Early Retirement in Mexico, Healthcare

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TresBelle65
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2015 2:44 pm

Early Retirement in Mexico, Healthcare

Postby TresBelle65 » Thu Jan 12, 2017 6:08 am

I've been holding out for early retirement. I have enough assets to retire, but waiting to be eligible to leave with my healthcare plan has seemed like a good idea. I don't know if I will get there (2 more years) - the stress of work is starting to get to me and maybe the more money one has, the more it feels ridiculous to put up with it.

Ok, so for a number of reasons, retiring and leaving for Mexico is an attractive idea to me. There are several areas of Mexico that interest me and I will likely be visiting in the coming year - Puerto Vallarta, Cabo, Rocky Point, Merida, San Miguel and so forth - in other words, my options are open. I am bilingual. I have a group of friends who are considering the same, so maybe we'll put the band back together, lol.

I am not sure about permanent residency, but I do plan to try for temporary residency to see how it goes.

I've been reading the expat boards - retired Americans and Canadians, generally speaking, seem to be very pleased with the quality and cost of healthcare in Mexico, only coming back to the US for healthcare if over 65 and with Medicare. It's hard to tell whether these appraisals are coming from people who are living in Mexico for financial or quality of life reasons.

Have any of you lived in Mexico and received healthcare there? any personal experience data is appreciated. Thanks!

Smokey21
Posts: 50
Joined: Fri Oct 31, 2014 7:07 am

Re: Early Retirement in Mexico, Healthcare

Postby Smokey21 » Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:25 am

Great post. I'll be following this thread.

Panama, Chile and Colombia as examples also have quality healthcare facilities in their major cities. While these countries do not have facilities like MD Anderson for cancer, Mass General, etc many have facilities that are "reported" to be as good or better than the community hospitals around our country. Rural medicine outside of the USA would scare me, particularly for surgery.

Good luck to you if you make the leap.

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lthenderson
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Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 12:43 pm
Location: Iowa

Re: Early Retirement in Mexico, Healthcare

Postby lthenderson » Thu Jan 12, 2017 9:01 am

Don't have any experience but just read a non-fiction book "On Mexican Time" by Tony Cohan about him and his wife doing the very same thing in one of the same towns you mentioned, San Miguel. If you haven't read it, I would highly recommend it.

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss ... xican+time

hicabob
Posts: 2360
Joined: Fri May 27, 2011 5:35 pm
Location: cruz

Re: Early Retirement in Mexico, Healthcare

Postby hicabob » Thu Jan 12, 2017 9:05 am

I will be following too. I expect "healthcare tourism" for Americans in Mexico, is about to have quite the dramatic increase similar to what we have seen with dentistry.

texasdiver
Posts: 2126
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 12:50 am
Location: Vancouver WA

Re: Early Retirement in Mexico, Healthcare

Postby texasdiver » Thu Jan 12, 2017 3:31 pm

Most healthcare is pretty simple and basic. Labs for diagnosis, medications for treatment, getting your butt chewed for not eating right or exercising enough. You can get that anywhere if you have money to pay.

The really complicated high tech stuff from the super specialists you find at places like Mayo and MD Anderson are needed by a very small percentage of the population.

I've lived and worked in various Latin American countries had have various family and friends in the medical profession in Chile. At least for facilities serving the middle and upper class it differs very little from what you find in the US. What they lack are the really high end research facilities.

avlfutbol
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Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2015 11:44 pm

Re: Early Retirement in Mexico, Healthcare

Postby avlfutbol » Thu Jan 12, 2017 4:13 pm

I work in operating rooms and closely with surgeons in all of Latin America. I have seen everything from the government run public hospitals to the facilities where the uber wealthy get healthcare. From a surgery standpoint, the majority of procedures I would get done here without hesitation (here meaning Latin America, I think I am going to have to get and ACL done soon and I will probably get it done here by a US trained surgeon). I have been in OR´s in many of the top tier, mid tier, and rural/low volume centers in the US also. So I have seen both.

