Cycling power meters

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Dieharder
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Cycling power meters

Post by Dieharder » Mon Dec 12, 2016 11:28 pm

Any power meter users out here, and if so, what are you doing?

I need to step up to my next level in cycling and start measuring stats using a power meter I feel. As of now I am doing a lot of riding when in season. I am looking at pedal meters. Question is to use single pedal which is cheaper or both pedals which costs more. I do believe that one of my legs are weaker than the other due to an injury from many years back, although this is unsubstantiated as I cannot feel any large difference while pedaling. A power meter would tell for sure, but it has to be on both pedals for that. To begin with I am thinking of going with single pedal, left side, and then add other side later if needed. This will keep initial investment low, as I also need to pair it with some device like Garmin Edge.

stlutz
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by stlutz » Mon Dec 12, 2016 11:41 pm

This guy's product reviews tend to be very good:

https://www.dcrainmaker.com/2016/09/pow ... ition.html

I ride many thousands of miles per year and do not and will not use a power meter, so no personal reviews from me. :happy

Dieharder
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by Dieharder » Mon Dec 12, 2016 11:47 pm

stlutz wrote:This guy's product reviews tend to be very good:

https://www.dcrainmaker.com/2016/09/pow ... ition.html

I ride many thousands of miles per year and do not and will not use a power meter, so no personal reviews from me. :happy


I am familiar with his site, already been there, but I am interested in hearing personal experience from others. May I ask why you do not prefer to use them? what other methods are there to benchmark and improve performance. Just like index funds, I need a benchmark to measure against then I know whether I am below, above, or keeping up with it.

duuuuuude
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by duuuuuude » Mon Dec 12, 2016 11:52 pm

I currently use the Pioneer powermeter, dual leg and hooked up to a Garmin 800 without any issues. (Had a quarq powermeter before and no problems either). I got the "dual upgrade kit", where you need to send in your current crank in the provided Pioneer box and they install.

However, due to unforseen clearance issues on my non-drive side with a DI2 battery mounted to the chainstay, I ended up splitting the crankset and now have powermeters on 2 separate bikes, albeit single sided each.

In terms of accuracy, the readings have been consistent vs. my former powermeter. I haven't played with the power on both sides to measure power inefficiency, but may in the future.

I don't get into the nitty gritty of analyzing my data though. I just use it for instantaneous data while riding and to gauge effort while riding/racing.

In terms of cost, I think the pioneer is the best bang for the buck in terms of what you get. Dual power, or 2-for-1 powermeter.

I would wait for a sale/coupon code from the major bicycle retailers and to straight with a dual-leg version since it would cost you more if you bought them separately. (Better bang for your buck!)

stlutz
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by stlutz » Tue Dec 13, 2016 1:09 am

May I ask why you do not prefer to use them? what other methods are there to benchmark and improve performance. Just like index funds, I need a benchmark to measure against then I know whether I am below, above, or keeping up with it.


A few reasons:

a) I spend my work hours focusing on numbers. I don't need to make cycling more like work.

b) I hang out in the endurance cycling world and the people who ride faster and further than me don't use power meters. They do however train more than I do, both in terms of miles and time on the bike. For recreational riders who have a day job, time and miles on the bike more than anything determines our level of performance. That doesn't mean that more miles always makes one better, but it's hard to get there without that.

c) People do fall and break things when they are fiddling with bike computers instead of paying attention to what they are doing.

d) Most of the things that hold part-time riders back are mental, not numbers. Today the wind is blowing 20 miles per hour and it's kind of cold. Tomorrow is supposed to be sunny, no wind, and pleasant temperatures. Rider A decides, "I can train at 200 watts any day, so I'll sit today out and go out tomorrow and train". Rider B says, "I'm going to go out today and put in a hard effort and try to enjoy myself doing it and then do a recovery day tomorrow." Who gets better?

e) Most of the gains one can get from electronic information can be gained from just having a plan for the ride. Whether one says, "I'm going to ride for an hour at a pace where I can talk but not whistle," or "I'm going to ride zone 2", or "I'm going to ride X watts because I know that's a solid pace that I can do for an hour"--all of three of those people doing the same thing and are getting more out of the ride than the person who just goes out to ride for a while and sees what happens.

