's really amazing how much little kids can (and want to) do if you give them the opportunity. Sure, there are some hiccups along the way, but being able to feed the baby while the 2 and 4 year old are mostly self-sufficient is a huge time saver.

veindoc
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by veindoc » Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:17 pm

I'm sure we are not as organized and clean as stoptothink but we too only do two maybe three loads of laundry/week. I never understood why some people do laundry every day. What a time sink!
Friday night I take the three boys' dirty clothes and put in washer. We have dinner. Clothes go to dryer or hung up. After an hour I fold clothes. Shortly thereafter take kids upstairs. While they are brushing teeth and putting on pajamas,I put away clothes. Saturday evening prior to dinner I wash my husband and my clothes. After dinner dry. In the evening my husband folds clothes while watching tv. Once done, I out away. I don't think about laundry for he whole week. Occasionally something gets very dirty over the week- one of the kids wets Thebes or clothes get really muddy. The items go to a bucket to be soaked until fri or sat washing.

I also only cook two to three times/week which minimizes clean up. We eat a lot of leftovers.

To the OP with the messy eaters- dont feed the kids messy food. Skip the oatmeal or the runny eggs. Feed them what you know can be cleaned rather quickly. Waffles, hard boiled eggs. Apple slices instead of banana. Smoothies with a straw instead of yogurt. I'm sure you can think of alternatives. Save the messy stuff for the evenings prior to bath time
. This maybe overkill but I fed my kids until they were two to three to minimize messes. I got myself ready, packed bags, cleaned up the kitchen etc so I could devote myself to getting the kids ready without distractions.

I also second getting kids to bed early. No later than 7:30. Sometimes I call friends or relatives and the little ones(<6) are still up and in their parent's way till 9pm! How can you possibly get anything done-keeping an over tired baby/toddler entertained and out of trouble. Put them to bed early- it takes discipline but it's worth it.


One thing I haven't done which I need to is minimize the toys. That is right now the biggest hindrance to a clean house. When I have stayed firm about toy clean up my home life is great but when I stray everything feels more chaotic. Who wants to spend time looking for missing pieces of toys at 9:30pm? Not me.

researcher
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by researcher » Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:23 pm

stoptothink wrote:One load of colors, another of whites. It's not rocket science, we simply don't wear multiple changes of clothes per day.
You have a 2 year old & a 5 year old, and they never wear multiple changes of clothes per day?
They don't go outside and get messy/dirty/wet? They don't spill anything on them while eating? They don't get paint/marker/glitter/play doh on them while playing? They don't have a potty accident? These are regular occurrences for most 2 year olds.

I'm also surprised you wash business casual items (pants, button up shirts, ect) in the same load as your kids' soiled clothes.
Every other week we wash everybody's sheets and that makes a 3rd load
Only washing sheets every other week certainly helps. No way you could convince my wife to go 2 weeks on the same sheets.
What about bath towels, wash cloths, hand towels, dish towels, rags, ect? Do you use these items for two weeks before washing?

How can you physically fit 3 sets of bedding and an entire household's worth of towels into one load? This can't be done in our machines.
And yes, with the help of my wife and 5yr old daughter, it takes all of maybe 5 minutes to sort the washed clothes and put them away. So, I was being facetious, but there is no way we spend more than 20min total per week as a family doing laundry.
I didn't realize you were being facetious. I thought your description was serious, that's why I questioned how you could do so little laundry, and how it could take so little time.
It appears you actually do ~20% more laundry than initially stated (10 vs. 8 loads a month) and it takes 400% longer (20 vs 5 minutes).
This seems somewhat more realistic.
Last edited by researcher on Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

corysold
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by corysold » Tue Mar 14, 2017 3:30 pm

We do way more laundry than probably anyone here, usually 1.5-2 loads a day. But with 6 kids, 3 under 5 and 3 in school. Kids get messy. What can you do.

But, we put all of their clothes in a dresser in our bedroom. All of the clothes get folded there and don't have to get delivered anywhere to be put away. I, or the kids when they are on duty, can fold them on the bed, turn around and put them away. They all pick out an outfit for the morning before bed and take it to their rooms with them. They can get dressed in the morning without bothering my wife too much and we don't have to worry about cleaning up messy rooms too often as the clothes are either on them, in the drawers or in the laundry.

shorty313
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by shorty313 » Tue Mar 14, 2017 4:59 pm

Kids 9 and 7, and we have a minimum of 5 loads a week. One for each kid, dark and light for grown ups, and sheets/towels. When they were littler in the summer sometimes we could combine kid loads but not anymore. Generally speaking I fold while watching tv. We don't wear multiple outfits a day and try to rewear items where reasonable.