What you will find in Latin America private healthcare facilities, will be the same that you will find in most higher quality institutions in the US. The earlier poster was very accurate that aside from the highly specialized procedures that can be done at Mayo/Cleveland Clinic/etc. may be better in the US. But aside from that, you will not notice a difference except for the language (which could be traumatizing in a surgical setting when they put you under or are waking you up). I do believe patient care (making sure you are comfortable) is of higher quality in Latin America than you find in the US. Strictly because culturally speaking the latin countries are much more open and warm.

reggiesimpson
Posts: 1518
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2011 12:47 pm

Re: Early Retirement in Mexico, Healthcare

Postby reggiesimpson » Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:13 pm

Check out the site topretirements for further details on Mx retirement and healthcare.

texasdiver
Posts: 2126
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 12:50 am
Location: Vancouver WA

Re: Early Retirement in Mexico, Healthcare

Postby texasdiver » Thu Jan 12, 2017 10:31 pm

avlfutbol wrote:I work in operating rooms and closely with surgeons in all of Latin America. I have seen everything from the government run public hospitals to the facilities where the uber wealthy get healthcare. From a surgery standpoint, the majority of procedures I would get done here without hesitation (here meaning Latin America, I think I am going to have to get and ACL done soon and I will probably get it done here by a US trained surgeon). I have been in OR´s in many of the top tier, mid tier, and rural/low volume centers in the US also. So I have seen both.

What you will find in Latin America private healthcare facilities, will be the same that you will find in most higher quality institutions in the US. The earlier poster was very accurate that aside from the highly specialized procedures that can be done at Mayo/Cleveland Clinic/etc. may be better in the US. But aside from that, you will not notice a difference except for the language (which could be traumatizing in a surgical setting when they put you under or are waking you up). I do believe patient care (making sure you are comfortable) is of higher quality in Latin America than you find in the US. Strictly because culturally speaking the latin countries are much more open and warm.


I have nowhere near that kind of experience. But daughter #1 was born at Clinica Alemana in Santiago Chile, Daughter's #2 and 3 were born in US hospitals in Alaska and Texas. The hospital in Chile was by far the best one in just about every way.

avlfutbol
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2015 11:44 pm

Re: Early Retirement in Mexico, Healthcare

Postby avlfutbol » Fri Jan 13, 2017 10:43 pm

texasdiver wrote:
avlfutbol wrote:I work in operating rooms and closely with surgeons in all of Latin America. I have seen everything from the government run public hospitals to the facilities where the uber wealthy get healthcare. From a surgery standpoint, the majority of procedures I would get done here without hesitation (here meaning Latin America, I think I am going to have to get and ACL done soon and I will probably get it done here by a US trained surgeon). I have been in OR´s in many of the top tier, mid tier, and rural/low volume centers in the US also. So I have seen both.

What you will find in Latin America private healthcare facilities, will be the same that you will find in most higher quality institutions in the US. The earlier poster was very accurate that aside from the highly specialized procedures that can be done at Mayo/Cleveland Clinic/etc. may be better in the US. But aside from that, you will not notice a difference except for the language (which could be traumatizing in a surgical setting when they put you under or are waking you up). I do believe patient care (making sure you are comfortable) is of higher quality in Latin America than you find in the US. Strictly because culturally speaking the latin countries are much more open and warm.


I have nowhere near that kind of experience. But daughter #1 was born at Clinica Alemana in Santiago Chile, Daughter's #2 and 3 were born in US hospitals in Alaska and Texas. The hospital in Chile was by far the best one in just about every way.


I spend a lot of time at Alemana. Excellent hospital. Very well trained staff. We are agreeing here I believe.

lynneny
Posts: 60
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 10:23 pm

Re: Early Retirement in Mexico, Healthcare

Postby lynneny » Sun Jan 15, 2017 1:29 am

Tresbelle65, I lived/worked in Latin America, including Mexico, for a number of years and found private healthcare (I wouldn't use the government-provided healthcare systems) to be good, and much more personal than in the U.S. Doctors spend more time with you, will often give you their cellphone numbers, and sometimes even make house calls. And since you speak Spanish, you won't have to search for English-speaking healthcare professionals.

I'm planning to retire to Mexico in the next couple years, probably to Merida (which has Mexico's best medical school! It's also extremely friendly, safe, affordable, has lots to do, and is just half an hour from the beach). On business trips to Latin America, I try to add a few days to explore possible retirement destinations, and find that Airbnbing the kind of home I might like to live in, like a casa colonial in Merida, really helps give me an idea what daily life there would be like.

It's hard for me to figure out a retirement budget, since it will (hopefully) be so much different than HCOL New York. But Mexico is so affordable that coming up with a detailed breakdown really isn't important.

Sorry I digressed from OP's question about healthcare. I'm excited to find someone else who's considering early retirement in Mexico!


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