Power meters provide data, but no context. One can get significant value of of them, especially when once combines that with heart rate data as well as with information like how much sleep you got the night before, what you've eaten today and with more affective things like whether you had a fight with your significant other last night. However, my view is that there is a lot more to be gained by being more deliberate about training, riding more, and pushing one's own mental boundaries. In a 50 mile ride, those things can shave tens of minutes off of one's time. Using a power meter can help pick up that extra 30 seconds. A big deal if one is racing. No so much for me.

It's like comparing the gains you make from following Boglehead principles as opposed to whether IJS or VBR is a better smallcap-value ETF. The later matters, but not near as much as saving a lot, staying the course, and keeping fees low.

Regarding the specific issue of power imbalance between legs, a few thoughts:

--Do you have back pain? If you are twisting on the bike because you're favoring one leg, that tends to be a problem as things start to hurt as a result.

--It's actually very normal to favor one leg over the other. Anytime we stand up from a chair and start walking, we all start with the same leg after all.

--Trying to fix an imbalance using a power meters actually leads to riding in an unnatural way which leads to injury.

--If an imbalance is causing discomfort issues, I'd recommend seeing a good bike fitter. The solution to the problem generally involves making adjustments to ones fit on the bike as opposed to simply trying to pedal harder with the weaker leg. Secondly, a PT could also help with off-the-bike exercises to help address imbalances--those problems don't just exist in the quads but through ones core, arms etc. Anytime I've seen a PT with an injury-related issue I've gotten huge value as they've observed things that I wasn't aware of at all because I'm just focused on making the legs go faster.

The goal is to be able to ride and train injury free, not to make two numbers equal each other. I have serious past injuries as well that impact my cycling. Staying injury free is what I focus on.

My more than $.02 on training philosophy. :happy

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Nearing_Destination
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by Nearing_Destination » Tue Dec 13, 2016 3:06 am

Power meters didn't exist back when I did more serious riding in my younger days (training rides for centuries were about 5 1/2 hours) but what I did was have split times for the various sections of the ride (straight, hills, long grades) and work on specific improvements.

I wasn't a racer so didn't look for some of the metrics that you seem to want. I also had an injury to one knee , with surgery, that took some time for improvement (still not up to same strength) but you will notice any impairment mostly on hills and especially on the long grades. That should tell you as much as any power meter.

tigermilk
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by tigermilk » Tue Dec 13, 2016 5:37 am

Been a user of power since 2002. It started after breaking a hip in a cycling crash. During the recovery I was going stir crazy and the doc cleared me for indoor riding. I picked up a Computrainer to keep me sane. From there it's been nearly 15 years of various meters. The next one was a Powertap wheel, and I continued to pick up a PT wheel every now and then. I actually just bought my most recent one this summer. The Powertap GS hub is getting cleared out for $299 (hub only, 24 spoke only - see https://powertap.com/product/powertap-gs-hub). PT wheels have always been rock solid for me. The first ones did chew through the cones in the hubs, but these days they are great. I've probably put over 100,000 miles on across 4 wheels.

Along the way I've had a couple of Ergomo bottom brackets - didn't work so well, and you can't find them anymore.

In January of this year I took delivery of the Powertap P1 pedals. Aside from a couple of issues, I love them. Those issues include clipping the pedals a few times on the ground going into a turn (the pedals have a greater stack height than normal pedals) and some interference causing the Ant+ signal to go awry (talking to someone with a differ Ant+ device, he said he'd run into issues in the same geographical region, so someone must be broadcasting with a strong router or something).

You have to ask yourself what you want out of the powermeter. It won't make you ride better on its own - you have to use the device to help you ride better. One cycling pal swore up and down he was fine with heart rate. We nagged him enough to get a PM and he ended up with a Quarq. In the first days of riding with it he realized how poor HR was for gauging effort. He always said he was maintaining the same effort throughout a ride since his HR was pegged to a consistent value. The PM showed him just how much his effort was dropping despite the HR staying elevated. And that's the crux of the matter - a PM measures the stimulus whereas the HRM measures the response to the stimulus. I compare it to weight lifting - you don't judge yourself by how hard you breath or the pain you feel during a lift but rather the actual weight you lift.

If you feel you have a leg imbalance, a single-sided system will not give you any feedback. And a single-sided pedal or crank system may lead to erroneous data. They merely double the one-sided value. On the other hand, if you don't care about the potential imbalance and just want the final total number, things like the PT hubs, Quarqs, SRMs, etc that measure total power are fine. According to my P1s, it says I have a slight imbalance. To me it feels like they are evenly balanced, but the data says they aren't.

