Frying pan recommendations

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ThankYouJack
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Frying pan recommendations

Post by ThankYouJack » Thu Dec 08, 2016 10:47 am

Any recommendations for a large frying pan? I like the ease of cleaning non-stick ones, but my wife gets concerned about the chemicals used in some of them...and happy wife = happy life

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lthenderson
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by lthenderson » Thu Dec 08, 2016 10:58 am

Based on America's Test Kitchen review, we got one from T-fal that has performed flawlessly and held up well these past five years. However it is a non-stick variety. We also use one by All-Clad that isn't non-stick. It is built like a tank and works well. I like it because you can use metal utensils or a scotch brite pad to clean it and not worry about the non-stick coating.

lightheir
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by lightheir » Thu Dec 08, 2016 11:02 am

I'm a big fan of the cast-iron skillet.

Warning though - if you expect to use and clean it like a typical stickless pan, you'll hate it.

But if you take the time to learn about it, it's an amazing tool.

Seasoning it is NOT difficult - I rarely do a dedicated seasoning treatment, and 'just cook' to season it.

One of the most unique things about it though - it really is a lifetime investment. They are pretty darn-near indestructible, and unlike almost any other cookware, they actually improve over time, rather than deteriorating (esp like a nonstick skillet!)

It's kind of like a hobby - look it up on the web, and see if it draws you in. If it piques your interest, you'll probably like/love it. If not, then move on.

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Mrs.Feeley
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by Mrs.Feeley » Thu Dec 08, 2016 11:05 am


Nearly A Moose
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by Nearly A Moose » Thu Dec 08, 2016 11:35 am

I love my All Clad skillet. Great investment. Also love my cast irons. I don't have problems cleaning either. I do have to periodically give the All Clad a deep clean to get it all shiny again. This is an area I like to "invest" in. I have one more larger skillet pan in mind, and then I might never buy another again in my life!
Pardon typos, I'm probably using my fat thumbs on a tiny phone.

ThankYouJack
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by ThankYouJack » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:13 pm

Thanks for the recommendations. How does all clad vs cast iron compare with time cleaning and maintenance? We enjoy cooking but with jobs and young kids don't have ample time to do and we try to minimize time with clean up

PoppyA
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by PoppyA » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:33 pm

Calphalon has a life time warranty if you don't abuse it. Good price too.
Love All-clad. I have both non-stick, and plain. More expensive, also has life time warranty.
I like cast iron, but it is heavy. I have one and use it for specific recipes.
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rgs92
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by rgs92 » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:36 pm

I second Calphalon. I've used them for many years and they work very well and seem like new after 10 years.

Chadnudj
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by Chadnudj » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:37 pm

All-Clad.

Spring for some Barkeeper's Friend to help with cleaning them.....really phenomenal stuff.

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JDCarpenter
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by JDCarpenter » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:48 pm

ThankYouJack wrote:Thanks for the recommendations. How does all clad vs cast iron compare with time cleaning and maintenance? We enjoy cooking but with jobs and young kids don't have ample time to do and we try to minimize time with clean up


Cast iron clean up is not a big deal. I just clean it up when slightly still warm. For example, with grilled cheese, just wipe it out with paper towel and maybe add/rub_in several drops of oil to freshen it up before setting aside. OTOH, if big bacon/eggs breakfast, I'll drain the oil/grease back into the repurposed jelly jar, wipe it out real well, then add some hot water to use with a cloth rag to get anything that stayed behind. Hand dry and add a little oil to cover bottom of pan when I rub it around.

Minimal time. (My 25 year old son uses his big lodge pan to cook pork tenderloins on stove/oven; he reports that it is easy--and he is a stereotypical 25 year old, single male. :shock: )
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mouses
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by mouses » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:51 pm

I am happy with all my NordicWare stuff, and have used their non-stick skillet probably hundreds of times. Plus, almost all their products are made in the U.S.

https://www.nordicware.com/cookware?cat=98

I just wipe the skillet out with a paper towel and pop the skillet in the dishwasher.

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simplesimon
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by simplesimon » Thu Dec 08, 2016 1:04 pm

I have both All Clad and a Lodge cast iron skillet. Both can be difficult or easy to clean depending on how you use it - use them correctly and its pretty easy.