We keep kids cups low and taught them early to clear dinner plates. I don't use serving bowls. The 9yo just recently started doing the dishes and that frees up my time to prep lunches. She can also get breakfast for both now.

I don't bulk cook too much but sometimes will prep things night before.

We do have a cleaning service on alternating weeks and that helps tremendously.

David Scubadiver
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by David Scubadiver » Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:57 pm

From the time your child is born until the time you child leaves for college, is only about 900 weeks. Enjoy every one of them if possible. You will have plenty of time to save when they leave the nest.

ThankYouJack
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by ThankYouJack » Wed Mar 15, 2017 9:50 am

I'm trying a variation of the LiveSoft dishwasher technique. We use a large variety of dishes, sometimes half the top rack will be filled with bottles and breast pump stuff, other times it'll be filled with glasses and mugs if we have people over. Anyway, I'll leave the clean dishes in there and take them out as needed (this helps eliminate the need to dry them). I'll let the dirty dishes soak in soapy water all day (hopefully this helps eliminate the need to prewash). When I have enough to do a full load, I'll unload the remaining dishes from the dishwasher, and put the dirty ones in. It won't save tons of time, but reduces steps and I think will help with the monotony.
stoptothink wrote:Some of the suggestions (ie. constantly running the dish and clothes washers) seem like total wastes to me; those are tasks which take us literally 15-20 minutes a week to do. We do two loads of laundry a week (Saturday morning), and the actual minutes spent doing that per week can be counted on a single hand. Dishes are washed immediately after use and put into dishwasher, which is turned on every Saturday morning - maybe 2mins a day washing the dishes and then a few minutes to turn on and then unload the dishwasher once a week.
We typically eat 3 varying meals a day at home, have at least 1 person over each day, have a group of people over each week, and cook or bake maybe 4-5 times a week. So we go through a lot of dishes
stoptothink wrote: When things are taken out, they are put back when they are finished being used (yes, our 2yr old even understands this concept); makes our floor-to-ceiling housecleaning on Saturday mornings take like 30min (doesn't hurt that our home is only 1500 sq. ft).
That's a great

kewper
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by kewper » Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:04 am

The "osmosis" bath. Put 1 year old and 3 year old in tub while you shower. They get clean by osmosis (i.e., shampoo and extra soap falling off you) and they enjoy playing with an old plastic cup and washcloth.

Rupert
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by Rupert » Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:08 am

kewper wrote:The "osmosis" bath. Put 1 year old and 3 year old in tub while you shower. They get clean by osmosis (i.e., shampoo and extra soap falling off you) and they enjoy playing with an old plastic cup and washcloth.
Ha. I employ a similar technique to clean the shower. Sprinkle some powdered cleaner on the floor before getting in and then use my foot and a sponge to clean the floor while showering.

stoptothink
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by stoptothink » Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:33 am

researcher wrote:
stoptothink wrote:One load of colors, another of whites. It's not rocket science, we simply don't wear multiple changes of clothes per day.
You have a 2 year old & a 5 year old, and they never wear multiple changes of clothes per day?
They don't go outside and get messy/dirty/wet? They don't spill anything on them while eating? They don't get paint/marker/glitter/play doh on them while playing? They don't have a potty accident? These are regular occurrences for most 2 year olds.

I'm also surprised you wash business casual items (pants, button up shirts, ect) in the same load as your kids' soiled clothes.
Every other week we wash everybody's sheets and that makes a 3rd load
Only washing sheets every other week certainly helps. No way you could convince my wife to go 2 weeks on the same sheets.
What about bath towels, wash cloths, hand towels, dish towels, rags, ect? Do you use these items for two weeks before washing?

How can you physically fit 3 sets of bedding and an entire household's worth of towels into one load? This can't be done in our machines.
And yes, with the help of my wife and 5yr old daughter, it takes all of maybe 5 minutes to sort the washed clothes and put them away. So, I was being facetious, but there is no way we spend more than 20min total per week as a family doing laundry.
I didn't realize you were being facetious. I thought your description was serious, that's why I questioned how you could do so little laundry, and how it could take so little time.
It appears you actually do ~20% more laundry than initially stated (10 vs. 8 loads a month) and it takes 400% longer (20 vs 5 minutes).
This seems somewhat more realistic.
Yep, we have a 2 and 5yr old and they do not change multiple times a day. You want to talk about a time waster, getting a 2 and 5yr old dressed takes a lot of time. If they get dirty, they get dirty. How many times can you expect a child to get dirty, so dirty that it necessitates a change of clothing, between the hours of 5pm and 7:30pm (they are in daycare 7:30am-4:30pm)? They get dressed in the morning and then put on pajamas for bed. And yes, they might wear the same pajamas for 2 or 3 nights in a row before being washed.