I'll admit I'm a slave to my powermeter - I've learned to ride harder with it. When doing intervals it keeps me honest, and more importantly it lets me pace properly on windy days. Going by HR or perceived effort alone, you may go too hard into the wind and too easy with it and you aren't getting that narrower power band you need for your interval. It's even more beneficial on VO2 intervals where you may start to decline late in the interval if going by other indicators. Also, it will actually help you dial into your perceived effort better. And finally, if you do race, and in particular time trials, you can use it to help make educated choices on equipment selection to get more aerodynamic or have less rolling resistance (i.e., make you go faster!).

Personally, if cost and accuracy were my top discriminators, you can't go wrong with the aforementioned Powertap GS. Yes it's a hub based system, so if you are racing and want to use that aero wheel, you'd have to match it up with the appropriate deep rim. But if you just use it as a training wheel, you can't beat the cost. You are stuck with Shimano (or SRAM) drivetrain; this is something that was an issue for me with my first PTs - I rode Campy and had to use a conversion cassette for years before I moved to SRAM. I matched my GS up with a DT Swiss 585 rim, which is semi-aero. I built the wheel myself for about $450 all-in (hub, wheel, spokes), but if you aren't comfortable building a wheel, someplace like Wheel Builder will do it for a fee.

If you do purchase one, also purchase "Training and Racing with a Power Meter". One of the authors, Dr. Andy Coggan, is a renowned exercise physiologist and creator of some of the cycling metrics used in power software. Also, do save a little $$$, you can use some freeware to crunch your power data. The program Golden Cheetah is in continuous development and very exhaustive. I've used it for at least the last 5 years, and it has its own top-level physiologist Dr. Phillip Skiba associated with it. And of course, visit the SlowTwitch forums or the wattage google group for more power related discussion (Coggan can be found on both).

kcb203
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by kcb203 » Wed Dec 14, 2016 10:01 am

Dieharder wrote:Any power meter users out here, and if so, what are you doing?

I need to step up to my next level in cycling and start measuring stats using a power meter I feel. As of now I am doing a lot of riding when in season. I am looking at pedal meters. Question is to use single pedal which is cheaper or both pedals which costs more. I do believe that one of my legs are weaker than the other due to an injury from many years back, although this is unsubstantiated as I cannot feel any large difference while pedaling. A power meter would tell for sure, but it has to be on both pedals for that. To begin with I am thinking of going with single pedal, left side, and then add other side later if needed. This will keep initial investment low, as I also need to pair it with some device like Garmin Edge.


I don't have much to add given that you've already read DC Rainmaker's site and you've had good feedback.

I've used a PowerTap for 7 years, and it just died after about 15,000 miles. I used it in the rain and even in the dirt and mud on my cross bike. I now have two PowerTaps--one on a carbon rim for racing and the $299 GS on an aluminium rim for training. I'm very happy with them. I think L/R power breakdown is unnecessary, but I wouldn't rely on one-sided either. Keep in mind that the Garmin pedals are very sensitive to installation torque--the PowerTap pedals are easier to install and swap between bikes.

Dieharder
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by Dieharder » Wed Dec 14, 2016 1:21 pm

I got some good feedback that I was looking for. Especially in making the decision between what type of power meter to use, and based on the fact that I may need to measure both legs individually, I am leaning towards pedal based dual meters. I have to add that I don't have any discomfort or any other physical problems on one leg that got injured a long time ago, I just feel that there could be a power imbalance, just don't know for sure or have any feeling / discomfort so on. Cycling is one activity that I am able to do comfortably with this imbalance, other activities like hiking or other sports aren't as comfortable, it could be because of the pedaling action is smooth and do not require me to twist my legs.

Review for bePro from favero looks interesting and it is one of the cheapest dual pedal meters out there at around $800. My LBS mechanic who owns several bikes and many of them with different kind of power meters also is recommending bePro as good value. I may go for it in spring along with a Garmin Edge 520 which seems like good value too.

tigermilk
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by tigermilk » Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:53 am

Dieharder wrote:Review for bePro from favero looks interesting and it is one of the cheapest dual pedal meters out there at around $800. My LBS mechanic who owns several bikes and many of them with different kind of power meters also is recommending bePro as good value. I may go for it in spring along with a Garmin Edge 520 which seems like good value too.

A few words of caution:

1) The bePro is a new product from a new company. You may very well end up being a paying beta tester. I went through this with the Ergomo - a lot of promise, decent price, but some significant growing pains with the product.
2) The setup looks to be problematic to some degree. I read the DCRainmaker review a few weeks ago and thought the install process was a PITA.