If you're coming from non-stick and don't have experience with either there will be a small learning curve with how to use them.

Use a good amount of oil when cooking with All-Clad.

Assuming the cast iron is well seasoned, you can do almost anything with it. One thing to get used to is the relatively long wait time for the pan to heat up, maybe five minutes? Once the cast iron is hot it will stay hot so be careful.

Cast iron is very cheap and extremely durable. All Clad is quite a bit more money.

adamthesmythe
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by adamthesmythe » Thu Dec 08, 2016 1:49 pm

I thought a cast iron skillet comes with your first apartment, or maybe when you hit 21.

Buy the cast iron first. Then think about whether you need anything else.

nymeria.stark
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by nymeria.stark » Thu Dec 08, 2016 1:55 pm

adamthesmythe wrote:I thought a cast iron skillet comes with your first apartment, or maybe when you hit 21.

Buy the cast iron first. Then think about whether you need anything else.


Bought mine when I moved into my first apartment!

One advantage to cast iron that I haven't seen mentioned here is that it's oven safe. I roast vegetables, chicken, turkey, potatoes, everything in it. I've even baked cornbread. For cleaning, I'll sometimes boil a little water in it to get off really stuck residue, but usually I just wipe it out with a paper towel and dribble a little bacon grease in there if I have some on hand.

I also have a Scanpan CTQ (non-stick) that I like for things like eggs that are difficult to clean out of a cast iron skillet. But if you're going to just buy one frying pan, cast iron is a good bet.

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by lazydavid » Thu Dec 08, 2016 1:59 pm

There's a few relatively cheap ways to get great cookware:

1. Commercial cookware from Costco/Sam's Club or a restaurant supply house. Restaurants buy skillets by the dozens, sometimes by the hundreds. They can't afford fashionable pieces that cost $300 each, but they demand great performance. I think I paid $26 the last time I got a giant skillet, and routinely see the little 8 inch ones at 2/$18. Nonetheless, they cook great, and you don't have to care about damaging them because they're so darn cheap. Handles are typically far superior to anything else you'll find.

2. Cast Iron. Costs a little more (probably 2-3x the commercial stuff), but will last literally forever if you use them right. Still WAY cheaper than the fancy brands. Most of the other benefits have been covered in the above posts.

3. Sets from Costco/Sam's Club. These are designed to compete with the Calphalons and All Clads of the world, at about 1/8 of the price. They look nicer than the commercial stuff, but are still pretty well made. Usually you'll be able to find separate sets of nonstick and uncoated cookware, for around $150 for 8-12 pieces.

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Abe
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by Abe » Thu Dec 08, 2016 2:24 pm

We love cast iron, but we don't use it all the time because my wife does most of the cooking and it's a little heavy for her. You can get new Lodge brand cast iron cookware at Walmart, but I prefer the old cast iron. You can find the old CI at flea markets, yard sales or thrift stores.

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leonard
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by leonard » Thu Dec 08, 2016 2:25 pm

Cast Iron.
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Pajamas
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by Pajamas » Thu Dec 08, 2016 2:32 pm

Can't beat cast iron for a skillet. If you are lucky enough to inherit or are willing pay up for a high-quality, smooth-surfaced one, either antique or new, it's even better. Not only is the material safe, it may even add a little iron to your diet. Practically unbreakable, surface never wears out, reasonably non-stick when seasoned, holds heat well. Makes great pancakes, cornbread, and pineapple upside-down cake too, and can go into the oven. It's also the best way to cook pizzas in a home oven.

It is a bit heavy, but my cast iron skillet just sits on my stove all the time because I use it for anything that doesn't have to be in a pot.

leonard
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by leonard » Thu Dec 08, 2016 2:38 pm

lazydavid wrote:2. Cast Iron. Costs a little more (probably 2-3x the commercial stuff)...


I see Lodge on sale all the time for 20-40% off. They are cheaper than most all pans - except perhaps the cheap non-sticks.

Price isn't an issue if you shop local retailers and wait for a sale.
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by MI_bogle » Thu Dec 08, 2016 2:47 pm

+1 to the high-quality and smooth surfaced cast iron

I have a Lodge pan, and it works ok. But to be honest, once you have used an antique cast iron pan or a high quality new one, the Lodge ones feel like cheap bunk. They last so long it's worth spending 80-150 on the pan rather than the 40 on a Lodge.