Every recommendation I have ever seen suggests that sheets should be washed every 10-14 days, if you do so more often, great. I'm not sure how the bedsheets and pillowcases on 3 beds and a handful of towels necessitates more than a single load of laundry unless you have a very small washer. It is not like we are actively trying to do as little laundry as possible.

I was a tad facetious (purposely), my point was that these things literally take minutes a day. If you are that concerned about saving 20min a week, to the point where you are running you appliances daily, wouldn't it be more efficient to rethink some things which actually take up a substantial amount of time? Your work commute? How long it is taking you to prepare meals? How much time you watch TV? If I was so time crunched that I was running my dishwasher daily, usually with dishes inside that have already been washed, just to save a few minutes, I'd definitely reevaluate a lot of things. But that's me.

You don't understand how we manage to run our household with so little laundry and dish-washing, and frankly I don't understand how most people need to do it so much. I can provide a million other examples. I guess we're just very mindful of any kind of waste. It's not odd or complex to us, it's just how we've always done things.

MrUnsure
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by MrUnsure » Wed Mar 15, 2017 11:22 am

Toy cleanup is a waste of parent time. Make the kids do it, it will also teach them something. We got a bunch of nice, soft bins for this, one per room. If a toy is on the floor after they are in bed, it is moved to the off limits bin in my room for a week. Every so often go through a bin and decide which toys to give to charity (or garage sale if that is your thing). New toys always arrived and overflowed before this system.

I got my wife a 2x/month housecleaner for Mothers day once. It has been an expensive luxury, but very worth it. There are many things I hate cleaning that were getting less attention than deserved. It also forces us to pick up the "clutter" at a minimum every two weeks.

researcher
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by researcher » Wed Mar 15, 2017 12:17 pm

stoptothink wrote:Yep, we have a 2 and 5yr old and they do not change multiple times a day. How many times can you expect a child to get dirty, so dirty that it necessitates a change of clothing, between the hours of 5pm and 7:30pm (they are in daycare 7:30am-4:30pm)?
So wait, where do your children stay on the weekends? Are they at daycare 7 days a week? Assuming they do live with you on the weekends...
They never spill applesauce/pasta sauce/ect on them at lunch? They never go outside and play in the dirt/mud/grass? They never play with water hoses/squirt guns/ect and get wet? These are things most kids your age do every weekend that would require a clothing change.
I'm not sure how the bedsheets and pillowcases on 3 beds and a handful of towels necessitates more than a single load of laundry. I was a tad facetious (purposely), my point was that these things literally take minutes a day.
Just like you didn't account for the 3rd load for sheets until I questioned it, I don't think you aren't accounting for the remaining laundry your household does. A family of four only uses a "handful" of bath towels, wash cloths, hand towels, dish towels, rags, ect over the course of two weeks? How many days in a row do you use the same bath towels and wash cloths, for example?
You don't understand how we manage to run our household with so little laundry and dish-washing, and frankly I don't understand how most people need to do it so much. I guess we're just very mindful of any kind of waste. It's not odd or complex to us, it's just how we've always done things.
I'm only making these points to show that you actually do more laundry, and spend more time doing it, then you initially led us to believe.
Now that you've acknowledged purposely underreporting this, it is clear that you don't in fact "run your household with so little laundry."

stoptothink
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by stoptothink » Wed Mar 15, 2017 12:57 pm

researcher wrote:
stoptothink wrote:Yep, we have a 2 and 5yr old and they do not change multiple times a day. How many times can you expect a child to get dirty, so dirty that it necessitates a change of clothing, between the hours of 5pm and 7:30pm (they are in daycare 7:30am-4:30pm)?
So wait, where do you children stay on the weekends? Are they at daycare 7 days a week? Assuming they do live with you on the weekends...
They never spill applesauce/pasta sauce/ect on them at lunch? They never go outside and play in the dirt/mud/grass? They never play with water hoses/squirt guns/ect and get wet? These are things most kids your age do every weekend that would require a clothing change.
I'm not sure how the bedsheets and pillowcases on 3 beds and a handful of towels necessitates more than a single load of laundry. I was a tad facetious (purposely), my point was that these things literally take minutes a day.
Just like you didn't account for the 3rd load for sheets until I questioned it, I don't think you aren't accounting for the remaining laundry your household does. A family of four only uses a "handful" of bath towels, wash cloths, hand towels, dish towels, rags, ect over the course of two weeks? How many days in a row do you use the same bath towels and wash clothes, for example?
You don't understand how we manage to run our household with so little laundry and dish-washing, and frankly I don't understand how most people need to do it so much. I guess we're just very mindful of any kind of waste. It's not odd or complex to us, it's just how we've always done things.
I'm only making these points to show that you actually do more laundry, and spend more time doing it, then you initially led us to believe.
Now that you've acknowledged purposely underreporting this, it is clear that you don't in fact "run your household with so little laundry."
:oops: I'm done. Nope, my kids don't need to change multiple times a day, even on weekends. Have they gotten so dirty in the middle of the day that I need to change their clothes? Sure, but it is far from a regular or even weekly occurrence. And do you do an entire load of laundry for a single extra child-sized t-shirt? I'm not sure how you know more about our laundry situation is than I do. I do 100% of the laundry in our home (my wife and daughter will often help put it away), I can tell you with absolute certainty that we virtually never do more than 3 loads of laundry in a single week and the only time I have had to do it any day but Saturday was that one time my daughter got the flu and threw up everywhere.