So you can get the BePro for around $800. FYI, I got my Powertap P1 pedals for $900. This was a Black Friday sale back in 2015, but even this holiday season numerous places had 20% deals that were applicable to the P1 set. Just wait for a deal at Performance, Nashbar, etc and you likely can get them for just under $1k.

While I haven't used the BePro or the Garmin Vector pedals, I can say that you would more than likely appreciate the P1 system more. You've got a system from a company that has been making power meters for nearly 2 decades, a company with a proven quality control record, a company with exceptional customer service, and also a product that installs in just a couple of minutes and is easy to switch from bike to bike. There's no special installation techniques with the P1s compared to the other products - just thread onto the crank arm, tighten a bit, and ride for a few minutes to let the pedals calibrate themselves. Really the only negative I have with the P1 pedals is the stack height.

nyblitz
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by nyblitz » Thu Dec 15, 2016 10:03 am

Thanks, Dieharder, for asking this question.

I've been curious to Boglehead thoughts on this.

Thanks also to those who are responding.

Dieharder
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by Dieharder » Thu Dec 15, 2016 8:14 pm

tigermilk wrote:
Dieharder wrote:Review for bePro from favero looks interesting and it is one of the cheapest dual pedal meters out there at around $800. My LBS mechanic who owns several bikes and many of them with different kind of power meters also is recommending bePro as good value. I may go for it in spring along with a Garmin Edge 520 which seems like good value too.

A few words of caution:

1) The bePro is a new product from a new company. You may very well end up being a paying beta tester. I went through this with the Ergomo - a lot of promise, decent price, but some significant growing pains with the product.
2) The setup looks to be problematic to some degree. I read the DCRainmaker review a few weeks ago and thought the install process was a PITA.

So you can get the BePro for around $800. FYI, I got my Powertap P1 pedals for $900. This was a Black Friday sale back in 2015, but even this holiday season numerous places had 20% deals that were applicable to the P1 set. Just wait for a deal at Performance, Nashbar, etc and you likely can get them for just under $1k.

While I haven't used the BePro or the Garmin Vector pedals, I can say that you would more than likely appreciate the P1 system more. You've got a system from a company that has been making power meters for nearly 2 decades, a company with a proven quality control record, a company with exceptional customer service, and also a product that installs in just a couple of minutes and is easy to switch from bike to bike. There's no special installation techniques with the P1s compared to the other products - just thread onto the crank arm, tighten a bit, and ride for a few minutes to let the pedals calibrate themselves. Really the only negative I have with the P1 pedals is the stack height.


Thanks for this input. I wasn't willing to shell out $1200 for the P1 pedals although that one has the best reviews. If I can get it under $1k then I am open to it. I will wait and shop around for discounted price on this. Anyway I am in no hurry since there is 4-5 months for the season to begin.

lightheir
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by lightheir » Thu Dec 15, 2016 8:27 pm

I have a Powertap hub built into a rear wheel. Got it before pedal-based and crank systems came down dramatically in price.

It's been a useful training aid for me, and it's extremely useful if you do a lot of indoor cycling on a trainer (I did that for 2 seasons and it was indispensable for that!)

That said, it's far from required, and it certainly doesn't make you a better cyclist just by acquiring one.

But if you're a serious cyclist/triathlete that loves racing and benchmarking yourself, it's both very entertaining to use and can yield some insights into training.

In my experience, my powermeter didn't change much of my outdoor training, nor did it change most of my friends' outdoor training. You go outside, you ride hard, and the power is recorded. Very few people (including me) have the discipline and roads to do the prescribed workout like a '20 minute nonstop effort at exactly 95% FTP' on the roads - you just ride, and ride hard.

Indoors though, it's a WHOLE different story. I pegged ALL of my indoor training to power targets using the Trainerroad web app. It was extremely hard, but extremely effective. I did 70% indoor/30% outdoor training on the bike and it worked great for me.