There's a time and place for everything. I have a non-stick pan, I generally buy on the low end there, because I cannot for the life of me get my wife to stop occasionally using a metal utensil while cooking and it's not a hill I want to die on

I also have some All-Clad and 2 cast iron pans. One is my grandma's from who knows when, it is incredibly smooth and way better than my Lodge skillet

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by leonard » Thu Dec 08, 2016 2:51 pm

MI_bogle wrote:I have a Lodge pan, and it works ok. But to be honest, once you have used an antique cast iron pan or a high quality new one, the Lodge ones feel like cheap bunk.


Huh. I better let my 12" pan, 10" pan, 10" square pan, and assorted other Lodge CI pieces that they haven't been getting the job done the last 10 or so years.
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MI_bogle
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by MI_bogle » Thu Dec 08, 2016 2:56 pm

leonard wrote:
MI_bogle wrote:I have a Lodge pan, and it works ok. But to be honest, once you have used an antique cast iron pan or a high quality new one, the Lodge ones feel like cheap bunk.


Huh. I better let my 12" pan, 10" pan, 10" square pan, and assorted other Lodge CI pieces that they haven't been getting the job done the last 10 or so years.


Please do not introduce a false equivalence. You clearly can see I said my Lodge works ok. They are fine products for the price.
I'm not saying they are bad.

I'm simply saying that high quality/antique cast iron is far superior.

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by leonard » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:00 pm

MI_bogle wrote:I'm simply saying that high quality/antique cast iron is far superior.


I've had old cast iron. Bake corn bread in a lodge and one in the old - they release and perform just the same.

I don't believe there is any magic in that old formulation of cast iron.
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by Dottie57 » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:01 pm

nymeria.stark wrote:
adamthesmythe wrote:I thought a cast iron skillet comes with your first apartment, or maybe when you hit 21.

Buy the cast iron first. Then think about whether you need anything else.


Bought mine when I moved into my first apartment!

One advantage to cast iron that I haven't seen mentioned here is that it's oven safe. I roast vegetables, chicken, turkey, potatoes, everything in it. I've even baked cornbread. For cleaning, I'll sometimes boil a little water in it to get off really stuck residue, but usually I just wipe it out with a paper towel and dribble a little bacon grease in there if I have some on hand.

I also have a Scanpan CTQ (non-stick) that I like for things like eggs that are difficult to clean out of a cast iron skillet. But if you're going to just buy one frying pan, cast iron is a good bet.


I have a glass top stove. I have been reluctant to purchase cast iron thinking it is too heavy. What type of stove do you have?

MI_bogle
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by MI_bogle » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:10 pm

The magic is not in the formulation of the iron, it's just that Lodge doesn't machine polish their pans so they are bumpier than the antique stuff that was polished smooth.

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by deanbrew » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:15 pm

It looks like a consensus has been reached, and I agree. I use two skillets for 95 percent of my cooking. I use a non-stick one (mine is Farber and the coating is starting to come off) for frying eggs, and cast iron (we have four cast iron skillets - 2 large and 2 small) for just about everything else. As mentioned, the cast iron can go from the stove top into the oven. Most of the time, cleaning the cast iron takes just a minute or two. If we do cook something that sticks to the bottom, add a 1/4" of water and put back on the burner for a few minutes to loosen up the gunk. It comes right off with a plastic pan scraper.

Oh, BTW, the other 5 percent of my non-oven cooking is on a griddle, when I make pancakes or grilled cheese sandwiches.
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Watty
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by Watty » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:20 pm

Just FYI, There is a company that did a kickstarter drive to start making new "old style" lighter weight smoother quality cast iron cookware.

I have not seen any reviews of their product yet and it looks like they are just now shipping to the people that funded them through kickstarter. (I did not).

http://www.fieldcompany.com/

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by leonard » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:27 pm

MI_bogle wrote:The magic is not in the formulation of the iron, it's just that Lodge doesn't machine polish their pans so they are bumpier than the antique stuff that was polished smooth.