I don't understand why you continue to question me. IMO, and it is just my opinion based upon my life, but if you are going through these extreme measures (which necessitates a whole lot of waste) to save minutes a week, you have a lot more important big-picture things to be considering. I couldn't even imagine feeling that time strapped. Maybe my kids are just outliers, but it isn't that hard and time consuming, and I have a demanding career and (jokingly) am nearly a single dad (my wife works full-time and is simultaneously a full-time student). Be clean and organized and all of these things aren't a consideration. Seems like total unnecessary complexity to me.

ems2013
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by ems2013 » Wed Mar 15, 2017 1:40 pm

We are foster parents to siblings ages 3 and 1. They joined us last fall just three hours after the phone call came from their social worker and we are rolling with it! My husband and I both work fulltime and the kids go to daycare during the day. Organization and planning ahead are the keys to making it work for us.

We batch cook on the weekend so we have extra meals in the freezer plus the week's meals are planned and mostly cooked by Sunday evening. We make extra/leftovers to take for lunches. We clean the upstairs together one week, then the downstairs the next week, which is less frequently than we used to clean but it's working ok. The kitchen floor gets mopped once/week. Toys stay in play room and kids put them away before bed each day. For the bathroom that gets the most use, which is the ones the kiddos bathe in, I wipe the sinks, mirrors, counters and toilet while they're playing in the tub during bathtime. After laundry is done, I organize a week's worth of kid clothes by outfit so we can grab & go as needed. The kids are thriving--the little one just "graduated" from early intervention services--and we think the organization & structure is helping immensely. :happy

Texanbybirth
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by Texanbybirth » Wed Mar 15, 2017 1:56 pm

ems2013 wrote:We are foster parents to siblings ages 3 and 1. They joined us last fall just three hours after the phone call came from their social worker and we are rolling with it! My husband and I both work fulltime and the kids go to daycare during the day. Organization and planning ahead are the keys to making it work for us.

We batch cook on the weekend so we have extra meals in the freezer plus the week's meals are planned and mostly cooked by Sunday evening. We make extra/leftovers to take for lunches. We clean the upstairs together one week, then the downstairs the next week, which is less frequently than we used to clean but it's working ok. The kitchen floor gets mopped once/week. Toys stay in play room and kids put them away before bed each day. For the bathroom that gets the most use, which is the ones the kiddos bathe in, I wipe the sinks, mirrors, counters and toilet while they're playing in the tub during bathtime. After laundry is done, I organize a week's worth of kid clothes by outfit so we can grab & go as needed. The kids are thriving--the little one just "graduated" from early intervention services--and we think the organization & structure is helping immensely. :happy
Bless you for taking those kids in.

fishmonger
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by fishmonger » Wed Mar 15, 2017 2:11 pm

JimmyD wrote:My wife convinced me to shell out $125/month to have our house professionally cleaned and as someone who greatly values a clean home, this was life-changing.
+1. I never thought I would pay someone to clean (or my wife for that matter, who is a bit of a neat freak). We pay someone $100 to come every 2 weeks for 4 hours. Includes vacuuming, mopping, cleaning all bathrooms, and occasionally dusting, doing dishes, etc.