Dieharder
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by Dieharder » Thu Dec 15, 2016 9:40 pm

I don't race. I am on the wrong side of 40s and cannot afford to crash. I cannot afford injuries and being out of work. Need to earn the bread and have children to tend to. You can call me your average serious amateur who like to ride 4-5 days a week when in season, do about 3-4 centuries a year, and the motivation is to get as much input as possible on what I am doing while riding. I can afford to buy this gadget even if it is not going to make a huge difference in performance. It's mostly for feedback and if I could improve something then that is an additional bonus.

calmaniac
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by calmaniac » Thu Dec 15, 2016 10:04 pm

I go with stlutz. Unless you're racing and working with a coach, I don't see a need for an average fitness rider, other than gizmo envy. Personally, I think it is more digitization of the experience and a distraction from the beauty of the ride itself. Don't get me wrong, I'd like riding hard and competing on a group ride, but I live with numbers and quantification in my day job. Cycling sets me free. I don't want to be a slave to more numbers.

minkster
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by minkster » Thu Dec 15, 2016 10:40 pm

I started with a PowerTap hub back in 2004 and it worked great. I finally upgraded to the PowerTap P1 pedals last March and I love them. The hub worked great too. I had it back in the shop twice over the 12 years, and replaced the rim a few times too but overall it was good value. Customer service at Saris (now PowerTap) was always good. I switched to the pedals because I have several bikes and I can move them between bikes in about 10 mins. I looked at quite a few other options (cranks, hub, chain-rings) and for my situation I decided the P1 pedals were the best fit, and they self-calibrate in a few seconds before each ride.

The pedals are definitely not cheap and they add a bit of extra weight. And you need to use PowerTap cleats, so if you have other bikes or shoes you kinda have to keep the shoes matched to the pedals and not mix and match. I use them with a Garmin Edge 500. I used to track a lot more data than I do now. Over time I've found I only need to track a few of the numbers from year to year. If you want to get fancy there's free open source software like Golden Cheetah that will give you every piece of data under the sun from your power meter and Garmin.

I race masters category road races each year so I use it to track my fitness from starting training in January to racing in March-July. It's mostly useful for shorter interval type work, say 1-20 min. efforts and hill climbs. I find if I try and measure longer efforts there are too many variables and interruptions to get in the way and it becomes less useful (stop signs, intersections, downhills, etc.). They are also good for indoor trainer workouts. I'm no race winner and my wattage numbers are nowhere near Bradley Wiggins but when I reach specific power ranges for various workouts (short and long) I know I'm ready to start racing. Then I just work to maintain those numbers for the rest of the race season.

I keep a ride/training log in a spreadsheet. I plan specific workouts each week with interval durations, hills or flat, and target average power. Then I record the ride and the actual power to track my fitness. Occasionally I'll upload my rides into Garmin Connect or Golden Cheetah to see how I've done for the past few months, but I don't use most of the data. Over the years I've read quite a few books on power training and dialed in what works for me.

Could I do without it? Probably, yes. I rode with an HR monitor for years just fine. But I like the data and I like seeing and tracking my actual fitness. I do find that I sometimes miss out on taking it easy and just enjoying a ride when I look down and see I'm only doing xx watts and feel the need to speed up. I could leave it at home on those days. But overall I'm not ready to give it up just yet.

lightheir
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by lightheir » Thu Dec 15, 2016 11:50 pm

I posted earlier, but as an addendum, to be dead honest, if you gave me the choice which one to keep or asked me which device I found superior for both racing and training, for me personally, the answer is hands down the heart rate monitor.

The powermeter is more precise, responds faster, and gives direct data on your pedalstroke, but at least for me, the integrated number of the HR (which incorporates fatigue, temps, etc.) has been a more useful number to me. Also costs <$100 for a darn good HRM, which is nice.

tigermilk
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by tigermilk » Fri Dec 16, 2016 7:00 am

calmaniac wrote:I go with stlutz. Unless you're racing and working with a coach, I don't see a need for an average fitness rider, other than gizmo envy. Personally, I think it is more digitization of the experience and a distraction from the beauty of the ride itself. Don't get me wrong, I'd like riding hard and competing on a group ride, but I live with numbers and quantification in my day job. Cycling sets me free. I don't want to be a slave to more numbers.

1) I used to race but no longer race
2) I've always been self-coached (honestly, it's not that difficult to plan workouts, analyze data, etc, some need coaching merely because they respond better to being told what to do by a third party)

You don't need them, but they do help you get more fit if used wisely. Same with heart rate monitors, perceived effort, or even a speedometer. It's merely a tool, but quite an effective one, and one that honestly is better than a HRM. And you still quite enjoy the beauty of the ride; it's not like your eyeballs are glued to an LCD display minutes on end.

stoptothink
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by stoptothink » Fri Dec 16, 2016 7:30 am

calmaniac wrote:I go with stlutz. Unless you're racing and working with a coach, I don't see a need for an average fitness rider, other than gizmo envy. Personally, I think it is more digitization of the experience and a distraction from the beauty of the ride itself. Don't get me wrong, I'd like riding hard and competing on a group ride, but I live with numbers and quantification in my day job. Cycling sets me free. I don't want to be a slave to more numbers.