The seasoning builds up to make the pan smooth.
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jpelder
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by jpelder » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:31 pm

I'll chime in for Lodge Cast Iron and Calphalon Stainless Steel. I got my Lodge cast iron skillets from TJ Maxx (they have cosmetic flaws, supposedly). They were $12 each. Even regular price is only about $30, so go nuts. As others have said, they do have a learning curve. A new cast iron skillet will darken tomato dishes and give a slight metallic taste to them. Never cook spinach in cast iron, as it will get a horrible metallic taste. You can use metal utensils in cast iron, which is a big plus for me (nylon spatulas are terrible). I can attest to its durability: my cast iron dutch oven originally belonged to my great-grandmother, who bought it sometime in the 1910s-1920s.

Good old stainless steel is pretty versatile. Look for a sturdy handle and a thick bottom. Stainless also has the advantage that it can go in the dishwasher with little problem (it will dull a bit, just like your stainless steel flatware does). You can use any utensil in them, too (a stainless steel spoon or spatula might scratch the bottom a bit, but it doesn't degrade performance.

Enameled cast iron is also nice, but it's a bit more expensive and less durable. I like my JC Penny house brand enameled cast iron dutch oven.

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hand
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by hand » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:32 pm

ThankYouJack wrote:Any recommendations for a large frying pan? I like the ease of cleaning non-stick ones, but my wife gets concerned about the chemicals used in some of them...and happy wife = happy life


Depends what you are planning to use it for:

For eggs / fish - go with a commercial non-stick frying pan; these by their nature require replacement every couple years, so no sense paying for fancy.
Personally, I'm a fan of Vollrath Wear-Ever classic with their top-tier coating "Ceramiguard" and a silicon handle.

For searing meats (especially if you don't have high output burners on your stove) or stovetop to oven cooking, cast iron is the way to go.
I prefer vintage cast iron, but there are plenty of modern or even enamelled alternatives.

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by adamthesmythe » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:52 pm

leonard wrote:
MI_bogle wrote:The magic is not in the formulation of the iron, it's just that Lodge doesn't machine polish their pans so they are bumpier than the antique stuff that was polished smooth.


The seasoning builds up to make the pan smooth.


Yeah, this is what I suspect. You just have to use it for a while. Well, years.

ThankYouJack
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by ThankYouJack » Thu Dec 08, 2016 4:34 pm

Thanks all, looks like cast-iron it is. We also have a large non-stick skillet which is great for eggs and pancakes.

adamthesmythe wrote:I thought a cast iron skillet comes with your first apartment, or maybe when you hit 21.



The very first thing I moved into my first apartment was a case of Sam Adams Octoberfest. So I either missed the cast-iron memo or started drinking the beer and forgot about step 2.

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by jayjayc » Thu Dec 08, 2016 4:37 pm

I really think you should not get an All-Clad skillet. They're overpriced and their handles are extremely uncomfortable. Go to a store and hold one for a few seconds and you'll see how poorly designed their handles are. I regret buying my All-Clad skillet.

Instead, get the commercial cookware from Costco. Brand is called Tramontina. They perform just as well as All-Clad, have much more comfortable handles and are 1/2 the price of All-Clads.

lazydavid wrote:There's a few relatively cheap ways to get great cookware:

1. Commercial cookware from Costco/Sam's Club or a restaurant supply house. Restaurants buy skillets by the dozens, sometimes by the hundreds. They can't afford fashionable pieces that cost $300 each, but they demand great performance. I think I paid $26 the last time I got a giant skillet, and routinely see the little 8 inch ones at 2/$18. Nonetheless, they cook great, and you don't have to care about damaging them because they're so darn cheap. Handles are typically far superior to anything else you'll find.

2. Cast Iron. Costs a little more (probably 2-3x the commercial stuff), but will last literally forever if you use them right. Still WAY cheaper than the fancy brands. Most of the other benefits have been covered in the above posts.

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by Easy Rhino » Thu Dec 08, 2016 5:24 pm

We have a brute of a 12" cast iron skillet my mother in law got at a swap meet I think. Had some surface rust and my wife spent a while cleaning it up. It's good for serious cooking and oven use, etc.

My wife loves fried eggs and we have a smallish (8") "ceramic nonstick" pan that works great for those.

also have two Tramontina stainless skillets I got as part of a set when they were on sale at Target. Mainly got the set for the pots... the skillets are nice, but they're not as big as the cast iron so we don't break them out as often.