That $200 is worth every penny for us to use free time enjoying life and our kids

an_asker
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by an_asker » Wed Mar 15, 2017 2:54 pm

David Scubadiver wrote:From the time your child is born until the time you child leaves for college, is only about 900 weeks. Enjoy every one of them if possible. You will have plenty of time to save
... and, if you ask me*, clean the house ...
David Scubadiver wrote:when they leave the nest.
* Don't ask my DW, that's a Pandora's box right there!! :oops:

Hug401k
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by Hug401k » Wed Mar 15, 2017 4:24 pm

lot of chicken breasts, hard-boiled eggs, fish, and mountains of steamed vegetables and leafy greens - virtually no "processed" food. My wife occasionally will get the hankering for something different and will cook something up for her and the kids, but probably 5 days a week she does the same thing I do. I am well aware that "doesn't cut it" for most people as eating is a pleasurable experience for them (I clearly eat to live), but I guarantee you it makes eating more cost and time efficient, and makes it dramatically easier to eat healthy.

I am very aware that our lifestyle habits aren't for everyone, but (for us), they deem these time hacks moot or wasteful.
I would challenge you that everything you said, including laundry strategy on Saturday AM to not eating until 4pm to eating the same exact thing all day, every day, is a time hack. This is why you don't think it's all that overwhelming.

Hug401k
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by Hug401k » Wed Mar 15, 2017 4:44 pm

Here is what I have:

Sunday: Cook up a ton of grilled chicken and grilled veggies. Eat those for dinner. Chop raw veggies for salad topping.
Monday: Mexican night with LO grilled chicken and grilled onions and peppers for quesadilla or whatever..with a salad.
Tuesday: Stir Fry or peanut noodles- use end of mixed grilled veggies and diced grilled chicken.
Wed: Pasta night: Make LO which everyone eats for lunch the next day. With a salad.
Thurs: Soup night (with any LO raw veggies): Make a triple batch and freeze the other 2 for following weeks so you only need to do this 1-2 a month.

Send your kids to a daycare that provides laundry and food services *awesome* even when you get the wrong kid's clothes back.
Alternate attending kids sporting events especially when you get to the age of "Away" games. Those things are serious time suckers.

Definitely hire a cleaning person. They are the best.

I could use help in the laundry department- always my weakness. I dream of making a single giant closet with a washer and dryer in the middle and everyone gathers clothes from there...

stoptothink
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by stoptothink » Wed Mar 15, 2017 4:47 pm

Hug401k wrote:
lot of chicken breasts, hard-boiled eggs, fish, and mountains of steamed vegetables and leafy greens - virtually no "processed" food. My wife occasionally will get the hankering for something different and will cook something up for her and the kids, but probably 5 days a week she does the same thing I do. I am well aware that "doesn't cut it" for most people as eating is a pleasurable experience for them (I clearly eat to live), but I guarantee you it makes eating more cost and time efficient, and makes it dramatically easier to eat healthy.

I am very aware that our lifestyle habits aren't for everyone, but (for us), they deem these time hacks moot or wasteful.
I would challenge you that everything you said, including laundry strategy on Saturday AM to not eating until 4pm to eating the same exact thing all day, every day, is a time hack. This is why you don't think it's all that overwhelming.
I don't in any way disagree, in fact I agree 100%. I have a near obsession with efficiency. This has led to us having an organized system for pretty much everything we do (thankfully, my wife is similar, or at least plays along).

My comments are in regards to these supposed "hacks" which just seem outright wasteful. Never unloading the dishwasher, just using it as a storage rack and turning it on occasionally even if it is full of dishes which have already been through a dishwashing cycle? Using the clothes washer as a hamper and turning it on daily? That's a lot of wasted energy, cleaning product, and (from my perspective) time dealing with responsibilities which could take very minimal time if they were just taken care of right then and there. Those actually sound like anti-time and money hacks to me.

ThankYouJack
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Re: Time Saving Tactics: Kids Edition

Post by ThankYouJack » Wed Mar 15, 2017 7:43 pm

stoptothink wrote:
My eating habits have been detailed countless times on this board. Nutrition/exercise/health is my passion and my career (I'm the chief health and exercise scientist for a health products megacorp). I'm not a competitive bodybuilder, but I eat like one; I eat the same thing day-in-day-out (have for 15+ years) and 99% of meals are pre-planned. A lot of chicken breasts, hard-boiled eggs, fish, and mountains of steamed vegetables and leafy greens - virtually no "processed" food. My wife occasionally will get the hankering for something different and will cook something up for her and the kids, but probably 5 days a week she does the same thing I do. I am well aware that "doesn't cut it" for most people as eating is a pleasurable experience for them (I clearly eat to live), but I guarantee you it makes eating more cost and time efficient, and makes it dramatically easier to eat healthy.
Where are the other threads?
I'm curious what your macronutrient intake is. Your willpower is admirable. I enjoy variety too much and remain in good shape staying active and eating in moderation, so it's not worth it to me, but interested to learn more.

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