I'll third this. Even when I was seriously racing, felt no need for one - even to the point where IMO, it probably takes away from the experience. I'd also agree with Lightheir's statement, that unless most of your training is done on a trainer indoors, the data may be cool, but not necessary useful.

tigermilk
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by tigermilk » Fri Dec 16, 2016 8:11 am

stoptothink wrote:
calmaniac wrote:I go with stlutz. Unless you're racing and working with a coach, I don't see a need for an average fitness rider, other than gizmo envy. Personally, I think it is more digitization of the experience and a distraction from the beauty of the ride itself. Don't get me wrong, I'd like riding hard and competing on a group ride, but I live with numbers and quantification in my day job. Cycling sets me free. I don't want to be a slave to more numbers.


I'll third this. Even when I was seriously racing, felt no need for one - even to the point where IMO, it probably takes away from the experience. I'd also agree with Lightheir's statement, that unless most of your training is done on a trainer indoors, the data may be cool, but not necessary useful.

Outdoors they are a more effective tool than indoors. Indoors you can maintain a consistent level of effort via resistance setting and speed/cadence. Outdoors, where you have wind, different road surfaces, and elevation changes, a power meter is the ONLY was to keep you in a narrow power band. I live in a pancake flat region (like 1 foot elevation gain per mile) but the winds on any given day can be between calm and 20 MPH. Even a 5-10 MPH wind wreaks havoc on speed. To maintain a consistent power on an interval, the speed difference with or against the wind may be 6 to 8 mph. It's only because of the power meter that I can better target intensity.

About the only time I have not found power to be useful is for short (<1 minute) intervals. For something like VO2 intervals, a PM is imperative. If done with HR or perceived effort, you liKelly will go too hard the first 60-90 seconds and too easy later, leading to a rather poor workout (I.e., you've actually spent less time in your VO2 zone than had you had proper pacing).

dad2000
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by dad2000 » Fri Dec 16, 2016 8:35 am

I'm a middle aged mid-level recreational rider who does a few centuries per year.

There's an indoor gym near me with the Stages SC3 bikes, which I believe use the same tech as their outdoor meters. I've used their bikes a few times on trial days to gauge my power. I always warm up for 10 minutes, then ride a 45 minute interval. The result has always been within 2-3 watts of what I'd estimated before going in... around 210W at the start of the season, 230W later in the season.

I've concluded that I don't really need the power meter to tell me how I'm doing... at best it's a confirmation. After logging thousands of miles, I'm pretty good at estimating power, cadence, speed, etc. All I really need to do is to ride the same interval on a moderate hill to check if I'm improving. My other measure is how long I can stay with the A group on a group ride :happy

tigermilk
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by tigermilk » Tue Dec 20, 2016 5:11 pm

FYI - http://www.probikekit.com/cycling-power ... fgod4e0B8w

Pedals currently on sale for just over $1k at PBK.

malbecman
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Re: Cycling power meters

Post by malbecman » Tue Dec 20, 2016 6:32 pm

stoptothink wrote:
calmaniac wrote:I go with stlutz. Unless you're racing and working with a coach, I don't see a need for an average fitness rider, other than gizmo envy. Personally, I think it is more digitization of the experience and a distraction from the beauty of the ride itself. Don't get me wrong, I'd like riding hard and competing on a group ride, but I live with numbers and quantification in my day job. Cycling sets me free. I don't want to be a slave to more numbers.


I'll third this. Even when I was seriously racing, felt no need for one - even to the point where IMO, it probably takes away from the experience. I'd also agree with Lightheir's statement, that unless most of your training is done on a trainer indoors, the data may be cool, but not necessary useful.



And I guess I'll quadruple(?) this sentiment. :D I know plenty of people in my local bike club that also feel this way. It really seems like there are two camps here.

Dieharder
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Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 6:22 pm

Re: Cycling power meters

Post by Dieharder » Tue Dec 20, 2016 7:56 pm

Okay, all of you saying no to this have put me on the fence. I will sit there for a while, since the season is still 3-4 months away :?

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