Also just recently had to replace our cheap 12" nonstick saute pan with another cheap nonstick 12" saute pan

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by surfstar » Thu Dec 08, 2016 5:40 pm

Am I the only one who bought and uses a cast iron for eggs?

I have a tiny 6" one that I use daily for one egg on my bagel sandwich. Pre-heated it requires little to no oil.

The large one we also use camping - it allows me to cook an egg and "toast" the bagel at the same time.

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by daveatca » Thu Dec 08, 2016 6:00 pm

For large, I use 2 all the time.

1. Le Creuset 11-3/4-inch Signature Skillet. I prefer it over the Lodge due to the shallower sides and a shallower slope to those sides.
Image

2. All-Clad Stainless Steel Saucier, 3qt. Deeper than a cast iron one.
Image

For small, I use 2.

1. Cheap, ceramic coated. For eggs.
2. Lodge cast iron.

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by barnaclebob » Thu Dec 08, 2016 6:18 pm

MI_bogle wrote:The magic is not in the formulation of the iron, it's just that Lodge doesn't machine polish their pans so they are bumpier than the antique stuff that was polished smooth.


I'll confirm this. I took a dual action sander to my lodge, went through several sanding disks, and made it much smoother. After re seasoning it performs much better and there is less popping from the oil.

I tried the linseed oil and baking method and it seemed to come off on the first few things that were cooked but the pan is gradually darkening again and even though the surface still looks grey in areas nothing sticks.

My Emiral branded cast iron was also much smoother and it performed better as well.

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by JDCarpenter » Thu Dec 08, 2016 6:53 pm

surfstar wrote:Am I the only one who bought and uses a cast iron for eggs?

...


It is the primary use of our Lodge--bacon and eggs about 2 times a month, if we are both off. That will change when we have more time to cook.
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jrbdmb
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by jrbdmb » Thu Dec 08, 2016 6:57 pm

My family has two Lodge cast iron pans which we like for certain things, but for day-to-day we use a set of Calaphon tri-ply SS, similar to All Clad but at a lower cost (but prob. not as low as Tramontina).

My issue with the cast iron is that (1) things do stick to it and it requires some work to clean and (2) we can't not use soap on it. There's no way my wife or i are going to use a pan to make pork chops or chicken or fish, "clean" it by wiping it with a paper towel, and then use it in a week to make eggs or pancakes. We do wipe a bit of oil on the pan after washing it, but even then I guess we'll never get that seasoning others rave about, since in the end that seasoning is apparently old food.

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by lightheir » Thu Dec 08, 2016 8:56 pm

I used to go with the stickless pan for eggs/fish and the cast iron for everything else.

After the stickless skillet dies every year (the 'high quality' ones last maybe 1.5 years at best before the nonstick really wears down), I just do it all on the cast iron, eggs and all. It's not as easy to clean as a brand new nonstick, but it's pretty trivial, and not a limiter at all for me.

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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by Ping Pong » Thu Dec 08, 2016 9:11 pm

If you like cast iron and want something smooth, get a carbon steel frying pan. It works the same way as cast iron. In fact, it's pretty much the same material, just not cast. You have to season it and you can't put it in the dishwasher. They cook great. Check the reviews on Amazon.

ThankYouJack
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by ThankYouJack » Fri Dec 09, 2016 11:30 am

Ping Pong wrote:If you like cast iron and want something smooth, get a carbon steel frying pan. It works the same way as cast iron. In fact, it's pretty much the same material, just not cast. You have to season it and you can't put it in the dishwasher. They cook great. Check the reviews on Amazon.


Thanks for the feedback. But based on this, it seems like the maintenance is similar to that of cast iron:

http://foodal.com/best-of-foodal/better-cast-iron-carbon-steel-skillets/ wrote:The difference in weight and capacity to heat up and cool down more quickly aren’t quite worth the price to me, and I appreciate that cast iron skillets are a little lower maintenance and more traditional to the American kitchen.


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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by Nearly A Moose » Fri Dec 09, 2016 12:13 pm

Chadnudj wrote:All-Clad.

Spring for some Barkeeper's Friend to help with cleaning them.....really phenomenal stuff.


+1. This is what I do. If you are good about cleaning or at least soaking the pan soon after use, it's not much more work than nonstick.
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by KSOC » Fri Dec 09, 2016 4:09 pm

I'm the cook in our house and have 7 cast iron pieces. I think I bought 3 of them new and the others I found at thrift stores or church yard sales. I do use them on my glass-top stove as well as my Weber Kettle. I guess folks give up on them or the heirs want no part of them. Also cherish my American made Revere Ware copper bottom pots. I'm kinda old school.
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Mrs.Feeley
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Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by Mrs.Feeley » Fri Dec 09, 2016 9:25 pm

KSOC wrote:I'm the cook in our house and have 7 cast iron pieces. I think I bought 3 of them new and the others I found at thrift stores or church yard sales. I do use them on my glass-top stove as well as my Weber Kettle. I guess folks give up on them or the heirs want no part of them. Also cherish my American made Revere Ware copper bottom pots. I'm kinda old school.


Just tonight I was using an old Revere Ware copper-bottomed stock pot I bought maybe 25 years ago and thinking of how wonderful that old U.S.A.-made Revere Ware was. There's a lot of it on ebay. The good old stuff can be identified by the old Revere Ware trademarks and if you Google I think you can find a database of the original trademarks. It's definitely worth checking out.

beachlover
Posts: 29
Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2013 10:44 pm

Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by beachlover » Fri Dec 09, 2016 9:47 pm

We recently retired (due to health concerns from Teflon coating) our Calphalon non-stick anodized aluminum skillets for similar Calphalon skillets but with white ceramic inner coatings for non-stick. We *love* the new ones but can't yet attest to the durability of the ceramic coating. Hope it lasts longer than the Teflon but we'll see. The glass covers are also very useful for cooking some things like puffy omelettes, etc.

google Calphalon ceramic skillet

reisner
Posts: 379
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2008 12:34 pm

Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by reisner » Sat Dec 10, 2016 9:05 am

Carbon steel skillet from Blu Skillet Ironware. Beats cast iron all to heck.

rick51
Posts: 62
Joined: Mon Sep 14, 2009 7:33 pm
Location: Maryland

Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by rick51 » Sat Dec 10, 2016 10:05 am

I got a trio of Tramontina Pro 3004 non-stick skillets from Costco a few years ago and they are the best non-stick pans I have ever owned. I also have two All-Clad frying pans that aren't non-stick that I've had for many years and they are also great. I have just one Lodge cast iron pan, works great but needs more care/maintenance than the others. While there is some overlap in the uses I put these pans to, there are also times when one type will be the best choice for what I am cooking. If you are interested in cast iron, there are some great youtube vids on their care an maintenance, including how to restore an abused cast iron pan and how to properly season a new pre-seasoned pan. As for value (and ease of use is part of that evaluation), I have to give the nod to the Tramontina, although the All-Clad and the Lodge will be the pieces that out last me and not doubt find their way to one of my grandkid's kitchens.

FedGuy
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Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2010 3:36 pm

Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by FedGuy » Sat Dec 10, 2016 11:10 am

rick51 wrote:and how to properly season a new pre-seasoned pan.

I'm confused. Isn't the whole point of a pre-seasoned pan that it's already been seasoned?

I'm actually contemplating purchase of a pre-seasoned cast iron pan, so this is an actionable issue for me.

nymeria.stark
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Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2016 9:27 am

Re: Frying pan recommendations

Post by nymeria.stark » Sat Dec 10, 2016 12:35 pm

Dottie57 wrote:
nymeria.stark wrote:
adamthesmythe wrote:I thought a cast iron skillet comes with your first apartment, or maybe when you hit 21.

Buy the cast iron first. Then think about whether you need anything else.


Bought mine when I moved into my first apartment!

One advantage to cast iron that I haven't seen mentioned here is that it's oven safe. I roast vegetables, chicken, turkey, potatoes, everything in it. I've even baked cornbread. For cleaning, I'll sometimes boil a little water in it to get off really stuck residue, but usually I just wipe it out with a paper towel and dribble a little bacon grease in there if I have some on hand.

I also have a Scanpan CTQ (non-stick) that I like for things like eggs that are difficult to clean out of a cast iron skillet. But if you're going to just buy one frying pan, cast iron is a good bet.


I have a glass top stove. I have been reluctant to purchase cast iron thinking it is too heavy. What type of stove do you have?


Gas! I'm a little old-fashioned, I guess...the heavy burners stand up to whatever pan I throw at them.

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